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COURSES TAUGHT IN ENGLISH

• Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management


• Master in Economics and Management
• Master in Informatics
CZECH UNIVERSITY OF LIFE SCIENCES PRAGUE
2007/2008
Foreword

Dear students,

I am very pleased to present you this Courses taught in English


publication for Incoming foreign students, which has been prepared with an
intention to introduce a digest of syllabi and structure information about our
bachelor and master programmes taught in English language at the Faculty of
Economics and Management of the Czech University of Life Sciences Prague.

I hope that you find this brochure practical in giving you advice on
planning your study stay at our Faculty. I am sure that you will appreciate the
educational as well as cultural heritage of Prague. Looking forward to meeting
you in Prague during the academic year 2008/2009.
Contact persons
Bachelor and Master
Programme director:

PhDr. Vlastimil Černý, CSc., MA


CULS Prague, Faculty of E&M
Kamýcká 129
Praha 6 – Suchdol, 165 21
Czech Republic

 +420 224 382 323


fax: +420 224 381 804
 cerny@pef.czu.cz

Bachelor AEM programme Master EM programme


administrator: administrator:

Ing. Vendula Pospíšilová Ing. Oldřich Výlupek


CULS Prague, Faculty of E&M CULS Prague, Faculty of E&M
Kamýcká 129 Kamýcká 129
Praha 6 – Suchdol, 165 21 Praha 6 – Suchdol, 165 21
Czech Republic Czech Republic

 +420 224 382 314  +420 224 382 313


 pospisilova@pef.czu.cz  vylupek@pef.czu.cz
 www.msc.pef.czu.cz/bsc  www.msc.pef.czu.cz/msc

Master INFO programme


administrator:

Ing. Martin Kozák


CULS Prague, Faculty of E&M
Kamýcká 129
Praha 6 – Suchdol, 165 21
Czech Republic

 +420 224 382 314


 kozakm@pef.czu.cz
 www.msc.pef.czu.cz/msc
Outline

1. Bachelor AEM - Programme structure…….. p. 5

2. Master EM - Programme structure….... p. 9

3 Master INFO - Programme structure….…. p. 12

4. Bachelor AEM - Programme syllabi…………. p. 15

4.1. - Syllabi - First year……….…. p. 18

4.2. - Syllabi - Second year…….. p. 35

4.3. - Syllabi - Third year.……….. p. 58

5. Master EM - Programme syllabi……….… p. 75

5.1. - Syllabi - First year…….……. p. 77

5.2 - Syllabi - Second year……… p. 105

6 Master INFO - Programme syllabi…..……… p. 137

6.1 - Syllabi - First year…………… p. 139

6.2. - Syllabi - Second year……… p. 164


Bachelor in Agricultural Economics
and Management

Programme structure

5
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management

Programme Structure

FIRST YEAR (academic year 2008-2009)

Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory


autumn semester

Mathematics for Informatics I English for English for Agricultural Foreign Language Introduction to
Economists I Academic Business Systems I (not English) study
Purposes Purposes

5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 0 ECTS Credits
spring semester

Mathematics for Informatics II Principles Fundamentals Agricultural Foreign Language Sport


Economists II of Business of Statistics Systems II (not English)
Negotiation

5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 0 ECTS Credits

6
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management

Programme Structure

SECOND YEAR (academic year 2008-2009)

Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory


autumn semester

Fundamentals Fundamentals Fundamentals Empirical Research Principles Fundamentals Sport


of Economics I of Management of Accounting in Economics of Ecology of Law

5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 0 ECTS
Credits

Fundamentals Information Trade and Qualitative Methods Introduction to Introduction to Sport


spring semester

of Economics II Systems Commerce Environmental Political Science


Economics

5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 0 ECTS
Credits

7
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management

Programme Structure

THIRD YEAR (academic year 2008-2009)

Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory


autumn semester

Business Natural Resources Financial Standards for Introduction to Bachelor


Economics Management Economics Thesis Writing Sociology thesis
and
Presentation

5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits


Credits 5 ECTS Credits

Agricultural Fundamentals Fundamentals Bachelor


spring semester

Economics of Marketing of Psychology thesis


defence

5 ECTS
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits Credits 15 ECTS Credits

8
Master in Economics and Management

Programme structure

9
Master in Economics and Management

Programme Structure

FIRST YEAR (academic year 2008-2009)

Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory


autumn semester

Economics of Management Corporate Finance Econometric Modelling Methods of Social Computer Diploma
Industries Research Science Thesis
(Sectoral Assignment
Economics)

5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS 0 ECTS


Credits 5 ECTS Credits Credits Credits

Economic Policies Human World and European Economy Accounting English for Diploma
Resources 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits Academic Thesis
spring semester

Management -------------- OR -------------- ----------- OR ------------- Purposes


IT for e-business Decision Support Systems 5 ECTS Credits
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits OR
-------------- OR -------------- ------------ OR ------------- English for
Rural Development Environmental Economics Business
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits Purposes 5 ECTS
Credits 5 ECTS Credits Credits

Obligatory restricted subjects A


Obligatory restricted subjects B
Obligatory restricted subjects C

10
Master in Economics and Management

Programme Structure

SECOND YEAR (academic year 2008-2009)

Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory

General Marketing EU Integration Trade Theory and Foreign Trade Diploma Thesis Diploma Thesis
autumn semester

Economics – 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits Seminar


International ---------------- OR ---------------- ----------------- OR -----------------
Economics Management Information Systems Statistical Seminar
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits
---------------- OR ---------------- ----------------- OR -----------------
Psychology of Organisation and Co-operative Business
Behaviour at Work 5 ECTS Credits
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits

Economics of Strategic Introduction to the Modern Law of International Finance Diploma Thesis
Enterprises Management EU 5 ECTS Credits Final State Exam
spring semester

5 ECTS Credits ----------------- OR -----------------


---------------- OR ---------------- Quantitative Methods in
Computer Security Macroeconomics
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits
---------------- OR ---------------- ----------------- OR -----------------
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits Business Strategy Social Economy 14 ECTS Credits
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits

Obligatory restricted subjects A


Obligatory restricted subjects B
Obligatory restricted subjects C

11
Master in Informatics

Programme structure

12
Master in Informatics

Programme Structure

FIRST YEAR (academic year 2008-2009)

Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory


autumn semester

Econometric Projecting of IS Computer Networks Statistical Data Analysis General Theory of ICT
Modelling Economics –
International
Economics

5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits

Security of IS Software Implementation


spring semester

Strategic Database and 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits CULS Optional Diploma Thesis
Marketing Knowledge IS ---------------- OR ---------------- ----------------- OR -----------------
Seminar in Computational Artificial Intelligence
Statistics 5 ECTS Credits
5 ECTS Credits
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits

Obligatory restricted subjects A


Obligatory restricted subjects B

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Master in Informatics

Programme Structure

SECOND YEAR (academic year 2008-2009)

Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory Obligatory


autumn semester

Management System Integration Internet Technologies – Client Side Logistic Systems CULS Optional Diploma Thesis
5 ECTS Credits
---------------- OR ----------------
Information Engineering
5 ECTS Credits
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits
spring semester

Prognostic Methods Quality Estimation of IS Internet Technologies – Server Side CULS Optional Diploma Thesis
5 ECTS Credits Final State Exam
---------------- OR ----------------
Decision Support Systems
5 ECTS Credits
5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 5 ECTS Credits 14 ECTS Credits

Obligatory restricted subjects A


Obligatory restricted subjects B

14
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics
and Management

Programme syllabi

15
Bachelor AEM PROGRAMME SYLLABI

FIRST YEAR
AUTUMN SEMESTER

EAE37E Mathematics for Economists I p. 19


ETE26E Informatics I p. 20
ELX67E English for Academic Purposes p. 22
ELX69E English for Business Purposes p. 23
AHA29E Agricultural Systems I p. 24
ELE17E Foreign Language – French p. 25
ELE18E Foreign Language – German p. 27

SPRING SEMESTER

EAE38E Mathematics for Economists II p. 29


ETE27E Informatics II p. 30
ELX68E Principles of Business Negotiation p. 32
ESE40E Fundamentals of Statistics p. 33
AGE04E Agricultural Systems II p. 34
ELE17E Foreign Language – French p. 25
ELE18E Foreign Language – German p. 27

SECOND YEAR
AUTUMN SEMESTER

ENE27E Fundamentals of Economics I p. 36


EREE2E Fundamentals of Management p. 38
EUE42E Fundamentals of Accounting p. 39
EEEB5E Empirical Research in Economics p. 41
LUE01E Principles of Ecology p. 43
EJE33E Fundamentals of Law p. 44

SPRING SEMESTER

ENE35E Fundamentals of Economics II p. 46


ETE49E Information Systems p. 48
EUE43E Trade and Commerce p. 50
EHEA6E Qualitative Methods p. 52
EEEE5E Introduction to Environmental Economics p. 54
EHEA5E Introduction to Political Science p. 56

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Bachelor AEM PROGRAMME SYLLABI

THIRD YEAR
AUTUMN SEMESTER

EEEE7E Business Economics p. 59


EREE1E Natural Resources Management p. 61
ENE38E Financial Economics p. 63
XKZE07 Standards for Thesis Writing and Presentation p. 65
EHEA4E Introduction to Sociology p. 67

SPRING SEMESTER

EEEE6E Agricultural Economics p. 69


ERED9E Fundamentals of Marketing p. 71
EPE03E Fundamentals of Psychology p. 73

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics
and Management

Programme syllabi – First year

18
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMISTS I (EAE37E)

Department of Operational and System Analysis


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: RNDr. Helena Brožová, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Overview of mathematics and its applications in business, economics and life and
social sciences

Lectures:
1. Basic Set Theory
2. Function of Single Variable
3. Function of Several Variables
4. Differentiation
5. Course of a Function
6. Maxima and Minima, Method of Lagrange Multipliers
7. Integration
8. Linear Algebra and Vector Space
9. Simultaneous Linear Equations
10. Graph Theory

Seminars:
1. Basic Set Theory
2. Function of Single Variable
3. Function of Several Variables
4. Differentiation
5. Course of a Function
6. Maxima and Minima, Method of Lagrange Multipliers
7. Integration
8. Linear Algebra and Vector Space
9. Simultaneous Linear Equations
10. Graph Theory

Study literature:
1. Hoffmann, L. D., Bradley, G. L.: Finite Mathematics with Calculus, McGraw Hill,
Inc., New York, 1995, ISBN 0-07-029352-X
2. Eric W. Weisstein: MathWorld - A Wolfram Web Resource,
http://mathworld.wolfram.com
3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
4. http://www.pef.czu.cz/kosa/MathEcon

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

INFORMATICS I (ETE26E)

Department of Informatics
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Miloš Ulman


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Secondary school level informatics and mathematics

Objective and general description:


The course combines theoretical and practical introductions to the most important
areas of the computer science - hardware, operating systems, programming
languages, data structures, some application software with emphasis on
spreadsheets, networks and network services. The practicals are held in the form of
informal group work in PC classrooms on PC at local and network mode. There is one
practical test at the end of semester. For particular seminars are prepared files and
tasks on server to use them in individual work of students.

Lectures:
1. Introduction to information science. Basic concepts. Data standardisation.
2. Components of computer (architecture, mainboard, performance)
3. Computer components ( case, memory, processor ...)
4. Peripherals (peripheral memories, input, output devices)
5. Computer classification. Actual equipment of Czech University of Agriculture
6. Software ( review, classification)
7. Application software (list, classification, examples)
8. Operating systems and shells (definition, function, classification)
9. Current operating systems ( Windows systems, OS/2, Unix, Linux)
10. Introduction to the databases, data types, data structures, storing of data in
memory
11. Computer networks (basic concepts, classification, topology, access methods...)
12. Network operating systems and its functions, Novell NetWare, Internet and
services
13. Computer networks (web browsing, Internet address systems, searching,
electronic business)
14. Laws and information science, network security, computer viruses

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

Seminars:
1. Local network, kinds of dialogue with computer, information sources at server
(necessary files for practicals)
2. Work with files and folders in different environment
3. The work with spreadsheet (Excel)- standard and format operations, absolute
and relative references
4. The work with spreadsheet (Excel) - functions ( mathematical, logical, financial,
date, statistical functions), formulas, graphs
5. The work with spreadsheet (Excel) - print, database operations (lists), sorting,
summary, filters
6. The work with spreadsheet (Excel) - forms, macros, pivot table
7. Written exercise (Excel)
8. PowerPoint - possibilities of presentation
9. The work with text editor (Word) - documents management, text formatting,
paragraph styles
10. The work with text (Word) - user templates ( creation and utilisation), tables
11. The work with text (Word) - graphical elements in document, fields in document,
mail merge
12. PowerPoint - demonstration of own presentation
13. The work with Internet, searching over the Internet
14. Course registration, individual access to students and evaluation of their work

Study literature:
1. Vaněk, J. a kol.: Informační technologie I - vybrané kapitoly. Praha, CREDIT,
2004. 160 s. - ISBN 80-213-1122-3
2. Vaněk, J. a kol.: Databázové a síťové technologie. Praha, CREDIT, 2000. 146 s. -
ISBN 80-213-0576-2
3. Žid, N. a kol.: Orientace ve světě informatiky. Praha, Management Press 1998.
384 s. - ISBN 80-85943-58-1
4. Časopisy: aktuální články - Computer World, Softwarové noviny, CHIP

Core literature:
1. Žid, N. a kol.: Orientace ve světě informatiky. Praha, Management Press, 1998.
391 s. - ISBN 80-85943-58-1
2. Minasi, M.: PC - velký průvodce hardwarem. Praha, Grada, 1996. 978 s. - ISBN
80-7169-178-X
3. Voříšek, J.: Strategické řízení informačního systému a systémová integrace.
Praha, Management Press, 1999. 323 s. - ISBN 80-85943-40-9
4. Sobota, B., Milián, J.: Grafické formáty. České Budějovice, Kopp, 1996. 157 s. -
ISBN 80-85828-58-8
5. Milková, E.: Algoritmy - typové konstrukce a příklady. Hradec Králové,
Gaudeamus, 2001. 109 s. - ISBN 80-7041-998-9
6. Groff, J.R., Weinberg, P.N.: Understanding UNIX. Indiana, Que, 1988. 234 s. -
ISBN 0-88022-343-X
7. Břehovský, P.: Praktický úvod do TCP/IP. České Budějovice, Kopp, 1994. 107 s. -
ISBN 80-85828-18-9
8. Horák, J.: Bezpečnost malých počítačových sítí. Praha, Grada, 2003. 200 s. -
ISBN 80-247-0663-6

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES (ELX67E)

Department of Languages
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Alan M. Westcott


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


This course is interactive and there are no lectures. Articles from current English
language newspapers and periodicals are used as the basis for further development of
language skills including: Expansion of vocabulary, Review of grammar, Discussion,
Conversation, Debate, Formal writing format, Creative writing. All correction of written
and oral presentations is done on a one-to-one basis with general explanation of
common errors.

Teaching and learning methods:


Students write essays each week based on the article/topic discussed in class. These
are proofread, returned to students, and time is allotted for explanation of corrections.

Literature:
Articles relating to globalisation, cultural differences, and current events are taken
from English language publications such as The International Herald Tribune, The
Economist, a variety of news magazines, and the Internet.

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

ENGLISH FOR BUSINESS PURPOSES (ELX69E)

Department of Languages
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Neil Harvey


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Students are provided a program of study to improve their command in English and
so enhance their career prospects. The students are familiarized with business
settings in which they will be expected to use English. They will be taught the basic
skills to enable them to operate effectively in these situations.

Students will learn the following skills:


• Comprehension and interpretation of written reports and other business documents
• Discussion and verbal presentation of findings
• The modification of business information for use in specific situations
• Analysis of graphically and numerically displayed information
• Summarizing and precise writing
• Writing minutes of meeting
• Composition of letters, memoranda, reports, etc.

Methodology:
Students will be asked to apply these skills to the following aspects of business:

1. The Administrative Function


2. Human Resource Management
3. Finance and Accounting
4. The Production Function
5. Decision Making
6. Marketing and the sales Function

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS I. (AHA29E)

Department of Agrochemistry and Plant Nutrition


Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources

Lecturer: prof. Dr. Pavel Tlustoš, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The subject gives to students a general overview about factors affecting crop
production and its quality including nowadays perceptions of landscape countryside.

Topics:
1. Structure and functions of agroecosystems
2. Soil fertility, and their parameters
3. Factors affecting plant growth and yield formation
4. Importance of nutrients for plant development and food quality
5. Environmental conditions and farming systems in the Czech Republic
6. Farming practices, crop rotation and soil tillage
7. Control of weeds, pests, and diseases
8. Cereals, production parameters
9. Root crops
10. Industrial crops
11. Medicinal herbs
12. Fruits and vegetables
13. Ornamental plants
14. Sustainability of agriculture and landscape management

Study literature:
1. GLIESSMAN S. R. (2000): Agroecology - ecological processes in sustainable
agriculture. Lewis publishers, 357 pp.
2. NORTON, G.W.; ALWANG, J. (1993): Introduction to Economics of Agricultural
Development. Mc Graw-Hill, New York, 404 pp.
3. WOJTKOWSKI, P.A. (2004): Landscape agroecology. The Haworth Press, New
York, 330 pp.
4. SMITH, A. E. (1995): Handbook of weed management systems. Marcel Dekker,
New York, 741 p.
5. Wild, A. (1988): Russell’s soil conditions and plant growth. Longman Scientific
Technical, XI. Ed. 991p.
6. Mengel K., Kirkby E.A. (1987): Principles of plant nutrition. International Potash
Institute, Bern, 687 s., ISBN 3-906-535-03-7.

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

FOREIGN LANGUAGE - FRENCH (ELE17E)

Department of Languages
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Mgr. Tereza Vogeltanzová


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn/spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The course is designed for elementary students with no previous knowledge of French
or for false beginners. The students will master basic conversation topics (together
with topic-related vocabulary) and basic writing skills.

Lectures:
1. French fonetics and phonology (WT); "Il y a" expression, prepositions of place 2
2. French fonetics and phonology (WT); What´s the time?, commencer and finir (-
IR) verbs, prepositions of time (ST)
3. Pronunciation and spelling (WT); Verbs of movement and stative verbs (ST)
4. Basic conversation phrases, introducing, être verb (WT); Question forms,
question words (ST)
5. Être verb, nationalities (masculine and feminine intro) (WT); Imperative (ST)
6. Regular -ER verbs, basic personal data (WT); Giving directions, asking for one´s
way (ST)
7. Regular -ER verbs, jobs, family (WT); Giving directions, asking for one´s way
(ST)
8. Cardinal and ordinal numbers 1, days, months, date (WT); Negation and articles
(ST)
9. Articles (definite, indefinite), regular feminine and plural-forming (WT); Irregular
feminine-forming (ST)
10. Articles and prepositions (contracted forms) (WT); Describing a person
(appearance, character) (ST)
11. In a class - irregular verbs (WT); Cardinal and ordinal numbers 2 (ST)
12. Free time, leisure, hobbies (WT); Housing and living, demonstrative pronouns
(ST)
13. Prepositions of place 1 (WT); Ordinal numbers (ST)
14. Revision and DELF sample test (WT); Revision (ST) and DELF sample test (ST)

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

Seminars:
1. Audio-oral course (WT); "Il y a" and describing a room, a flat, a city (ST)
2. Audio-oral course (WT); What´s the time? - schedules, daily routines,
programmes (ST)
3. Audio-oral course (WT); Travelling by bus, train and plane (ST)
4. Introducing, ABC, spelling (WT); Fill-in the form (applications, CV etc.) (ST)
5. Personal data - housing, family, studies, hobbies etc. (WT); Asking for one´s way
and giving directions (ST)
6. Parler verb - languages (WT); Prague and Paris (monuments, introducing the
capitals) (ST)
7. My family (WT); Knowledge and skills (ST)
8. Dates, the four seasons and related activities (WT); Describing people
(appearance and character) (ST)
9. Feminine, plurals (WT); CVs, cover letters and reservations (ST)
10. Travelling, prepositions within the names of cities, countries (WT); Statistical
data - figures ( life in France) (ST)
11. At school, at work, at home - daily routines (WT); Housing and living - our
house/flat/neighbourhood (ST)
12. Free time - hobbies and leisure time activities (WT); Food and drink - In a
restaurant (ST)
13. Describing a picture - prepositions (WT); Ordinal number - the history of France
(ST)
14. Revision (WT); Revision (ST)

Study literature:
1. Dominique P., Girardet J.,Verdelhan M.: Le Nouveau Sans Frontières 1. CLE
International, 1990
2. Dominique P., Girardet J.,Verdelhan M.: Le Nouveau Sans Frontières 1 (Cahier
d´exercises). CLE International, 1990
3. Coffman Crocker M., Crocker M.E.: French Grammar. Schaum, 1999

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

FOREIGN LANGUAGE - GERMAN (ELE18E)

Department of Languages
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Mag. Isolde Hipfl


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn/spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: German 2

Objective and general description:


Students should be able to articulate their needs with (fairly simple) linguistic means.
They are able to talk write about present, past and future events. Written and oral
forms of communication are practised in learner orientated ways.

Lectures:
1. Phonetics - basics (WT); Direct and indirect questions (ST)
2. Present tense (regular and irregular verbs) (WT); Survey: personal pronouns and
adverbs of place (ST)
3. Survey: article, gender, nouns adjectives, adjectives used as nouns (WT);
Reflexive and partly reflexive verbs (ST)
4. Survey: plural of nouns (WT); Reflexive pronouns: dative and accusative (ST)
5. Form ,würde, + Infinitive (WT); Relative clauses and relative pronouns (ST)
6. Infinitive + ,zu, (WT); Verbs with prepositions (ST)
7. Survey: present perfect tense (WT); Clause: ,um ... zu + Infinitive, (ST)
8. Past tense: regular and irregular verbs (WT); Survey: future (ST)
9. Past perfect tense (WT); Passive present tense (ST)
10. Subordinate clause; temporal (WT); Collocations I: fixed connections between
verbs and nouns (ST)
11. Subordinate clause, causal (WT); Collocations II: verbs with prepositions (ST)
12. Suggestions with ,würde, könnte, sollte, (WT); Passive past tense (ST)
13. Use of the tenses: past and present (WT); Passive and modal verbs (ST)
14. Survey: subordinate clauses (WT); Summary (ST)

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

Seminars:
1. Getting to know each other - identity (WT); Talking about holidays (ST)
2. Ways of living (WT); Weather forecast (ST)
3. Looking for a flat (WT); Looking for a partner; lonely hearts add (ST)
4. Furniture (WT); Partnership (ST)
5. Dream houses, literary texts (WT); Celebrations and invitations (ST)
6. Living conditions in Germany, Austria and the Czech Republic (WT); Literary texts
(ST)
7. Talking about past events (WT); Supernatural events in everyday life (ST)
8. Ages of man (WT); Fortunetelling (ST)
9. Biographies of famous people (WT); Predicting the future and warnings (ST)
10. Literary texts, short stories (WT); Illness and cures (ST)
11. Hobbies and free time (WT); Alternative healing methods (ST)
12. Planning a journey (WT); Food (ST)
13. Hotels: once and now (WT); Health food and healthy living (ST)
14. Revision (WT); Revision (ST)

Study literature:
1. Dallapiazza, R.-M. et al, 1999: Tangram 2 A. Hueber.
2. Reimann, M., 1996: Grundstufen . Grammatik für Deutsch als Fremdsprache.
Hueber.
3. Gerngross, G. et al, 1999: Grammatik kreativ. Materialien für einen
lernerzentrierten Unterricht. Langenscheidt.

28
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMISTS II (EAE38E)

Department of Operational and System Analysis


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Dr. Ing. Tomáš Šubrt


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Overview of mathematics and its applications in business, economics and life and
social sciences

Lectures:
1. Introduction to Operations Research/Management Science
2. System Approach and Model Approach
3. The Phases of Application of OR/MS
4. The General Optimization Problem
5. Linear Programming
6. The Simplex Method
7. Solution of a Linear Programming Model
8. Transportation Problem
9. Transshipment Problem
10. Assignment Problem
11. Travel Salesman Problem

Seminars:
1. Simultaneous Linear Equations
2. Jordanien Elimination
3. Linear Programming
4. The Simplex Method
5. Solution of a Linear Programming Model
6. Transportation Problem
7. Transshipment Problem
8. Assignment Problem
9. Travel Salesman Problem

Study literature:
1. Hoffmann, L. D., Bradley, G. L.: Finite Mathematics with Calculus, McGraw Hill,
Inc., New York, 1995, ISBN 0-07-029352-X
2. Turban E.: Decision Support Systems. Wiley, 4th ed., N.Y., 1998.
3. http://home.eunet.cz/berka/o/English/home.htm
4. http://en.wikipedia.org
5. http://orms.czu.cz

29
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

INFORMATICS II (ETE27E)

Department of Information Technologies


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Miloš Ulman


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Informatics I, Basic mathematics

Objective and general description:


The course combines theoretical and practical introductions to other important areas
of the computer science - programming, data structures, some application software
with emphasis on database systems and text editors. The practicals are held in the
form of informal group work in PC classrooms on PC at network mode. There is one
practical test at the end of semester. For particular seminars are prepared files and
tasks on server to use them in individual work of students.

Lectures:
1. Database systems (terminology, base of data, data and function modelling)
2. Database systems (relational model, database design, normalisation)
3. Database systems (creating of database, editing, browsing, selecting, joiming)
4. Database systems (queries, forms, reports)
5. Database systems (SQL)
6. Introduction to programming (basics of algorithms)
7. Introduction to programming (commands, data and program structures)
8. Visual Basic for Application (VBA) - objects, properties, methods, events,
procedures, functions
9. VBA (data types, variables, declarations, arrays, dynamic arrays)
10. VBA (loops, commands with conditions, switch)
11. Hypertext Markup Language (HTML) - history, basic tags and their attributes
12. HTML (basic tags and their attributes, headings, anchor, images,...)
13. DHTML - Cascading style sheets
14. Information Society

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

Seminars:
1. Database systems (design of own database for selected range, Entity
Realationship Diagram)
2. Database systems (database foundation in Access, table relationships)
3. Database systems (work and editing of own tables)
4. Database systems (various types of queries)
5. Database systems (design of forms and reports)
6. Database systems (testing)
7. VBA in MS Office applications (event driven programming, userforms modules)
8. VBA in MS Office applications (macro analysis and editing at Word)
9. VBA in MS Office applications (macro analysis and editing at Excel)
10. VBA in MS Office applications (code analysis and editing at common modules,
examples)
11. HTML ( web pages creating, text formatting)
12. HTML (web pages creating, anchor, images)
13. HTML (web pages creating, tables)
14. Course registration, individual evaluation of students

Study literature:
1. Vaněk, J., Štěpánová, J.: Informační technologie II, PEF Praha, CREDIT 2004,
110s. - ISBN 80-213-1160-6
2. Časopisy : aktuální články - Computer World, Softwarové noviny
3. Cats-Baril,W. - Thompson,R :Information Technology and Management.USA,
IRVIN 1997. 506 s. - ISBN 0-256-17618-3
4. Solomon, Ch.:Tvorba aplikací v MS Office 97 pomocí jazyka Visual Basic. Praha,
Computer Press, 1998. s.99-169, s.501-552, s.559-574, - ISBN 80-7169-626-9
5. Date, C.J: An Introduction to Database Systems. Addison - Wesley Comp., 1991.
s.31-50, s.249-306, s.579-593 - ISBN 0-201-51381-1
6. Walkenbach, J.: Microsoft Excel 2000 - Programování ve VBA. Praha, Computer
Press, 1999. 679 s. - ISBN 80-7226-250-5
7. Powell, T.A.: Web Design. The Complete Reference. Osborne/McGraw-Hill 2000.
ISBN 0-07-212297-8
8. Musciano, Ch., Kennedy, B.:HTML a XHTML - O Reilly 2000
9. Niederst, J.: Web design in a nutshell. O Reilly 2002. ISBN 0-596-00196-7
10. McFedries, P.: VBA for Microsoft Office 2000. Brno, Unis, 2000. 1038 s. - ISBN
80-86097-43-9

31
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

PRINCIPLES OF BUSINESS NEGOTIATION (ELX68E)

Department of Languages
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Neil Harvey


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Students are provided with a programme of study which will improve their abilities to
negotiate successfully in different situations in order to improve their career potential.
The students will be familiarized with the techniques to ensure a win:win situation is
obtained. Students will be asked to apply these skills in the various types of
negotiations.

Lectures:
1. Personal preparation
a) Self assertive training
b) Compensating for overconfidence
2. Identifying desired objectives
3. Assessing the opposition
4. Choosing a strategy
5. Putting your case effectively
6. Conductin a negotiation
a) Essentials of Bargaining
b) Listening and Reacting
c) Asking the right questions
7. Closing a negotiation
a) Movement to close the gap between parties
b) Achieving the right results

Methodology:
Students will be asked to apply these skills in the various types of negotiations.

32
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

FUNDAMENTALS OF STATISTICS (ESE40E)

Department of Statistics
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Otakar Macháček, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Mathematics and English

Objective and general description:


Students are made familiar with elementary statistical methods for work with economic and
social data. Instruction is given by means of lectures and practicals.

Lectures:
1. Introduction. Basic notions. Frequency distribution. Properties.
2. Measures of location of the frequency distribution.
3. Measures of variation, computation methods. Other measures.
4. Basic notions of probability. Distribution models.
5. Sample estimation. Confidence interval for the mean.
6. Sample estimation II. Connected problems.
7. Statistical hypothesis testing. Models. One sample t-test for the mean.
8. Two sample - and paired test. F-test for the variance.
9. Simple linear regression and correlation.
10. Multiple regression. Matrix computation approach.
11. Significance testing and estimation in regression.
12. Time series description and forecasting. Trend analysis.
13. Seasonal and periodic time series analysis.
14. Basics of index numbers.
Seminars:
1. Introduction. Basic notions. Frequency distribution. Properties.
2. Measures of location of the frequency distribution.
3. Measures of variation, computation methods. Other measures.
4. Basic notions of probability. Distribution models.
5. Sample estimation. Confidence interval for the mean.
6. Sample estimation II. Connected problems.
7. Statistical hypothesis testing. Models. One sample t-test for the mean.
8. Two sample - and paired test. F-test for the variance.
9. Simple linear regression and correlation.
10. Multiple regression. Matrix computation approach.
11. Significance testing and estimation in regression.
12. Time series description and forecasting. Trend analysis.
13. Seasonal and periodic time series analysis.
14. Basics of index numbers.

Study literature:
1. Trešl, J.: Success in Statistics. VŠE, Praha, 1998.

33
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management first year

AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS II. (AGE04E)

Department of Genetics and Breeding


Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Ivan Majzílk, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Students will become familiar with the economic and ecological dimensions of the
different types of animal productions. Students will gain an inside in to livestock
systems and life stock farming systems

Topics:
1. Contribution of domestic animals, economy and animal breeding, domestication.
2. Zootechnical taxonomy, genetic resources, pedigree and herdbook. Body
conformation in animals, branding of animals.
3. Ecological aspects of animal breeding, ecological livestock farming.
4. Animal welfare
5. Anatomy of animals
6. Anatomy of animals
7. Physiology of animals - stress
8. Physiology of animals - reproduction, lactation
9. Horses and the horse industry
10. Dairy cattle and milk production
11. Beef cattle production, sheep production
12. Pig production
13. Poultry production, special animal production
14. Aquaculture - fishery management

Study literature:
1. SCIENTIFIC FARM ANIMAL PRODUCTION: Robert E.T., Collier Macmillan
Publishers
2. WORLD ANIMAL SCIENCE: Fraser A. F., Elsevier Science Publishers

34
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics
and Management

Programme syllabi – Second year

35
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMICS I. (ENE27E)

Department of Economics
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Michaela Krčílková


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Mathematics

Objective and general description:


- to familiarize the student with the basic concepts and methods of microeconomics -
the study of how consumers and producers make their decisions and interact in
markets, under conditions of perfect and imperfect competition.
- to enable the student to apply these concepts and methods to policy issues. Policy
issues such as whether, when and how markets may fail and whether government
intervention may be needed to correct those failures.
- to lay the groundwork for future study: in the next term, for the study of
macroeconomic issues such as unemployment, inflation and long-run economic
growth; and more generally for such courses as managerial accounting and
management decision-making, as well as economics courses in finance, labor,
international economics and managerial economics, which require mastery of basic
microeconomic concepts.

Lectures:
1. Introduction. Goal of the subjects. Fundamentals of Economic thinking.
2. Supply, Demand and Market Equilibrium.
3. Consumer Choice and the Demand Curve.
4. Indifference Curves and Budget Constraints, Consumers’ Optimum.
5. Theory of the Firm.
6. Production and Cost functions.
7. Profit maximization.
8. Market Structure – Perfect Competition.
9. Market Structure – Imperfect Competition – Monopoly.
10. Market Structure – Imperfect Competition – Oligopoly, Monopolistic Competition.
11. Factors of production. Supply and Demand of Production Factors.
12. Labor Market, Capital Market, Land Market.
13. General Equilibrium and Efficiency.
14. Market Failures.

36
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

Seminars:
1. Math as a tool for economic analysis.
2. Supply and Demand – Search for the market equilibrium. Derivation of Supply
and Demand Curve.
3. Consumer Choice – Cardinalistic Theory of Utility. Marginal utility. Consumer
Price.
4. Consumers’ choice – Ordinalistic Theory of Utility. Analysis of Indifference Curve.
Search for Consumers’ Optimum.
5. Production Function, Marginal and Average Product.
6. Cost Function. Marginal and Average Costs of Production.
7. Profit Maximization and Supply in Perfect Competition.
8. Profit Maximization and Supply in Monopoly. Price discrimination.
9. Profit Maximization and Supply in Oligopoly.
10. Profit Maximization and Supply in Monopolistic Competition.
11. Perfect and Imperfect Competition in Factor Markets.
12. General Equilibrium and Efficiency.
13. Externalities and Public Goods.
14. Recapitulation.

Study literature:
1. Samuelson P. A. & Nordhaus W. D.: ECONOMIC. 18th edition. McGraw Hill. New
York, 2005
2. Frank R. H.: MICROECONOMICS AND BEHAVIOR. McGraw Hill. New York. 1991
3. Pindick R. S. & Rubinfeld D. L.: MICROECONOMICS. Prentice Hall International.
London. 2001
4. Mankiw N. G. PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS. Dryden Press, Fort Worth,
Texas, USA, 1998

37
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

FUNDAMENTALS OF MANAGEMENT (EREE2E)

Department of Management
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Richard Selby


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


This module gives a general overview of the theory and principles of management in
relation to modern business. The basic principles of business economics are also
introduced. Lectures are supported by appropriate practical exercises and
assignments.

Lectures:
1. Basic management concepts. Management and organizational theory.
2. Fundamental concepts of a business or firm, including hierarchies.
3. Basic business economics; cash flow, profit etc.
4. Control of business activities.
5. External business environment. Business opportunities. Business strategy.
6. Investment, production and development.
7. Business systems and processes.
8. Decision making.
9. Business functions and mission.
10. Organisational structure and organisational development.
11. Basic concepts of human resource management.
12. Managerial roles, styles and personalities.
13. Corporate culture. The role and structure of teams.
14. Business ethics.

38
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

FUNDAMENTALS OF ACCOUNTING (EUE42E)

Department of Trade and Finance


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Marta Stárová


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The aim of this course is to provide theoretical and practical base of Accounting.

Lectures:
1. Characterization of Accounting, its position in economics, the balance sheet
structure, characterization of balance-sheet items
2. Business transactions recorded in accounting system, T- account, Book-closing,
Profit and loss account
3. Fixed assets – characterization, accounting procedures
4. Inventory – characterization, accounting procedures
5. External operating expenses and revenues
6. External financial expenses and revenues, extraordinary expenses and revenues
7. Receivables and payables (liabilities)
8. Recapitulation of book-closing (including the income tax)
9. Own equity
10. Classification of accounts, principles of accounting
11. Accounting systems, accounting documents
12. Books of accounts
13. Financial Statements
14. Cash-flow

Seminars:
1. Compiling the balance-sheet
2. Business transactions with no effect on equity
3. Business transactions with effect on equity
4. Value added tax
5. Purchase and sale of assets and services – method A
6. Purchase and sale of assets and services – method B
7. Own inventory production
8. Accounting for wages and salaries
9. Profit or loss from operating, financial and extraordinary activities
10. Principles of accounting for expenses and revenues
11. Accounting documents
12. Comprehensive exercise of double-entry accounting
13. Comprehensive exercies of single-entry accounting (tax evidence)
14. Credit

39
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

Study literature:
1. Lorinczová E. : Accounting, ČZU, PEF, Praha 2006
2. Stárová M. : Accounting – seminars, ČZU, PEF, Praha 2006
3. Meigs, Williams, Haka, Bettner: Accounting, McGraw-Hill, Ins. USA, 1999
4. Warren, Fess: Financial Accounting, South-Western Publishing Co, Ohio, 1988
5. Valder A.: Teorie účetnictví, ČZU, PEF, Praha 2005

40
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

EMPIRICAL RESEARCH IN ECONOMICS (EEEB5E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Lenka Šobrová


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Micro- and Macro-economics

Objective and general description:


The course is organised through lectures and calculation practicals with economic
interpretation of results. In order to pass the course it is essential to participate
actively at practicals, submit course project, and be successful at examination based
on defending of a course project. During the lectures, the main problems are
explained and during the exercises, outlined principles and methods are verified and
studied in depth by solving specific problems determined for each of practicals. During
second half of semester students work on their course projects which will be
evaluated by practicals teacher. This assessment is involved into a final grade when
passing examination realized by defending of course project. The course aims to give
students knowledge of research methods which are in countries with developed
market mechanism a non-substitutable tool of quantitative analysis of national
economy development, its industries and enterprises for determination of an optimal
strategy of development of enterprises, agrifood sector and economy as a whole.
Teaching forms are based on lectures and seminars, an use of computer technology is
supposed. After passing of the course examination students’ ability to analyze
different databases and information resources for making correct conclusions will be
enhanced.

Lectures:
1. Methodology of science
2. Databases in economic research - qualitative data
3. Cross-section data bases and their gathering and use
4. Time series databases and their gathering and use
5. Panel databases and their gathering and use
6. Experimental databases and their gathering and use
7. Experimental economics and stabilities and organization of experiments.
8. Basic research methods - qualitative and quantitative analysis (1)
9. Basic research methods - comparison and synthesis (2)
10. Comprehensive system methods (3)
11. Specifics of research methods at microlevel
12. Specifics of research methods at macrolevel
13. Organization of research and research network at national level
14. Organization of research and research network at European level

41
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

Seminars:
1. Writing of research project
2. Specification of research task for group (individual) students
3. Bibliography information resources for research and their research
4. Examples of cross section data bases and their elaboration
5. Analysis and modelling of economic and financial time series (1)
6. Analysis and modelling of economic and financial time series (2)
7. Examples of panel data bases and heir elaboration
8. Management of experiments in demand analysis
9. Management of experiments in supply analysis
10. Peer defending of research projects
11. Peer defending of research projects
12. Peer defending of research projects
13. Peer defending of research projects
14. Peer defending of research projects

Study literature:
1. Judge, G. and others: The Theory and Practice of Econometrics, Wiley, New York
1991
2. Tvrdoň, J.: Econometric Modelling, CUA Prague, 2003
3. Griffiths and others: Learning and Practicing Econometrics, Wiley, New York 1993
4. Ramanathan, R.: Introductory econometrics, The Dryden Press 1995, ISBN 0-03-
094922X

Core literature:
1. Griffiths and others: Learning and Practicing Econometrics, Wiley, New York 1993
2. Judge, G. and others: The Theory and Practice of Econometrics, Wiley, New York
1991
3. Ramanathan, R.: Introductory econometrics, The Dryden Press 1995, ISBN 0-03-
094922X
4. Samuelson, P.A., Nordhaus, W.D.: Economics, McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1992
5. Kagel, J.H., Roth, A.E.: Handbook of Experimental Economics, Princeton
University Press, New Persey, 1995
6. Marsh, D., Stoker, G.: Theory and Methods in Political Science, MacMillan Press,
London 1995
7. Peters, B.G.: Comparative Politics. Theory and Methods, MacMillan Press, London
1998
8. Tvrdoň, J.: unpublished lectures to research

42
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

PRINCIPLES OF ECOLOGY (LUE01E)

Department of Landscape Ecology


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: RNDr. Martiš Miroslav, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


This subject is concentrated essentially on the processes, links and interrelations
within the landscape with special attention to the landscape management and
ecological applications. The course is focused on application of landscape-ecology and
environmental knowledge for application of instruments of environmental assessment
and management in international and national legal context for decision-making
processes in state administration, environmental expertise and business management
(with special emphasis to the practice in counseling and projecting firms and for
environmental positions in the commercial sphere). The course expects close co-
operation with related foreign institutions.

Lectures:
1. Landscape history and present state.
2. Landscape structure, functionin and typology.
3. Biodiversity, landscape heterogeneity. ecological stability.
4. Czech landscape in the international context (European landscape convention,
relevant inter. documents, NATURA 2000, landscape in transboundary context)
5. Landscape vulnerability and development project and concept feasibility
classification
6. Environmental impact assessment – early solution of development conflicts (line,
corridors point and polygon characters projects assessment examples)
7. Assessment of development policies, strategies and plans in regards of the
environment (branch and crosssectorial policies environmemntal consequences
assessment examples)
8. EIA and SEA interrelations, branches and regions development decison making
processes feedback to EIA and SEA in the frame of regional and state develop.
9. Landscape planning and management, nature protected areas mng. plans.
10. Data sources (analogous, digital, internet)
11. Application of Geographical Information Systems
12. European landscape management policies and tools
13. Enterprise subject in the landscape (environmental risks and prospectives)
14. The role of public in single instruments of landscape management, acces to
information, public participation a acces to right, forms of public participation in
decision making – civil society in practice.

Study literature:
1. Richard T. T. Forman, Michel Godron: Landscape Ecology, Wiley, New York 1986.

43
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

FUNDAMENTALS OF LAW (EJE33E)

Department of Law
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: JUDr. Bohumír Štědroň, LL.M.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The aim of the course is to give a broad and general introduction to the concept of law
and the legal methods. The lectures will be followed by seminars where the discussed
issues will be dealt with in detail. At the end of the course there will be a closed book
written exam for which both credit and a grade will be awarded.

Lectures:
1. Law and its Function
2. Legal Systems
3. Categories of Law
4. Democracy and Legal Institutions
5. Introduction to European Union
6. Introduction to European Union Law
7. International Institutions and International Law
8. Human Rights and its Protection and Enforcement
9. Alternative Dispute Resolution and Disputes Settlements
10. Bilateral Investment Protection Treaties
11. Public Procurement Law and Public-Private Partnership
12. Cyber (Internet) Law and Data Protection
13. Intellectual Property Law
14. Czech Business Law

Seminars:
1. Czech Constitutional Law
2. Business Law in Czech Republic and EU
3. International Arbitration and Dispute Settlement (WTO)
4. Intellectual Property Law in Czech Republic
5. Legal Regulation of Information Society in Czech Republic and EU
6. European Legal Entities
7. Selected Issues from Czech Law

44
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

Study literature:
1. Štědroň, B., Fundamentals of Law, Czech University of Life Science (Česká
zemědělská univerzita), 2007 (will be available by mid 2007 at University
Bookshop)
2. Steiner and Woods, Textbook on EC Law, Oxford University Press 2003, ISBN 0-
19-925874-0; (available at the MSc departmental library)

45
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

FUNDAMENTALS OF ECONOMICS II. (ENE35E)

Department of Economics
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Mansoor Maitah, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Mathematics

Objective and general description:


The course will introduce student to basic concepts and methods of macroeconomics.
After taking this course, student will be able to describe and analyze issues such as
unemployment, inflation and economic growth in closed and open economy by
applying tools of modern macroeconomics.

Lectures:
1. Introduction to Macroeconomics
2. Indicators of national Economy
3. Consumption and Investment
4. Government and Export, Import
5. Money market
6. Aggregate Demand and Supply - a
7. Aggregate Demand and Supply - b
8. IS x LM Model – a
9. IS x LM Model - b
10. Balance of Payment
11. Inflation
12. Unemployment
13. Fiscal and Monetary Policy
14. International Trade

46
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

Seminars:
1. Introduction to Macroeconomics
2. Indicators of national Economy
3. Consumption and Investment
4. Government and Export, Import
5. Money market
6. Aggregate Demand and Supply - a
7. Aggregate Demand and Supply - b
8. IS x LM Model – a
9. IS x LM Model - b
10. Balance of Payment
11. Inflation
12. Unemployment
13. Fiscal and Monetary Policy
14. International Trade

Study literature:
1. Samuelson P. A. & Nordhaus W. D.: ECONOMIC. 18th edition. McGraw Hill. New
York, 2005
2. Mankiw N. G. PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS. Dryden Press, Fort Worth,
Texas, USA, 1998

47
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

INFORMATION SYSTEMS (ETE49E)

Department of Information Systems


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Tomáš Rain, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Subject aim is to explain meaning of information, their importance, processing and
analyzing. Learning “Information systems” allow students get to know with area of
information and communication technologies in company. Learning leavers
“Information systems” will be able to work with enterprise team dealing with
informatics management. Process of education is divided to lectures and seminars,
over seminar-time students process two terminal projects, witch being presented in
teams. Exercise output is to learn about IS of enterprise and describe their basic
characteristics in demand.

Lectures:
1. Theory of information
2. Definition and classification of information systems
3. Managing of enterprise IS and information strategy
4. Life cycle of information system
5. Analyse and design of information system
6. System integration
7. Architectures of information systems
8. EIS and MIS
9. Economics of information systems
10. Critical factors of building IS
11. E-government
12. Net economy
13. ERP systems
14. Outsourcing IS

48
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

Seminars:
1. Introduction to seminars (opening information, condition for credit conferment)
2. Preparing of digital presentation and presentation skills
3. Preparing of digital presentation and presentation skills
4. Recruitment, motivating and managing of IT specialists
5. Using of selected ERP information system
6. IS analyse training
7. Free seminar: team-work on first project
8. Free seminar: team-work on first project
9. Presentations of first team projects
10. Presentations of first team projects
11. Free seminar: team-work on second project
12. Free seminar: team-work on second project
13. Presentations of second team projects
14. Presentations of second team projects

Study literature:
1. Angelo, I. O., Smithson, S.: Information System Management – Opportunities
and Risks, Macmillan, 1991
2. Dagenais T., Gautschi D.: Net Markets: Driving Success in the B2B Networked
Economy, McGraw-Hill Companies 2002; 268 p., ISBN 00-7089-308-X
3. Negroponte A.: Being Digital, Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.,
4. Schwartz E. I.: Digital Darwinism, Broadway Books, New York 1999;
5. Voříšek J.: Strategické řízení informačního systému a systémová integrace
6. Vrana I., Richta K: Zásady a postupy zavádění podnikových informačních
systémů, Praha, Grada Publishing 2005, 187 s, ISBN: 80-247-11003-6
7. Dohnal J., Pour J.: Architektury informačních systémů v průmyslových a
obchodních podnicích, Praha: Ekopress, 1997. 301 s. ISBN 80-86119-02-5
8. Dyson E.: Release 21 – vize života v digitálním věku. Praha: Management Press,
2001. 287 s. ISBN 80-7261-030-9
9. Papík R., Michalík Pavel., Michalík Petr, Nováček L.: Internet, ekonomické,
marketingové a finanční aplikace, Praha: EKOPRESS, 1998. 220 s. ISBN 80-
86119-03-3

49
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

TRADE AND COMMERCE (EUE43E)

Department of Trade and Finance


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Olga Regnerová


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The course is intended to basic elements and process in interior and foreign trade,
readiness of enterprises to push merchandise to international markets and consumer
behaviour at domestic and international context as well.

Lectures:
1. Business activities - introduction
2. Interior trade – structure, wholesale and retail trade, foreign trade
3. Business subjects
4. Business operations
5. Goods, classification, assortment, trademark protection
6. Distribution, logistics
7. Terms of sale
8. Terms of payment
9. Price, price structure
10. Marketing
11. Advertising and public relations
12. Economic ethics
13. Goods transport
14. Trade negotiation

Seminars:
1. Introduction to trade theory
2. Interior trade, foreign trade
3. Business subjects
4. Business operation
5. Goods, specification, identification
6. Distribution, logistics
7. Delivery conditions
8. Payment conditions
9. Price
10. Retail system
11. Advertising, public relations
12. Economic ethics
13. Transportation and shipping
14. Credit week

50
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

Study literature:
1. Campbell, D.: Business for non-business students, DP Publication Ltd., London
1994
2. Czinkota-Ronkainen: International Marketing, The Dryden Press 1990
3. Hermann, A.H.: International Trade Terms, Radix s.r.o., Praha 1996
4. Hoffman, M.: Business Ethics, Mc Graw Hill 2000
5. Kotler, P.: Marketing, Management, Prentice Hall 1994
6. Laudon, K.C.: Business information System, Dryden Press 1998
7. Morgen, G.: Images of organisation, Sage Publications Inc. 1998
8. Palmer, A.: The business and marketing environment, Manchester University
Press 2001
9. Quinm, J.B.: The Stategy process, Prentice-Hall International 2002
10. Thomas, G.P.: Government and the Economy Today, Manchester University Press
2001
11. Zodl, J.A.: Export-Import, Betterway books, Ohio 1995
12. Czech Trade: Facts on foreign trade, 2000-2005

51
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

QUALITATIVE METHODS (EHEA6E)

Department of Humanities
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Lukáš Zagata


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Sociology

Objective and general description:


The aim of this subject is to introduce the students into methods of field sociological
research as qualitative approach - participative observation, structured interview as
well as biographical method. Students will learn how to prepare, carry out and analyse
field research. This course is constructed as introduction to the sociological, field
researches. The methods common to social scientists will be taught (structured
interview, live story, focus group, participated observation, writing field records etc.).

Lectures:
1. Introduction the course. Division of topics and discussions. Literature.
2. Method and ethic.
3. Quantitative and qualitative research in social sciences, the main differences
4. Project in qualitative research, choice of sample
5. Participative observation – distance and emotions
6. What is it the field record? How to write the field record?
7. Interview: learning how to write and listen, analytical field record, interview
preparation, dialectics of interview
8. Surveys and Focus group
9. Sociomentry, Quasi-sociometry and other techniques of qualitative research
10. Qualitative data analysis
11. Grounded Theory
12. Research production. Formulation of findings
13. Research production. Reflection, synthesis and analysis: from field records to the
own theory
14. Writing the texts. Conclusion and discussion

Seminars:
1. Qualitative and quantitative methods
2. Qualitative research preparation
3. Qualitative data as a background for qualitative research
4. Participative methods and techniques
5. Results interpretation of qualitative research
6. Error in Generalisation
7. Text writing – differences between technical and interpretation texts

52
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

Study literature:
1. Bernard H. Russell. 2002. Research Methods in Antropology. Qualitative and
Quantitative Approaches
2. Berg, B.: Qualitative reseasrch methods for the social sciences. Allyn and Bacon,
1995
3. Denzin, N. K., Lincoln, X. S.: Handbook of qualitative research. Sage, 1994
4. Čermák, I. & Miovský, M. : Kvalitativní výzkum ve vědách o člověku na prahu
třetího tisíciletí, Brno, Boskovice, 2000
5. Hendl, J.: Úvod do kvalitativního výzkumu. Praha, Karolinum 1997
6. Majerová, V., Majer, E.: Kvalitativní výzkum v sociologii venkova a zemědělství,
díl I. (2003) a II. (2005), ČZU Praha
7. Katrňák, T.: Český archiv kvalitativních dat a dokumentů. In SDA Literatura, info
č.3/I., p.6., 1999

53
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (EEEE5E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Steve Clark (CAN) / Lutz Laschewski (GER)


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Aim of the subject is providing students with theoretical knowledge of economic
approaches in area of sustainable development, pricing of natural sources and their
use. Further pieces of knowledge in delimitation of specifics of expert activities in
relation to environment of life. On base of theoretical knowledge possible ways and
means will be discussed and to secure and maintain the environment of life. The
course unit is organised in lectures and seminars. The students are required to
prepare projects as a part of their out-of class educational activities.

Lectures:
1. The Introduction into The Environmental economics, economics, economics of
natural resources
2. Economic causes of environmental and resources misallocation in market
economy
3. Externalities as market failure causem, public versus private exter-ies and their
macro and microeconomic implications
4. Goals and theories of environmental assets valuation. Monetary measures of
environmental goods
5. The Cost benefit analysis, Direct and indirect valuation methods
6. Methods of common goods valuation. The Hedonic price model. The Contingent
valuation in the Travel cost methods
7. Quality assessment of environmental goods valuation methods
8. The Environmental policies and their main goals. Impact analysis of
environmental pocies and policy failure
9. Applied policy instruments, definition and comparison of different categories of
analytic tool
10. Green taxation, the issue of direct and indirect ecological taxes implementation
and its distortion effects
11. International dismension of environmental problems and applied policies
12. The Firm level consequences fo The Public interest theory, various allocation of
the policy cost
13. Environmental management and information system on the firm level, eco-
accounting and eco-auditing systems
14. The economics of natural resources utilization, the classification of natural
resources, property rights

54
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

Seminars:
1. Basic principles of the Economics of natural Resources
2. Externalities and environmental goods
3. Monetary measures of environmental goods
4. The Cost benefit analysis
5. Quality assessment of environmental goods valuation
6. Direct and indirect ecological taxation
7. Basic principles and constraints enfironmental policies

Study literature:
1. Norman J. Vig: Environmental Policy: New Directions for the Twenty-First
Century, Fourth editon, 2002
2. Charles D. Kolstad: Environmental Economics, Oxford University Press, 1999
3. Robert N. Stavins: Economics of the Environment, W.W. Norton & Company.
2000
4. Tom Tietenberg: Environmental and Natural Rerousce Economics, Sixth edition,
2002
5. John Glasson et al: Introduction to Envornmental Impact Assessment, Routledge,
1998
6. Roger Perman et al: Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Prentice
Hall, 2003
7. Perace D.W.: Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment, Hawerter
Weatsbeup, 1990
8. Daniel J. Fiorino: Making Environmental Policy, University of California Press,
1995

55
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE (EHEA5E)

Department of Humanities
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. PhDr. Michal Lošťák, CSc. / Nigel Swain (UK)


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelors
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Philosophy, Sociology

Objective and general description:


The goals of this course are: Understanding politics as an imprescriptibly activity
substantially influencing everyday life. Knowledge of political system of pluralistic
democracy and understanding the mechanisms of practical politics. Accomplishment of
political refinement adequate for a citizen of a democratic society with a university
degree. Knowledge of interest bonds of rural area and agriculture and their
international relations will unable to understand current problems of agrarian policy.
Teaching methods: lectures on chosen themes, seminars with discussions and
analyses of particular problems.

Lectures:
1. Politics and political science. Introduction to the history of political thinking.
2. Political ideologies: liberalism and conservatism.
3. Political ideologies: socialism, new social movements.
4. Totalitarian political systems and ideologies.
5. Political system of representative democracy.
6. Function of elections in modern democracy. Electoral systems.
7. Political parties and movements, interest groups. Party systems.
8. Development of party system in CR.
9. Presidential and parliamentary model of division of power.
10. Parliament and legislative process.
11. Human and civil rights, social policy.
12. Farmers and rural area in political relations.
13. International policy, international institutions.
14. International status of CR. European integration process.

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management second year

Seminars:
1. Man and political power. Legitimacy and legality.
2. Morality and pragmatism in politics.
3. Hayek, Scruton – text analysis.
4. Marx, Hobsbawm – text analysis.
5. Fascism and communism.
6. Theory of democracy.
7. Comparison of electoral systems.
8. Political parties and party systems.
9. Political spectrum in CR.
10. Division and control of power in CR. Parliament and legislative process.
11. Human and civic rights in international documents.
12. UN, NATO, EU.
13. International policy of CR.
14. Final test.

Study literature:
1. Blackwellova encyklopedie politického myšlení. Ed. David Miller. CDK,
Proglas/Jota, Brno 1995.
2. Brokl, L. a kol.: Reprezentace zájmů v politickém systému České republiky.
SLON, Praha 1997.
3. Čermák - Fiala - Houbal: Pozvání do politologie. Vyšehrad, Praha 1994.
4. Čmejrek, Kubálek, Pátek: Politologie. Učební texty. PEF ČZU 1996.
5. Klíma, M.: Volby a politické strany v moderních demokraciích. Radix, Praha 1998.
6. Machiavelli, N.: Vladař. Ivo Železný, Praha 1995.
7. Montesquieu, Ch.: Duch zákonov. Tatran, Bratislava 1989.
8. Novák, M.: Systémy politických stran. SLON, Praha 1997.
9. Phillips, Shively W.: Power and Choice. McGraw - Hill 1995.
10. Weber, M.: Metodologie, sociologie a politika. OIKOMENH, Praha 1998.
11. Heywood A.: Politics 2nd ed Politics 2nd ed. Palgrave Macmillan 2002.
12. Heywood A.: Political Theory. An Introduction. Palgrave Macmillan 2004

57
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics
and Management

Programme syllabi – Third year

58
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

BUSINESS ECONOMICS (EEEE7E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Karel Tomšík, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelor
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Economic theories

Objective and general description:


The course is intended to explain basic theory of business economics and methods
used in analysing the position of firms in the market. The subject should prepare
students for further study of economic subjects in higher education degree. Basic
teaching forms are lectures, seminars, elaborating individual projects.

Lectures:
1. Introduction, Business Organization (Behaviour of firms, objectives of the firm,
Profits and Production)
2. Business Organization (location of business firms, legal forms, co-operation and
integration)
3. Demand Analysis and Consumer Behaviour (Factors, demand estimation, demand
function, elasticity of demand)
4. The production process (Business decisions and production, short- run, long-run
time horizon)
5. Cost theory (cost classification, short-run, long-run cost functions)
6. Risk and Uncertainty (utility theory and risk, decision making under uncertainty)
7. The economics of Time (concepts and principles, compounding, discounting,
annuities)
8. Theory of the Firm and Market structure (market structures, profit maximization
analysis)
9. Profits and Profitability Analysis (accounting, economic profit, breakeven, margin
of safety)
10. Basic accounting statements (balance sheet, income statement, measurement
problems in accounting statements
11. Financial planning (projected financial statements, methods)
12. Pricing decision (dimensions of pricing, pricing process, pricing techniques)
13. Government and Business (regulations, costs of regulations, adaptation by
business to regulation)
14. Starting up a business (general recapitulation of business economic approaches)

59
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

Seminars:
1. Business Organization - case study
2. Production - practical exercises
3. Cost in a business organization - practical exercises
4. Time value of financial flows - practical exercises
5. Profitability analysis - practical exercises
6. Financial Planning - practical exercises
7. Pricing decision - practical exercises

Study literature:
1. Tomšík, K.: Economics of Enterprises, 2005, electronic form
2. Samuelson, P.A.: Economics (Mc.Graw-Hill 1992)
3. Lucey, P., Costing, (DP Publications, 1996)
4. Tabarrok, A.: Entrepreneurial Economics (Oxford University Press, 2002)
5. Brigham, E., Ehrhardt, M.: Financial Management (Hardcover 2004)
6. Rutherford, D.: Routledge Dictionary of Economics (Routledge, London 2002)
7. Dictionary of Business (Penguin Reference, London 2002)
8. Dictionary of Economics (Penguin Reference, London 2003)
9. Peppers, L., Balis, D.: Managerial Economics, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs,
1987

60
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (EREE1E)

Department of Management
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Jiří Šindelář


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelor
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The aim of this course is to provide students with modern knowledge of natural
resources management specifics. Theoretical concepts and their managerial
consequences are explained at lectures, while seminars are aimed at the very
practical level of the subject – case studies, projects. The graduates of the course are
able to handle with different management systems operating with natural resources
either at company, regional and national level.

Lectures:
1. Introduction to the subject, basic concepts of utilization of natural resources
(theory of expansion, sustainable development), basic typology of natural
resources (renewable, nonrenewable)
2. Nonrenewable natural resources and their specifics (legal and regulatory
framework, technological limitations, specific characteristics and their
consequences form managerial point of view)
3. Renewable and alternative natural resources and their specifics (legal framework,
technological limitations, specific characteristics and their consequences form
managerial point of view)
4. Systematic focus on management of natural resources – micro systems
(company, regional level) and macro systems (national, global level) systems,
definitions and analysis of basic models and their consequences for management
5. Company and natural resources – operational and tactical level of natural
resources management and its specifics, process management and logistics of
natural resources
6. Strategic management and natural resources – typology of company´s goals in
the area of natural resources and in context of global business goals, strategic
management of natural resources, natural resources as a source of competitive
advantage
7. Adaptive management – transpositions of scientific findings into managerial
practice, innovations, forecasting and planning of natural resources on company
level
8. Management of natural resources in public sphere – typology of public goals in
the area of natural resources, regional, national and global level, planning, basics
of environmental and economic policies
9. Stakeholders analysis in the context of natural resources utilization and
stakeholders themselves (public, nonprofit, commercial)

61
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

10. Relations between public and private sphere, conflicts of goals – lobbying,
sponsoring, cross liabilities
11. Externalities and their managing instruments at company and public level
12. Main trends in the development of natural resources (utilizations and exploation),
globalization and its managerial consequences
13. Ethic dimension of management of natural resources, social and ecological
responsibility of a company, environmental accounting
14. Credit

Seminars:
1. Introduction, requirements for getting credit, panel discussion (global natural
resources, natural resource utilizations concepts etc.), assignment of the first
case study („best practices“)
2. Presentation and evaluation of elaboration of first case study, assignment of the
second case study („worst practices“)
3. Presentation and evaluation of elaboration of the second case study, assignment
of the term project (possible fields of study):

• Conducting a company´s natural resource management strategy


• Projection on natural resources management system in selected company
• Analysis of selected system of management of natural resources and
synthesis of recommendation for improvement

4. Presentation and evaluation of term project


5. Credit

Study literature:
1. Bromley, D.W. Handbook of Environmental Economics, Blackwell (1995). ISBN
1557866414
2. Hanley N., Shogren J.F., White B. Environmental Economics in Theory and
Practice, Macmillan (1997). ISBN 019521255X
3. Koontz, H., Weihrich, H. Management: A global perspective, McGraw-Hill (1992).
ISBN 0070691703
4. Sheriff, S. L. (foreword), Shenk, T. (ed.), Franklin, A. (ed.). Modeling in Natural
Resource Management: Development, Interpretation, and Application, Island
Press (2001). ISBN 1559637404
5. Strickland, A.J., Thompson, A. A. Cases in strategic management, McGraw-Hill
(1997). ISBN 0256241481

62
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

FINANCIAL ECONOMICS (ENE38E)

Department of Economic Theories


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: L. O. Dittrich, Ph.D., M.P.H


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelor
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Microeconomics, Macroeconomics, Management, Statistics

Objective and general description:


The course provides students with a conceptual understanding of the financial decision
making of the firm operating in the market environment under different economic
conditions.

Lectures:
1. Primary goals of the firm
2. The financial management function
3. Review of financial statement
4. Evaluation of firm performance
5. Time value of money I
6. Time value of money II
7. Bond valuation
8. Common stock valuation
9. Capital budgeting I
10. Capital budgeting II
11. Risk and return
12. Concept of leverage
13. Elements of portfolio theory
14. Market Efficiency and Financial Decisions

Seminars:
1. Primary goals of the firm
2. The financial management function
3. Review of financial statement
4. Evaluation of firm performance
5. Time value of money I
6. Time value of money II
7. Bond valuation
8. Common stock valuation
9. Capital budgeting I
10. Capital budgeting II
11. Risk and return
12. Concept of leverage
13. Elements of portfolio theory
14. Market Efficiency and Financial Decisions

63
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

Study literature:
1. A. Keown, J. Martin, William Petty, David Scott : Foundation of Finance, fifth
edition Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006
2. Fred Weston & Thomas Copeland, Managerial Finance, Addison Wesley Publishing
Company, 1983
3. Brealey R. A., Myers S. C.: Principles of Corporate Finance, Third edition,
McGraw-Hill, 1998

64
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

STANDARDS FOR THESIS WRITING AND PRESENTATION (XKZE07)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Bohuslava Boučková , CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelor
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The aim of the seminar is to support students in the bachelor thesis writing including
the language support. The theoretical part includes the basic methods of working with
literature and other resources, methods and tools of data processing and
presentation, structuring of a scientific thesis, its analysis and conclusion. The
practical part consists of the bachelor thesis presentation methods, state examination
procedure and important points including behaviour and language support. Students
will prepare and present at the seminars selected parts of their bachelor thesis, their
performance will be analysed and evaluated.

Lectures:
1. Bachelor thesis as stage of scientific work - introduction
2. Choice of the BT topic. Theoretical and practical basis
3. Ethics of research and scientific work
4. Basic scope, structure and time-table of the bachelor thesis preparation. Risks to
avoid
5. Literature resources: seeking, processing, quoting
6. The pros and cons of internet as a resource
7. English language as the tool of the BT I.: style, sentences, paragraphs
8. English language as the tool of the BT II.: abbreviations, ungrammatical English,
punctuation
9. The BT style: How to interest a reader. Tables, graphs, diagrams
10. Conclusions of the BT. Use of methods: SWOT analysis, synthesis
11. Conclusions of the BT. Use of methods: SWOT analysis, synthesis
12. Bachelor thesis presentation I.: Structure and techniques of presentation. .ppt
presentation
13. Bachelor thesis presentation II.: How to deal with opponents and critical
questions
14. State examination: its time table and procedure

65
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

Seminars:
1. Introduction to the course, setting tasks and time-table of presentations
2. Presenting selected chapter/part of student’s diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
performance
3. Presenting selected chapter/part of students diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
performance
4. Medium term evaluation: How far have you got with your BT, what are the main
problems to face and solve
5. Presenting selected chapter/part of students’ diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
performance
6. Presenting selected chapter/part of students’ diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
performance
7. Presenting selected chapter/part of students’ diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
performance

Study literature:
1. Guirdham, M., Tyler, K. :Enterprise skills for students.BH, Oxford, 1992
2. How to Organize your Thesis, by John W. Chinneck, N.Y.Press, 2003
3. How to Write Semester and Diploma Theses. www.tik.ee.ethz.ch
4. Guirdham, M., Tyler, K. :Enterprise skills for students.BH, Oxford, 1992

66
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY (EHEA4E)

Department of Humanities
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. PhDr. Michal Lošťák , Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Bachelor
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: general knowledge (history, economics)

Objective and general description:


In the introduction in sociology students gain information about sociology as a
particular science. They get to know basic sociological terms, practice sociological
imagination, and look for clues and rules of law. In the applied part student are
required to match specific social phenomena with the general sociological frame and
to work a different types of data. The goal of the course is to provide students with
basic information about sociology, the way of sociological thinking and its importance
for everyday life and professional career. The style of the course is based on lectures
and seminars, where are solved specific problems related to the particular issue.

Lectures:
1. Introduction in sociology
2. Establishing and development of sociology
3. Sociological terminology
4. Sociological terminology II.
5. Sociological terminology III.
6. Relationship of an individual and society
7. Social norms and deviation
8. Social institutions and organizations, social groups.
9. Social inequality and social stratification
10. Social inequality, race and ethnicity
11. Social inequality and regional inequality
12. Social action, freedom and society.
13. Social action, power and political action.
14. Social action, economic behavior

67
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

Seminars:
1. Introductory seminar – system of working in the seminar, introductory discussion
of sociology
2. Function of sociology in society.
3. Sociological thinking and sociological imagination
4. Theory and empirics in sociological work I.
5. Theory and empirics in sociological work II.
6. Society – nature – culture in traditional society
7. Society – nature – culture in modern society.
8. Society and an individual in traditional society.
9. Society and an individual in modern society
10. Society, institutions and organization in traditional society
11. Society, institutions and organization in modern society.
12. Social inequality and in traditional and modern society I
13. Social inequality and in traditional and modern society II
14. Social inequality and in traditional and modern society III

Study literature:
1. Bauman, Z. 1996. Myslet sociologicky. Praha
2. Berger, P.L. 1991. Pozvání do sociologie. Praha
3. Giddens, A. 1999. Sociologie. Praha
4. Petrusek, M. 1992. Sociologie. Praha.
5. Keller, J. 1992. Úvod do sociologie. Praha
6. Velký sociologický slovník I., II. 1996. Praha
7. Bauman, Z. 1996. Myslet sociologicky. Praha
8. Bauman, Z. 1999. Globalizace. (Důsledky pro člověka). Praha
9. Beneš, J. 1994. Člověk. Praha
10. Berger, P. L. 1991. Pozvání do sociologie. Praha
11. Bourdieu, P. 1979. La Distinction: critique sociale du jegement. Paris
12. Disman, M. 1993. Jak se vyrábí sociologická znalost. Praha
13. Giddens, A. 1999. Sociologie. Praha
14. Jandourek, J. 2004 Úvod do sociologie. Praha
15. Kabele, J. 1998. Přerody. Principy sociálního konstruování. Praha
16. Keller, J. 1992. Úvod do sociologie. Praha
17. Keller, J. 1995. Dvanáct omylů sociologie. Praha
18. Lawless, R. 1996. Co je kultura? Olomouc
19. Naisbitt, M. a kol. 1992. Sociologie. Praha
20. Petrusek, M. 1992. Sociologie. Praha
21. Velký sociologický slovník I., II. 1996. Praha

68
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (EEEE6E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Jiří Mach, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelor
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Micro- and Macroeconomics, Business Economics

Objective and general description:


The course emphasizes both individual and collaborative learning through the use of
individual and group work, and seeks to stimulate each student’s understanding of the
entire economic system for agricultural and food products from consumption back to
production and agricultural inputs. The students will have got the opportunity to
understand in detail the EU and Czech agri-food system - its participants,
characteristics, functions, interdependencies, and major marketing trends. They also
would understand of the role of trade policy in agriculture and the effects of various
trade policies, issues and agreements on domestic and international competition and
prices, consumption, production and trade of key commodities.

Lectures:
1. Definition and object of agrarian sector and agricultural economics. The role of
agriculture in the NE, specifics of agriculture
2. Trade agreements - GATT (WTO) – General system of preferences, EBA, CPA
3. European agricultural market, common market organisation and its implications
in the Czech agriculture, the political-legal environment
4. Liberalization vs. protectionism of agri-food markets
5. Vertical and horizontal integration in agri-food chains
6. Economics of cereal and oil-plants vertical
7. Sugar and starch
8. Other world traded crop plants
9. Milk production and processing
10. Beef , Pork and Poultry production. Mad cows, GMOs and the Biosafety protocol

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

Seminars:
1. Introduction, contents of the course. Rules and demands
2. Current demand and supply conditions in world agriculture
3. Cost levels of key commodities and comparison round the world. Analysis of
agricultural commodity prices
4. Major tendencies in crop production with applications to the food processing and
wholesaling industries
5. Major tendencies in crop production with applications to the food processing and
wholesaling industries
6. Major tendencies in livestock production with applications to the food processing
and wholesaling industries
7. Major tendencies in livestock production with applications to the food processing
and wholesaling industries
8. Effeciency of investments into agri-food chains
9. Semestral project presentation
10. Semestral project presentation

Study literature:
1. Colander, D.C.: Macroeconomics.Irwin International, 1995
2. Colander, D.C.: Microeconomics.Irwin International, 1995
3. Kay, R. D., Edwards, W. M.: Farm Management. McGraw-Hill, 1994. ISBN: 0-07-
113426-3
4. Norton, G. W., Alwang, J.: Introduction to Economics of Agricultural
Development. McGraw-Hill, 1993. ISBN: 0-07-047922-4
5. Brouwer, F., Straaten v. d. J.: Nature and Agriculture in the EU: New
Perspectives on Policies that Shape the European Countryside. Edward Elgar
Publishing, Cheltenham – Northampton, 2002. ISBN: 1-84064-235-1
6. Tisdell, C.: Economics and Ecology in Agriculture and Marine Production. Edward
Elgar Publishing, Cheltenham – Northampton, 2003. ISBN 1-84376-020-7
7. Perman, R.,Ma,Y.:Natural resources and environment economics.Longman,
London, 1996
8. Taylor, R. E., Bogart, R.: Scientific Farm Animal Production. Macmillan, New York,
1988. ISBN: 0-02-311750-8
9. Comp. auth.: The Farm Problem. The Freeman Library, The Foundantion for
Economic Education, New York, 1986.
10. Comp. auth.: Tomorrow’s Agriculture: Incentives, Institutions, Infractructure and
Innovations; proceedings of the 24th Internat. Conference of Agric. Economists
held at Berlin in 2000. Ashgate, 2001. ISBN: 0-7546-2167-7
11. Brosig, S., Hartmann, M.: Analysis of Food Consumption in Central and Eastern
Europe: Relevance and Empirical Methods. IAMO, Wissenschaftsverlag Vauk Kiel,
2001. ISBN: 3-8175-0349-0

70
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

FUNDAMENTALS OF MARKETING (ERED9E)

Department of Management
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Richard Selby


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelor
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: English for academic purposes or English for business
purposes; Fundamentals of management

Objective and general description:


The primary objective of this subject is to introduce participants to the theory and
practice of relationship marketing. The secondary objectives are to understand the
importance of Customer Care and Quality. These objectives will be achieved by
lectures and seminars, during which the participants will work in small groups to
produce a reasoned and original marketing plan for a product agreed between
themselves and the lecturer.

Lectures:
1. Concept of marketing versus sales; concept of a market; relationships; marketing
process
2. Enhanced STEP analysis, the 7-level marketing mix; value chain
3. Segmentation
4. SWOT analysis, and its application in marketing
5. Marketing research; methods and techniques
6. Product life-cycle; marketing cycle marketing objectives
7. Marketing plan
8. Customer communication; advertising
9. Buyer behaviour; decision making unit
10. Customer care; quality
11. Ethical issues in marketing
12. Presenting the marketing plan

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

Seminars:
1. Consideration and discussion of the marketing process
2. STEP analysis for a fictitious company. Consideration of the components of a
comprehensive Marketing mix
3. Segmentation exercise
4. SWOT analysis for the company
5. Marketing research exercise
6. Managing the Product life cycle
7. Produce a marketing plan (I)
8. Advertising/promotion in context of the marketing plan (II)
9. Production of the marketing plan (III)
10. Quality and Customer care in the context of the marketing plan (IV)
11. Final preparation of marketing plan (V)

Study literature:
1. Kotler, P. Kotler on marketing. Free Press (Simon & Schuster UK Ltd) 255p.
2. Kotler, P. A framework for marketing management. Prentice Hall 352p.

72
Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

FUNDAMENTALS OF PSYCHOLOGY (EPE03E)

Department of Psychology
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Mgr. Hana Chýlová


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Bachelor
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: basic elements of psychology

Objective and general description:


The course provides students with the knowledge of basic psychological terms, laws
and theories, with the focus mainly on cognitive and social psychology,
communication, motivation and personality. Students practise their knowledge in
seminars, where the skills for their future social roles and positions are developed
through active social learning methods. Psychology, as a basic subject, is a
prerequisite for the study of other specialised subject such as, for example,
management marketing and commerce. It helps to understand factors influencing
personality development in society, contributes to self-knowledge and broadens
education in humanities.

Lectures:
1. Basic disciplines of psychology
2. Schools of psychology
3. Psychological methodology
4. Biological preconditions for personality in phylogenesis and ontogenesis
5. Psychological dimensions of the development
6. Psychological processes
7. Abilities (creativity, intelligence)
8. Temperament and character
9. Motivation
10. Stress
11. Social cognition
12. Social communication
13. Social behaviour
14. Assertivity

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Bachelor in Agricultural Economics and Management third year

Seminars:
1. Interview
2. Self-perception
3. Self-concept, future plans
4. Intelligence test
5. Training of individual creativity
6. Brainstorming
7. Bodily constitutions and quick assessment of temperaments
8. Needs and values and their solutions
9. Self-regulation and coping with stress
10. Social roles and adult personality
11. Social interaction, dominant and submissive behavioural patterns
12. Transactional analysis
13. Assertive behaviour (principles, techniques)
14. Social communication training

Study literature:
1. GROSS, RICHARD: Psychology: the science of mind and behaviour. London:
Hodder Arnold, 2005. ISBN: 0340900989
2. HAYES, NICKY: Foundations of Psychology: An Introductory text. London:
Thomson Learning, 2000. ISBN: 1861525893
3. GLEITMAN, HENRY, JONIDES, HOHM: Basic Psychology. New York:W W Norton,
2000. ISBN: 0393949877
4. SMITH, EDWARD, NOLEN-HOEKSEMA, SUSAN, FREDRICKSON, BARBARA.
Atkinson and Hilgard's Introduction to Psychology. London: Thomson Learning,
2002. ISBN: 0155050699
5. HAYES, NICKY: Principles of Social Psychology. U.S.: L. Erlbaum, 1993. ISBN:
0863772595

74
Master in Economics and Management

Programme syllabi

75
Master EM PROGRAMME SYLLABI
FIRST YEAR
AUTUMN SEMESTER

EEE63E Economics of Industries (Sectoral Econ.) p. 78


ERE19E Management p. 80
ENE24E Corporate Finance p. 82
EEE49E Econometric Modelling p. 83
EHE65E Methods of Social Research p. 85
ETE43E Computer Science p. 87

SPRING SEMESTER

EEEB1E Economic Policies p. 88


ERE25E Human Resources Management p. 90
ENE33E World and European Economy p. 92
ETE44E IT for E-business p. 93
EHEA2E Rural Development p. 94
EUE01E Accounting p. 97
EAE24E Decision Support Systems p. 99
EEE68E Environmental Economics p. 101
ELX57E English for Academic Purposes p. 103
ELX55E English for Business Purposes p. 104

SECOND YEAR
AUTUMN SEMESTER

ENE26E General Economics (International Econ.) p. 106


EREB2E Marketing p. 108
EEEE1E EU Integration p. 110
EIE18Z Management Information Systems p. 111
EPE16E Psychology of Organisation and Behaviour at Work p. 113
EEEE2E Trade Theory and Foreign Trade p. 115
ESE23E Statistical Seminar p. 117
ERE32E Co-operative Business p. 119
EEEB4E Diploma Thesis Seminar p. 121

SPRING SEMESTER

EEE46E Economics of Enterprises p. 123


EREB4E Strategic Management p. 125
EJE21E Introduction to the Modern Law of European Union p. 127
ETE45E Computer Security p. 128
ERE27E Business Strategy p. 130
ENE34E International Finance p. 132
EEEE3E Quantitative Methods in Macroeconomics p. 133
EEEE4E Social Economy p. 135

76
Master in Economics and Management

Programme syllabi – First year

77
Master in Economics and Management first year

ECONOMICS OF INDUSTRIES (SECTORAL ECONOMICS) (EEE63E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Bohuslava Boučková, CSc


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: General micro/macro economics

Objective and general description:


The course aims at acquiring basic knowledge of economic categories, production
factors and their evaluation, indicators of economic performance and efficiency on the
sector level. Economic position and problems of the sector are characterised,
systemised and interrelated on the basis of different economic theories and
viewpoints. Seminars are based on economic games and essay presentation. Students
prepare and present group essays on the selected segment of the given sector.

Lectures:
1. What is economics? Basic types, levels. Positions of sectoral economics.
2. Production factors in general. Factor Mobility.
3. Production factor capital. Fixed capital consumption.
4. Production factor labour. Specifics of labour market.
5. Income disparity: definition, types, explanations.
6. Production factor land. Specifics of land market.
7. Indicators of economic performance. GDP: methods of computation, criticism,
alternative indicators.
8. Costs as an economic category. Cost categories, cost calculation.
9. Economic efficiency indicators: productivity, profitability, intensity.
10. Regional and structural economics. Definition and evaluation of region.
11. Globalisation and its economic impacts. New economy.
12. Sustainable development: definition, limits. The role of selected sectors in SD.
13. Environemntal economics. Environmental evaluation.
14. Specific types of economics, their implications on sectoral economics. Social
economics, Feminist/gender economics.

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Master in Economics and Management first year

Study literature:
6. Colander, D.C.: Macroeconomics. Irwin International, 1995
7. Carn, N.: Real Estate Market Analysis. Prentice Hall, 1998.
8. Samuelson, P., Nordhaus, W.: Economics. McGraw Hill, 1992
9. Perman, R. Ma, Y.: Natural Resources and Environmental Economics. Longman,
1996.
10.Vanek, J.: Crisis and Reform: East and West. Essays in Social Economy. Cornell
University Press, 1989.

79
Master in Economics and Management first year

MANAGEMENT (ERE19E)

Department of Management
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Richard Selby


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Cybernetics in Management, Mathematical Methods in Eco

Objective and general description:


Self-managed teams of students work on projects aimed at proposal of business plan
using various methods including PC tools (business plan software).

Lectures:
1. Evolution of management thinking and theories.
2. Strategic management: Diversity, Culture, Change, Structure, Planning.
3. Managers and Management.
4. Hierarchies and teams.
5. Managing People: Individuals and Groups.
6. Business Processes: Operations Management.
7. Communication, Documentation, and Feedback.
8. Managing Finance: Control of finance within a business.
9. Managing Finance: External Obligations and Analysis.
10. Managing Projects (1: project management theory).
11. Managing Projects (2: project scheduling and analysis).
12. Managing Marketing and Customer Care.
13. Managing Quality Management Systems (ISO 9000/2000).
14. Managing Health and Safety.

Seminars:
8. Applied management theories
9. Strategy and Operations Identification. Mission Statements
10. What makes an outstanding manager?
11. Management hierarchies - case studies
12. Management Game: Making teams work
13. Small Group Project Assignment: Business processes
14. Management Game: Business simulation - strategy
15. Management Game: Business simulation - management decisions
16. Management Game: Business simulation - responding to stress
17. Management Game: Business simulation - group presentations
18. Project scheduling
19. Excellence in Customer Service
20. Quality: ISO9000-series documentation
21. Health and Safety case studies

80
Master in Economics and Management first year

Study literature:
1. McShane, S.,Von Glinow, M.A.: Organizational Behaviour. McGraw Hill Education,
2000
2. Keuning, D.: Management, A Contemporary Aproach. FT Prentice Hall, 1997
3. Koonz, H., Wheirich, H.: Management. McGraw Hill 1976 - 11 editions
4. ISO 9000/2000: Quality Management Systems
5. Ivancevich J.M. et al.: Management Quality and Competitiveness. McGraw
Hill/Irwin, 1996
6. Library of dissertation theses at http://www.tady.cz/rizeni/strana2.htm

81
Master in Economics and Management first year

CORPORATE FINANCE (ENE24E)

Department of Management
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: L. O. Dittrich, Ph.D., M.P.H


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Macroeconomics, Microecoomics, Managment, Statistics

Objective and general description:


The purpose of the course is to introduce students to fundamentals of corporate
finance, with special emphasis on financial decisions within the firm. The course
covers among others topics such as: Objective of the firm; Time value of money;
Financial statements and Ratio analysis; Capital budgeting decisions; Financial
forecasting; Portfolio theory; etc. The course is organized in lectures and seminars
with the emphasis on the students work out of classes.

Lectures:
1. The Time Value of Money
2. Capital Budgeting Techniques
3. How the Market Determines Discount Rates
4. Financial Ration Analysis
5. Financial Ratio Analysis
6. Working Capital Policy
7. Cash and Marketable Securities Management
8. Management of short term assets
9. Management of short term liabilities
10. Short-Term Financing
11. Portfolio Theory
12. Risk and Return
13. Options on Risky Assets
14. Market Efficiency and Financial Decisions

Study literature:
1. Fred Weston & Thomas Copeland, Managerial Finance, Addison Wesley Publishing
Company, 1983
2. Brealey R.A., Myers S.C.: Principles of Corporate Finance, Third edition, McGraw-
Hill, 1998
3. Arnold G.: Corporate Financial Managemet, Financial Times Pitman Publishing,
1998
4. Lumby S. and Jones Ch.: Investment Appraisal and Financial Decisions, Sixth
edition, Thomson Learning, 1999
5. Helfert I.A.: Techniques of Financial Analysis. A Modern Approach. Irwin McGraw-
Hill, 1997

82
Master in Economics and Management first year

ECONOMETRIC MODELLING (EEE49E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Lukáš Čechura, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Micro- and Macroeconomics

Objective and general description:


The course is organised through lectures and calculation practicals with economic
interpretation of results. In order to pass the course it is essential to participate
actively at practicals, submit course project, and be successful at examination. During
the lectures, the main problems are explained and during the exercises, outlined
principles and methods are verified and studied in depth by solving specific problems
determined for each of practicals. During second half of semester students work on
their course projects which are evaluated by practicals teacher. This assessment is
involved into final grade during passing of examination. Forms of teaching are based
on lectures and seminars with use of PC classrooms. The course aims to give students
knowledge of econometric modelling which is in countries with developed market
mechanism a non-substitutable tool of quantitative analysis of national economy
development, its industries and enterprises for determination of an optimal strategy of
development of enterprises, agrifood sector and economy as a whole. Teaching forms
are based on lectures and seminars, an use of computer technology is supposed. The
content of the subject is a specification of econometric models, explanation of the
basic methods, derivation of structural parameters, econometric analysis of demand
and supply and they mutual interaction, econometric analysis of production and costs.
There are explained complex econometric models for industry and macroeconomic
modelling. In the following part there are demonstrated open principles of prognostic
use of econometric models on the both macroeconomic and enterprise level and types
of simulation calculations for economical choice optimization.

Lectures:
1. Construction of econometric models. Specification of variables and structural
parameters. Models typology
2. Methods of structural parameters estimation. OLS. Limited and full information
methods.
3. conometric analysis of supply and demand. Determination of supply and demand
elasticities.
4. One-equation demand models. Classical single product models. Aggregated
demand models.
5. Simultaneous demand models. Single products models. Aggregated demand
models.
6. Econometric production analysis. Deriving of production functions. Aggregated
production function.
7. Econometric analysis of production factors. Deriving of isoquants functions.

83
Master in Economics and Management first year

8. Econometric analysis of relations among industries. Deriving of izofactor function.


9. Econometric analysis of costs. Deriving of cost functions.
10. Derivation of one-equation supply models. Specification of supply function,
specification from cost function.
11. Econometric analysis of market equilibrium. Cobweb model.
12. Complex econometric models. Structure of comprehensive econometric models.
13. Financial econometric models. The concept of financial models.
14. Industries econometric models. Agrifood sector models. Econometric prognosis.

Seminars:
1. Repeating of basic terms of vector and matrix count. Repeating of bases of
regression and correlation analysis.
2. Condition of econometric model construction.
3. Model of identification and its transmission into structural form generally.
4. Estimation of EM parametres with use of method of variance ration minimisation.
5. Estimation of EM parametres with two-stage least square method.
6. Testing of significance of structural parametres model and tightness of chosen
function dependence.
7. Derivation of one-equation product demand function and its economic
interpretation.
8. Creation and calculation of nonlinear consumption functions.
9. Simultaneous models, relation between its structural and reduced form.
10. Creation of demand functions.
11. Construction of production functions.
12. Two-factor production function.
13. Relation between production factors.
14. Relation between production and branches.

Study literature:
1. Judge, G. and others: The Theory and Practice of Econometrics, Wiley, New York
1991
2. Tvrdoň, J.: Econometric Modelling, CUA Prague, 2003
3. Tvrdoň, J., Peterová, J., Hálová, P.: Exercises in Econometrics, 2003
4. Ramanathan, R.: Introductory econometrics, The Dryden Press 1995, ISBN 0-03-
094922X
5. Griffiths and others: Learning and Practicing Econometrics, Wiley, New York 1993
6. Hušek, R.: Ekonometrie, VŠE Praha 1992
7. Hušek, R.: Econometrická analýza, VŠE Prague 1999

84
Master in Economics and Management first year

METHODS OF SOCIAL RESEARCH (EHE65E)

Department of Humanities
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Lukáš Zagata


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The goal of this course is to introduce the students to basic techniques of quantitative
and qualitative research in social sciences. During the seminars, individual techniques
will be practiced, further to topics of previous lectures. The students who have gone
through this course should be able to choose appropriate approaches in research of
particular problems and to interpret acquired data. This course leads to independent
use of basic methods and techniques of social sciences research. The students will
learn classical and alternative techniques of data collection as well as different ways of
work with data, interpretation and use for practical purposes.

Lectures:
1. What is scientific research; comparison of natural and social sciences;
opportunities and limits of social sciences research.
2. Quantitative and qualitative research in social sciences, the main differences.
3. Quantitative research: identification of research problem, formulation of
hypotheses, operationalization of variables.
4. Ways of choice, insurance of representativity during sample determination,
mistakes of choice.
5. Procedure of field data collection, coding and preparation for analysis, statistic
data processing and interpretation.
6. Observation, types and ways of observation.
7. Questioning methods, the difference between a questionaire and interview.
8. Questionaire construction, structure and formulation of questions.
9. Examination methods and document study.
10. Qualitative research: its specifications and opportunities.
11. Procedure of qualitative research and the method of involved examination.
12. Interview: the way of leading a dialogue, taking record, writing field notes and
interpretations, data transcription.
13. Group interview.
14. Qualitative data analysis, open, axial and selective coding, creating own theory.

Seminars:
1. Introductional discussion on sociology
2. Purpose of sociology in society – identification of research problem. Ethics of
research in social sciences.
3. Quantitative and qualitative research in social sciences, the main differences.
4. Quantitative research, hypotheses formulation, general and work hypotheses,
operationalization of variables.

85
Master in Economics and Management first year

5. Choice of sample, difference between samples of qualitative and quantitative


approach, mistakes in choice.
6. Preparation of field examination in quantitative research, data collection and their
preparation for processing.
7. Preparation of qualitative examination project – comparison and explanation of
methodological differences.
8. Triangulation of techniques and possible combinations of techniques.
9. Examination and interview and their use in qualitative and quantitative research.
10. Interview and group interview, its pros and cons.
11. Construction of a questionaire and possibilities of its use.
12. Document study and types of documents, work with documents.
13. Sociometry and quasisociometry.
14. Closing review and ways of data presentation.

Study literature:
1. Babbie, E.: The practice of social research. Wadsworth Publishing Company,
London, England, 1995, str. 104
2. Becker, H. S.: Writing for social scientists: How to start and finish your thesis,
book, or article. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1986
3. Berg, B. L.: Qualitative research methods for the social sciences. Allyn & Bacon,
Boston, 1989
4. Brewer, J., Hunter, A.: Multimethod research: A synthesis of styles. Sage,
Newbury Park, CA, 1989
5. Bruyn, M. J. M.: Validity and the problem of reality: An issue of trust. IN Rothe,
J. P.: Qualitative research. A practical guide. RCI/PDE Publications, Heidelberg,
Ontario (Canada)
6. Bruyn, M. J. M.: Validity and the problem of reality: An issue of trust. IN Rothe,
J. P.: Qualitative research. A practical guide. RCI/PDE Publications, Heidelberg,
Ontario (Canada)
7. Corbin, J., Strauss, A.: Grounded theory method: Procedures, canons, and
evaluative criteria. Qualitative Sociology, 13, str. 3-21, 1990
8. Denzin, N. K., Lincoln, Y. S.: Handbook of qualitative research. Sage, Thousand
Oaks, CA, 1994
9. Denzin, N. K.: Sociological methods: A sourcebook. McGraw-Hill Book Company,
New York, 1978
10. Guba, E. G.: The paradigm dialog. Sage, Newbury Park, CA, 1990
11. Guy, R. F., Edgley, C. E., Arafat, I., Allen, D. E.: Social research methods. Allyn
and Bacon, Boston, 1987
12. Hammersley, M.: Reading ethnographic research: A critical Guide. Longman,
London, 1990
13. Huberman, A. M., Miles, M. B.: Data management and analysis methods. IN
Denzin, N. K., Lincoln, X. S.: Handbook of qualitative Research. Sage, Thousand
Oaks, CA. 1994
14. Kurzman, C.: Convincing sociologists: Values and interests in the sociology of
knowledge. IN Miles, M. B., Huberman, A. M.: Qualitative data analysis: An
expanded sourcebook.
15. Leedy, P. D.: Practical research: Planning and Design (5. vydání). Macmillan,
New York, 1993
16. Babbie, E.: The practice of social research. Wadsworth Publishing Company,
London, England, 1995, str. 104
17. Bruyn, M. J. M.: Validity and the problem of reality: An issue of trust. IN Rothe,
J. P.: Qualitative research. A practical guide. RCI/PDE Publications, Heidelberg,
Ontario (Canada)

86
Master in Economics and Management first year

COMPUTER SCIENCE (ETE43E)

Department of Information Technologies


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Zdeněk Havlíček, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The aim of the subject is to provide the students with the basic information on the
development and usage of new ICT. The basic form of teaching is lectures, seminars
in computer laboratory and independent work with PC. Students create their own
individual essays as well as group essays.

Lectures:
1. Introduction into the course unit - Data-Information-Knowledge
2. Development of ICT - Hardware
3. Markup Languages
4. DHTML - DOM, DHTML - Cascading Style Sheets
5. DHTML - Cascading Style Sheets, Java Script
6. Computer Graphics
7. Multimedia and Flash Technology
8. Web Design
9. Architectures of IS
10. Development of ICT - Software
11. Modelling on the real world
12. Advanced Internet Technologies
13. E-commerce, E-business
14. Information Society, eEurope Action Plan

Study literature:
1. Cats-Barill, W. T., R.: Information technology for managers. IRWIN 1997.
2. Havlíček, Z. et all.: Internet Technology. PEF ČZU 2005.
3. Slides on http://kit.pef.czu.cz/msc.php
4. Bergmen, T.P.: The Essentials Guide to Web Strategy for Entrepreneurs. Prentice
Hall 2002. ISBN 0-13-062111-0
5. Niederst, J.: Web design in a nutshell. O'Reilly 2002. ISBN 0-596-00196-7
6. Zeldman, J.: Designing with Web Standards. New Riders Publishing Publication
2003.
7. Timothy J. O'Leary: Computing Essentials 2005 Intro Edition w/Student CD, 12th
Edition. ISBN 0072256478
8. Musciano Ch., Kennedy, B.: HTML, XHTML. O'Reilly 2000, ISBN 0-596-00382-X
9. Amor, D.: The Ebusiness Revolution, Prentice Hall PTR 2000 ISBN 0-13-085123-X
10. Daconta, M.C., Obrst, L.J., Smith K.T.: The Semantic Web. Willey Publishing, Inc.
2003; ISBN 0072836075

87
Master in Economics and Management first year

ECONOMIC POLICIES (EEEB1E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Bohuslava Boučková , CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: general economics, sectoral economics, English language

Objective and general description:


Introduction into the basic types of economic policies. Included are: policies regarding
production factors, trade policies, environmental policies, regional and structural
policies, food and nutrition policy. A short insight into the development of Czech agrar
policy as an example of economic policy development is included. Tackled is also the
topic of social and economic policies regarding gender and family. Lectures are
combined with seminar discussions, using .ppt techniques and Internet, economic
games, team case study preparation and presentation.

Lectures:
1. Basic types, goals, time and space levels of economic policies.
2. Economic policies with regard to production factors in general.
3. Economic policies with regard to production factor capital.
4. Economic policies with regard to production factor labour. Income redistribution
and its tools.
5. Economic policies with regard to production factor land. Agricultural land
protection.
6. Market regulation tools.Competitiveness, its forms and measuring.
7. Trade policies. Trade liberalisation and protectionism.
8. Regional and structural policies.
9. Food and nutrition policy.Food consumption measuring.
10. Field trip: Impact of economic policies on Czech agriculture, countryside and food
industry.
11. Economic transformation policies and tools.
12. Economic and social policies regarding gender and family: gender
mainstreaming, gender budgeting, equal opportunities.
13. Environmental policies on international level.
14. Environmental policies on national level.

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Master in Economics and Management first year

Seminars:
1. Rules, demands, literature of the course. Setting groups and topics for essays.
2. Economic policy actors:Who are they? Searching on internet and drawing a
diagram.
3. Essay drafts evaluation. Income re-distribution: possibilities in theory, impacts in
practice.
4. Tradable pollution permits: practical possibilities on the international and CR
level.
5. Field trip:SWOT analysis of the Czech agrarian policy impacts in practice.
6. Essay presentation and evaluation I.
7. Essay presentation and evaluation II.

Study literature:
1. Svatoš, M. et al.: Economics of Czech and Slovak Agriculture in Integration with
the EU. ČZU, Prague, 1999
2. Overview of Agricultural Policies. Czech Republic. OECD, 1995
3. Gorter, H., Swinnen, J.F.: The economic polity of farm policy. JAE,45/1993,
pp.312-326
4. Josling,T.E.: Agricultural policies in developed countries. JFE 5/1996
5. Perman, R., Ma.J., McGilvray,J. : Natural resources and environmental
economics. Longman, London, 1996
6. Kraus,J. et al.: Prerequisites of the Czech agriculture from the standpoint of
accession of the Czech Republic into the EU. VÚZE Praha, 1997
7. Agricultural economics (Zemědělská ekonomika) Journal 2000-2004 ( selected
contributions in English )
8. Baldwin, R. et al.:Economic Policies. Blackwell, 2003
9. Perman, R., Ma.J., McGilvray,J. : Natural Resources and Environmental
Economics. Longman, London, 1996
10. Gorter, H., Swinnen, J.F.: The Economic Policy of Farm Policy. JAE,45/1993,
pp.312-326
11. Brux,J.M.,Cowe, J.L.: Economic Issues and Policy.Rutledge, 2003

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Master in Economics and Management first year

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT (ERE25E)

Department of Management
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Dr. Joan Harvey (UK)


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Management Theory, Basic of Legal Discipline, Personality
Psychology and Communication

Objective and general description:


To deepen knowledge of personnel management and personnel activities of a
manager. To obtain deeper knowledge on work relationships within an organization as
well as on the system of social activities in an organization. To deepen skills in areas
like recruitment, adaptation, appraisal of employees and work performance
motivation. The basic forms of teaching include lectures and seminars oriented on
practicing some of the skills as well as on cultivating opinions during case studies
resolution. A project on selected personnel management activity in a particular
organization forms both a part of the seminars and a prerequisite for obtaining the
credit.

Lectures:
1. Conceptions and objectives of human resource management (HRM).
2. Labour market.
3. Work potential, job position, job task, human in a work process, workplace.
4. Work analysis, work conditions.
5. Recruitment, selection and placement of employees, managing of adaptation
processes.
6. Work behaviour motivation, rewarding employees, social policy.
7. Evaluation of employees, education of employees.
8. Labour mobility management, professional career.
9. Subjects of HRM, HRM department, HRM information system.
10. Managers and HRM, ethics in human resource management.
11. Interpersonal relationships between employees, processes of participation and
identification, business climate.
12. Relationship between employer and trade unions, collective negotiations.
13. Human resource management planning.
14. HRM advisory and HRM research, HRM perspectives.

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Master in Economics and Management first year

Seminars:
1. Content of the subject – study requirements. Assignment of papers. Assignment
of projects. Self-assessment.
2. Paper no.1. Recruitment of employees – ways and forms of recruitment.
Preparation of the way of self-presentation.
3. Paper no.2. Self-presentation of the job position applicant. Model business and
model job position – assignment.
4. Model business and model job position (collective task) – fieldwork – obtaining
basic information, processing.
5. Presentation of model business and model job position. Business selection.
Preparation of job interview.
6. Paper no.3. Preparation of job interview: selection board, applicants.
7. Paper no.4. Selection process simulation, applicants’ comparison, adaptation
plan.
8. Individual project preparation – fieldwork.
9. Workplace adaptation: materials for new ingoing employee, adaptation plan.
10. Paper no.5. Motivating of work behaviour: motivational focus, creation of
motivational climate, stimulation.
11. Paper no.6. Evaluation of employees: methods of employee evaluation,
evaluation of a colleague or other person.
12. Paper no.7. Work career: self-knowledge, type of career choice. Submission of
written project.
13. Project presentation.
14. Project presentation. Credit.

Study literature:
1. Hofstede, G (2005) Cultures and Organizations. New York: McGraw Hill
Psychology . 4th Ed.
2. Psychology . 4th Ed. Harlow, Essex: Pearson
3. Mullins LJ (2002) Management and Organizational Behaviour. 5th Ed. London:
Pitman
4. Gordon, JR (2001) Organizational Behaviour. New Jersey: Prentice Hall
5. Sims D, Fineman S and Gabriel Y (1993) Organizing and Organizations. London:
Sage
6. Cohen AR and Fink SL (2001) Effective Behaviour in Organizations. New York:
McGraw Hill
7. Rosenfeld P, Giacalone RA and Riordan CA (1995) Impression Management.
London: Routledge
8. Buchanan D and Huczinski A (2004) Organizational Behaviour: An introductory
text. New York: Prentice Hall
9. Hofstede, G (2005) Cultures and Organizations. New York: McGraw Hill

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Master in Economics and Management first year

WORLD AND EUROPEAN ECONOMY (ENE33E)

Department of Economics
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: L. O. Dittrich, Ph.D., M.P.H


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Courses in Macroeconomics and Microeconomics

Objective and general description:


Course covers basic trade models, trade policies, trade/ currency unions, foreign
exchange markets and role of trade in economic growth. The goal of this course is to
acquaint students with the main theories of the world trade and finance and practical
issues and problems confronting today world global economy.

Lectures:
1. An overview of the world economy.
2. Why countries trade.
3. Factor endowments and the commodity composition of trade.
4. Intra-industry trade.
5. Tariffs
6. Non-tariff distortion to trade.
7. Regional economic arrangements.
8. International trade and economic growth.
9. National income accounting and the balance of payments.
10. International transactions and financial markets.
11. Exchange rates and their determination.
12. Fixed exchange rates and currency unions.
13. International monetary arrangements.
14. Capital flows and developing countries.

Seminars:
1. Presentation of the contents and the aims of the course. Information on the
conditions of crediting and exams. Assignment of the topics for students´ essays.
2. Factor endowments and the commodity composition of trade.
3. Tariffs and Non-tariff distortion to trade.
4. Regional economic arrangements.
5. International transactions and financial markets.
6. Fixed exchange rates and currency unions.
7. International monetary arrangements.

Study literature:
1. W.Ch. Sawyer, R.L. Sprinkle.: International Economics (second edition), Prentice
Hall, USA, 2006, ISBN 0-13-170416-8.
2. The Economicst Journal, EBSCO Host database

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Master in Economics and Management first year

IT FOR E-BUSINESS (ETE44E)

Department of Information Technologies


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Zdeněk Havlíček, CSc. / Paulo Rita (PTG)


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: English, B.Sc. studies

Objective and general description:


The basic form of teaching are lectures, controlled seminars in computer laboratory
and independent work with PCs. Students create individual essays and group web site
projects. The project report is presented and discussed in the class in the presence of
a committee.

Lectures:
1. Introduction into the course unit. Data, Information, Knowledge.
2. Development of ICT, The Architecture C/S.
3. Markup languages: HTML, XML, XHTML.
4. Internet Infrastructure. The Web Environement, Portals, Searching in the
Internet.
5. Computer Graphics
6. Internet Technologies Client side.
7. Internet Technologies Server side.
8. Web Design.
9. Architectures of IS.
10. Modelling of the real world.
11. Database Systems.
12. Web services.
13. E-commerce
14. Information Society, eEurope Action Plan

Study literature:
1. Cats-Barill, W. T., R.: Information technology for managers. IRWIN 1997.
2. Havlíček, Z. et all.: Internet Technology. PEF ČZU 2005.
3. Slides on http://kit.pef.czu.cz/msc.php
4. Bergmen, T.P.: The Essentials Guide to Web Strategy for Entrepreneurs. Prentice
Hall 2002. ISBN 0-13-062111-0
5. Niederst, J.: Web design in a nutshell. O'Reilly 2002. ISBN 0-596-00196-7
6. Zeldman, J.: Designing with Web Standards. New Riders Publishing Publication
2003.
7. Timothy J. O'Leary: Computing Essentials 2005 Intro Edition w/Student CD, 12th
Edition. ISBN 0072256478
8. Musciano Ch., Kennedy, B.: HTML, XHTML. O'Reilly 2000, ISBN 0-596-00382-X
9. Amor, D.: The Ebusiness Revolution, Prentice Hall PTR 2000 ISBN 0-13-085123-X

93
Master in Economics and Management first year

RURAL DEVELOPMENT (EHEA2E)

Department of Humanities
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. PhDr. Michal Lošťák, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: economics, methods of social reserach

Objective and general description:


The objective of the course unit is to educate the experts for rural development. They
should be skilled to apply theoretical knowledge provided by social sciences (mostly
economics and sociology) in concrete strategies and projects of rural development in
order to make this development sustainable (economically profitable, environmentally
friendly and socially acceptable). That is why the course unit aims at understanding
the role of people in this development (for who the development is implemented and
who is involved in its implementation). It also promotes the skills to use human and
social capital in rural development. Framed into the concept of integrated endogenous
rural development, the students acquire the knowledge and the skills about the
possible solutions of unacceptable rural-urban inequalities. These solutions are applied
both in EU and in the Czech Republic. The course unit is realized in lectures and
seminars. While the lectures are of theoretical background, the seminars are of
practical nature and require active participation of students based on materials they
learned during their out-of-class preparation. The multimedia tools and examples of
actual problems of rural development (as they were found by department members
during their research) are exploited for the seminars. The course unit starts from
outlining the frames of rural development form the point of view of social sciences. It
refers to the issues of ordering the rural space (the countryside in the space) and the
issues of the change in the countryside, incl. its development (the countryside in
time). Also the theoretical backgrounds of social sciences are explained. Students are
educated to apply these backgrounds in the practice of rural development (during
seminars), especially as for the use and support of human and social capital. The core
issue addressed is the questions of rural-urban inequalities and inequalities among
various rural regions. That is why the reasons of inequalities are explained and
different ways of their solutions are presented. To achieve this goal, the model of
integrated endogenous development is used as the base of modernization strategy,
which also aims at supporting rural specificities and maintaining its original character.
The economic, environmental, political, social and cultural dimensions of this model
are explained. The course unit also addresses the issue of multifunctional agriculture
as one of the crucial elements of contemporary rural development. The course unit is
based on concrete principles and content of regional policy and common agricultural
policy (incl. rural development) in EU and in the Czech Republic.

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Master in Economics and Management first year

Lectures:
1. Social sciences and their role in rural development.
2. The countryside as the space (the ways of defining countryside; classifications
and types of rural areas, LFA).
3. The countryside and time. Social change. Modernization, innovation.
Development, growth, stagnation, decline.
4. Processes shaping the countryside: urbanization and the question of
collectivisation.
5. Sociological, anthropological and geographical backgrounds of rural development.
6. Economic background of rural development (projection of economic theories into
rural development).
7. Rural development (sustainable rural development as its modernization and
maintenance, duality of structuration).
8. Rural development and globalization (globalization and its impacts on rural
communities).
9. Concepts of rural-urban relations and their projections into practical issues of
rural development.
10. Rural development as moderating rural-urban inequalities. Inequality as social
problem, Problem and institutions.
11. Social and cultural dimensions of rural development (social structures, social and
human capital, civic engagement).
12. Exogenous model of rural development.
13. Model of integrated endogenous rural development.
14. Rural development in the development policy of the Czech Republic and EU.

Seminars:
1. Rural development as the activity and field of study of rural studies.
2. Goals (objectives), subjects, tools and objects of rural development. Analysis of
official documents.
3. Ways of coping with social changes and social problems in the countryside – TV
document analysis.
4. Identifying factors influencing viability and development of rural communities
(identification of factors by students).
5. Logical frame (LOGFRAME) as the tool for rural development project
management and implementation – its elaboration.
6. Activating local people („local action groups“ v Leader+ Community Initiatives).
7. Social capital and institutional building.
8. Multifunctional agriculture as basic element in rural development (work with
data)
9. Rural development experience (students presentations or discussion with foreign
expert).

Study literature:
1. Buttel, F.H. 2001. Some Reflections on Late Twentieth Century Agrarian Political
Economy. Sociologia Ruralis 41 (2):165-181
2. Douwe van der Ploeg, J., Renting, H. Minderhound-Jones, M (eds.). 2000. The
Socio-Economic Impact of Rural Development: Realities and Potentials.
Sociologia Ruralis 40 (4): 391-543
3. Falk, I. Kilpatrick, S. What is Social Capital? A Study of Interaction in a Rural
Community. Sociologia Ruralis 40 (1): 87-110.
4. Innovations, Institutions and Rural Change (ed. by M. Blanc). 2003.
Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities

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Master in Economics and Management first year

Core literature:
1. Rural Development in Europe: the EU LEADER Programme Reconsidered (papers
edited and introduced by Christopher Ray) 2000. Sociologia Ruralis 40 (2): 163-
227.
2. Bauman, Z. 1999. Globalizace (Důsledky pro člověka). Praha: Mladá fronta.
3. Blažek, B. 1998. Venkov, město média. Praha: Sociologické nakladatelství.
4. Blažek, J. Uhlíř, D. 2002. Teorie regionálního rozvoje (nástin, kritika, klasifikace).
Praha: Karolinum
5. Hompland, A. Rurbanizace, předměstí a metropole. Sociální scénáře v Norsku a
Evropě. Zemědělská ekonomika 40 (5): 397-408.
6. Hudečková, H, 1995. Privatizace v zemědělství a obnova venkova. Sociologický
časopis 31 (4):449-462.
7. Hudečková, H., Lošťák, M. 2002. Sociologie a její aplikace v regionálním/rurálním
rozvoji. Praha: PEF ČZU.
8. Illner, M. 1992. Continuity and Discontinuity. Political Change in Czech Village
After 1989. Czechoslovak Sociological Review, Special issue, August 1992:79-91.
9. Kayser, B. 1990. La renaissance rurale (Sociologie des campagnes du monde
occidental). Paris: Armand Colin.
10. Jehle, R. 1998. Pojetí endogenního rurálního rozvoje a jeho zavádění do
regionální politiky v České republice. Zemědělská ekonomika 44(1): 9-17.
11. Johaentges, A. 1996. Das Dorf als Wohnstandort. Bonn: Forschungsgesellschaft
für Agrarpolitik und Agrarsoziologie e.V., Bonn.
12. Librová, H. 1996. Decentralizace osídlení – vize a realita. Část první: vize,
postoje k venkovu a potenciální migrace v ČR. Sociologický časopis 32 (3):285-
296.
13. Librová, H. 1997. Decentralizace osídlení – vize a realita. Část druhá:
decentralizace v realitě České republiky. Sociologický časopis 33 (1):27-40.
14. Lošťák, M. 1999. Projekty rozvoje venkova a jejich realizace. Zemědělská
ekonomika 45(2): 85-91.
15. Newby, H. 1982. Rural Sociology and Its Relevance to the Agricultural Economist:
A Review. Journal of Agricultural Economics 33 (2): 125-165.

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Master in Economics and Management first year

ACCOUNTING (EUE01E)

Department of Trade and Finance


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Enikı Lırinczová, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The aim of this course is to provide theoretical knowledge and practical skills of
Accounting, Taxes and Accounting harmonization, focused on terminology. The course
also introduces the basic principles of IAS and GAAP.

Lectures:
1. Czech Accounting legislation (Accounting Act).
2. Czech Accounting legislation (Czech accounting standards).
3. Accounting documents and books.
4. Assets and liabilities.
5. Equity
6. Book-closing accounting events.
7. Financial statements- Balance sheet, Income Statement, Notes.
8. Financial statements- Balance sheet, Income Statement, Notes.
9. Accounting harmonization.
10. EU Directives
11. IAS
12. GAAP
13. The differences and similarities between Czech accounting, IAS, GAAP.
14. Financial Statement Analysis.

Seminars:
1. Balance-sheet, Income statement, T-account.
2. Accounting for fixed assets, inventory, expenses and revenues.
3. Accounting for own equity, Securities, depreciation, wages.
4. Book-closing, Financial statements.
5. Taxes, financial statements.
6. IAS - examples
7. Differences between IAS and Czech accounting - examples.

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Master in Economics and Management first year

Study literature:
1. Lorinczová E.: Accounting, PEF, ČZU, Praha, 2006
2. Stárová M. : Accounting - seminars, PEF, ČZU, Praha, 2006
3. Accounting legislation in 2005, Trade Links, s.r.o.,Prague, 2005
4. Czech Taxation in 2005, Trade Links, s.r.o., Prague, 2005
5. Kovanicová D.: Jak porozumět světovým, evropským, českým účetním výkazům,
Bova Polygon, Praha, 2004
6. Mládek R. : Světové účetnictví - IFRS, US GAAP, Linde Praha, 2005
7. Adámková D. : Účetnictví podle mezinárodních standardů, ČZU, PEF, Praha, 2003
8. Fourth Council Directive 78/660/EEC
9. Seventh Council Directive 83/349/EEC
10. International Accounting Standards - Illustrative Financial Statements, PWC,
2004
11. IFRS and Czech GAAP - Similarities and differences, PriceWaterhouseCoopers,
2004
12. Meigs, Williams, Haka, Bettner: Accounting, Irwin/McGraw-Hill, 1999
13. www.iasplus.com
14. www.pwcglobal.com
15. http://www.fasb.org

98
Master in Economics and Management first year

DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS (EAE24E)

Department of Operational and System Analysis


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Ludmila Dömeová, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Basic Mathematics, B.Sc. level of Economy, Management,
Management Science, Basic Informatics, MIS, Psychology

Objective and general description:


The goal of the subject is exploitation and synthesis of knowledge of quantitative
methods and other branches, methodology and layout of decision support systems,
decision-making process analysis. Helping students understand the fundamental
concepts and techniques necessary for attaining world-class performance in
manufacturing, service operations and state control. Besides its importance to
corporate competitiveness, reasons for studying this field are: — A business education
is incomplete without an understanding of modern approaches to managing
operations. — Subject provides a systematic way of looking at organization. — The
concepts of DDS are widely used in managing other functions of a business and all
type of managers can profit from the knowledge of them. Theoretical lectures are
followed by seminars with majority of individual work. Computers and software tools
are available in the seminars so the students can solve more complicated practical
examples. The written part of the examination contains an application of theoretical
knowledge to a real situation. In the oral part of the exam the student can expand
and justify his/her solution. Most of the curriculum is covered in scheduled lectures
and scheduled seminars. Learning and application of the subject are supported by
theoretical exercises, particularly in the form of problem solving. The last 5 weeks of
the semester are devoted to a group project which is worked through in groups of 3-4
students with a distinct inter-disciplinary aspect, using information from all the topics
discussed to focus on a specific aspects of system decision making support. The
project is presented and evaluated at the end of the course.

Lectures:
1. Decision Making Theory and Decision Making Support.
2. Decision Support Systems.
3. Multiplecriteria Decision Making.
4. Linear programming - principles, algorithms and solutions.
5. Multiple Criteria Optimisation.
6. Multiple Objective Decision Making.
7. Project Management.
8. Waiting lines and Queuing Systems Theory.
9. Supply Management Models.
10. Fuzzy Sets and Systems.
11. Simulation techniques and simulation models.
12. Soft Systems.

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Master in Economics and Management first year

13. Soft approaches to decision making support.


14. Knowledge based decision making support.

Seminars:
1. Construction of Mathematical Model.
2. Decision Trees.
3. Game Theory.
4. Multiplecriteria Decision Making.
5. Analysis of the Linear Programming Solution.
6. Real Models in the MS Project.
7. Waiting lines and Queues - applications.
8. Supply Management Models.
9. Simulatiom Techniques.
10. Simulations in Queues.
11. Soft Systems.
12. Fuzzy Sets and Systems.
13. Project assignment.
14. Credit

Study literature:
1. Turban E.: Decision Support Systems. Wiley, 4th ed., N.Y., 1998.
2. Schaik F.D.J.: Effectiveness of Decision Support Systems. Delft University Press,
1988.
3. Decision Support systems, The International Journal, North-Holland, ISBN 0137-
9236. Selected volumes.

100
Master in Economics and Management first year

ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS (EEE68E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Dr. Hock Guan Chong (MY) / Dr. Steve Clark (CAN)
Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Aim of the subject is providing students with theoretical knowledge of economic
approaches in area of sustainable development, pricing of natural sources and their
use. Further pieces of knowledge in delimitation of specifics of expert activities in
relation to environment of life. On base of theoretical knowledge possible ways and
means will be discussed and to secure and maintain the environment of life. The
course unit is organised in lectures and seminars. The students are required to
prepare projects as a part of their out-of class educational activities.

Lectures:
1. Environmental pollution cases and disasters in the world – Case examples
2. Key concepts and benefits of environmental management systems
3. Challenges in EMS development – need to overcome them
4. ISO 14001 standard – principles and requirements
5. Case examples and applications of EMS ISO 14001 in organizations
6. Sustainable development in the context of EMS
7. Video presentation on environmental disasters and protection
8. The Environmental policies and their main goals. Impact analysis of
environmental pocies and policy failure.
9. Applied policy instruments, definition and comparison of different categories of
analytic tool.
10. Green taxation, the issue of direct and indirect ecological taxes implementation
and its distortion effects.
11. International dismension of environmental problems and applied policies.
12. The Firm level consequences fo The Public interest theory, various allocation of
the policy cost.
13. Environmental management and information system on the firm level, eco-
accounting and eco-auditing systems.
14. The economics of natural resources utilization, the classification of natural
resources, property rights.

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Master in Economics and Management first year

Seminars:
1. Basic principles of the Economics of natural Resources.
2. Externalities and environmental goods.
3. Monetary measures of environmental goods.
4. The Cost benefit analysis.
5. Quality assessment of environmental goods valuation.
6. Direct and indirect ecological taxation.
7. Basic principles and constraints enfironmental policies.

Study literature:
1. Norman J. Vig: Environmental Policy: New Directions for the Twenty-First
Century, Fourth editon, 2002
2. Charles D. Kolstad: Environmental Economics, Oxford University Press, 1999
3. Robert N. Stavins: Economics of the Environment, W.W. Norton & Company.
2000
4. Tom Tietenberg: Environmental and Natural Rerousce Economics, Sixth edition,
2002
5. John Glasson et al: Introduction to Envornmental Impact Assessment, Routledge,
1998
6. Roger Perman et al: Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Prentice
Hall, 2003
7. Perace D.W.: Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment, Hawerter
Weatsbeup, 1990
8. Perace D.W.: Economics of Natural Resources and the Environment, Hawerter
Weatsbeup, 1990
9. Roger Perman et al: Natural Resource and Environmental Economics, Prentice
Hall, 2003
10. Bjorn Lomborg: The sceptical Environmentalist, Cambridge University Press,
2001
11. Daniel J. Fiorino: Making Environmental Policy, University of California Press,
1995

102
Master in Economics and Management first year

ENGLISH FOR ACADEMIC PURPOSES (ELX57E)

Department of Languages
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Alan M. Westcott


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


This course is interactive and there are no lectures. Articles from current English
language newspapers and periodicals are used as the basis for further development of
language skills including: Expansion of vocabulary, Review of grammar, Discussion,
Conversation, Debate, Formal writing format, Creative writing. All correction of written
and oral presentations is done on a one-to-one basis with general explanation of
common errors.

Teaching and learning methods:


Students write essays each week based on the article/topic discussed in class. These
are proofread, returned to students, and time is allotted for explanation of corrections.

Literature:
Articles relating to globalisation, cultural differences, and current events are taken
from English language publications such as The International Herald Tribune, The
Economist, a variety of news magazines, and the Internet.

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Master in Economics and Management first year

ENGLISH FOR BUSINESS PURPOSES (ELX55E)

Department of Languages
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Neil Harvey


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Students will be provided with a program of study to improve their command of
English in order to enhance business communications and so improve their career
prospects.

Lectures:
1. The theory of communication.
2. The setting of clear objectives.
3. Preparing and planning the correct method to use as well as the message to be
communicated.
4. Using the righ kind of language.
5. The use of visual aids.
6. The importance of the "body language".
7. How to get around barriers in communication.

Methodology:
1. Preparations
2. Report Writing.
3. Summarizing meeting and writing préci's of written information.
4. Answering written communication.
5. Handling questions.
6. Negotiating
7. Advertising
8. Meetings

104
Master in Economics and Management

Programme syllabi – Second year

105
GENERAL ECONOMICS - INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS (ENE26E)

Department of Economics
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: L. O. Dittrich, Ph.D., M.P.H


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The goal of the subject is extending of economic theories education. It means the
students will get knowledge about next parts of economic theory and about
functioning of international economy. They got in Microeconomics and
Macroeconomics basic knowledge about functioning of market economy and
governmental policies. International Economics continues in this stream.
Undergraduates will gain deeper knowledge about economic models in international
trade and about next problems of international economic relations between two
countries, about impacts of tariff and other trade policies tools, about impacts of fiscal
and monetary policies in open economy and about exchange rates functioning. The
exam consists of written part (done through the test which addresses theoretical
knowledge of a student) and of oral part which also consists of ability to transfer the
theoretical knowledge into practical measures.

Lectures:
1. Introduction. Characteristic features of external economic relations and basic
terms of open economy.
2. Evolution of economic thought in sphere of international relations. Basic
theoretical streams of international trade.
3. Classical concept of international trade. Trade between one factor economies.
Ricardian models of international trade.
4. Neoclassical concept of income distribution in trade. Trade between two factors
economies. Model of spefic factors.
5. Neoclassical concept of factors substitution in open economy. Proportions
between two (and more) factors.
6. Theory of world economy. Relative supply and demand in foreign trade. Terms of
trade and effects of their change.
7. Theory of world economy II. Effects of economic growth in open economy (export
and import changes). Ohlin´s point.
8. Returns of scale and interna-l trade. Interna-l trade of goods in various types of
competition. Imperfect competition.
9. International transfer of factors. Intertemporal trade and intertemporal
comparative advantage, real rate of interest.
10. Trade policy and its role in economic theory. Governmental policies in open
economy. Theory of national welfare.
11. Tools of trade policies. Trade policy and incomes distribution. International
agreements and trade policy.

106
12. Tools of trade policies II. Tariff and its effects in open economy. Impacts on
national welfare in big and small economics.
13. Fiscal and monetary policies. Effects of fixed and floating rates of exchange on
open economy, capital mobility.
14. Rate of exchange on assets market. Parity of purchase power, rate of interest
and expectations. Evolution of IMSystem.

Study literature:
1. Krugman, P.R., Obstfeld, M. International Economics, Theory and Policy. 4th Ed.
New York: Addison – Wesley Longmann Inc., 1997.
2. 2.King, P., International Economics and International Economics Policy. sec. Ed.
1995.
3. Giancarlo Gandolfo, International Trade Theory and Policy. Paperback. 544pp.
1998.
4. Svatoš, M. et al., Economics of Czech and Slovak Agriculture Intergration with
the EU. Prague 1999.
5. Bilson, J.F. Monetary Approach to the Exchange Rates: Some Empirical Evidence.
International Monetary Start Papers, 1978, vol. 25, pp. 48 – 75.
6. Frenkel, J.A. Theory of Floating Exchange Rates. American Economic Review,
1979, vol. 69, pp. 610 – 622.
7. Krugman, P.R., Obstfeld, M. International Economics, Theory and Policy. 4th Ed.
New York: Addison – Wesley Longmann Inc., 1997.
8. Kol. autorů. Mezinárodní ekonomie – cvičebnice. Praha, FinEco, 2001.

107
MARKETING (EREB2E)

Department of Economics and Management


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Alain Boge (FR), Conor Horan (IRL)


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60
Prerequisites: Management, Management Theory

Objective and general description:


Main objective of the course is to help to students develop marketing view on
consumers and organisational buyers, competitors, and suppliers. The course is based
on lectures, seminars, workshops, consultations, and study texts and glossaries. After
introduction is projected strategy and operational marketing with support of teacher.
All these three steps student repeat again when developing new market. Project for
groups of students is assigned on the first lecture. Its attractivity for financing bodies,
suppliers, salesman and performers is evaluated together with written test of
terminology knowledge.

Lectures:
1. Marketing : A philosophy of business.
2. Monitoring of environment.
3. Segmentig markets. Consumer markets and segmenting organizational markets.
4. Analyzing of consumer behavior.
5. Formal and informal information flows. Marketing information system.
6. Marketing research.
7. Product life cycle.
8. Managing products. Development new products.
9. Marketing intermediaries - distribution channels and types of D.Ch..
10. Pricing. Adaptation strategy of price-setting.
11. Communication process and communication tools in marketing.
12. Using of new communicational media and interactive approach to marketing
communication.
13. Managing the sala force. Personal selling.
14. Problems of global development.

108
Seminars:
1. Introduction, Setup working teams.
2. Selection of project subject Team discussion, consultation with lecturer.
3. Visit Trade fair 'Reklama'.
4. Presentation of project methodology, designing questionnaire.
5. Case study - PLC - preparation phase.
6. Case study - presentation.
7. Field research.
8. Field research.
9. Field research.
10. Field research.
11. Field research.
12. Case study - Communication - preparation phase.
13. Case study - presentation.
14. Project presentation.

Study literature:
1. Bennet, D., Peter, : Marketing. McGraw-Hill Inc. New York 1988
2. Kinnear, C., Thomas. Taylor, R., James, : Marketing Research. McGraw-Hill, Inc.
New York 1991
3. Walker, O.C., Boyd H. W., Larreche, Jean-Claude,: Marketing Strategy (Planning
and Implementation). Irwin McGraw-Hill, Inc. New York 1995
4. Pepperdine University: Marketing Annual Editions 96/97
5. Belch, E., G., Belch M., A., : Introduction to Advertising & Promotin. Irwin,
Chicago 1995
6. Schoell, W., F., Guiltinan, J., P. : Marketing Essentials. Allyn and Bacocn, 1993.
7. Kotler, P., : Marketing Management. Prentice Hall, New Jersey, 1994
18. Zikmund, W., G.,´dAmicjo, M., Marketing. West Publishing Company, Mineapolis/
St. Paul, 1993

109
EU INTEGRATION (EEEE1E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Derek Shepherd (GB)


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The aim of the course ids to supply a concise insight into the development, functioning
and institutions of the EU Special attention is paid to the Common Agricultural Policy
and Structural Policy of the EU. The course is taught in co-operation with visiting
lectures from another EU country. Lectures are combined with seminar discussions,
using .ppt techniques and Internet. Students prepare individual essays to the given
topics.

Lectures:
1. History and development of the EU. Individual etaps.
2. Institutions of the EU.
3. Decision-making processes in the EU.
4. Theories of integration I: the economics of preferential trading areas.
5. Theories of integration II: the economic theory of clubs.
6. Single market in Europe: development, pros and contras.
7. European Monetary Union.
8. EU Enlargement: processes, impacts.
9. Common Agricultural Policy.
10. Future of the EU : What will it be ?
11. European Constitution.

Seminars:
1. Agricultural policy
2. Competition policy
3. Employment policy
4. Environmental policy
5. Regional policy
6. Social policy
7. Trade policy

Study literature:
1. Artis, M., Nixson, F.: The Economics of the European Union. Oxford, Oxford
University Press, 2001
2. El-Agraa, A.M.: The European Union. Harlow, Pearson Education, 2004
3. Molle, W.: The Economics of European Integration. Aldershot, Ashgate, 2001.
4. Wallace, W., Wallace, H.: Policy-Making in the European Union. Oxford, Oxford
University Press, 2005

110
MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS (EIE18Z)

Department of Information Engineering


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: prof. Ing. Ivan Vrana, DrSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Objective is to teach students basic concepts of individual, work-team and enterprise
information systems, their components and added value to the business processes.
The course introduces students to a basic methodology for solving problems, control
of complex objects and processes and also for information support of individuals,
workgroups and institutions. The course will also provide students with general
knowledge of building information systems oriented to management support. Students
will learn about use of information in attaining goals of business people and business
organizations, about what information systems do, what they are made of, how they
are developed, about how IS add value to the organizations, and about composition of
IS and IS development.

Lectures:
1. Definition of Management IS (MIS).
2. Information and characteristics of a good information, components of IS.
3. Personal and workgroup IS, its components.
4. Enterprise IS, its components.
5. Characteristics of system types, system development life-cycle.
6. Transaction processing, on-line and batch systems.
7. Architecture of MIS, DSS, OAS, ESS.
8. Introduction to IS technology.
9. Data representation, integrity, independence.
10. The value added by IS.
11. Personal management IS, primary functions.
12. Developing personal MIS, prototyping.
13. Developing workgroup MIS.
14. Business management IS.

111
Seminars:
1. Definition of Management IS (MIS). Information and characteristics of a good
information, components of IS.
2. Personal and workgroup IS, its components. Enterprise IS, its components.
3. Characteristics of system types, system development life-cycle. Transaction
processing, on-line and batch systems.
4. Architecture of MIS, DSS, OAS, ESS. Introduction to IS technology.
5. Data representation, integrity, independence. The value added by IS.
6. Personam mgmt. IS, primary functions. Developing personal MIS, prototyping.
7. Developing workgroup MIS. Business mgmt. IS.

Study literature:
1. D. Kroenke: Management Information Systems. McGraw Hill 1992, ISBN 0-07-
112677-5.
2. T.O.Flaatten: Foundations of Business Systems. Dryden Press, 1991.
3. I. Vrana, J. Búřil, A. Černý: Methods for Building a University Information
Systems. Edited by Eunis, Brno, March 2001, ISBN 80-214-1837-0.
4. D. Kroenke: Management Information Systems. McGraw Hill 1992, ISBN 0-07-
112677-5.
5. T.O.Flaatten: Foundations of Business Systems. Dryden Press, 1991.
6. J. Martin: Information Engineering. Prentice Hall, 1991.
7. I. Vrana, J. Búřil, A. Černý: Methods for Building a University Information
Systems. Edited by Eunis, Brno, March 2001, ISBN 80-214-1837-0.

112
PSYCHOLOGY OF ORGANISATION AND BEHAVIOUR AT WORK
(EPE16E)

Department of Psychology
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. PhDr. Luděk Kolman, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The course objective is to help the students to understand the human side of an
enterprise. Basically, it is a course in psychology of work, but the way this subject is
dealt with takes the inner logic of an organisation in the account. Work psychology is
about people’s behavior, thought and feelings related to their work. It could be used
to improve our understanding and management of people at work. Moreover,
psychological processes, like group dynamics, and communication processes shape
organisational structures, and processes of production. The aim making clear how
closely are management, work, and inner working of men knit together. Most of the
curriculum is covered in scheduled lectures and seminars. Experiential learning in
seminars facilitates learning of the subject. The students have to submit an essay on a
subject covering one of the themes of the course. The essays are evaluated at the end
of the course.

Lectures:
1. Perspectives on work organizations and cultures. Characteristics of organizations.
2. Person in a workplace. Different approaches to the study of a person at a
workplace.
3. Work psychology as a field of study – its origins, uses, research, and the present
state of the art.
4. Applying psychology in HRM.
5. Individual differences. Cognitive ability. Intelligence and intelligence tests.
Personality tests.
6. Personnel selection and assessment processes. Job analysis. Validity and
reliability.
7. Attitudes and values at work. How could be attitudes and values measured.
8. National culture as a mental software. Dimensions of national cultures.
9. Work motivation. Content and process theories of work motivation.
10. Pay and motivation. Reward and punishment in work behaviour.
11. Teams and cooperation development. Negotiation and persuasion.
12. Training at work. Assessing needs and training design. Training transfer and
evaluation.
13. Careers and career management. Career choice. Gender and career.
14. Stress at work and its management. Sources and costs of stress. Dealing with
stress at workplace.

113
Seminars:
1. Types of learning, methods of learning, ways used by human brain to process
data.
2. Accessing other people and establishing rapport. The use in management and
business.
3. Group dynamics.
4. Types of interpersonal behaviour.
5. Transactional analysis.
6. Assertiveness training.
7. Psychological contract.
8. Interpersonal communication skills.
9. Principles of management training.
10. How to measure motivation. The use of a shortened TAT.
11. Ways of dealing with stress.
12. Time management.
13. Goal setting.
14. Cuture shock - experience of the sojourners.

Study literature:
1. ARNOLD, J. et al., 2005: Work Psychology. Financial Times, London
2. IVANCEVITSH, J. M., MATTESON, M. T., 1990: Organizational Behavior and
Management. BPI/Irwin, Boston
3. MOORHEAD, G.; GRIFFIN, R. W., 1989: Organizational Behavior. Houghton,
Boston
4. NELSON, P.L.; QUICK, J. C. 1996 Organizational Behavior. The Essentials.
Minneapolis: West Publishing Company
5. SCHERMERHORN, J. R. et al. 1997 Organizational Behavior. N. York: John Wiley
& Sons
6. ORGAN, D. W.; BATEMAN, T. S., 1991: Organizational Behavior. Irwin, Boston
7. TSOUKAS, L. 1994 New Thinking in Organizational Behaviour. Oxford:
Butterworth - Heinemann

114
TRADE THEORY AND FOREIGN TRADE (EEEE2E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Luboš Smutka, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The course unit provides students knowledge from the area of world trade which is
inseparably connected over the globe. The reasons of such mutual connection are
explained with an aim to show how increasing foreign trade determinates the
globalisation and integration processes. The course is given in lectures and practicals.
The students also will work out individual projects.

Lectures:
1. Theory of foreign-trade relations I.
2. Theory of foreign-trade relations II.
3. World trade - dynamics.
4. Structure and balance of trade and payment balance.
5. Foreign trade and international finance.
6. Foreign trade policy.
7. Negotiation strategy and non-tariff regulation of foreign trade (institutions,
interest groups)
8. Commodity structure of world trade I.
9. Commodity structure of world trade II.
10. Territorial structure of world trade I.
11. Territorial structure of world trade II
12. Globalization, trade liberalization, international financial regime.
13. Trade aims North-South, direct foreign investment
14. Trade, environment of life and natural resources.

Seminars:
1. A system of work with relevant information sorces (e-info, yearbooks, etc.)-UN,
OECD, Eurostat...
2. Price development and structural changes of world trade.
3. Main world exporters.
4. Main world importers.
5. Institutional structure of world trade.
6. Efficiency of export measures, development aid, debtors crisis of developing
countries.
7. A clasp of globalization, foreign trade and sustainable development.

115
Study literature:
1. Galdolto G.: International Trade Theory and Policy, Springer Vlg. Heidelberg,
1998
2. Ingram J. C. and Dunn M.: International Economics, 3rd ed, John Wiley & Sons,
Inc, 1993
3. Svatoš M. et al.: Economics of Czech and Slovak Agriculture Integration with the
EU, (ČZU v Praze, SPU v Nitře), Praha 1999
4. World Bank Atlas (Year). World Bank, Washington, D.C.
5. King P.: International Economics and International Economic Policy, A Reader,
2nd ed, McGraw Hill, 1990
6. Časopisecká literatura, ročenky, elektronické informační zdroje: UN, OECD,
Eurostat, USDA aj.
7. Kenen P. B.: The International Economy, Cambridge University Press, 1994, ISBN
0-521-43618-4
8. Gandolfo G.: International Trade Theory and Policy, Springer Vlg. Heidelberg,
1998
9. Dieckheuer G.: Internationale Wirtschaftsbeziehungen, Oldenbourgh Vlg.,
München - Wien, 1998
10. Jahrman F.U.: Außenhandel, Kiehl Vlg. Ludwigshafen, 1995
11. Cihelková E. a kol.: Světová ekonomika-regiony a integrace, Grada Publishing,
Praha 2002
12. International Trade Statistics Yearbook (Year), UN
13. Södersten B., Reed G.: International Economics, London, Macmillan, 3rd ed.,
1994
14. Relevantní v čase srovnatelná data (ročenky, databáze, studie): UN, FAO, OECD,
Eurostat, USDA, ČSÚ, MZe
15. Jeníček V., Foltýn J.: Globální problémy a světová ekonomika (Global problems
and world economics), C.H.Beck, 2003
16. Boháčková I., Jeníček V., Svatoš M.: Evropská integrace (European integration),
Credit, Prague 2003
17. Lehmanová Z. et al.: Aktuální otázky globalizace (Actual questions of
globalization), Oeconomica, VSE Prague, Prague 2003
18. Krugman P.R. and Obstfeld M.: International Economics: Theory and Policy, 2nd
ed. Harper Collins, 1991

116
STATISTICAL SEMINAR (ESE23E)

Department of Statistics
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. RNDr. Helena Nešetřilová , CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


This is a course for students who have passed two semesters of basic statistics (e.g.
Statistics I and II). The course intends: to review basic statistical methods while
working on the diploma thesis and (for the Czech students) to introduce the English
statistical terminology. Further, the course should bring more insight into basic
statistical methods and offer some alternatives based on modern developments.
During seminars, which shall take place in a computer lab, the students should learn
to use statistical SW (SPSS) and will have a chance to discuss choice of statistical
methods suitable for their individual data, application of these methods and
interpretation of the results.

Lectures:
1. Review of basic statistical notions.
2. Exploring Data and Distributions.
3. Normal distribution and detection of outliers.
4. Precision in survey sampling.
5. Testing statistical hypotheses using small samples.
6. Impact of deviations from model assumptions on parametric test statistics.
7. The Bootstrap.
8. Basic problem in statistics.
9. Robust measures of location and inference.
10. Exploring Data and Relationships.
11. Categorical data and measures of association.
12. Methods of regression analysis, impact of deviations from the linear model
assumptions.
13. Nonlinear regression (growth functions).
14. Remarks on time series.

117
Seminars:
1. Basic information on SPSS moduls. Data editor. Import and export of data files.
2. Descriptive statistics and graphs in SPSS.
3. SPSS Syntax Files.
4. Testing hypotheses on means in SPSS.
5. Analysis of variance.
6. Robust measures of location.
7. Regression analysis, modul Base.
8. Nonlinear regression, modul Regression Models.
9. Contingency tables, modul Tables.
10. Time series. Building a model, possibilities of choice.
11. Individual Seminar Projects.
12. Individual Seminar Projects.
13. Individual Seminar Projects.
14. Defence of the Seminar Projects.

Study literature:
1. Svatošová, L., Kába, B.,Prášilová, M.: Zdroje a zpracování sociálních a
ekonomických dat. Učební texty. PEF ČZU, 2004.
2. Brabenec, V., Šařecová, P.: Statistické metody v marketingu a obchodu. Vybrané
přednášky a příklady. PEF ČZU, Praha 2001.
3. Prášilová, M., Svatošová, L.: Cvičení ze statistiky. PEF ČZU, 1996, 1997.
4. Cyhelský, L., Kahounová, J., Hindls, R.: Elementární statistická analýza.
Management Press, Praha 1996.
5. Anděl, J.: Základy matematické statistiky. Matfyzpress, Praha, 2002.
6. Svatošová, L., Kába, B.,Prášilová, M.: Zdroje a zpracování sociálních a
ekonomických dat. Učební texty. PEF ČZU, 2004.
7. Brabenec, V., Šařecová, P.: Statistické metody v marketingu a obchodu. Vybrané
přednášky a příklady. PEF ČZU, Praha 2001.
8. Hebák, P. a kol.: Vícerozměrné statistické metody 1, 2 a 3. Informatorium, Praha
2004 a 2005.
9. Johnson, R.A., Wichern, D.W.: Applied Multivariate Statistical Analysis. Prentice
Hall, Upper Saddle River, 1998.
10. Lindsey, J. K.: Introduction to Applied Statistics, a modelling approach. Oxford
University Press New York 2004, 2nd ed.
11. Meloun, M., Militký, J.: Kompendium statistického zpracování dat. Academia,
Praha 2002.
12. Simonoff, J.S.: Analyzing Categorical Data. Springer, New York 2003.

118
CO-OPERATIVE BUSINESS (ERE32E)

Department of Management
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Bob Briscoe (IRL)


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


One of the aims of this subject is to make students more aware of the significance of
co-operatives and the key roles they are playing in the lives of so many people.
Another key objective is to underline the competitive advantages of the co-operative
way of doing business, and to suggest ways in which co-operatives can build on their
competitive edge. Important personalities in the development of cooperatives.
Emergence of early cooperatives in western Europe, early cooperative efforts in other
selected countries. Nature and objectives of cooperative enterprise : principles and
characteristics of the cooperatives-definition, aim and differences between
cooperatives and other forms of enterprises. The lectures and seminars are the in-
class activities but the students are also required to work out of classes on their
projects.

Lectures:
1. Why study Co-operatives?
2. The variety of co-operative businesses.
3. The origins of co-operative action.
4. Co-operative principles and process.
5. Approaches to analyzing co-operatives.
6. The management dilemmas of conventional business.
7. The management dilemmas of co-operatives.
8. Financing co-operatives.
9. Managing a co-operative democracy.
10. Directing co-operative and corporate governance.
11. Dilemmas of openness. Dilemmas of success.
12. Community co-operatives and rural development. Co-operatives and the
provision of credit.
13. Worker co-operatives and food business development.
14. Developing co-operatives. Relations with governments.

119
Seminars:
1. Reasons of study Co-operatives. The exapmles of their variety.
2. Co-operative action, movement and principles.
3. Analyzing co-operatives.
4. Financing co-operatives.
5. Managing a democracy in co-operatives.
6. Dilemmas of openness. Dilemmas of success.
7. How to develop co-operatives.¨

Study literature:
1. Hird, Christopher: Making co-operation competitive.Red Pepper, November,2000
2. Miller, Danny.: How excellent Organisations Can Bring About Their Own Downfall.
New York:Harper Business, 1990
3. Mohn, Paul O., Buckley, J.: Decision processes in Irish diary co-ops.Centre for
Cooperative Studies University College Cork.
4. Bonner, A.: British Co-operation. Manchester:Co-operative Union, 1996
5. Briscoe, R.: The Co-operative Idea. UCC:Centre for Co-operative Studies, 1982
6. Briscoe, R.: Co-operatives in Ireland. National University of Ireland, 2000.

120
DIPLOMA THESIS SEMINAR (EEEB4E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Bohuslava Boučková , CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The aim of the seminar is to support students in the diploma thesis writing including
the language support. The theoretical part includes the basic methods of working with
literature and other resources, methods and tools of data processing and
presentation, structuring of a scientific thesis, its analysis and conclusion. The
practical part consists of diploma thesis presentation methods, state examination
procedure and important points including behaviour and language support. Students
will prepare and present at the seminars selected parts of their diploma thesis, their
performance will be analysed and evaluated.

Lectures:
1. Diploma thesis as scientific work - introduction.
2. Ethics of research and scientific work.
3. Basic scope, structure and time-table of the diploma thesis preparation. Risks to
avoid.
4. Literature resources: seeking, processing, quoting.
5. The pros and cons of internet as a resource.
6. English language as the tool of the DT I.: style, sentences, paragraphs.
7. English language as the tool of the DT II.: abbreviations, ungammatical English,
punctuation.
8. The DT style: How to interest a reader. Tables, graphs, diagrams.
9. Conclusions of the DT. Use of methods: SWOT analysis, synthesis.
10. Medium term evaluation: How far have you got with your DT, what are the main
problems to face and solve.
11. Diploma thesis presentation I.: Structure and techniques of presentation. .ppt
presentation.
12. Diploma thesis presentation II.: How to deal with opponents and critical
questions.
13. State examination: its time table and procedure.
14. Ten commandments of the preparation for state examination. Problems to avoid.

121
Seminars:
1. Introduction to the course, setting tasks, roles and time-table of presentations.
2. Presenting selected chapter/part of students diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
peformance.
3. Presenting selected chapter/part of students diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
peformance.
4. Presenting selected chapter/part of students diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
peformance.
5. Presenting selected chapter/part of students diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
peformance.
6. Presenting selected chapter/part of students diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
peformance.
7. Presenting selected chapter/part of students diploma thesis. Evaluation of the
peformance.

Study literature:
1. Guirdham, M., Tyler, K. :Enterprise skills for students.BH, Oxford, 1992
2. How to Organize your Thesis, by John W. Chinneck, N.Y.Press, 2003
3. How to Write Semester and Diploma Theses. www.tik.ee.ethz.ch
4. Guirdham, M., Tyler, K. :Enterprise skills for students.BH, Oxford, 1992

122
ECONOMICS OF ENTERPRISES (EEE46E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Karel Tomšík , Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The course is intended to explain advanced methods of entrepreneurial economics and
their practical applications with an emphasis on conceptions used in English speaking
countries. Study of this subject requires basic knowledge of economics. Basic teaching
forms are lectures, seminars, elaborating individual projects.

Lectures:
1. Introduction, (Subject of Economics of Enterprises, Building a Business ).
2. Financing a Business (Financial Sources – Equity and Debt Capital).
3. Costing I (Classification of Costs, Cost Assignment).
4. Costing II (ABC Method, the Role of CVP in Costing)
5. Capital Budgeting (Objectives, Capital Budgeting Techniques).
6. Budgeting (Construction of a Budget, Master Budget, Flexible Budget)
7. Pricing Decision (Optimal Selling Price, Price Setting)
8. Financial Analysis (Theoretical Approaches to Financial Analysis).
9. Cash Flow (Theoretical Approaches to Cash Flow Determination).
10. Evaluation of Entrepreneurial Activities (General Recapitulation of Evaluation
Methods)

Seminars:
1. Financing a Busines (Loan Installments, Purchase versus Lease Decision)
2. Costing (Practical Use of Costing Methods)
3. Capital Budgeting Techniques – practical examples
4. Construction of a Budget - practical example
5. Financial Analysis – practical examples

123
Study literature:
1. Samuelson, P.A.: Economics (Mc.Graw-Hill 1992)
2. Tomšík K.: Economics of Enterprises (ČZU Praha - v edičním plánu, v současnosti
v elektronické formě)
3. Synek, M.: Podniková ekonomika, C-H Beck, 1999
4. Rosochatecká, E.: Ekonomika podniků, ČZU 2003
5. Veth, K., Lister, R.: Schlüsselbegriffe der Wirtschaft - Fachsprache Englisch
(Cornelsen, Berlin 2002)
6. Rutherford, D.: Routledge Dictionary of Economics (Routledge, London 2002)
7. Dictionary of Business (Penguin Reference, London 2002)
8. Dictionary of Economics (Penguin Reference, London 2003)
9. Dictionary of Business (Oxford University Press 2002)
10. Peppers, L., Balis, D.: Managerial Economics, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs,
1987
11. Atrill, P.: Financial Management for Decision Makers, Prentice Hall, Harlow, 2006
12. Drury, C.: Management and Cost Accounting, Thomson, London 2005

124
STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT (EREB4E)

Department of Management
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Ivana Tichá, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The course is organised in rather traditional lectures delivering basic principles of
strategic management combined with current developments in the field and in
seminars driven by individual / team work.

Lectures:
1. Strategic Management Process.
2. Competitive Advantage.
3. Guest lecture.
4. External Environment.
5. Internal Environment.
6. Strategy Formulation.
7. Guest lecture.
8. Strategy Implementation.
9. International Perspectives on Strategy.
10. Strategic Alliances. Knowledge Management and Learning Organisation.

Seminars:
1. Introductory case study - (teamwork)
2. Feedback and Assessment.
3. Case study - environmental analysis (teamwork).
4. Case study - environmental analysis (teamwork).
5. Feedback and Assessment.
6. Case study -building competitive advantage (teamwork).
7. Case study -building competitive advantage (teamwork).
8. Feedback and Assessment. Test
9. Case study - strategy implementation (teamwork).
10. Feedback and Final Assessment.

125
Study literature:
1. Miller, A.: Strategic Management, Irwin/McGraw-Hill, 1998
2. Collis, D.J., Montgomery, C.A.: Corporate Strategy: A Resource Based Approach,
Irwin/McGraw-Hill, 1998
3. Stacey, R.: Strategic Management and Organisational Dynamics, Pitman
Publishing, 1993
4. Harvard Business Review.
5. Strategic Management Journal.
6. Ticha, I.: Strategic Management (study text), PEF ČZU Praha, 2005.
7. Fitzroy, P., Hulbert, J.: Strategic Management: Creating Value in Turbulent
Times.
8. Tomposn, J. L.: Strategic Management. Thomson Learning, United Kingdom 2001
9. Hitt, M.A., Ireland, R.D., Hoskisson, R. E.: Strategic Management:
competitiveness and globalization. Sauth-Western College Publishing, USA 2001
10. Daft, R. L. : Management. Thomson Learning, Ohio USA 2004
11. Fitzory, P., Hulbert, J.: Strategic Management: creating valve in turbolent times.
John Wiley a sons, Inc., UK 2005
12. Pitts, R.A., Lei, D.: Strategic Management: Building and Sustaining Competitive
Advantage, South-Western College Publishing, 2000

126
INTRODUCTION TO THE MODERN LAW OF EUROPEAN UNION
(EJE21E)

Department of Law
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: JUDr. Bohumír Štědroň, LL.M.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The aim of the course is to give a broad and general introduction to EU law including a
practical knowledge of EU institutions and policy. The lectures will be followed by
seminars where the discussed issues will be dealt with in detail. At the end of the
course there will be a closed book written exam for which both credit and a grade will
be awarded.

Lectures:
1. History of the European Union
2. Institutions of the European Union
3. European Union Law and its Sources
4. Legislative process in EU
5. Member States of EU and their National Legal Systems
6. Legislative process in Czech Republic compared to EU legislative process
7. Internal Market of the European Union (Four Basic Freedoms)
8. European Competition Law
9. Protection of Human Rights in EU
10. Procedure before the European Court of Justice and the Court of First Instance

Study literature:
1. The Business Law in EU
2. International Arbitration and Dispute Settlement
3. Intellectual Property Law in EU
4. Legal Regulation of Information Society in EU
5. European Legal Entities

Study literature:
1. Textbook on EC Law, Steiner - Woods, Oxford University Press 2003, ISBN 0-19-
925874-0; (available at the MSc departmental library)
2. Gateway to the European Union (http://europa.eu/index_en.htm)
3. Constitutional Law of the European Union, Lenaerts – Nuffel, Sweet & Maxwell
2005, ISBN 0-421-88610-2
4. International Law, Antonio Cassese, Oxford University Press 2003, ISBN 0-19-
829998-2

127
COMPUTER SECURITY (ETE45E)

Department of Information Technologies


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Zdeněk Havlíček, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The subject is taught by teachers with the experience in the field of the computer
security, operation systems and other areas of computer science. The course
combines lectures with theoretical and practical exercise under supervision. The
course combines theoretical and practical introductions to the use general and specific
encryption methods for work with information. During the lectures, the main problems
are outlined, and during the exercise, principles and methods used in chosen subjects
are studied in depth. Students are encouraged to solve problems in informal groups.
Students work with problems in the relevant areas, either in groups or individually.
The fundamental elements of the subjects are taught in lectures and the learning
process is supported by homework including problem solving in basics of data
protection. The course is held as lectures and calculation practicals in area of basic
encoding and decoding. In order to pass the course it is essential to participate
actively and a report has to be done in chosen topics.

Lectures:
1. Computer crime and its criminal-law implications.
2. Basic encoding and decoding. Safety coding systems.
3. Use of encoding, protocols and programming of a coding algorithms.
4. Protection in operating systems I.
5. Protection in operating systems II.
6. Design of safe operation systems.
7. Network and distributed systems security.
8. Security of network administration.
9. Security of database systems.
10. Basics of data protection, technical data protection asssurance.

128
Study literature:
1. Adámek, J.: Foundations of Coding. New York, John Wiley & Sons 1991, 336 s.,
ISBN 0471621870
2. Hutt, A. E. - Bosworth, S. - Hoyt, D.B.: Computer Security Handbook. New York,
John Wiley & Sons 1995, 1088x., ISBN 0471118540
3. Welsh, D.: Codes and Cryprography. New York Oxford University Press 1988,
257s., ISBN 0198532873
4. Stallings, W.: Network and Internetwork Security. Prentice Hall 1995, 480s.,
ISBN 002415830
5. Scambray J., McClure S., Windows Server 2003 (Hacking Exposed), ISBN
0072230614
6. Hatch B. et al: Hacking Hacking Linux Exposed, Second Edition, ISBN
0072225645
7. Peltier, T., R., Information Security Risk Analysis, Auerbach Pub. 2001, ISBN
0849308801

129
BUSINESS STRATEGY (ERE27E)

Department of Management
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Steve Fisher (UK)


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


To develop awareness and understanding of strategy applicable to business and
organization. To develop an understanding of the overall strategic issues facing an
organization and therefore the broad perspective from which to appreciate their own
contribution to the organization’s purpose. To develop an understanding of the
strategic management issues. The course comprises reading material (preparatory
and in the business game), assessment of case studies, lectures and business
simulation.

Lectures:
1. Demonstrate knowledge of the nature of strategy and strategic planning.
Strategic issues; the paradigm.
2. Demonstrate an understanding of organizational objectives.
3. Demonstrate an understanding of techniques for strategic analysis.
4. Demonstrate an understanding of strategy and people.
5. Identify the value of forecasting as an integral function of strategic planning and
management.
6. Review the decision making function within the strategic planning process.
7. Review the modelling function applicable to strategic planning.

Seminars:
1. Demonstrate knowledge of the nature of strategy and strategic planning.
Strategic issues; the paradigm.
2. Business game.
3. Business game continuation I.
4. Business game continuation II.
5. Business game continuation III.
6. Business game continuation IV.
7. Business game final evaluation.

130
Study literature:
8. Bingham, F.G.: Business Marketing Management, NTC:USA, 1997
9. Hisrich, P.: Entrepreneurship, McGraw-Hill:USA, 1998
10. Nickels, McHugh.: Understanding Business, McGraw-Hill:USA, 1999
11. Baye, M.R.: Managerial Economics and Business Strategy, McGraw-Hill:USA,
1997
12. Bower, J.L.: Business Policy, McGraw-Hill:USA, 1995
13. Grant, R.M.: Contemporary Strategy Analysis, Blackwell Business:UK, 1993

131
INTERNATIONAL FINANCE (ENE34E)

Department of Economics
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: L. O. Dittrich, Ph.D., M.P.H


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


The International Financial Management course is designed to provide students with
and understanding of the theory of finance in multinational companies. Theoretical
models specific to international finance are introduced and explored through numerical
examples and discussion of relevant empirical evidence. The course balances
evaluative and computational skills with the aim of presenting international finance in
a theoretical and practical perspective.

Lectures:
1. Multinational Financial Management: An Overview.
2. International Flow of Funds.
3. International Financial Markets.
4. Exchange Rate Determination.
5. Forecasting Exchange Rates
6. Measuring Exposure to Exchange Rate Fluctuations.
7. Managing Transaction Exposure.
8. Manging Economic Exposure and Translation Exposure.
9. Direct Foreign Investment.
10. Multinational Capital Budgeting.
11. Country Risk Analysis.
12. Financing International Trade.
13. Short-Term Financing.
14. International Cash Management.

Study literature:
1. Madura, J. "International Financial Management, 6th ed., 2000; and Madura &
Schnusenberg, "Study Guide" 2000
2. Meric I., Meric G,. Global Financial Markets at the Turn of the Century, 2001,
Pergamon
3. Apel, E. Central Banking Systems Compared, 2003, Routledge.
4. Nall, L.A. Issues in International Corporate Control and Governance, 2001,
Research in IB and F, Vol. 15

132
QUANTITATIVE METHODS IN MACROECONOMICS (EEEE3E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Mansoor Maitah, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


This course is concerned mainly with aggregate economic activity. Major emphasis is
on factors determining GDP, employment, price level and balance of payments. The
purpose of the course is to link the theoretical knowledge of participants with
empirical issues in macroeconomics and such a way to improve their analytical and
syntactical abilities. The participant will understand the implications of changes in
macroeconomic factors from several viewpoints. They will be able to work with
empirical studies and to process them as well. Furthermore, they will be aware of the
important aspects of theoretical concepts and their confrontation with real world. The
course consists of lectures and seminars. Independent work of students out of classes
is required.

Lectures:
1. The structure of economy and its implications.
2. The determinants of aggregate consumption, business investment, imports and
exports, government spending and taxation.
3. Fiscal and monetary policy – the role in economy and their interaction – several
empirical studies.
4. Monetary transmission – direct channel, interest rate channel, credit channel,
channel of asset price and the channel -1.
5. Monetary transmission – direct channel, interest rate channel, credit channel,
channel of asset price and the channel -2.
6. Price level.
7. Price level–price puzzle.
8. Asymmetric information and their role in economy.
9. Balance of payments and its determinants in Czech economy (1)
10. Balance of payments and its determinants in Czech economy (2)

Seminars:
1. General equilibrium modelling
2. Partial equilibrium modelling.
3. Monetary policy modelling.
4. Fiscal and balance payments modelling.
5. Open economics relationships modelling.

133
Study literature:
1. Bondt G. J. de: Credit and asymmetric effects of monetary policy in six EU
countries: an overview, De Nederlandsche Bank NV, 1998
2. Espinosa-Vega M.A.: How powerful is Monetary Policy in the long run?, Federal
Reserve Bank of Atlanta Economic Review, 3Q 1998, 12-31
3. Giordani P.: Essays in Monetary Economics and Applied Econometrics, Stockholm
school of Economics, Elanders Gotab, Stockholm, 2001
4. Okun A.M.: Prices & Quantities – a macroeconomic analysis, Basil Blackwell
Publisher, Oxford, 1981
5. Romer, D.: Keynesian Macroeconomics without the LM curve, January 2000,
www.nber.org/paper/w7461
6. Seddighi H.R., Lawler K.A., Katos A.V.: Econometrics: A Practical Approach,
ROUTLEDGE, London, 2000
7. Stiglitz J.E., Greenwald B., Arnott R.: Information and economic efficiency, w.p.
No. 4533, NBER, 1993
8. Favero, C.A.: Applied Macroeconometrics, Oxford University Press, 2001
9. Banerjee A., et al.: Co-integration, error correction and the econometric analysis
of non-stationary data, Oxford University Press, 2003
10. Charemza W.W., Deadman D.F.: New directions in econometric practice: general
to specific modelling, cointegration and vector autoregression, Northampton:
Edward Elgar, 2003
11. Mishkin, F.: The Economic of Money, Banking and financial Markets, Scott
Foresman and Company, New York, 1989
12. Samuelson P.A., Nordhaus W.D.: Economics, 17-th Edition, McGraw-Hill, 2001
13. Stiglitz J.E., Greenwald B.C.: Asymmetric information and the new theory of the
firm: financial constraints and risk behaviour, w.p. No. 3359, NBER, 1990
14. Taylor J.: The Monetary Transmission Mechanism – an Empirical Framework,
Journal of Economic Perspectives, October 1995, 11-26

134
SOCIAL ECONOMY (EEEE4E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Bohuslava Boučková , CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Masters
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 60

Objective and general description:


Introduction into the topic of social economy as one of the important alternative
economic phenomena in the present world. Students get acquainted with the
theoretical base of SE including some of the representatives of the theory on the
world level., as well as with the practical examples of the SE institutions and
enterprises on the EU and CR level. Specific examples, as the implementation of the
Public Private Partnership and Fair Trade are included. Students apply the knowledge
on the preparation of group project of a SE enterprise of the selected type and its
presentation.

Lectures:
1. Definition and key concepts of social economy. Main types.
2. Theoretical base of SE: Main goals of economic activities.Person as an economic
object.Social capital.
3. Jaroslav Vanek: Cooperative economy, Labour Manged Economy, Solidarity-
based Economy.
4. Co-operatives as a part of social economy: The Mondragon case, Czech
examples.
5. Institutional frame of social economy. Social economy zones.
6. Specific SE movements: Emaus Movement, Prout Co-operatives, Liberation
Theology.
7. Social economy in the EU: documents, examples, Equal projects.
8. Social economy enterprises in the CR: types, functioning, support. Possibilities in
agrar sector and rural areas.
9. Public Private Partnership:definition, origin, goals. PPP in the EU and CR.
10. Fair Trade:definition, goals, principles. FT in Europe. development of FT in the
CR.

Seminars:
1. Aims, content and demands of the course. Topics and recommendations for the
group project.
2. Information on social economy in the world on Internet: Mondragon, kibutzim, SE
enterprises in the U.K.
3. Social economy game: Establishing social capital.
4. Fair Trade in practice: Excursion to the Fair Trade shops in Prague.
5. Group projects presentations.

135
Study literature:
1. Vanek, Jaroslav: Crisis and reform:Essays in social Economy. Ithaca University
Press, N.Y.,1989
2. Alternatives to economic globalisation. A report of the International Forum on
Globalisation.BK Publishers, San Francisco, 2002
3. Karafolas, S., Spear, R.(ed.): Local society, global economy.The role of co-
operatives. Hellin, Greece, 2002
4. Bauman, Z.: Globalisation.Polity Press 1999
5. Review of Social Economy .The Journal of the Association for Social
Economics.www.tandf.co.uk
6. Vanek, J.:The Labor-Managed Economy: Essays by Jaroslav Vanek.Amazon, N.Y.,
2004
7. Vanek, J.:Globalisation, desructive trade and remedies through
cooperation.Cornell University Press, 2003

136
Master in Informatics

Programme syllabi

137
Master Informatics PROGRAMME SYLLABI

FIRST YEAR
AUTUMN SEMESTER

EIE27E Projecting of Information Systems p. 140


EIE28E ICT Theory p. 142
ENE28E General Economics III p. 145
EEEB8E Econometrics p. 147
ESE34E Statistical Data Analysis p. 149
ETE50E Computer Networks p. 151

SPRING SEMESTER

EREF7E Strategic Marketing p. 153


EIE29E Database and Knowledge Information Systems p. 155
EIE30E Software Implementation p. 157
EIE31E Artificial Intelligence p. 159
ESE35E Seminar in Computing Statistics p. 160
ETE51E Security of Information Systems p. 162
Optional Course

SECOND YEAR
AUTUMN SEMESTER

EAE45E Logistic Systems p. 165


EIE32E Systems Integration p. 166
EIE49E Information Engineering p. 167
EREF8E Management p. 169
ETE52E Internet Technologies - Client Side p. 171
Optional Course

SPRING SEMESTER

EAE46E Decision Support Systems p. 173


EEEF9E Prognostic Methods p. 174
EIE50E Quality Estimation of IS p. 177
ETE53E Internet Technologies - Server Side p. 179
Optional course

138
Master in Informatics

Programme syllabi – First year

139
Master in Informatics first year

PROJECTING OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS (EIE27E)

Department of Information Engineering


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: prof. Ing. Ivan Vrana, DrSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral vindication of project
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


Object methods of information engineering in continuation of structured
techniques, the emphasis are put at object consideration of analysis and
design of information system. This approach is to enable fast development of
applications in automated environment of object I-CASE tools. The object
oriented paradigm will be presented in lectures and its utilisation in
description and design of information systems. Several methodologies will be
considered. Individual techniques will be trained in case studies in seminars,
utilising available CASE tools.

Lectures:
11. Introduction to OO paradigm
12. Object data model
13. Moldelling dynamic features of the system
14. System life cycle in OMT
15. Introduction to OO analysis and design
16. Instruments of object analysis
17. Instruments of object design
18. Description by diagrams
19. UML - Unified Modelling Language
20. Assessment and transformations of conceptual model
21. Rambough, Martin-Odell and Coad-Yourdon methodologies
22. Agile modelling
23. Maintenance and transferrability of applications
24. Examples of utilisation of OO approaches

Seminars:
11. Introduction to OO approach
12. Modelling dynamic features, System life cycle
13. OO analysis and design - introduction
14. Tools for OO design, diagrams
15. UML
16. Verification of conceptual models
17. Agile modelling

140
Master in Informatics first year

Study literature:
5. James Rumbaugh: Object-oriented modeling and desing. Prentice-Hall, 1991
6. Ambler S.W.: Agile modeling. John Wiley 2002
7. Fowler M.: UML distilled. Addison Wesley 2004

141
Master in Informatics first year

ICT THEORY (EIE28E)

Department of Information Engineering


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: prof. RNDr. Jiří Vaníček, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The objective of the course is to supply student by basic necessary
knowledge and skills from the areas of applied mathematics, applied logic,
algoritmization and theory of computation for understanding the consecutive
special courses in master degree program in informatics. With respect to the
possibility of the students with different previous education on bachelor
degree level to entry the program, the course is used also as a tool for
consolidation of the base for further study.
During the course students get to know the fundaments of set theory, the
concepts of fuzzy set, relation, fuzzy relation and operation. Get acquainted
with the concepts of data message, information and knowledge. Relations
will be applied to the various types of ordering as preference relations and
also to the representation of information by data using data base structures.
Students get acquainted with the possibility to describe the attributes of the
objects in real world by numbers using measurement. Further with the
representation of measures by data and with the problems of interpretation
of results obtained by computation as meaningful statements valid in real
world.
Students get the knowledge about propositional and predicate calculus and
with deduction in a given theory. . Get acquainted with the directed and
undirected graphs and their applications to the description of process and
algorithm, decision-making theory, for process planning and for a selected
optimisation tasks with application in economy. Students get the knowledge
about the concept of formal language, formal grammar and with the
mathematical models of computation. The part of the course will be also the
study of recursive and recursively enumerated languages and problems on
the formal model and in practical situations. The regard will be given to
computational complexity of algorithms. Get to now basic information about
NP-hard and NP-complete problems and with the possibility of alternative
heuristic approaches to such problems. The brief information concerning the
algorithms for classification, pattern recognition and cluster analysis will be
also given…

142
Master in Informatics first year

Lectures:
1. Classes and sets. Set operations. Fuzzy sets and operation on fuzzy sets
2. Concept of data message, information and knowledge. Interpretation of data
obtained by computation
3. Relation. Fuzzy relation. Preference relation types. Database relation structures,
operation on the set
4. Directed and undirected graphs. Trees. Their representation in data. Fundamental
tasks for graphs
5. Concept of direct access memory machine Algorithm. Procedure. Definition of
computational complexity of algorithms
6. Base and structured data types. Structured algorithm, program and design.
Representation using graphs. Recursion
7. Propositional logic. Logical functions. Boolean algebra. Normal forms of logical
function
8. Predicate logic. Formal theory. Natural deduction in predicate calculus. Resolution
principle
9. Formal languages and grammars. Programming languages syntax, Chomsky’s
hierarchy
10.Deterministic and nondeterministic finite automata. Regular expressions. Regular
languages
11.Formal computation models. Turing machines. Recursive and recursively
enumerated languages and problems
12.Formal definition of computational complexity P-hard NP-hard and NP-complete
algorithms and problems
13.Heuristic approaches for alternative solution of NP-complete problems
14.Algorithms for classification, pattern recognition and cluster analysis. Genetic
algorithms

Seminars:
1. Entry test. Rehearsing and completing entry knowledge
2. Practise the theory explained during lectures
3. Algorithms for structured data
4. Computational complexity analysis of concrete algorithms
5. Logical functions
6. Analysis and synthesis of formal models of computation, recognizing a given formal
language
7. Final concluding test

143
Master in Informatics first year

Study literature:
1. Hehner, E.C.R.: The logic of programming, Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall Inc.
Prentice-Hall International series in computer science, 1984, ISBN 0-3-539966-1
2. Manna Z.: Mathematical theory of computation. McGraw-Hill book company, 1974,
ISBN 0-07-039810-7
3. Davis M.D, Sigal, R., Weyuker, E. J. and Davis, M.D.: Computability, Complexity
and Languages. Fundamental of Theoretical Computer Sci., 1983, 86, ISBN 0-12-
206380-5
4. Weiss, M.A.: Data structures and algorithm analysis in C. Menlo Park: Addison-
Wesley, 1997, ISBN 0-201-49840-5
5. Kozen, D.C.: The Design and Analysis of Algorithms. New York: Springer-Verlag,
1991, 320 pages, ISBN 0-387-97687-6
6. WIRTH, N.: Algoritms + data structures = programs . Prentice Hall, Englewood
Cliffs N.J., 1976
7. Copi, I.M.: Introduction to logic. New York: MacMillan Publishing Company, 1961,
ISBN 0-02-325020-8
8. Hehner, E.C.R.: The logic of programming, Englewood Cliffs: Prentice-Hall Inc.
Prentice-Hall International series in computer science, 1984, ISBN 0-3-539966-1
9. Hopcroft, J.E. and Ullman, J.D.: Formal languages and their relations to automata.
Adison-Wesley Publishing Company
10.Manna Z.: Mathematical theory of computation. McGraw-Hill book company, 1974,
ISBN 0-07-039810-7

144
Master in Informatics first year

GENERAL ECONOMICS III (ENE28E)

Department of Economic Theories


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Mansoor Maitah, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The objective of the course unit is to educate the experts for advanced economic
analyses. The course unit aims at understanding the macroeconomic theory. After
taking this course, students will be able to describe and analyze economic issues in
closed and open economy by applying tools of modern macroeconomics.

Lectures:

1. The subject of national, world and international economics and their main goals.
2. The economic performance of a country.
3. Economic Markets: Market of Goods and Services, Financial Market, Market of
Resources and Foriegn Exchange Market.
4. Labour market and unemployment
5. Inflation and business cycles
6. Money and banking
7. Macroeconomic equilibrium of economy.
8. Macroeconomic policies
9. The government budget constraints, explanation of budget defecits and the role of
the state in Macroeconomy.
10.Exchange rate regimes in an increasingly integrated world economy.
11.Economic growth: Theory and policy
12.Analysis of balance of payments and its determinants in Czech economy.
13.Theory of absolute and comparative advantage and international trade.
14. International trade policies, their tools and role of tariffs.

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Seminars:
1. Introduction, seminar works. Basic terms of international economics
2. Characteristic features of export, import, trade balance and payments balance
3. International trade and its impacts on economy
4. International transfer of factors, labour and capital
5. Economic policy of government in open economy
6. Fiscal and monetary policies, rates of exchange
7. Presentation of seminar works. Term

Study literature:
1. Krugman, M. - Obstfeld, M. International Economics. Prentice-Hall, Engelwood
Cliffs, New York, 1997.
2. Mundell, R. International Economics. Macmillan, New York, 1968.
3. Dornbusch, R. – Fischer, S. Makroekonomie. Praha: SPN, 1994.
4. BURDA - WYPLOSZ: MACROECONOMICS. OXFORD, 2005
5. W.CHARLES SAWYER-RICHARD SPRINKLE: INTENATIONAL ECONOMICS,
PRENTICE HALL 2004.

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Master in Informatics first year

ECONOMETRICS (EEEB8E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Lukáš Čechura, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 56

Objective and general description:


The aim of subject is to give students knowledge of economic modelling
which in countries with developed market mechanism is non-substitutable
tool of quantitative analysis of national economy, its industries and
enterprises for determination of optimal strategy of enterprise development,
agri-food complex and economy.
Forms of teaching are based on lectures and seminars with use of PC
classrooms.

Lectures:
1. Construction of econometric models.
2. Methods of structural parameters estimation.
3. Econometric analysis of supply and demand.
4. One-equation demand models. Classical single product models. Aggregated demand
models
5. Simultaneous demand models. Single products models. Aggregated demand models
6. Econometric production analysis. Deriving of production functions. Aggregated
production function.
7. Econometric analysis of production factors. Deriving of isoquants functions
8. Econometric analysis of relations among industries. Deriving of izofactor function
9. Econometric analysis of costs. Deriving of cost functions
10.Derivation of one-equation supply models. Specification of supply function,
specification from cost function
11.Econometric analysis of market equilibrium. Cobweb model
12.Complex econometric models. Structure of comprehensive econometric models.
13.Financial econometric models. The concept of financial models
14.Industries econometric models. Agrifood sector models. Econometric prognosis.

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Seminars:
1. Repeating of vector and matrix algebra. Repeating of regression and correlation
analysis.
2. Construction of econometric model; dynamization of econometric model.
3. Identification of EM and its transmission from the structural form into the reduced
form
4. Estimation of EM parameters with use of method of dispersion ration minimisation
5. Estimation of EM parameters with two-stage least squares method
6. Verification of EM; Test of significance of structural parameters and tightness of
dependence
7. Derivation of one-equation product demand function and its economic interpretation
8. Derivation and estimation of nonlinear consumption functions
9. Simultaneous models, relation between its structural and reduced form
10.Estimation of supply functions
11.Estimation of production functions (one-factor, two-factors)
12.Relation between production factors and relation between production and branches
13.Complex EM
14.Application of EM in forecasting

Study literature:
1. Darnell, Adrian C., Evans, L.:The Limits of Econometrics, Edward Elgar Publishing
Limited, Hants, England 1994, ISBN 1-85278-517-9
2. Greene, William H.: Econometric Analysis, Pearson Education, Inc., New Jersey
2003, ISBN 0-13-110849-2
3. Gujarati, Damodar N.:Esentials of Econometrics, McGraw-Hill, Inc., USA 1992, ISBN
0-07-025194-0
4. Charemza, Wojciech W., Deadman, Derek F.: New Directions in Econometric
Practice,
5. Edward Elgar Publishing Limited, Hants, England 1993, ISBN 1 85278 846 1
6. White, H.: New Perspektives in Econometric Theory, Edward Elgar Publishing
Limited, Cheltenham 2004, UK, ISBN 1 84376 586 1

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Master in Informatics first year

STATISTICAL DATA ANALYSIS (ESE34E)

Department of Statistic
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Libuše Svatošová, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The course synthesizes notions gained in statistical courses at BSc level and expands
those especially in the domain of multivariate data processing and in processing and
assessment of economic information.

Lectures:
1. Survey design, minimum necessary sample size assessment techniques, explorative
analysis
2. Data transformation, censored and winsorized samples
3. Fast one-sample and two-sample tests on the mean
4. Fast variance analysis
5. Contingency table analysis
6. Enumerative data analysis
7. Ordinal data analysis
8. Covariance analysis
9. Multiple regression and correlation - assumptions for application
10.Multiple regression and correlation - search for the optimum subset of explanatory
variables
11.Multivariate statistical methods - principles and application
12.Principial component analysis
13.Factor analysis
14.Cluster analysis

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Master in Informatics first year

Seminars:
1. Survey design, minimum necessary sample size assessment techniques, explorative
analysis
2. Data transformation, censored and winsorized samples
3. Fast one-sample and two-sample tests on the mean
4. Fast variance analysis
5. Contingency table analysis
6. Enumerative data analysis
7. Ordinal data analysis
8. Covariance analysis
9. Multiple regression and correlation - assumptions for application
10.Multiple regression and correlation - search for the optimum subset of explanatory
variables
11.Multivariate statistical methods - principles and application
12.Principial component analysis
13.Factor analysis
14.Cluster analysis

Study literature:
1. Delwiche, L.D., Slaugtner, S.J.: The Little SAS Book. SAS Publishing, Cary, NC,
2000
2. Dowdy, S., Wearden, S.: Statistics for research. Wiley, New York, 1982
3. Huitema, B.E.: The Analysis of Covariance and Alternatives. New York, Willey, 1980
4. Jobson, J.D.: Applied Multivariate Data Analysis. New York, Springer, 1992
5. Smith, G.: Statitical reasoning. Allin and Bacon, Inc. Boston, 1985

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Master in Informatics first year

COMPUTER NETWORKS (ETE50E)

Department of Information Technologies


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Jiří Vaněk, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The course combines theoretical and practical introductions to the most developing
area of the computer science - networks. The practical are held in the form of informal
group work in PC classrooms. Each student individually studies a topic of his/her own
choice (within the curriculum), resulting in a report which has to be approved by the
staff member responsible for the course. Each student, or two students together, does
a project on specific problem.

Lectures:
1. The entrance to the Computer Networks, networks LAN and WAN, computing model
2. Network taxonomy, network operating systems
3. Network architecture - model ISO OSI
4. Network architecture - TCP/IP
5. Data communication
6. Transmission technics, basic transmission paradigma, physical layer
7. Guest lecture
8. Link layer, Access control
9. Network layer, switching, routing
10.Transport layer
11.Internetworking
12.Ethernet
13.Optical networks, ATM
14.Guest lecture

Seminars:
1. Introduction: programme of seminars, evaluation system, assembling of work
teams - projekt_I
2. Novell NetWare (6.x)
3. MS Windows NT (200, 2003) server
4. MS Windows NT (200, 2003) server - presentation of project
5. Unix/Linux
6. Unix/Linux - presentation of project
7. Presentation of case study

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Master in Informatics first year

Study literature:
1. Klander, L.: Hacker Proof, Unis Publishing. 1998. 648 s.- ISBN: 80-86097-15-3
2. Greer, T.: Intranety. Computer Press 1999. 309 s.- ISBN: 80-7226-135-5
3. Microsoft, SuSE Linux, Novell, IBM - internet documentation

152
Master in Informatics first year

STRATEGIC MARKETING (EREF7E)

Department of Management
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Václav Kala, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written, oral vindication of project
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The goal is amendment and completion of obligatory courses knowledge and literature
study leading to ability to handle managerial skills of strategic marketing. Teaching is
based on usage and further development of knowledge from related courses using
examples from practice in lectures, seminars and exercises.

Lectures:
1. Introduction to marketing management, its significance and functions. Marketing
strategies.
2. Process of strategic managing marketing projects, strategic scenarios. Corporate
culture.
3. Strategic marketing management processes, strategic marketing planning
processes.
4. Analysis of environment, market opportunities, expected threats, competition
analysis, competitor’s strategy identification.
5. Internal marketing strategies preliminaries analysis, potential objectification,
establishing and maintaining competitive advantage, co-operational approaches,
marketing audit functions.
6. Marketing instruments and strategy relations. Marketing synergy effects.
7. Formulation of suggested marketing strategies.
8. Instrumental variables formulation.
9. Orientation in marketing strategy approaches in accordance with: life cycles,
product X service,market types, innovations, trade marketing,brand
marketing,turbo, tele … e-marketing, direct marketing,marketing strategies in
accordance with customer
10.Marketing communication strategy
11.Marketing informational system strategy
12.Marketing programs budget establishment.
13.Marketing strategies assessment.

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Master in Informatics first year

Seminars:
1. Seminars in accordance with themes from ad 9., work on project: “Corporate
marketing strategy”

Study literature:
1. Crawford,C.M.: New Products Managemen. Third Edition IRWIN, Boston 1991
2. Hamel,G.-Prahmalad,C.K.: Competing for the Future, HBS Press, Boston 1995
3. Kuhn,R.L. (editor): Frontiers in Creative and Innovative Management, Ballinger,
Boston 1985

154
Master in Informatics first year

DATABASE AND KNOWLEDGE INFORMATION SYSTEMS (EIE29E)

Department of Information Engineering


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Vojtěch Merunka, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: credit and combined exam
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The course introduces large database systems with various data models.
Relational, object-oriented and hierarchical data model is discussed together
with corresponding formal techniques.
The course material is taught in lectures, seminars and computer laboratory
practical using special modelling software. Students will also communicate
with the lecturer via electronics media and will use discussion forum and e-
library in faculty intranet.

Lectures:
1. Basic concepts of the DB technology
2. Levels of abstraction, DB architecture, internal level
3. Data model and data types in DB systems, knowledge reprasentation
4. Relational algebra, calculus, data model
5. Formal techniques of relational data design¨
6. Object-oriented data model, object algebra
7. Formal techniques of object-oriented data design¨
8. Query language OQL and Smalltalk DB and their extension towards fuzzy and
knowledge systems
9. Operation of OODB
10.Client-server architectures. Possibilities of application and database server
relationship. Object-relational mapping
11.Transaction processing. Management and administration of large database systems.
12.Data-warehouses, possibilities of its implementation and its integration into
enterprise information system.
13.Knowledge information systems, databases for knowledge management.
Management of IT enterprise architecture.
14.Modern trends in information engineering techniques. Specific methods for website
design. The overview of currently.

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Master in Informatics first year

Seminars:
1. Relational algebra and calculus
2. Relational calculus and SQL in examples
3. Data normalization, decomposition and synthesis in examples
4. Data modeling, decomposition and synthesis
5. Object querying examples
6. Manipulation of object data
7. Semestral projects presentations.

Study literature:
1. Kroha P.: Objects and Databases, McGraw Hill 1993 ISBN 0-07-707790-3
2. Embley, David, Object Database evelopment, Addison-Wesley 1997 ISBN:
0201258293
3. Bertino E., Martino L: Object-Oriented Database Systems - Concepts and
Architectures, Addison Wesley 1995, ISBN 0-201-62439-7
4. Connorly Thomas, Begg Carolyn E, Strachan Anne D.: Database Systems - A
Practical Approach to Design, Implementation and Management, Addison Wesley
1996, ISBN 0-201-42277-8
5. Merunka V.: Database Systems Course, printed material CZU, 2004

156
Master in Informatics first year

SOFTWARE IMPLEMENTATION (EIE30E)

Department of Information Engineering


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: prof. RNDr. Jiří Vaníček, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The objective of the subject is to get students acquainted with universal methods used
in problems solving or in implementation of programmes in most programming styles.
Students will gain basic knowledge of algorithms, structured design, complex data
types and operations. Object-oriented, functional and logical programming approaches
will be discussed. Students will learn the purpose and usage of automata, languages,
grammars, compilers and their software implementation.

Lectures:
1. Algorithm, structured programme design, programming languages and styles
2. Data types plain and structured, description and implementation.
3. Complex data types (lists, graphs) and operations on them. Basic methods of data
searching and data sorting
4. Object-oriented approach to problem solving. Polymorphism utilisation.Clean and
hybrid object-oriented programming
5. Methods of problem solving and algorithms’ efficiency improving.
6. Recursion, its sorts, usage, functional programming
7. Problem solving using functional programming
8. Predicate logic, logical programming
9. Problem solving using logical programming
10.An introduction to the lexical and syntactical analysis. Language, grammar,
translation
11.Stack automata, regular, LL and LR languages and syntactic analysers
12.A software implementation of final automata, grammars and translators
13.Reusability in programming (libraries, components, frameworks, design patterns)
14.Uncertainty and its diffusion during deduction

Seminars:
1. Complex data types introduction. Searching and sorting
2. Linked structures, graph algorithms
3. Object orientation refreshing. Solving problems using object orientation
4. Simple tasks in the Lisp programming language
5. Simple tasks in the Prolog programming language
6. Exercising grammars, syntactical analysis and translators
7. Semestral projects presentations

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Master in Informatics first year

Study literature:
1. Davis, M.D; Sigal, R and Weyuaker, E.J.: Computability, Complexity and
Languages. Fundamentals of Theoretical Computer Science, Second EditionSAn
Diego, Accademic Press, 1994
2. Manna, Z.: Mathematical Theory of Computation, New York, McGraw-Hill book
company, 1974, ISBN 0-07-039910-7
3. Hopcroft, J.E. and Ullman, J.D.: Formal languages and their relation to automata,
Reading Mass., Addison=Wesley Publ. Comp.
4. Weiss, M.A.: Data structures and algorithm analysis in C. Menlo Park: Addison-
Wesley, 1997, ISBN 0-201-49840-5
5. Kozen, D.C.: The Design and Analysis of Algorithms. New York: Springer-Verlag,
1991, ISBN 0-387-97687-6

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Master in Informatics first year

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (EIE31E)

Department of Information Engineering


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Arnošt Veselý, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


Lectures form introduction to those parts of artificial intelligence that are mostly used
in modern database systems, expert systems, in the field of representation and
processing of knowledge and in decision models. The theory discussed in lectures will
be clarified on examples which students will be dealt with on exercises.

Lectures:
1. Introduction to artificial intelligence
2. Mathematical model of neuron
3. Adaptation of neuron
4. Feedforward layered networks
5. Application of feedforward layered networks
6. Hopfield networks
7. Competitive neural networks, Kohonen self-organizing maps
8. Genetic algorithm
9. Fuzzy sets and fuzzy relations
10.Fuzzy logic
11.Approximative reasoning I
12.Approximative reasoning II
13.Fuzzy systems
14.Neurofuzzy systems

Seminars:
1. Models of neuron
2. Feedforward layered networks
3. Hopfield networks
4. Kohonen self-organizing maps
5. Fuzzy sets and relations¨
6. Aproximative reasoning
7. Fuzzy systems

Study literature:
1. Beale R., Jackson T. : Neural Computing: An Introduction , Prentice Hall, 1994.
2. Patterson D. : Artificial Intelligence, Prentice Hall, 1990.
3. Jang J., R.: Neuro-Fuzzy and Soft Computing, Prentice-Hall,1997.

159
Master in Informatics first year

SEMINAR IN COMPUTING STATISTICS (ESE35E)

Department of Statistic
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Libuše Svatošová, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The course synthesizes knowledge from the preceding Statistics courses (Probability
theory, Mathematical Statistics I –III, Applied statistics). The students obtain a
thorough overview of the techniques of data collection, description and summarization
and inferential analysis of the data sets from various environments of their supposed
future employment (economics, business, finance, management, marketing, insurance,
etc.). Tuition is mostly individualized with attention to individual handling of case
studies and projects, chosen by the students according to their assumed professional
interest. Following the individualized manner of tuition the sequence of topics as given
below is not compulsory and it can be modified.

Lectures:
1. Statistical computing environment.
2. Statistical survey types and their use in economic research.
3. Techniques of assessment of necessary sample size.
4. Selected procedures of primary data analysis.
5. Summation, presentation and visualization of statistical data
6. Graphical tools in contemporary statistical software.
7. One sample statistical procedures.
8. Two sample statistical procedures.
9. Analysis of variance (ANOVA).
10.Nonparametric ANOVA, multiple comparisons.
11.Regression, model building and interpretation.
12.Regression diagnostics.
13.Time series analysis.
14.Categorical data analysis.

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Master in Informatics first year

Seminars:
1. SAS software. Creating, printing and sorting SAS data sets.
2. SAS/INSIGHT Software.
3. Guided data analysis (SAS/LAB software).
4. Using SAS/ASSIST Software.
5. Examining distributions of data.
6. Graphical tools of SAS Software.
7. One sample statistical procedures.
8. Two sample statistical procedures.
9. Analysis of variance (ANOVA). GLM procedure.
10.Nonparametric ANOVA, multiple comparisons.
11.Regression, model building and interpretation.
12.Regression diagnostics.
13.Time series analysis and forecasting.
14.Categorical data analysis.

Study literature:
1. Delwiche, L.D., Slaughter, S.J.: The Little SAS Book, SAS Publishing, Cary, NC,
2000
2. Dowdy, S., Wearden, S.: Statistics for Research, Wiley, New York, 1982
3. Sachs, L.: Applied Statistics, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1984
4. SAS/LAB Software, User´s Guide, SAS Institute, Cary, NC, 1995
5. SAS/ETS User´s Guide, SAS Institute, Cary, NC, 1995

161
Master in Informatics first year

SECURITY OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS (ETE51E)

Department of Information Technologies


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Čestmír Halbich, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The subject is taught by teachers with the experience in the field of the computer
security, operation systems and other areas of computer science. The course combines
lectures with theoretical and practical exercises under supervision. The course
combines theoretical and practical introductions to the use general and specific
encryption methods for work with information. During the lectures, the main problems
are outlined, and during the exercises, principles and methods used in chosen subjects
are studied in. depth. Students are encouraged to solve problems in informal groups.
Students work with problems in the relevant areas, either in groups or individually. The
fundamental elements of the subjects are taught in lectures and the learning process is
supported by homework including problem solving in basics of data protection. The
course is held as lectures and calculation practicals in area of basic encoding and
decoding. In order to pass the course it is essential to participate actively and a report
has to be done in chosen topics.

Lectures:
1. Computer crime and its criminal-law implications
2. Basic encoding and decoding, Safety coding systems
3. Usage of encoding, protocols and programming of a coding algorithms
4. Protection in operating systems
5. Protection in operating systems
6. Protection in operating systems
7. Protection in operating systems
8. Design of safe operating systems
9. Network and distributed systems security
10.Network and distributed systems security
11.Network and distributed systems security
12.Security of network administration
13.Security of database systems
14.Basics of data protection, technical data protection assurance

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Master in Informatics first year

Seminars:
1. Basic encoding and decoding, Usage of encoding
2. Protocols and programming of a coding algorithms
3. Protection in operating systems
4. Design of safe operating systems
5. Network and distributed systems security
6. Security of network administration
7. Design of technical data protection assurance

Study literature:
1. Adámek, J. Foundations of Coding. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1991, 336 s,.
ISBN 0471621870
2. Hutt, A..E. Bosworth, S. Hoyt, D.B.. Computer Security Handbook. New York: John
Wiley & Sons, 1995, 1088s., ISBN 0471118540
3. Welsh,D.. Codes and Cryptography. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988,
257s., ISBN 0198532873
4. Stallings, W.. Network and Internetwork Security. New York: Prentice Hall, 1995,
480s., ISBN 002415830
5. Hatch B. et al.. Hacking Hacking Linux Exposed. Second Edition. San Francisco:
McGraw-Hill, 2002, ISBN: 0072225645
6. Scambray J., McClure S.. Windows Server 2003 (Hacking Exposed). San Francisco:
McGraw-Hill, 2003, ISBN: 0072230614

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Master in Informatics first year

Master in Informatics

Programme syllabi – Second year

164
Master in Economics and Management second year

LOGISTIC SYSTEMS (EAE45E)

Department of Operational and System Analysis


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Tomáš Šubrt, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The subject’s aim is to acquaint the students with the basic principles and the latest
trends in supply, transport, and manufacturing logistics. The focal point of the subject
is the transport logistics, particularly in using different mathematical models in this
area. The lectures have a classical form and seminars are orientated towards software
solution.

Lectures:
1. Introduction to logidtic systems, basic terms and typology
2. Analysis of a logidstic chain, basic calculations
3. Logistic costs I – Types and calculations
4. Logistic costs II - Constant demand optimization methods
5. Logistic costs III - Variable demand optimization methods
6. Transportation logistics I - Route planning, direct shortest path problem
7. Transportation logistics II - Route servicing in non directed networks
8. Transportation logistics III - Route servicing in directed networks
9. Transportation logistics IV- Flow scale economies on route choice, fractal networks
10.Inventory logistics I - Deterministic supply management
11.Inventory logistics II - Stochastic supply management
12.Production logistics I - Analysis of material flows
13.Production logistics II - Methods for optimal objects allocation
14.Cross-sectoral logistics

Seminars:
1. Transportation and transhipment problems - recapitulation
2. Simulation model of a logistic system
3. Analytical model of a logistic systems with constant demand
4. Analytical model of a logistic systems with variable demand
5. Route servicing models
6. Flow economieies and route designe calculations
7. Inventory logistics models

Study literature:
1. Christopher, M. (ed): Logistics - the strategic issues. Chapman &Hall, 1995
2. Daganzo, C.F.: Logistic Systems Analysis, Springer Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg,
2005

165
Master in Economics and Management second year

SYSTEMS INTEGRATION (EIE32E)

Faculty of economics and management


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Prokop Toman, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: vindication of project
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


Curriculum is covered in scheduled lectures and scheduled seminars.

Lectures:
1. Basics of systems integration
2. Trends in business practices and IS/IT
3. Life-cycle of IS/IT and life-cycle of a project
4. Global strategy of enterprise, information strategy of enterprise
5. Tenders
6. System specification and requirement analysis
7. Analysis and design of system
8. Implementation, testing and maintenance of a system
9. Technological line of information system development
10.Quality and ISO 9000+ standards
11.IS/IT security
12.Globalisation of society
13.Elektronical trading
14.Future of informatics

Seminars:
1. Content of practicals will follow lectures

Study literature:
1. Aaker, D.A.: Developing Business Strategies, John Wiley and Sons, 1998
2. Avison, D.E. and Fitzerald, G.: Information System Development: Methodologies
Techniques and Tools, McGraw Hill, 1995
3. Yeh, R.T.: Current Trends in Programming Methodology. Vol. I
4. Roberts, F.S.: Measurement Theory with Applications to Decisionmaking, Utility
and Social Sciences. Encyclopaedia of Mathematics and ist Aplications, Addison -
Wesley, London, Amsterdam, Don Mills - Ontario, Sydney, Tokyo, 1971

166
Master in Economics and Management second year

INFORMATION ENGINEERING (EIE49E)

Department of Information Engineering


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Vojtěch Merunka, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: credit and combined exam
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The goal is to learn how to use necessary tools and work with theoretical
background for currently used techniques of analysis, design and as the
important part also software implementation of information systems. The
approach is based on the object-oriented paradigm. In practices, system
VisualWorks together with applicable CASE tools and database systems will
be used. The application perspective of discussed approaches is stressed
from viewpoint of ICT processes and ICT management. Practices are fit to
the individual approach to each student with training and with solving of
semester projects.
Lectures will describe the basic concepts and their relationships. Emphasis
will be given to principles not to formal details and formal mathematical
proves. Applications of general concepts in practice will be stressed.
During the practices and the seminars the theory gained in lectures will be
exercised on concrete tasks including the implementation of algorithms in
suitable software. The part of teaching process in the semester project,
which is to be presented and defended at the end of semester.

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Master in Economics and Management second year

Lectures:
1. ICT management and its relation to information and business strategy..
2. ICT project lifecycle regarded from manager perspective. Dependence on
information system development and organization.
3. Process driven approach of ICT projects, management documentation, tasks
necessary for project initiation and closing.
4. The concept of business and workflow process and process model. The role of Petri
nets and finite state machines for.
5. Process models with EPC. Business engineering.
6. Requirement engineering techniques. Interviewing for process model gathering and
validation.
7. Object/oriented process models. Concepts and relationships.
8. Concepts and relationships in model of conceptual objects. Optimalization and
transformation between business process.
9. Validation and optimalization of the conceptual model. Design patterns and object
normal forms.
10.Software implementation alternatives. Differences in approaches in miscellaneous
programming paradigms.
11.The role of CASE and CAME tools in consulting and analysis activities. The
fundamentals of metamodeling.
12.The issue of quality and maturity of ICT processes. CMM and ITIL approach.
13.Agile approach for information systems modelling and implementation.
14.Modern trends in information engineering techniques. Specific methods for website
design. The overview of currently.

Seminars:
1. Content of practicals will follow lectures.
2. The usage of CASE tool outputs for management documentation.
3. Process model examples as the requirement base for an information system.
4. Examples of models in OBA and BORM.
5. Examples of software model development in CASE tool.
6. Examples of code generation and documentation generation in CASE tool.
7. Semestral projects presentations.

Study literature:
1. Abadi M., Cardelli L.: A Theory of Objects, Springer-Verlag New York Inc. ISBN:
0387947752
2. Ambler Scott: Building Object Applications That Work, Your Step-By-Step
Handbook for Developing Robust Systems Using Object Technology, Cambridge
University Press/SIGS Books, 19
3. Ambler Scott: Object Orientation – Bringing data professionals and application
developers together, http://www.agiledata.org/essays/objectOrientation101.html.
4. Hall J.et al.: Accounting Information Systems 3rd edition, South-Western
Publishing, 2003, ISBN 0538877960.
5. Merunka V., ICT Management, CZU 2004.

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Master in Economics and Management second year

MANAGEMENT (EREF8E)

Department of Statistic
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Marie Horalíková, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The objective of the subject consists of acquiring knowledge of entrepreneur subjects
functioning and of managerial activities. This knowledge is necessary to obtaining
partial skills of managerial functions and roles as well as creative approaches to
problem solving. The basic form of the teaching includes lectures and practises
realised in the form of seminars focused on partial managerial skills, solving of
situations and partial projects.

Lectures:
1. Management, managerial functions.
2. Subjects of management, forms of business organizations.
3. Business functions - manufacturing, economic, social, ecological and managerial.
4. Organisational and managerial structures in business subjects.
5. Business environment - market, suppliers, buyers and customers, legislative and
economic issues, region and community.
6. Business strategy, business plan, business culture, tactical and operational
management.
7. Information and decision-making processes.
8. Control and supervisory processes.
9. Requirements on activities and the personality of a manager, professional ethics in
managerial practice, professional.
10.Leading of people and labour groups – delegation, work motivation.
11.Work groups, teams, group dynamics.
12.Participation, identification with business, business climate.
13.Rationalisation of business processes, time-management.
14.Rationalisation of managerial functions, management effectiveness.

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Master in Economics and Management second year

Seminars:
1. The course content – requirements. Papers setting. Students’ preliminaries on
managerial work.
2. Managerial communication. Particular studies solving.
3. Managerial work style, human leadership. Test of managerial work style.
4. Strategy, SWOT analysis. Setting SWOT analysis of PEF CZU in Prague, suggesting
strategy for INFO branch.
5. Case study on managerial proceedings.
6. Case studies of decision-making situations. Setting particular studies.
7. Presentation of particular studies.

Study literature:
1. Ivanicevich, J. M., Lorenzi, P., Skinner, S. J., Crosby, P. B.: Management. Quality
and Competitiveness. Boston: IRWIN/McGraw-Hill, 1997
2. Thompson, A. A. jr., Strickland, A. J. III.: Strategic Management. Concepts and
Cases. Homewood, Illinois: BPI/IRWIN, 1987
3. Torrington, D., Weighman, J., Jones, K.: Effective Management. People and
Organisation. New York/London: Prentice Hall, 1989

170
Master in Economics and Management second year

INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES - CLIENT SIDE (ETE52E)

Department of Information Technologies


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Zdeněk Havlíček, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (autumn semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 42

Objective and general description:


The basic forms of teaching are lectures, controlled seminars in computer laboratory
and independent work with PC. Inform students about technologies used in creation of
web sites on part of customer especially technologie DHTML. Students create
individual essays and group web site projects. The project report is presented and
discussed in the class in the presence of a committee.

Lectures:
1. Introduction into the course unit, Development of IT
2. Development of internet HTML, XML and XHTML
3. DHTML - Document Object Model
4. Cascading Style Sheets - selectors
5. Cascading Style Sheets - styles for documents
6. Javascript - description of language
7. Javascript - examples
8. Computer graphics
9. Accessibility on web
10.AJAX technologie
11.Multimedia and technologies flash
12.Web design
13.E-commerce and security of IS
14.Standard trends

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Master in Economics and Management second year

Seminars:
1. Introduction into seminars, Information retrieval
2. Rules of el. communication, Essay entry
3. Markup languages
4. Preparation of essay - consultation
5. Cascading Style Sheets
6. Presentation of esssays and entry of group projects
7. Javascript - examples
8. Preparation of projects - consultation
9. CSS - examples
10.Preparation of student´s projects - consultation
11.AJAX - examples
12.Preparation of student´s projects - consultation
13.Presentation of student´s projects
14.Presentation of student´s projects - Assignment

Study literature:
1. Flanagan D.: JavaScript. Computer Press 2002
2. Musciono Ch., Kennedy B.: HTML a XHTML Computer Press 2000.
3. Goodman, D.: Dynamic HTML The Definitive Guide. O` Reilly 2002. ISBN 0-596-
00316-1.
4. Harold, E.R., Means, W.S.: XML in a Nutshell. O` Reilly 2004. ISBN 0-596-00764-
7.
5. Bates, C.: XML in Theory and Practice. John Wiley&Sons 2003. ISBN 0-470-84344-
6.
6. Powell, T.A.: Web Design. The Complete Reference. Osborne/McGraw-Hill 2000.
ISBN 0-07-212297-8.
7. Daconta, M.C.,Obrst,L.J., Smith K.T.: The Semantic Web. Wiley Publishing, Inc.
2003; ISBN 0-471-43257-1.
8. Zeldman, J.: Designing with Web Standards. New Riders Publishing Publication
2003. ISBN 0-7357-1201-8
9. Meyer, E.: Cascading Style Sheets - The Definitive Guide. O Reilly 2004. ISBN:0-
596-00525-3
10.Niederst, J.: Web design in a nutshell. O Reilly 2002. ISBN 0-596-00196-7

172
Master in Economics and Management second year

DECISION SUPPORT SYSTEMS (EAE46E)


Department of Operational and System Analysis
Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. RNDr. Helena Brožová, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: oral and vindication of project
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 30

Objective and general description:


Most of the curriculum is covered in scheduled lectures and scheduled seminars.
Learning and application of the subject are supported by theoretical exercises,
particularly in the form of problem solving. The last 5 weeks of the semester are
devoted to a group project which is worked through in groups of 3-4 students with a
distinct inter-disciplinary aspect, using information from all the topics discussed to
focus on a specific aspects of system decision making support. The project is
presented and evaluated at the end of the course. The project can be written in Czech
or English.

Lectures:
1. Managerial Information Systems
2. Paradigm of system, Modelling and Metamodelling
3. Decision-making process, structure, phases
4. Cognitive approach in Decision Support
5. Decision Support Systems History
6. Decision Support Systems Projects
7. Decision Support Systems - Types, Efectivity
8. Experts Systems and Its History, Artificial Inteligence
9. Knowledge Systems
10.Practical examples

Seminars:
1. Decision-making Process, Analysis of Decision-making Phases, Decision-making
Structure
2. Design of Decision Support Systems Userface
3. Project of Decision Support Systems
4. Methodological Analysis of Expert Systems
5. Case Study of Decision Support Systems in Agriculture

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Master in Economics and Management second year

Study literature:
1. Turban Efraim.: Decision Support Systems. Wiley, 4th ed., N.Y., 1998.
2. Bonini, Ch.P., Hausman, W.H.: Quantitative Analysis for Management. MacGraw,
1997. ISBN 0-256-14021-9.
3. Schaik F.D.J.: Effectiveness of Decision Support Systems. Delft University Press,
1988, kapitoly 1, 3, 5.
4. Decision Support systems, The International Journal, North-Holland, ISBN 0137-
9236. Selected volumes.
5. Hwang, Ch., Young, L.: Fuzzy Mathematical Programming. Springer, 1999.
6. Chase, R.B., Aquilans, N.J.: Production and Operational Management. Irwin 1995.
ISBN 0-256-16546-7.

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Master in Economics and Management second year

PROGNOSTIC METHODS (EEEF9E)

Department of Agricultural Economics


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: Ing. Lukáš Čechura, Ph.D.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 30

Objective and general description:


Aim of the subjects is to give students knowledge of common prognostic
methods use of which is a necessary presumption of perspective branch
strategy on both national-economy and enterprise levels. Qualified use of
prognostic methods is a condition of a successful economic decision making.
Seminars will be taught with use of PC classrooms.

Lectures:
1. Determination of prognostics
2. Classification of prognoses
3. Subjective prognostic methods
4. Objective prognostic methods
5. System-econometrics prognostic methods
6. Derivation of demand functions
7. Demand function’s use for demand prognosis
8. Derivation of supply functions
9. Supply function’s use for demand prognosis
10.Prognosis of agrifood market development
11.Verification of prognostic characteristic of models
12.Derivation of prognosis from complex econometrics models
13.Simulation and enterprise prognosis
14.Business prognosis, 15. Prognosis of macroeconomic aggregates

Seminars:
1. Typology of prognosis and prognostic methods
2. Subjective prognostic methods
3. Objective prognostic methods
4. Econometric prognostic methods
5. Demand prognoses
6. Supply prognoses
7. Prognoses from complex econometric models and simulation prognoses

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Master in Economics and Management second year

Study literature:
1. Darnell, Adrian C., Evans, L.:The Limits of Econometrics, Edward Elgar Publishing
Limited, Hants, England 1994, ISBN 1-85278-517-9
2. Gilchrist, W.: Statistical Forecasting, Wiley London 1996
3. Gujarati, Damodar N.:Esentials of Econometrics, McGraw-Hill, Inc., USA 1992,
ISBN 0-07-025194-0
4. Greene, William H.: Econometric Analysis, Pearson Education, Inc., New Jersey
2003, ISBN 0-13-110849-2
5. Charemza, Wojciech W., Deadman, Derek F.: New Directions in Econometric
Practice, Edward Elgar Publishing Limited, Hants, England 1993, ISBN 1 85278 846
1
6. Labys, W.C.: Modelling and Forecasting Primary Commodity Prices, Ashgate, 2006

176
Master in Economics and Management second year

QUALITY ESTIMATION OF IS (EIE50E)

Department of Information Engineering


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: prof. RNDr. Jiří Vaníček, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 30

Objective and general description:


Aim of the subjects is to give students knowledge of common prognostic
methods use of which is a necessary presumption of perspective branch
strategy on both national-economy and enterprise levels. Qualified use of
prognostic methods is a condition of a successful economic decision making.
Seminars will be taught with use of PC classrooms.

Lectures:
1. The concept of structure. Empirical and formal structure. The concept of measure
scales.
2. Ordinal, interval and ratio scale. The concepts, which are invariant in the given
metric scale.
3. The general concept of quality. The special situation in the area of information
system. International standardisation.)
4. The quality characteristics, subcharacteristics attributes and predictors. External
and internal measures.
5. The managers, developers, acquires and independent evaluators point of view to
the quality.
6. Complexity as a quality indicator. The complexity in the imperative environment.
Software physics.
7. Complexity using structural analysis of flow graph. Mc Cabe, Piwovarsky and
Zuse´s approach.
8. Complexity in the object oriented environment. The different behaviour concerning
the concatenation.
9. Complexity time and effort, COCOMO formula. omplexity and effort estimation on
the specification stage.
10.Quality evaluation of concrete program packages and information systems.

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Master in Economics and Management second year

Seminars:
1. Clasification of various types of measure scales
2. Students presentations of the contents parts of international standards.
Presentation of projects.
3. Students presentations of the contents parts of international standards.
Presentation of projects.
4. Students presentations of the contents parts of international standards.
Presentation of projects.
5. Students presentations of the contents parts of international standards.
Presentation of projects.

Study literature:
1. Zuse, H.: Software Complexity. Measures and Methods. de Gruiter Berlin, 1991,
605 p.
2. Krantz, D.H.; Luce, R.D.; Sippers, P. and Tversky, A.: Foundation of Measurement,
Vol. I Additive and Polynomial Representations, Academic Press, San Diego, New
York, Boston, London, Sydney, Tokyo, Toronto, 1971, 584 p.
3. Roberts, F.S.: Measurement Theory with Applications to Decisionmaking, Utility
and Social Sciences. Encyclopaedia of Mathematics and its Applications, Addison -
Wesley, London, Amsterdam, Don Mills - Ontario, Sydney, Tokyo, 1971, 420 p.
4. Actual Draft International standards, technical reports, committee drafts and
working drafts of international standardisation groups ISO/IEC JTC1/SC7 Software
engineering, specially drafts of series ISO/IEC 14598 Evaluation of software
products
5. ISO/IEC 9126 Software quality characteristics and metrics

178
Master in Economics and Management second year

INTERNET TECHNOLOGIES - SERVER SIDE (ETE53E)

Department of Information Technologies


Faculty of Economics and Management

Lecturer: doc. Ing. Zdeněk Havlíček, CSc.


Teaching period: academic year 2008/2009 (spring semester)
Type subject: Master
ECTS credit: 5.0
Assessment: written and oral
Marking scale: 4-point scale
Contact hours: 30

Objective and general description:


Inform students with possibilities of creation and administration of dynamic
web sites. Subject is oriented on www technologies on part of server. The basic
forms of teaching are lectures, controlled seminars in computer laboratory and
independent work with PC. Students create individual essays and group
projects.

Lectures:
1. Introduction into the course unit, new IS architecture
2. Sever side Technologies - overview
3. Forms in HTML
4. Forms and Scripting
5. Editors, Toolkits, Professional Programing
6. Java and servlets on server side
7. DBS and Web server
8. Internet application and its integration
9. Architecture of Internet - CESNET example
10.Monitoring of Internet

Seminars:
1. Introduction into seminars, group project entry
2. Preparation of project structure
3. Forms - examples
4. Creation of projects - consultation
5. PHP - examples
6. Creation of projects - consultation
7. MySQL - examples
8. Creation of projects - consultation
9. Presentation of student´s project
10.Presentation of student´s project + Assignment

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Master in Economics and Management second year

Study literature:
1. Zeldman, J.: Designing with Web Standards. New Riders Publishing Publication
2003. ISBN 0-7357-1201-8
2. Castagneto, J. and all.: Profesional PHP Programing. WROX 2000. ISBN 1-861002-
96-3
3. Fowler, S., Stawick V.: Web Application Design Handbook, Elsevier 2004. ISBN 1-
55860-752-8

180