Sie sind auf Seite 1von 11

Find the text both in original and modern English: http://www.enotes.

com/hamlet-text or
(better): http://www.hamletregained.com/
Hamlets humanism (a play about reenge and indecision! about the hesitant thin"er)
The scholars who enthusiastically rediscovered these classical texts were motivated by an
educational and political ideal called (in Latin) humanitiesthe idea that all of the capabilities and
virtues peculiar to human beings should be studied and developed to their furthest extent.
Renaissance humanism, as this movement is now called, generated a new interest in human
experience, and also an enormous optimism about the potential scope of human understanding.
amlet!s famous speech in "ct ##, $%hat a piece of wor& is a man' ow noble in reason, how
infinite in faculty, in form and moving how express and admirable, in action how li&e an angel, in
apprehension how li&e a godthe beauty of the world, the paragon of animals'( is directly based
upon one of the ma)or texts of the #talian humanists, *ico +ella ,irandola!s -ration on the +ignity
of ,an. .or the humanists, the purpose of cultivating reason was to lead to a better understanding
of how to act, and their fondest hope was that the coordination of action and understanding would
lead to great benefits for society as a whole.
"s the Renaissance spread to other countries in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, however, a
more s&eptical strain of humanism developed, stressing the limitations of human understanding. .or
example, the sixteenth/century .rench humanist, ,ichel de ,ontaigne, was no less interested in
studying human experiences than the earlier humanists were, but he maintained that the world of
experience was a world of appearances, and that human beings could never hope to see past those
appearances into the $realities( that lie behind them. This is the world in which 0ha&espeare places
his characters. amlet is faced with the difficult tas& of correcting an in)ustice that he can never
have sufficient &nowledge ofa dilemma that is by no means uni1ue, or even uncommon. "nd
while amlet is fond of pointing out 1uestions that cannot be answered because they concern
supernatural and metaphysical matters, the play as a whole chiefly demonstrates the difficulty of
&nowing the truth about other peopletheir guilt or innocence, their motivations, their feelings,
their relative states of sanity or insanity. The world of other people is a world of appearances, and
Hamlet is, fundamentally, a play about the difficulty of living in that world.
Humanism (optimism) s. #ounter-Humanism (pessimism)
$he %enaissance celebration o& man (experience! reason) s. the medieal debate concerning
the misery o& mans existence ('roidence! superstitions)
/ optimism about the potential scope (range, extent) of human understanding2 *ico della
,irandola (Oration on the Dignity of Man) 3 fifteenth century2 $%e have made thee 456 so
that with freedom of choice and with honour, as though the ma&er and molder of thyself,
thou mayest fashion thyself in whatever shape thou shalt prefer.( The Renaissance &ept the
idea of a universe conceived of as a divine hierarchy in which each created thing has its
fixed place but borrows from 7lassical "nti1uity an emphasis on the unlimited capacities of
man as the only rational being in the universe.
(ct ))! scene *
amlet2
%hat a piece of wor& is a man' how noble in
reason' how infinite in faculty' in form and
moving how express and admirable' in action
how li&e an angel' in apprehension how li&e a
god' the beauty of the world, the paragon of
animals' (##, 8, 9:8 /9;:)
amlet2
%hat a piece of wor& is man' ow noble in
reason' how infinite in faculties (< Rom. talente,
aptitudini)' in form and moving, how expressive
and admirable' #n action how li&e an angel' in
understanding, how li&e a god' The beauty of the
world' the paragon (< ideal, model of perfection)
of animals'
(ct )! scene +
,arcellus2
Therefore # have entreated him along
%ith us to watch the minutes of this night,
That if again this apparition come (9=)
e may approve our eyes and spea& to it.
oratio2
Tush, tush, >twill not appear. (5)
oratio2
?efore my @od, # might not this believe
%ithout the sensible and true avouch
-f mine own eyes.(A:) (5)
oratio2
#n what particular thought to wor& # &now notB(C:)
?ut, in the gross and scope of my opinion,
This bodes some strange eruption to our state. (5)
oratio (tal&ing about the ghost)2
( mote it is to trouble the mind,s eye.
#n the most high and palmy state of Rome,
" little ere the mightiest Dulius fell,
The graves stood tenantless, and the sheeted dead
+id s1uea& and gibber in the Roman streetsB(;9:)
"s stars with trains of fire and dews of blood,
+isasters in the sunB and the moist star,
Epon whose influence Feptune>s empire stands
%as sic& almost to doomsday with eclipse.
"nd even the li&e precurse of feared events,(;9=)
"s harbingers preceding still the fates
"nd prologue to the omen coming on,
ave heaven and earth together demonstrated
Ento our climature and countrymen.
,arcellus2
0o #!ve begged him to come along
%ith us to watch what happens this night,
That, if this apparition comes again,
e may believe what we have seen and spea& to it.
oratio2
Fonsense, nonsense, it will not appear. (5)
oratio2
?efore my @od, # might not believe this thing
%ithout the seeing and true testimony
-f my own eyes. (5)
oratio2
# don!t &now what its intentions are,
?ut, in the plainness and freedom of my opinion,
This foretells (< Rom. preGice) some strange
eruption to our state. (5)
oratio2
)t is a spec" o& dust to irritate the mind,s eye.
#n the most high and palm tree/li&e state of Rome,
" little before the mightiest Dulius 7aesar was
&illed,
The graves had no bodies, and the dead in sheets
01uea&ed (<Rom. a vorbi pitigaiat) and gibbered (<
Rom. trancani) in the Roman streets,
"s stars with trains of fire and red morning dews,
+isasters in the sun. Hven the wet/loo&ing moon,
That influences the tides of the oceans,
ad an eclipse that seemed to go on forever.
"nd li&e similar forecasters of fierce events,
"s harbingers before the fates,
"nd prologue to the omen coming on,
eaven and earth have together demonstrated
To our country and countrymen.
(ct )! scene *
7laudius2
.or your intent
#n going bac& to school in -ittenberg,
#t is most retrograde to our desire2
"nd we beseech you, bend you to remain
ere, in the cheer and comfort of our eye,
-ur chiefest courtier, cousin, and our son.
7laudius2
"s for your intentions
#n going bac& to school in %ittenberg,
%e are contrary to this
"nd we beg you change your plans and stay
ere, in the cheer and comfort of our eye,
-ur principal courtier, cousin, and our son.
(ct )! scene .
*olonius2
@ive thy thoughts no tongue,
For any unproportioned thought his act.
*olonius2
+on!t say what you thin&
Fever ta&e action on anything you haven>t thought
?e thou familiar, but by no means vulgar.
Those friends thou hast, and their adoption tried,
@rapple them to thy soul with hoops of steelB
?ut do not dull thy palm with entertainment
-f each new/hatch>d, unfledged comrade.
?eware
-f entrance to a 1uarrel, but being in,
?ear>t that the opposed may beware of thee.
@ive every man thy ear, but few thy voiceB
Ta&e each man>s censure, but reserve thy
)udgment.
7ostly thy habit as thy purse can buy,
?ut not express>d in fancyB rich, not gaudyB
.or the apparel oft proclaims the man,
"nd they in .rance of the best ran& and station
"re of a most select and generous chief in that.
Feither a borrower nor a lender beB
.or loan oft loses both itself and friend,
"nd borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
This above all2 to thine ownself be true,
"nd it must follow, as the night the day,
Thou canst not then be false to any man.
through properly.
,a&e friends but do not be deficient in refinement
%hen you have a good friend, stic& fast to him. ?ut
don>t go out of your way to get friendly with
common people
Ta&e good care
Try to stay out of fights, but if you find yourself in
one / ma&e sure that you &eep the guy you are
fighting afraid of you.
Listen to everyone, but be choosy over who you
agree with.
"lways listen when people criticise you, but don>t
be too 1uic& to criticise other people.
?uy the best 1uality clothing you can afford /
because people often )udge you by what you are
wearing. ?ut spend your money on 1uality, not )ust
on being ostentatious. Remember that the .rench
pay a lot of attention to how you dress (Laertes is
going to .rance).
+on>t lend people money2 you won>t get your money
bac&, and you will probably 1uarrel with the person
you lent it to. +on>t borrow money either, learn to
manage your own.
"lways be who you areB if you are who you are,
then obviously everybody else can trust you to.
(7oming from *olonius / the most two/faced character in the play / this piece of advice is hilarious)
(ct )! scene .
*olonius2
-phelia,
+o not believe his vowsB for they are bro&ers,
Fot of that dye which their investments show,
?ut mere implorators of unholy suits,
?reathing li&e sanctified and pious bawds,
The better to beguile.
*olonius2
-phelia,
+o not believe his vows, for they are not li&e
bro&ers
%ho are proven by the 1uality of their investments.
#nstead his words are pleaders of evil suits (courting
of a woman)
That only sound li&e blessed and virtuous bonds,
The better to mislead you.
(ct )! scene . (preiously)
Laertes2
perhaps he loves you now,
"nd now no soil nor cautel doth besmirch
The virtue of his will, but you must fear2
is greatness weighed, his will is not his own,
.or he, himself, is sub)ect to his birthB
e may not, as unvalued persons do,
7arve for himselfB for on his choice depends
The sanctity and health of this whole state,
"nd therefore must his choice be circumscribed
Ento the voice and yielding of that body
Laertes2
*erhaps amlet has true love for you now,
"nd now no disgracefulness or deceit taints
The virtue of his desire. ?ut be fearful,
7onsidering his social status, his future is not
entirely his own.
.or he, himself, is subservient to his high birth.
e cannot do as lower class persons do,
To ma&e his own choice of a wife. is choice
involves
The saintliness and health of this entire nation.
%hereof he is the headB then, if he says he loves
you,
#t fits your wisdom so far to believe it
"s he, in his peculiar sect and force,
,ay give his saying deed, which is no further
Than the main voice of +enmar& goes withalB
Therefore amlet>s choice must be limited
?y the voice and consent of the people
-f whom he is the *rince. #f he says he loves
you,
Ese your wisdom to believe that only as far
"s he, in his unusual allegiance and power,
7an prove it by marrying you. That is no farther
Than the consent of the Iing of +enmar& goes.
(ct )! scene /
amlet2
Jea, from the table of my memory
#>ll wipe away all trivial, fond records
"ll saws of boo&s, all forms, all pressures past,
That youth and observation copied there,
"nd thy commandment, all alone, shall live
%ithin the boo& and volume of my brain (5)
,y tables2 meet it is # set it down
$hat one may smile! and smile! and be a
illain
amlet2
Jes, from the catalog of my memory
#>ll erase all the trivial, foolish entries,
"ll the 1uotations from boo&s, all the shapes,
and impressions of the past,
That youthful curiosity and observation have
copied there.
"nd # shall live by your commandment alone
%ritten in the boo&s and volumes of my brain
(5)
%here is my writing tablet / it>s proper # write
down
$hat one may smile! and smile! and be a
illain.
(ct ))! scene *
*olonius2
Ta&e this from this, if this be otherwise.
#f circumstances lead me, # will find
%here truth is hid, though it were hid indeed
%ithin the centre. (;KL)
*olonius2
Ta&e this from this, if this isn!t the case now.
#f get the opportunity, # will find
%here truth is hidden, though it were hidden
indeed
%ithin the centre of the man.
amlet2
there is nothing either good or bad but thin&ing
ma&es it so. (8=C)
amlet2
there is nothing either good or bad but only
thin&ing ma&es it so.
(ct )))! scene +
*olonius2
-phelia, wal& you hereB gracious, so please youB
%e will bestow ourselvesB read on this boo&,
That show of such an exercise may color
Jour lowlinessB we are oft> to blame in this,
>Tis too much proved, that with devotion>s visage
"nd pious action, we do sugar o>er
The +evil, himself.
*olonius2
-phelia, wal& here. @raciously, if you please'
The Iing and # will hide ourselves. Read this
boo&
0o that the appearance of such an activity may
show
Jour humility. %e are often to blame in this way,
"nd it is too often proven, that with the face of
devotion
"nd pious action, we can lure (< Rom. a
ademeni), or hide,
The +evil, himself.
(ct )))! scene +
amlet2
To be, or not to be, that is the 1uestion,
%hether >tis nobler in the mind to suffer
The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,
-r to ta&e arms against a sea of troubles,
"nd by opposing, end themB to die, to sleep
Fo more, and by a sleep, to say we end
The heartache, and the thousand natural shoc&s
That flesh is heir toB >tis a consummation
+evoutly to be wished2 to die, to sleepB
To sleep, perchance to dreamB "ye, there>s the
rubB
.or in that sleep of death, what dreams may
come,
%hen we haue shuffled off this mortal coil,
,ust give us pauseB there>s the respect
That ma&es calamity of so long life.
.or who would bear the whips and scorns of
time,
The oppressor>s wrong, the proud man>s
contumely,
The pangs of despised love, the law>s delay,
The insolence of office, and the spurns
That patient merit of the unworthy ta&es,
%hen he, himself, might his 1uietus ma&e
%ith a bare bod&inB who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
?ut that the dread of something after death,
The undiscovered country, from whose bourn
Fo traveler returns, puGGles the will,
"nd ma&es us rather bear those ills we have,
Then fly to others that we &now not of.
Thus, conscience does ma&e cowards,
"nd thus the native hue of resolution
#s sic&lied o>er with the pale cast of thought,
"nd enterprises of great pitch and moment,
amlet2
To be, or not to be, that is the 1uestion.
#s it more noble, to my mind, to suffer
The twists and turns of outrageous (< Rom. cumplit)
fortune,
-r to ta&e up arms against a sea of troubles,
"nd by opposing them, end them, one way or the
otherM To die, to sleep,
(Fo more than that,) and by a sleep, to say we end
The heartache, and the thousand natural shoc&s
That human flesh is heir to. #t is a consummation
+evoutly to be wished2 to die, to sleep . . .
To sleep / perchance to dream' "ye, there>s the rub
(< Rom. impediment, obstacol).
.or in that sleep of death, the dreams that may
come,
%hen we have shuffled off this mortal shell,
,ust give us pause. There>s the way
That ma&es for the misery of a longer life.
.or who could bear the whips and scorns of time,
The oppressor>s wrongs, the arrogant man>s
contempt,
The pain of re)ected love, the law>s delays,
The insolence of office holders, and the &ic&s
That those who don>t deserve them patiently suffer,
%hen he, himself, might ma&e his death
%ith a bared daggerM %ho would bear burdens
To grunt and sweat through a weary (< Rom.
obositor) life
Hxcept for the fear of something after death,
The undiscovered country, from whose entry
Fo traveler returns. #t baffles (< Rom. a Gapaci) the
will
"nd ma&es us rather bear those ills we have
Than rush to others that we &now not.
Thus conscience ma&es cowards . . .
%ith this regard, their currents turn awry,
"nd lose the name of action.
"nd the healthy natural color of resolution
#s made sic&ly with the pallor of second thoughts,
"nd enterprises of great energy and importance,
Ta&ing all this into account, their progress goes
awry (< Rom. anapoda)
"nd they lose the name of action.
(ct )))! scene +
amlet2
@et thee a nunnery, why would>st thou be a
breeder of sinnersM
# am myself indifferent honest, but yet # could
accuse me of
such things, that it were better my mother had
not borne me2 # am
very proud, revengeful, ambitious, with more
offenses at my bec&,
than # have thoughts to put them in, imagination
to give them shape,
or time to act them inB what should such fellows
as # do, crawling
between earth and heaven, we are arrant &naves,
believe none of usB
amlet2
@o to a nunnery' %hy would you be a breeder
of sinnersM
,yself, #>m as honorable as most men, but still #
could accuse me of
such things that it would be better # had never
been born. # am
very proud, revengeful, ambitious, and with
more sins # could commit
than # can thin& about, or shape in my
imagination,
or find time to act upon. %hat should men li&e
me do, crawling
between earth and eavenM ,en are outright
&naves (< Rom. ticalosi, escroci), believe no
man.
(ct )))! scene +
-phelia2
-h what a noble mind is here o>erthrown'
The courtier>s, soldier>s, scholar>s, eye, tongue,
sword,
The expectation, and rose of the fair state,
The glass of fashion, and the mold of form,
The observed of all observers, 1uite 1uite down
-phelia2
-h, what a noble mind is overthrown (Rom.
doborat) there'
The courtier>s, soldier>s, scholar>s, eye, tongue,
and sword'
The expectation and rose of this fair country'
The mirror of fashion, and the pattern of proper
form'
The most observed among all observers2 1uite,
1uite, down'
(ct )))! scene * ($he 0ousetrap) 3 oratio is the observerB *olonius confesses to having been an
actor himselfB he played Dulius 7aesar!s part and was &illed by ?rutus 5
(ct )))! scene .
7laudius2
- my offense is ran&, it smells to heaven'
#t hath the primal
N
, eldest curse upon it2
" brother>s murder. *ray, can # not,
Though inclination be as sharp as will,
,y stronger guilt defeats my strong intent,
"nd li&e a man to double business bound,
# stand in pause where # shall first begin,
7laudius2
-h, my crime is ran& (offensive), it smells to eaven'
#t has the primal
N
, oldest curse upon it2
" brother>s murder. # cannot pray.
"lthough my instinct to pray is as strong as my desire
to, O ,y stronger guilt defeats my strong intention,
"nd li&e a man obligated to do two things at once,
# stand still, wondering where # should begin,
"nd both neglectB what if this cursed hand
%ere thic&er than itself with brother>s bloodM
#s there not rain enough in the sweet heavens
To wash it white as snowM %hereto serves
mercy,
?ut to confront the visage of offenseM
"nd what>s in prayer but this two/fold force2
To be forestalled ere we come to fall,
-r, pardon being downM Then #>ll loo& up.
,y fault is past, but oh, what form of prayer
7an serve my turn, forgive me my foul murderM
That cannot be, since # am still possessed
-f those effects for which # did the murder2
,y 7rown, mine own ambition, and my Pueen.
,ay one be pardoned and retain the offenseM
"nd neglect both tas&s. %hat if this cursed hand of
mine O %ere dar&er than itself, covered with a brother>s
bloodM O#s there not rain enough in all the sweet heavens
To wash it white as snowM ow can # find the mercy of
@od
Hxcept to loo& my offense truly in the faceM
"nd what is the use of this prayer, but this two/fold
power2 O To be stopped before we fall,
-r to gain pardon when we are downM Then, #>ll loo&
up. O ,y crime is past (<already committed), but, oh,
what form of prayer O 7an serve my purpose, forgive me
my foul (< Rom. )osnic, marsav) murderM O #t cannot be,
since # still have O Those things for which # did the
murder2 O The crown, my desire to be Iing, and the
Pueen. ,ay one be pardoned, and &eep the spoils (<
profits) of the crimeM
1 the first murder in 7hristian tradition is 7ain!s &illing of his brother, "belB
(ct )))! scene .
amlet2
Fow might # do it, but now he is a/prayingB
"nd now #>ll do>t, and so he goes to heavenB
"nd so, am # revengeM That would be scant.
" villain &ills my father, and for that,
#, his sole son, do this same villain send
To heaven.
%hy, this is base and silly, not revenge'
e too& my father grossly full of bread, (5)
Ep sword, and &now thou a more horrid hent,
%hen he is drun&, asleep, or in his rage,
-r in the incestuous pleasure of his bed,
"t game a/swearing, or about some act
That has no relish of salvation in itB
Then trip him that his heels may &ic& at heaven,
"nd that his soul may be as damned and blac&
"s ell, whereto it goesB
7laudius2
,y words fly upB my thoughts remain below.
%ords without thoughts never to heaven go.
amlet2
Fow might # do it, but now he is a/prayingB
"nd now # do it, and so he goes to eaven.
"nd so, am # true RevengeM That would be scant (<
Rom. insuficient) vengeance / O " villain &ills my
father, and in return,
#, the only son, do send this same villain O To eavenM'
%hy, it would be hire and payment, not revenge'
e &illed my father grossly full of his sins (not
repentant < Rom. pocait, plin de remuscari)
?e put away, my sword, and wait for a more horrid
chance, O %hen he is drun&, asleep, or in a rage,
-r in the incestuous pleasure of his bed,
-r gambling, or swearing, or doing some act
That has no hint of salvation in it.
Then, trip him so his heels &ic& uselessly at eaven,
"nd so his soul will be as damned and blac&
"s ell, where it goes'
7laudius2
,y words fly up, but my thoughts remain below.
%ords without thoughts, never to eaven go.
The &ing!s final words reveal that his attempt to pray has failed, casting an retrospective light on
amlet!s reasons to spare himB later on amlet &ills *olonius thin&ing he is the &ing.
(ct )2! scene .
7laudius2
# have sent to see& him, and to find the bodyB
ow dangerous is it that this man goes looseB
Jet must not we put the strong law on him,
7laudius2
# have sent them to find amlet, and to find the
body. O ow dangerous it is, that he>s wandering
around loose.
e>s loved of the distracted multitude,
%ho li&e, not in their )udgment, but their eyes,
"nd where >tis so, the offender>s scourge is
weighed
?ut never the offense. (5)
Jet # cannot put the strong arm of the law upon
him,
?ecause he>s very popular with the craGy
ma)ority of the people,
%ho li&e him, not because they have sense, but
because he loo&s good.
"nd when that happens, the offender>s
punishment is 1uestioned, O ?ut his offense is
ignored. (5)
(ct )2! scene 3
amlet2
ow all occasions do inform against me,
"nd spur my dull revenge. %hat is a man
#f his chief good and mar&et of his time
?e but to sleep and feedM " beast, no more.
0ure, he that made us with such large discourse
Loo&ing before and after, gave us not
That capability and god/li&e reason
To fust in us unusedB
amlet2
ow everything that happens shapes up against
me,
"nd drives me away from my blunted revenge'
%hat is a man
#f his chief good and business during his time on
earth
#s only to sleep and feed, li&e a beast, and no
more than thatM
0urely, he who made us with such great power
of reason,
To predict what>s ahead, and remember what>s
behind us, did not give us
That capability, and god/li&e mental capacity
To mold away in us, unused.
(ct )2! scene 3
Laertes2
ow came he deadM #>ll not be )uggled with'
To ell allegiance, vows to the blac&est devil'
7onscience and grace, to the profoundest pit'
# dare damnation. To this point # stand,
That both the worlds # give to negligence,
Let come what comes, only #>ll be revenged
,ost thoroughly for my father.
Laertes2
ow did he dieM #>ll not be toyed with'
To ell with allegiance, # cast my vows to the
blac&est devil,
"nd my conscience and salvation into the
deepest pit.
# dare damnation. -n this point # ma&e my stand,
That both this world, and the world beyond my
life, # negligently discard.
Let whatever happens, happen / only that # will
be revenged
7ompletely, for my father.
(ct 2! scene +
amlet2
That s&ull had a tongue in it, and could sing
onceB how the &nave )owls it to the ground, as if
>twere 7ain>s )awbone, that did the first murderB
this might be the pate of a politician, which this
ass now o>er/reachesB one that would circumvent
@od, might it notM
amlet2
That s&ull once had a tongue in it, and could
sing. Loo& how the &nave tosses it on the
ground, as if it were the )awbone of 7ain, who
did the first murder. #t might be the head of a
politician, whom this )ac&ass now outran&s. -r,
one who wanted to fool @od, might it not beM
oratio2 #t might, my Lord.
amlet2 -r of a 7ourtier, which could say good
morrow, sweet lord, how dost thou, sweet lordM
This might be my Lord 0uch/a/one, that
praised my Lord 0uch/a/one>s horse when he
went to beg it, might it notM
oratio2 "ye, my Lord.
amlet2 %hy even so, Q now my Lady %orm>sB
chopless, Q &noc&ed about the maGGard with a
sexton>s spadeB here>s fine revolution and
we had the tric& to see itB did these bones cost no
more the breeding, but to play at loggats with
themM ,ine ache to thin& on it.
oratio2 #t might be, my Lord.
amlet2 -r, that of a courtier, who could say,
R@ood morning, sweet Lord, how are you, sweet
LordMR #t might be Lord 0o/and/so, who once
praised the horse of Lord %hoever when he
wanted to borrow it, might it notM
oratio2 Jes, my Lord.
amlet2 Jes, even so, and now it>s Lady %orm>s
/ )awless, and hit on the head with a sexton>s
(Rom. < gropar) spade. ere>s a fine turn of
events, and
we had the luc& to see it. %ere these bones
worth no more in their creation,
but, only for playing games with themM ,y
bones ache, to thin& about it.
(ct 2! scene +
oratio2
0o @uildenstern and RosencrantG go to it.
amlet2
They are not near my conscienceB their defeat
+oes by their own insinuation growB
>Tis dangerous when the baser nature comes
?etween the pass and fell incensed points
-f mighty opposites. (5)
amlet2
+oes it not, thin& thee, stand me now uponM
e that hath &illed my &ing, and whored my
mother,
*opped in between the election and my hopes,
Thrown out his angle for my proper life /
"nd with such coGenage / is it not perfect
conscience
To 1uit him with this armM "nd is it not to be
damned,
To let this can&er of our nature come
#n further evilM
oratio2
0o @uildenstern and RosencrantG have had it.
amlet2
They are not on my conscience. Their defeat
came from O Their own desires to get involved.
#t>s dangerous when foolish people come
?etween the moving, deadly, angry points
-f powerful opponents.
amlet2
+on>t you thin& it rests upon my shoulders to do
something nowM
e who has &illed my father the &ing, and
whored my mother,
*ut himself unlawfully between me and the
crown,
.ished for a way to ta&e life properly my own,
"nd with such criminal deception / can>t #, with
a clear conscience,
Iill him with this armM "nd shouldn>t # be
damned
#f # let that diseased example of human nature
cause
,ore evilM
(ct 2! scene +
amlet (sha&es hands with Laertes)2
@ive me your pardon, sir, # have done you
wrongB
?ut pardon it, as you are a gentleman. This
presence &nows,
"nd you must needs have heard, how # am
punished
amlet (sha&es hands with Laertes)2
@ive me your pardon, sir, # have done you
wrong.
?ut pardon me as a gentleman. The people here
&now,
"nd you must have heard, how # have been
punished
%ith a sore distractionB what # have done
That might your nature, honor, and exception
Roughly awa&e, # here proclaim was madness.
%as it amlet, wronged LaertesM Fever amlet.
#f amlet from himself be ta&en away,
"nd when he>s not himself, does wrong Laertes,
Then amlet does it not, amlet denies itB
%ho does it, thenM is madness. #f it be so,
amlet is of the faction that is wrongedB
is madness is poor amlet>s enemyB
?y being afflicted with madness. %hatever #
have done
That might offend your nature, your honor, and
cause you
To ta&e exception, # hereby declare was
madness.
as amlet wronged LaertesM Fo, not amlet.
#f amlet is ta&en away from himself
"nd is not himself, and does wrong to Laertes,
Then amlet, himself, does not do it. amlet
denies it.
%ho does it, thenM is madness. #f it be so,
amlet is among those who are wronged.
is madness is poor amlet>s enemy.
(ct 2! scene +
amlet2 -h, # die, oratioB
The potent poison 1uite o>er/crows my spiritB
# cannot live to hear the news from HnglandB
?ut # do prophecy the election lights
-n .ortinbrasseB he has my dying voiceB
0o tell him, with the occurrents, more and less,
%hich have solicited . . . the rest is silence.
amlet2 -h, # die, oratio.
The strong poison o'er-crows my spirit.
# cannot live to hear the news from Hngland.
?ut # do foresee the choice for the new Iing will
?e .ortinbrasse, and he has my dying support.
Tell him that, and also about the events, greater
and smaller,
That have lured . . . 4me to this tragic fate.6 The
rest is silence.