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Top 10 Things to Teach Novice Welders

For companies who find themselves faced with the challenge of training novice welders, it is important to
instill good habits early on in the training process. Doing so helps ensure that these individuals are well
prepared not only to create quality welds, but also to contribute positively to the overall welding operation.
Learning to weld is no easy task. It takes patience, practice and a solid foundation of knowledge. For companies who
find themselves faced with the challenge of training novice welders, it is important to instill good habits early on in the
training process. Doing so helps ensure that these individuals are well prepared not only to create quality welds, but
also to contribute positively to the overall welding operation. It can also help the welders gain the confidence they
need to become increasingly proficient.

Following are 10 important things to teach novice welders, to help them improve their skills and stay safe in the
process.

1. Make safety a first priority: It is critical that welders protect themselves from the heat and electricity generated by
the welding process. The arc is dangerous to both the eyes and skin, and welders need to wear the proper personal
protective equipment (PPE) at all times. These items include: flame-resistant gloves, safety glasses, a welding helmet
and a long-sleeved welding jacket. Flame-resistant clothing and steel-toed shoes are also recommended. Both the
American Welding Society (AWS) and OSHA offer guidelines for PPE for specific environments.

It is also important for welders to use enough ventilation, local exhaust at the arc, or both to keep the fumes and
gases below the Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL)/Threshold Limit Value (TLV)/Occupational Exposure Limits
(OELs) in their breathing zone and the general area. Always train new welders to keep their heads out of the fumes.
Too, explain to new welders the importance of reading and understanding the manufacturers instructions for
equipment, your companys safety practices, and the safety instructions on the label and the material safety data
sheet for the filler metals being used. In short, remind novice welders to take all necessary precautions to protect
themselves and others.

Routinely checking for proper ground connections and standing on a dry rubber mat (indoors) or a dry board
(outdoors) during welding can further protect welders by minimizing the possibility of electrical shock.


2. Install Consumables Properly: Good conductivity (the ability for the electrical current to flow along the welding
circuit) is an important factor in gaining good weld quality. New welders should always install their consumables
diffusers, nozzles, contact tips, collet bodies, etc. according to the manufacturers recommendation, making sure
that each component is securely tightened. In a gas metal arc welding (GMAW) operation, for example, the
connection between the GMAW gun neck and diffuser needs to be secure to prevent shielding gas leaks. Secure
connections also provide the surface area necessary to carry the electrical current throughout the GMAW gun (or gas
tungsten arc welding GTAW torch) to create a stable arc. Good connections also help prevent weld defects, support
consistent productivity and reduce the risk of premature consumable failure due to overheating.


3. Cleanliness is critical: Cleaning the base material prior to welding, and as needed between weld passes, is
absolutely essential. Dirt, oil, grease and other debris can easily enter the weld pool causing contamination that leads
to poor weld quality and costly rework. Excessive oxidation and moisture are also culprits that can compromise
quality weld. New welders need to be educated as to the proper cleaning procedure for the particular base material
they are welding. In some cases, wiping the base material with a clean, dry cloth may suffice. However, welding on
aluminum, for example, takes more precautions. The welder will need to use a stainless steel wire brush designated
for aluminum to clean out the joint before welding. A wire brush removes dirt and any of the oxides that may still
reside on aluminums surface.

Regardless of the material, it is important to provide the welder with the proper instructions for cleaning before
welding commences.

4. Always follow welding procedures: Welding procedures are the recipe needed to create consistent welds. New
and experienced welders alike need to understand the importance of these procedures and should follow them at all
times. The procedures for a given application have been carefully determined and qualified by experts to ensure that
the recommended parameters are capable of yielding the desired results. Weld procedures include details such as
the required shielding gas mixture, recommended gas flow rate, and voltage and amperage ranges. These
procedures also provide information on the type and diameter of filler metal to use, as well as the proper wire feed
speed in the case of a GMAW or flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) application.

5. Understand the importance of filler metals: Filler metals are a critical, but sometimes confusing, component of
the welding system. New welders can benefit from familiarizing themselves with the attributes of various types of
wires, including flux-cored and metal-cored wires, as well as the techniques for welding with each type. For example,
they should learn whether their particular filler metal requires a push or pull technique. Following old adages like,
If theres slag, then you drag, can help; it indicates that flux-cored wires, which produce slag, should be operated
using a pull technique. New welders should also establish the habit of consulting the manufacturers specification
sheet for additional operating recommendations.

Learning to handle and store filler metals properly is also critical for new welders to learn. They should always wear
clean gloves when handling filler metals and if they are responsible for storing them, should do so in a clean, dry
environment.

6. Stay comfortable: Keeping cool and comfortable during the welding process can help welders lessen the chance
of injuries associated with repetitive movement and reduce overall fatigue. When possible, welders should learn to
minimize cumulative strength moves, material handling or constant motion. They should also use a GMAW gun or
GTAW torch with a comfortable handle and cable style, as these factors both contribute to the equipments weight
and maneuverability. New welders should be encouraged to play an active role in improving the ergonomics of their
welding workspace. Typically, the more involved a welder is in providing input about the job, the more satisfied he or
she will be. Plus, such active involvement can help ensure greater safety compliance and lower workers
compensation costs for injuries.

7. Know the material properties: Every material has different mechanical and chemical properties. Helping new
welders understand the difference between materials particularly how they react to heating and cooling is a key
component of training. For example, austenitic stainless steel conducts heat at around half the rate of mild steel, but
has a much higher rate of thermal expansion when welded; it also has a more localized heat affected zone (HAZ) that
can lead to buckling when the weld cools. Welders who are aware of such properties can take precautions such as
clamping to prevent distortion. Similarly, many materials require pre- and post-weld heat treatments to control the
cooling rate and prevent cracking. When welders are familiar with such material attributes, theyre better prepared to
make necessary adjustments during the welding process.

8. Visually inspect the welds: Knowing how to conduct an accurate visual inspection of a completed weld is the first
step in quality control. It is also the quickest and least expensive method of inspection. New welders should learn how
to identify weld defects that have porosity, for example, since the presence of this weld defect on the surface often
indicates a similar problem throughout the weld. Identifying the defect early on helps prevent the time and cost
associated with other testing methods, including x-ray or NDT (non-destructive testing) inspections. Other defects
that welders should learn to identify include lack of penetration (high, ropey welds), excessive penetration (sunken
welds) and undercutting (characterized by a notch in the base material). It is important, too, that welders inspect for
weld cracks, which are among the most common weld defects to occur in the welding operation.

9. Learn how to troubleshoot: Being able to identify and rectify welding problems quickly is a key skill for new
welders to learn. Good troubleshooting skills not only help reduce downtime, but they also contribute to good weld
quality and productivity. Such skills can also help reduce costs associated with rework. New welders can benefit from
learning how to adjust gas flow rates properly and/or identify gas leaks in order to solve instances of porosity. They
should also know how to make adjustments to amperage and voltage settings if they encounter issues such as lack
of penetration, excessive penetration or undercutting. Identifying welding problems associated with worn
consumables is also important, since poor conductivity can result in an unstable arc and lead to a variety of weld
defects.

10. Maintenance makes a difference: From the power source to the GMAW gun or GTAW torch and consumables,
every part of the welding system requires maintenance to keep it operating efficiently and effectively. New welders
should become familiar with proper maintenance procedures preferably preventive ones in order to play an
active part in the ongoing upkeep of the entire welding system. Regularly checking that the connections throughout
the length of their gun or torch are tight is important, as is visually inspecting the front-end consumables for signs of
wear. In the case of a GMAW gun, the welder should replace nozzles or contact tips that have spatter buildup on
them to prevent issues such as poor gas coverage or an erratic arc that will likely lead to weld defects. Welders
should also regularly check the power source, primary power line, gas cylinders and gas distribution system to ensure
that they are working properly. They also need to replace faulty gas regulators or cables and hoses that show signs
of wear, cracks or damage.

There is more to teaching a novice welder than just showing him or her how to set the power source or hold the gun
or torch at the correct angle. The best approach to training is to incorporate good habits that will keep the welder safe
and comfortable, and provide the knowledge to address everything from maintenance to materials. The time required
to transition a novice welder to a skilled one will, of course, take time. Still, the long-term benefits are worth it.








Top Factors and Considerations for MIG (GMAW) Gun Selection

All MIG guns are not created equal, and heavy-use applications require a careful review of rated output, size,
components, and application requirements
Selecting a MIG gun (or torch) for your welding application should be done with just as much attention to detail as the
welding power source itself. Think of it as the human body: an injured toe or finger inhibits our ability to perform basic
functions such as walking or grasping. The gun while an extension of the system is just as critical to the quality
of the weld itself and the productivity of your operators. There are also important considerations when selecting a
MIG gun that may help you lower your operating costs. In this article, well take a look at common types of MIG guns
and considerations you should make when selecting the gun thats right for you.

Choose Wisely: Types and Varieties of MIG Guns

The choice of a MIG gun goes beyond just air- or water-cooled models. Here well look at your five basic options for
MIG welding (as well as considerations if you plan to run flux-cored wires) and what you need to know about each:

Air Cooled: Air-cooled guns use ambient air and shielding gas to dissipate excess heat. The power cable on an air-
cooled gun contains more copper than the cable on a water-cooled torch to help prevent the cable insulation from
melting or burning. As a result, air-cooled guns are heavier and less flexible compared to water-cooled guns in most
cases. Air-cooled systems, however, are less expensive as they do not require an independent radiator cooling
system and extra hoses that are associated with water-cooled systems. The simpler design of air-cooled setups
makes them easier to operate, assemble, maintain and support. Air-cooled MIG guns are typically available in a wide
range of amperages, between 150 and 600 amps.

Water Cooled: Water-cooled MIG gun systems require a radiator cooling system that circulates water, the ambient
air and shielding gas to dissipate heat from the gun. However, water-cooled gun cables are lighter and more flexible
because the cable contains less copper compared to air-cooled systems. Water-cooled MIG guns are typically
available in 300- to 600-amp ranges.

Push-Pull: Available in both air- and water-cooled designs, push-pull guns are particularly helpful when welding soft
alloys such as aluminum, small diameter stainless, silicon bronze and cored wires (aluminum should typically only be
welded with a push-pull system or a spool gun). They are also an excellent option when welding far away from the
power source some push-pull guns are capable of working more than 50 feet away (although 15- to 35-foot
distances are more common and preferred). This is not always ideal, but is helpful when accessibility is an issue.
Push-pull systems feature a push motor at the feeder that works in conjunction with a pull motor on the gun,
effectively allowing the wire to feed through the liner with minimal resistance. The feeder and the gun must be
compatible for these systems to work. Push-pull guns are typically available in gooseneck and pistol-style grip to
meet application demands and operator preference.

Spool Gun: Spool guns improve feeding of soft wires by locating a small spool of wire, typically about 1 pound and 4
inches in diameter, on a pistol-grip style gun. Because spool guns only need to feed the wire a few inches before it
hits the weld puddle, they eliminate the potential problems created by pushing soft wires through a regular gun, such
as birdnesting. This type of gun is particularly helpful with welding aluminum. As compared to a push-pull system,
which is more suitable for production welding environments, a spool gun is best suited to applications such as MRO
where welding is occasional and often performed at lower amperages.

The key to a spool gun is flexibility. Duty cycles are typically lower, but the spool gun offers one of the most cost
effective entry points into MIG welding, as it can be used with any power source with a 14-pin connection, including
some engine drivesyou dont need to buy new power sources to get into MIG welding aluminum in most cases.

Fume Extraction Gun: Fume extraction guns capture the fume right at the gun and connect back to a high-vacuum
fume extraction system. Typically rated up to about 400 amps, these models have become more efficient and user
friendly with features such as adjustable extraction control (so as not to disturb shielding gas flow while still providing
excellent fume extraction), a smaller vacuum chamber (for ease-of-handling) and improved neck designs for better
joint access.

These guns provide an extra defense against potentially harmful welding fumes, such as those encountered when
welding certain varieties of stainless and galvanized steels, and when welding with wires and steels containing high
levels manganese.

Flux-Cored Guns: While the same machine can typically be used to run both MIG and flux-cored wires, a MIG gun is
not recommended to run the Flux-Cored process. Flux-Cored welding is typically hotter and rougher on front-end
consumables. There are, however, consumable conversion packages that will allow you to run flux-cored wires on a
standard MIG gun. Otherwise, if you plan to run the Flux-Cored process, make sure that you have a dedicated flux-
cored gun in addition to your MIG gun.

Top Considerations for Gun Selection

1. Application: Whether you choose an air- or water-cooled MIG gun often comes down to operator preference, as
each type has models rated up to 600 amps. We tend to see high-amperage Pulsed MIG applications relying on
water-cooled systems, as well as applications that run larger diameter wires (1/16-in. and up). Applications with
smaller diameter wires (.035-, 3/64-in.) tend to more often use air-cooled guns. Companies that run a helium mix tend
to prefer water-cooled systems as helium runs hotter than other gas mixes. In general, water-cooled guns also help
consumables last longer (creating less downtime and increasing cost savings) because the tip, nozzle and diffusers
all run cooler.

Also, are you welding in the shop or in the field? Air-cooled MIG guns are more practical for outdoor use because
they require fewer parts, which simplifies transport, set-up and parts management. Water-cooled systems make more
sense in stationary applications because of the required water-cooling system and hoses.

As mentioned before, when welding with softer wires, such as aluminum, small diameter stainless steel, silicon
bronze and cored wires, push-pull and spool guns will provide greater support to prevent feeding problems.

2. Amperage Ratings/Duty Cycle: One of the most common mistakes is to buy a gun that has too low or too high of
a duty cycle. Guns rated at 600 amps will more than cover almost any application you can think of, but the added
size, weight and cost of a gun with that high of a rating may exceed your needs and fatigue the operator. A gun rated
at 150 or 200 amps will cost less, be lighter and easier on the operator, but wont be suitable for extensive welding on
applications that may require 300-400 amps. As new work comes in that requires welding at higher amperages, you
may find youll have to buy a higher-amperage gun anyway.

Its a delicate balance: you may weld at 400 amps, but you may be able to work with a gun rated at 300 amps/100
percent duty cycle because you realistically will not be welding 100 percent of the time. The average arc-on time for
a welding operator over an eight-hour day is roughly 30 minutes for each hour. Take a good hard look at your welding
application and determine, based on average amperage and arc on time, what gun will be best for your application.

3. Cost: Water-cooled systems offer a higher cost of implementation due to the added components (e.g. cooling
system, hoses). Those added components are also prone to the same working hazards as an air-cooled system,
which means there are more parts and components that may be prone to downtime. On the other hand, as previously
stated, water-cooled systems help consumables last longer, helping reduce those associated costs.

Push-pull guns are ideal for welding soft wires and will provide greater performance and productivity than trying to
weld those same wires with a push-only system. However, these need to be coupled with compatible wire feeders
and systems, potentially increasing the cost of implementation. If you infrequently weld with these wires, a spool gun
may prove to be a wise choice because it will work with most of the welding systems you already own (provided they
have a 14-pin connection) and will not require you to buy new equipment in most cases.

4. Components/Consumables: A welding system is only as strong as its weakest part. Here are a few things to look
at when specifying a MIG gun:

a. The back end: A heavy, sturdy power pin designed to seal the connection tightly helps prevent problems such as
electrical resistance, overheating, gas leakage and poor conductivity. Look for a rigid strain relief at the connection
between the power cable and the wire feeder. This will prevent kinking and improve feeding. Also, select a gun with
multiple, interchangeable plug options. A gun that can be matched with multiple feeders is also preferred as it allows
you to standardize on one type of gun and consumable, helping to reduce equipment costs, minimize inventory and
simplify the entire process.

b. The liner: There are three key factors when looking at liners: make sure there is a good gas seal and/or solid o-
ring connection at the back of the liner to prevent gas leaks; choose liners with durable jacketing or coating to prevent
additional gas loss, and select a liner designed for your diameter wire. Also, look for a liner that is easy to remove and
replace to minimize downtime. Push-pull guns use unique liners designed specifically for this type gun, usually made
of teflon or a type of plastic.

c. The power cable: A cable that is too light for your application can cause the gun to overheat and may lead to poor
welding performance, whereas a cable that is too large can be cumbersome and cause clutter on the shop floor. A
good rule of thumb is to use the smallest and shortest cable possible without limiting your welding needs; smaller
cables reduce operator fatigue, minimize clutter and help prevent excessive coiling that can lead to poor wire feeding.

d. Trigger options: Triggers are the only moving part on a MIG gun that can fail due to mechanical motion. Look for
a strong, reliable trigger that is easily serviceable to help minimize downtime for component changeovers. Also,
choose a gun that gives you the most appropriate trigger option for your application: standard, locking, dual pull and
dual schedule switches are all available through most manufacturers. These options allow your welding operators to
work with the trigger set-up that best suits them and the application, and will further increase productivity by making
welding more comfortable.

e. Neck and handle options: MIG guns are available with fixed, rotatable and flexible necks of different lengths and
angles to provide flexibility when welding in various positions or tight quarters. Rotatable necks, for instance, allow
you to weld out-of position more comfortably without changing your gun handle or sacrificing quality. Flexible necks
can be easily adjusted to fit different positions, and save time and money for changing out and/or inventorying
expensive specialty guns for a given application. Also, choose a neck with good armor (hard plastic or metal) to
protect it from damage that could lead to shorts and failures in the gun. When looking at handle options, consider
lightweight, comfortable styles that will meet your amperage/duty cycle rating needs. Similar to the power cable, a
smaller handle makes it easier for you to weld. Also, a ventilated handle can reduce heat and increase your comfort
and productivity.

f. Consumables (nozzles and tips): Less expensive consumables do not always translate into cost savings -
ultimately, you get what you pay for. By selecting a consumable based on longevity instead of price, you can reduce
costs for replacement parts and for changeover time. You will likely spend more money upfront for such
consumables, but more durable consumables can help reduce overall operating costs in the long run by increasing
productivity and reducing downtime. It is also important to look for heavy duty tips and nozzles that provide good
conductivity and gas coverage to help ensure good arc starts, less spatter and less rework and clean-up.


As you can see, the choice is much more complicated than simply picking the least expensive or most powerful gun
that matches your machine. Careful consideration of your welding process, operator preferences and
performance/comfort will lead you to the gun that is right for you.


Some push-pull guns are capable of working more than 50 feet away, although 15- to 35-foot distances are
more common and preferred.
















How MIG Guns Can Improve Productivity and Lower Operating
Costs
Not all gas metal arc welding (GMAW) guns are created equal. Yet guns are often considered a commodity when
purchasing a GMAW system. More costly components such as the power source, wire feeder and shielding gas
generally take precedence and the gun often becomes an afterthought. Unfortunately that afterthought can lead to
poor weld quality and higher operating costs.
Because the GMAW gun is responsible for consistently delivering the current, the electrode and shielding gas to the
weld puddle, it plays a critical part in achieving quality welds. Closely examining your application and selecting a gun
specifically designed for your needs can be an easy and cost effective means of improving that weld quality,
increasing productivity and lowering your operating costs.
Are You Using Too Much Gun?
The first question to ask is: Am I using too much gun? A common misconception dictates that if a welding procedure
calls for 400 amps, then you need a gun rated at 400 amps and 100-percent duty cycle. A welding operator could
certainly weld at 400 amps for eight hours straight and never set that gun down, but in reality, movement of parts,
tacking and other labor attribute to a day's work. In fact, the average "arc-on" time for a welding operator over an
eight-hour day is roughly 45 minutes to one hour.
You may be able to buy a smaller, less expensive gun with a lower duty cycle rating and still achieve the same
results. For example, switching from a 400-amp gun (100% duty cycle) down to a 300-amp gun (100% duty cycle)
can often provide equal performance. However, switching to a smaller gun can lower equipment costs (lower
amperage guns cost less) and it can also reduce operator fatigue and downtime-less gun means less weight, better
maneuverability and increased comfort. A smaller gun can even help establish a healthier workforce and save money
by reducing workers' compensation claims for injuries such as carpal tunnel syndrome, which is often associated with
using heavier guns.
Using shorter power cables on your gun can also help minimize downtime and lower costs. Shorter power cables are
less expensive and help prevent wire feeding problems by minimizing unnecessary coiling. Using the shortest power
cable possible for your application-one that will meet your amperage and duty cycle requirements-can also offer
better maneuverability for your welding operators.
GMAW Gun Components That Can Save You Money
Amperage is not the only cost-saving consideration related to choosing the right GMAW gun for your application.
Several components on a GMAW gun can translate into savings when given careful consideration.

Choosing the right neck option for your GMAW gun can help you weld expertly
in narrow or out-of-position joints and can save money for costly specialty guns.
The Back End
Begin with a close examination of the power pin that connects the gun and power cable to the wire feeder. A loose
connection between the gun and the feeder can cause higher electrical resistance throughout the entire system,
leading to overheating that can damage either the gun or the wire feeder. It can also cause gas leakage and poor
conductivity that could lead to an erratic arc and poor weld quality. A heavy, sturdy power pin designed to seal the
connection tightly helps prevents these problems and the costly downtime and rework associated with them.
Secondly, choose a gun with a rigid strain relief at the connection between the power cable and the wire feeder. It
can prevent the power cable from kinking and provide better wire feeding, a more stable arc and better quality welds-
each factors that add up to less rework, more welding time and better productivity.
It is also important - specifically in shops that run different brands and styles of feeders - to select a gun with multiple,
interchangeable plug options. Having a gun that can be matched with different feeders allows you to standardize on
one style of GMAW gun throughout your shop and stock only one brand of accompanying consumables. This
standardization helps reduce equipment costs and minimize inventory, not to mention the costly time that goes into
stocking and maintaining numerous parts.
The Liner
Liners are one of the most critical components of a GMAW gun: many feeding problems originate with this
component and its replacement can be among the more expensive causes of downtime and/or maintenance issues.
The liner can also be a source of gas leakage, which wastes costly shielding gas and leads to insufficient protection
of the weld puddle (leading to rework and added clean-up).
First, make sure that there is a good gas seal and/or solid o-ring connection at the back of the liner to help prevent
gas leaks. Also choose liners with a durable jacketing or coating to prevent additional gas loss through the steel liner
coils.
Next, select a liner designed specifically for your diameter of wire. Liners that are either too large or too small can
cause poor wire feeding that may lead to an erratic arc and poor weld quality. The liner size needs to match wire size,
usually within a specific range; for example, you could use a .035-in. wire in a .035-in. to .045-in. liner. Maintaining
these parameters will help ensure proper wire feeding and improved weld consistency.
The Power Cable
A cable that is too light for your application can cause the gun to overheat and may lead to poor welding
performance, whereas a cable that is too large can be cumbersome and cause clutter on the shop floor. A good rule
of thumb is to use the smallest and shortest cable possible without limiting your welding needs; smaller cables reduce
operator fatigue, minimize clutter and help prevent excessive coiling that can lead to poor wire feeding. As with other
components, make sure that the power cable fits tightly into the wire feed system to maintain proper conductivity.
Trigger Options
Triggers are the only moving part on a GMAW gun that can fail due to mechanical motion. Look for a strong, reliable
trigger that is easily serviceable to help minimize downtime for component changeovers. Also, choose a gun that
gives you the most appropriate trigger option for your application: standard, locking, dual pull, dual schedule switches
are all available through most manufacturers. These options allow your welding operators to work with the trigger set-
up that best suits them and the application, and will further increase productivity by making welding more
comfortable.
Neck and Handle Options
GMAW guns are available with fixed, rotatable and flexible necks of different lengths and angles to provide flexibility
when welding in various positions or tight quarters. Rotatable necks, for instance, allow you to weld out-of position
more comfortably without changing your gun handle or sacrificing quality. Flexible necks can be easily adjusted to fit
different positions and save time and money for changing out and/or inventorying expensive specialty guns for a
given application. Also, choose a neck with good armor (hard plastic or metal) to protect it from damage that could
lead to shorts and failures in the gun.
When looking at handle options, consider lightweight, comfortable styles that will meet your amperage/duty cycle
rating needs. Similar to the power cable, a smaller handle makes it easier for you to weld. Also, a ventilated handle
can reduce heat and increase your comfort and productivity.
Consumables (nozzles and tips)
Less expensive consumables do not always translate into cost savings - ultimately, you get what you pay for. By
selecting a consumable based on longevity instead of price you can reduce costs for replacement parts and for
changeover time. You will likely spend more money upfront for such consumables, but more durable consumables
can help reduce overall operating costs in the long run by increasing productivity and reducing downtime. It is also
important to look for heavy duty tips and nozzles that provide good conductivity and gas coverage to help ensure
good arc starts, less spatter and less rework and clean-up.
Conclusion
GMAW guns are an important and often overlooked
component and should be a major factor when selecting a
welding system. A gun should be durable, easy-to-use and
customized to your specific application and offer the lowest
amperage necessary to fulfill welding parameters. The right
GMAW gun offers less downtime for maintenance,
component changeovers or operator fatigue, and more
consistent welds for better productivity. Most importantly,
each of those factors leads to reduced operating costs.
Take the time to fully investigate your gun options and
begin improving your bottom line today.



Air-cooled guns use ambient air and shielding gas to dissipate excess heat. In most
cases, air-cooled guns are heavier and less flexible compared to water-cooled guns, but
are less expensive, and easier to operate and maintain.



Selecting more expensive, longer lasting consumables
can add up to long-term cost savings.

Dedicated Flux-Cored guns are recommended for Flux-Cored welding, although there
are consumable conversion packages that can transform a standard MIG gun into a
Flux-Cored gun.




Spool guns offer one of the most cost effective entry points into MIG welding, as they
can be used with any power source with a 14-pin connection, including some engine
drivesyou dont need to buy new power sources to get into MIG welding aluminum in
most cases.