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northwestern unıversıty

Univ e r s i t y Car e e r Se rvi c e s

Graduation Survey Report Class of 2009

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Tabl e of Cont e nt s

Introdu c tion and Surv e y R e s ult s ……………………………………………………… 3

Summary Highligh t s Profil e of R e spond e n t s

C ar e e r Statu s at T im e of G raduation ………………………………………………… 4

Und e rgraduat e E mploym e nt by Indu s try and Job F un c tion ……………………… …7

Salary

G e ographi c Di s t ribu t ion

12

Introdu c tion and

Surv e y R e s ult s

3

The Northwestern University Career Services Graduation Survey provides a profile of the career directions of undergraduate and graduate students of the class of 2009 and a perspective on their career planning and job search process. The 2009 survey had a very high response rate of 82% (92.7% for undergraduates). The survey data offers insights about this year’s graduating population as well as prepares us for the coming year as the full extent of the nation’s economic rebound emerges. Northwestern is committed to helping students proactively plan for their futures and develop new strategies for internship and employment planning.

Summary Highligh t s

First destination data describes the specific career plans of graduates immediately following graduation. The following are key highlights:

For respondents at all degree levels 72.5% were employed or planning to attend graduate school, down from 86% last year.following graduation. The following are key highlights: The mean starting salary for 2009 undergraduates was

The mean starting salary for 2009 undergraduates was $42,853, lower than the 2008 mean salary of $48,094. Graduate student salaries were mixed - Doctoral students had an $8,000 decrease in mean salary since last year but Master’s degree salaries remained consistent. but Master’s degree salaries remained consistent.

Overall, more undergraduates in 2009 are indicating plans to continue their education immediately after graduation when compared to 2008 (2009,19.7%; 2008,18.3%). The Bienen School of Music had the greatest number of students planning to continue their education.year but Master’s degree salaries remained consistent. The top four long-term career interests cited by respondents

The top four long-term career interests cited by respondents were the same as in 2007 and 2008: business, medicine, communication, and art/performance.number of students planning to continue their education. A significant portion of undergraduate 2009 respondents

A significant portion of undergraduate 2009 respondents (75.0%) indicated intentions to pursue an advanced degree. This portion was consistent with respondents in 2008 and 2007 (74.2%, 75.7%).business, medicine, communication, and art/performance. Students who utilized the different career resources offered

Students who utilized the different career resources offered by Northwestern were significantly more likely to have employment upon graduation than students who used the career services less frequently. Likewise, these students earned significantly higher salaries on average.intentions to pursue an advanced degree. This portion was consistent with respondents in 2008 and 2007

Profil e of R e spond e n t s

4

A total of 2,616 NU graduates completed surveys, for an overall survey response rate of 82.0 percent, with the strongest rate attained by undergraduates (92.7%), as shown in Table 1. The overall response rate increased dramatically in 2009. Table 2 shows the survey response rate for the last three years.

Tabl e 1 .

Cla ss of 2009 R e s pon s e Rat e s by Typ e of D e gr e e

 

Class of 2009 Surveyed N

Class of 2009 Respondents N

Class of 2009 Response Rate Percent

Bachelor’s

2,050

1,901

92.7

Master’s

782

471

60.2

Doctorate

358

244

68.2

Totals

3,190

2,616

82.0

Tabl e 2 .

Hi s tori c al R e s pon s e Rat e s by Typ e of D e gr e e

 

Class of 2007 Respondents

Class of 2008 Respondents

Class of 2009 Respondents

N

Percent

N

Percent

N

Percent

Bachelor’s

1,719

79.4

1,430

70.2

1,901

92.7

Master’s

341

24.1

316

28.3

471

60.2

Doctorate

260

62.5

161

39.4

244

68.2

Totals

2,320

57.7

1,907

47.6

2,616

82.0

Car e e r Statu s at Tim e of Graduation

As indicated in Table 3, the future direction and career status for graduates has experienced a shift with the 2009 graduating class, which can be attributed greatly to the economic downturn that has affected employment across several industries. There was a decrease in the full-time

employment rate compared to 2008, as well as a decrease in pending offers.

graduates continuing their education directly after graduating has remained relatively stable from 17.5 percent to 16.6 percent over the past four years. Similar to last year, there is a significant number of students pursuing a post-graduate internship or fellowship.

The percentage of

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Tabl e 3 . All R e s pond e nt s Car e e r Statu s Aft e r Graduation

First Destination/ Career Status at Graduation

2006

2007

2008

2009

 

N

%

N

%

%

%

N

%

Full Time Employment

760

39.8

866

38.4

721

37.8

801

31.1

Continue Education

334

17.5

393

17.4

290

15.2

426

16.6

Unemployed

267

14.0

282

12.5

269

14.1

559

21.7

Full time Offer Pending

106

5.5

116

4.9

132

6.9

118

4.6

Post Grad: Intern/Fellowship

97

5.1

182

8.1

148

7.8

219

8.5

Temporary or Contract

96

5.0

133

5.9

87

4.6

113

4.4

Employed Part Time

71

3.7

81

3.6

70

3.7

90

3.5

Self-Employed

70

3.7

58

2.5

60

3.1

89

3.5

Other

54

2.8

74

3.3

60

3.1

87

3.4

Voluntarily Unemployed

27

1.4

29

1.2

13

0.7

26

1.0

Community Service

23

1.2

35

1.5

25

1.3

38

1.5

Military Service Full time

6

0.3

8

0.3

10

0.5

7

0.3

Total

1,911

2,257

1,885

2573

F igur e 1 . 2006-2009 All Respondents’ Career Status After Graduation by Year

2006 2007 2008 2009 39 . 8% 38 . 4% 37 . 8% 31 .
2006
2007
2008
2009
39 . 8%
38 . 4%
37 . 8%
31 . 1%
21 . 7%
17 . 4%
17 . 5%
16 . 6%
14 . 0%
15 . 2%
14 . 1%
12 . 5%
8 . 1%
7 . 8%
8 . 5%
6 . 9%
5 . 5%
4 . 9%
4 . 6%
5 . 1%
F
ull tim e O ff e r P e nding
Un e mploy e d
Continu e Edu c ation
Full Tim e Employm e nt

Po s t G rad: s hip Int e rn / F e llow

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Table 4 shows career status by type of degree. Advanced degree graduates experienced a higher rate of full-time employment while a higher percentage of Bachelor’s graduates were actively pursuing employment.

T abl e 4 . All Respondents’ Career Status by Type of Degree

 

Bachelor’s

Master’s

Doctorate

Career Status

N

Percent

N

Percent

N

Percent

FT Employed or Offer Pending Continuing Education Unemployed, Seeking Work Temporary or Contract Job Internship/Fellowship Employed Part-Time Other Voluntarily Unemployed Community Service Self-Employed/Freelance Military Service

611

32.5

198

42.0

117

48.8

371

19.7

52

11.0

7

2.9

424

22.6

109

23.1

27

11.3

90

4.8

18

3.8

5

2.1

131

7.0

18

3.8

71

29.5

66

3.5

20

4.2

4

1.7

70

3.7

18

3.8

3

1.3

24

1.3

1

0.2

1

0.4

37

2.0

0

0.0

1

0.4

49

2.6

36

7.6

4

1.7

6

0.3

1

0.2

0

0.0

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Und e rgraduat e Employm e nt by Indu s try and Job Fun c tion

On the 2009 survey, respondents who were employed or had accepted a position were asked to name their job titles and employers. An additional question asked respondents to choose from a list of 9 long-term career interest categories, including finance, public administration, computer science, social services, healthcare, engineering, marketing, communications, and other functional categories. In assembling Figure 2, job titles were re-categorized along these long- term career interest categories to allow for a meaningful assessment of the fields that 2009 graduates were planning to enter.

Figure 2. Undergraduate Employment by Industry

Community, Public or Social Service, 5% Arts, Performance, Law, 1% Music, 1% Government, Public Policy,
Community, Public or
Social Service, 5%
Arts, Performance,
Law, 1%
Music, 1%
Government, Public
Policy, Politics, 5%
Medicine/Health, 6%
Research/Academia,
7%
Business, Consulting,
Fin. Mgmt, Sales, etc.,
37%
Communication,
Journalism, Media, 8%
Technology or
Engineering, 15%
Education/Teaching,
14%

The largest segment of this population is employed in consulting, finance, management and other business-related fields (37%). Engineering and technology, which includes computer science jobs, was the second largest segment (15%), which education/teaching right behind with 14% of the full-time employed graduates.

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Tabl e 5 . 2009 Und e rgraduat e Employm e nt by Indu s try

The following table provides a more detailed breakdown of employment outcomes by Industry.

 

Jobs

% of

 

Total

Bu s in e s s and R e lat e d

221

33

. 43%

Banking - Investment

26

3.93%

Banking - Commercial

13

1.97%

Consulting

71

10.74%

Economics

6

0.91%

Financial Services

31

4.69%

Human Resources

1

0.15%

Insurance

6

0.91%

Organization Change/Development

5

0.76%

Management/Administration

13

1.97%

Pharmaceuticals

6

0.91%

Real Estate

8

1.21%

Sales

17

2.57%

Securities/Trading

18

2.72%

Communi c ation s Mark e ting and / or M e dia

78

11

. 80%

Advertising

19

2.87%

Arts Management

1

0.15%

Broadcasting TV and Radio

7

1.06%

Design - Fashion, Web

1

0.15%

Event Planning

2

0.30%

Fundraising

2

0.30%

Marketing

15

2.27%

Public Relations

6

0.91%

Writing/Journalism/Publishing

16

2.42%

Film

3

0.45%

Performing Arts - Drama, Music, Theater

5

0.76%

Visual Arts

1

0.15%

Engin e e ring and S c i e n c e

48

7

. 26%

Biomedical/Biotechnical

6

0.91%

Chemical Engineering

4

0.61%

Civil/Transportation Services

8

1.21%

Computer Engineering

2

0.30%

Electrical Engineering

6

0.91%

Engineering Management/Project Management

6

0.91%

Environmental Engineering

0

0.00%

9

Information Technology

4

0.61%

Industrial Engineering

1

0.15%

Life Sciences

6

0.91%

Material Sciences

1

0.15%

Mechanical Engineering

4

0.61%

Non-Profit / Edu c ation / Gov e rnm e nt

227

34

. 34%

Education

62

9.38%

Government

24

3.63%

Healthcare/Public Health

29

4.39%

Higher Education

9

1.36%

International/Teaching Overseas

6

0.91%

Law

18

2.72%

Medical

11

1.66%

Politics

2

0.30%

Public Policy

10

1.51%

Social Services/Counseling/Community Development

19

2.87%

Teaching - Elementary, Secondary

19

2.87%

Research

18

2.72%

Oth e r

87

13

. 16%

Other

87

13.16%

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Figur e 3 . Und e rgraduat e Employm e nt by Job Fun c tion

Social Services, 5% Computer Science, 3% Public Administration, 5% Finance, 17% Healthcare, 6% Academia, 7%
Social Services, 5% Computer Science, 3%
Public
Administration, 5%
Finance, 17%
Healthcare, 6%
Academia, 7%
Education, 14%
Communications,
7%
Engineering, 12%
Marketing,
10%
Consulting,
Other Business,
12%

Tabl e 6 . 2009 Und e rgraduat e Employm e nt by Job Fun c tion Di s c iplin e

The following table provides a more detailed breakdown of employment outcomes by Job Function.

 

Jobs

% of

 

Total

Finan c e

60

17

. 00%

Accounting

2

0.57%

Commercial Banking (Consumer)

2

0.57%

Commercial Banking (Lending)

3

0.85%

Financial Analysis

20

5.67%

Investment Banking (Corporate Finance)

6

1.70%

Investment Banking (Mergers & Acquisitions)

4

1.13%

Investment Banking (Real Estate)

3

0.85%

Sales & Trading

17

4.82%

Portfolio Management/Brokerage

3

0.85%

Mark e ting

37

10

. 48%

Advertising

9

2.55%

Brand/Product Management

10

2.83%

11

Buyer/Merchandising

5

1.42%

Customer Service

2

0.57%

Marketing Research

3

0.85%

Purchasing

1

0.28%

 

Sales

7

1.98%

Con s ulting , Oth e r Bu s in e ss

42

11

. 90%

Consulting

36

10.20%

Management Trainee (Entry-Level Management)

6

1.70%

Engin e e ring

43

12

. 18%

Bioengineering

1

0.28%

Design/Construction

10

2.83%

Environmental/Sanitation

1

0.28%

Field Engineering

2

0.57%

Hardware Design & Development

2

0.57%

Manufacturing/Industrial

2

0.57%

Power Systems

1

0.28%

Production Engineering

1

0.28%

Project Engineering

2

0.57%

Quality Control

2

0.57%

Research & Development

5

1.42%

Software Design & Development

6

1.70%

Systems/Programming

2

0.57%

 

Testing

2

0.57%

Other engineering (NEC)

4

1.13%

Comput e r S c i e n c e

12

3

. 40%

Computer Programming

4

1.13%

Computer Systems Analysis

3

0.85%

Network Administration

1

0.28%

Technical/Computer Support

2

0.57%

Other computer related

2

0.57%

H

e alth c ar e

21

5

. 95%

Administrative (Healthcare)

10

2.83%

Medical Technology

2

0.57%

 

Paramedic

1

0.28%

Physical Therapy

1

0.28%

Other health related (NEC)

7

1.98%

Publi c Admini s tration

19

5

. 38%

Executive, Legislative, & General

2

0.57%

 

Policy

7

1.98%

Law Enforcement

3

0.85%

 

Military

5

1.42%

12

National Security

1

0.28%

Urban/Regional Planning

1

0.28%

So c ial S e rvi c e s

17

4

. 82%

Administrative (Social Services)

7

1.98%

Counseling

2

0.57%

Fundraising/Development

4

1.13%

Social Work

4

1.13%

Communi c ation s

26

7

. 37%

Design/Graphic Arts

1

0.28%

Media Planning

3

0.85%

Public Relations

10

2.83%

Reporting

7

1.98%

Writing/Editing

5

1.42%

A c ad e mia

25

7

. 08%

Research (Nontechnical)

9

2.55%

Research (Technical/Scientific)

16

4.53%

Edu c ation

51

14

. 45%

Teaching

51

14.45%

Salary Out c om e s

Table 7 shows the distribution of salary levels by type of degree. As expected, graduate students reported higher salaries than undergraduates. From 2008 to 2009, mean salaries decreased by approximately 11 percent for undergraduates and 11.5 percent for doctoral level students. For Master’s level students, the mean salary remained very stable compared to 2008.

Tabl e 7 .

Starting Salari e s by D e gr e e Typ e and Y e ar

2007

Responses

Mean

2008

Responses

Mean

2009

Responses

Mean

Bachelor’s

639

$46,694

482

$48,094

1936

$42,853

Master’s

151

$63,765

135

$61,175

482

$60,954

Doctorate

126

$64,979

103

$68,826

247

$60,919

13

Table 8 indicates the variance in mean starting salaries across the different employment categories.

T abl e 8 . Und e rgraduat e M e an Starting Salari e s - C hang e from 2008

Job Title Category

Business, Consulting, Fin. Mgmt, Sales, etc. Technology or Engineering Medicine/Health Government, Public Policy, Politics Law Arts, Performance, Music Research/Academia Education/Teaching

Communication, Journalism, Media

Community, Public or Social Service

2008

2009

 

Change in

N

Mean

N

Mean

Percent

Change

Mean

Salary

235

$55,511

133

$51,398

-7.4%

($4,113)

66

$54,891

55

$54,868

0.0%

($23)

17

$40,429

21

$47,678

17.9%

$7,249

15

$45,708

19

$35,392

-22.6%

($10,316)

19

$37,447

3

$37,000

-1.2%

($447)

5

$31,400

5

$17,800

-43.3%

($13,600)

14

$36,500

25

$34,360

-5.9%

($2,140)

45

$34,314

51

$27,298

-20.4%

($7,016)

30

$34,018

27

$26,199

-23.0%

($7,819)

17

$27,812

17

$21,007

-24.5%

($6,805)

The Medicine/Health industry was the only area that experienced an increase (+ $7,249) in salary while the largest decrease was seen in Arts, Performance, Music (- $13,600).

Tabl e 9 . Und e rgraduat e Salary by Job Fun c tion The following table shows the number of reported offers by undergraduates and average salary by job function.

Finance

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

Mean Salary

Accounting

2

$ 15,000

Commercial Banking (Consumer)

2

$ 99,000

Commercial Banking (Lending)

3

$ 59,333

Financial Analysis

20

$ 52,050

Investment Banking (Corporate Finance)

6

$ 59,333

Investment Banking (Mergers & Acquisitions)

4

$ 62,500

Investment Banking (Real Estate)

3

$ 50,000

Sales & Trading

17

$ 48,853

Portfolio Management/Brokerage

3

$ 88,333

14

Consulting, Other Business-Related, Etc.

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

 

Mean Salary

Consulting

36

$

57,514

Management Trainee (Entry-Level Management)

6

$

51,833

Engineering

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

 

Mean Salary

Bioengineering

1

$

-

Design/Construction

10

$

57,980

Environmental/Sanitation

1

$

43,521

Field Engineering

2

$

28,600

Hardware Design & Development

2

$

61,750

Manufacturing/Industrial

2

$

64,000

Power Systems

1

$

50,000

Production Engineering

1

$

60,000

Project Engineering

2

$

28,000

Quality Control

2

$

60,000

Research & Development

5

$

49,400

Software Design & Development

6

$

64,750

Systems/Programming

2

$

55,000

Testing

2

$

53,350

Other engineering (NEC)

4

$

54,379

Marketing

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

 

Mean Salary

Advertising

9

$

44,889

Brand/Product Management

10

$

36,300

Buyer/Merchandising

5

$

46,600

Customer Service

2

$

30,000

Marketing Research

3

$

36,000

Purchasing

1

$

38,000

Sales

7

$

37,286

15

15 Healthcare   Job Function # of Graduates Mean Salary Administrative (Healthcare) 10 $ 42,978

Healthcare

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

Mean Salary

Administrative (Healthcare)

10

$ 42,978

Medical Technology

2

$ 55,500

Paramedic

1

$ 30,000

Physical Therapy

1

$ 25,000

Other health related (NEC)

7

$ 23,577

Public Administration

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

Mean Salary

Executive, Legislative, & General

2

$ 35,500

Policy

7

$ 25,414

Law Enforcement

3

$ 42,852

Military

5

$ 46,400

National Security

1

$ 41,000

Urban/Regional Planning

1

$ 22,000

16

16 Communications   Job Function # of Graduates   Mean Salary Design/Graphic Arts 1 $

Communications

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

 

Mean Salary

Design/Graphic Arts

1

$

12,000

Media Planning

3

$

40,867

Public Relations

10

$

27,727

Reporting

7

$

24,786

Writing/Editing

5

$

24,400

Academia

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

 

Mean Salary

Research (Nontechnical)

9

$

33,056

Research (Technical/Scientific)

16

$

35,094

Education

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

 

Mean Salary

Teaching

51

$

27,298

17

Tabl e 10 . Und e rgraduat e Salary by Indu s try The following table shows the number of reported offers by undergraduates and average salary by industry.

Business and Related

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

Mean Salary

Banking - Investment

26

$

62,577

Banking - Commercial

13

$

51,250

Consulting

71

$

57,869

Economics

6

$

38,417

Financial Services

31

$

60,417

Human Resources

1

$

3,000

Insurance

6

$

55,600

Organization Change/Development

5

$

31,733

Management/Administration

13

$

42,602

Pharmaceuticals

6

$

55,630

Real Estate

8

$

47,936

Sales

17

$

45,625

Securities/Trading

18

$

55,750

Communications Marketing and/or Media

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

Mean Salary

Advertising

19

$

38,800

Broadcasting TV and Radio

7

$

23,800

Design - Fashion, Web

1

$

28,000

Event Planning

2

$

27,500

Fundraising

2

$

41,000

Marketing

15

$

33,000

Public Relations

6

$

37,200

Writing/Journalism/Publishing

16

$

23,669

Film

3

$

37,333

Performing Arts - Drama, Music, Theater

5

$

8,000

18

Engineering and Science

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

Mean Salary

Biomedical/Biotechnical

6

$

41,800

Chemical Engineering

4

$

62,500

Civil/Transportation Services

8

$

51,574

Electrical Engineering

6

$

45,167

Engineering Management/Project Management

6

$

55,900

Information Technology

4

$

60,250

Industrial Engineering

1

$

61,000

Life Sciences

6

$

31,400

Material Sciences

1

$

35,000

Mechanical Engineering

4

$

51,675

Non-Profit/Education/Government

 

Job Function

# of Graduates

Mean Salary

Education

62

$

29,518

Government

24

$

37,438

Healthcare/Public Health

29

$

33,000

Higher Education

9

$

22,278

International/Teaching Overseas

6

$

12,000

Law

18

$

36,679

Medical

11

$

27,630

Politics

2

$

24,175

Public Policy

10

$

21,509

Social Services/Counseling/Community Development

19

$

19,952

Teaching - Elementary, Secondary

19

$

28,197

Research

18

$

37,786

19

G e ographi c Di s t ribu t ion

In addition to salary, the survey also asked Northwestern graduates where they would be residing next fall. While most graduates indicated that they would stay in the United States, eight percent reported an international location. Figure 11 presents graduates’ geographic distribution (within the U.S. and internationally) for those students who clearly indicated a location for next fall’s residency.

F igur e 4 . G e ographi c Di s tribution of all Graduates Reporting Next Year’s Location

Int e rnational 8 . 0% Southw e s t 1 South 3 . 4%
Int e rnational
8 . 0%
Southw e s t 1
South 3 . 4%
. 5%
Mid-Atlanti c
7 . 1%
W e s t 10 . 5%
North e a s t 9 . 8%
Midw e s t 59 . 7%

There appears to be less geographic dispersion in 2009 with nearly 60 percent staying in the Midwest compared to 49 percent in 2008. The Northeast has the second largest domestic presence (9.8%), followed by the West (10.5%), the Mid-Atlantic (7.1%), the South (3.4%), and the Southwest (1.5%).

Students’ future destination had an effect on salary. Table 17 represents graduates’ salary by region and major city. Graduates tended to cluster in major cities like Chicago, New York, Boston and Washington, DC. Students planning to reside in Chicago or the Chicago suburbs make up 45 percent of the salaried graduates. Among U.S. regions, the Southwest represents the highest mean salary ($56,800) while the Mid-Atlantic represents the lowest ($42,321). San Francisco and Los Angeles had the highest median salaries of the cities reporting at $61,500 and $57,500 respectively.

20

Tabl e 17 . Ba s e Salary by G e ographi c Di s tribution*

R e gion

City / R e gion

N

P e r c e nt

Rang e ($)

M e an ($)

M e dian ($)

Mid-Atlantic

159

7.1

3,000-150,000

42,321

41,500

 

Washington DC

37

1.6

24,000-150,000

58,345

57,000

Midwest

1343

59.7

1,500-182,000

49,684

45,500

 

Chicago

771

34.3

30,000-175,000

44,781

44,000

 

Greater Chicago**

246

10.9

5,232-120,000

32,212

29,500

 

Ann Arbor

31

1.4

25,500-182,000

49,020

45,500

 

Minneapolis

29

1.3

36,000-120,000

59,472

53,750

 

Madison

16

0.7

23,000-130,000

59,000

55,000

Northeast

221

9.8

12,000-170,000

54,048

48,000

 

New York City

155

6.9

30,000-142,000

43,900

43,750

 

Boston

40

1.8

5,000-170,000

38,555

32,500

 

Philadelphia

15

0.7

38,000-65,000

49,750

47,500

South

76

3.4

24,000-103,000

54,913

60,000

Southwest

33

1.5

30,000-110,000

56,800

44,000

West

237

10.5

4,000-170,000

53,556

50,000

 

San Francisco

22

0.9

36,995-80,000

60,423

61,500

 

Los Angeles

57

2.5

11,000-103,000

56,333

57,500

International

180

8.0

1,500-110,000

31,511

28,000

 

Asia/South Pacific

49

2.1

1,500-110,000

26,506

24,500

 

Europe

57

2.5

10,000-100,000

36,850

31,500

*Ba s e d on s e l f -r e por t ing r e spond e n t s who r e por t e d a c i t y and/or s t a t e and s alary **In c luding Evans t on , bu t e x c luding Chi c ago

If you have any questions about this information please contact Wesley Thorne, Assistant Director for Business and Employer Relations, wthorne@northwestern.edu