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Application of Uasbr in Treatment Of Dairy Waste Water

Vivek R. Kasar(Kokil), Research scholar, Dept. of Civil Engineering , Vishwakarma Institute of


InformationTechnology, Pune viv_kasar@rediffmail.com
R.A.Joshi, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering , Vishwakarma Institute of InformationTechnology,
Pune, rahul11802000@ yahoo.co.in

ABSTRACT

In developing, agricultural based countries like India,
the industrial development moving faster, along with this
the water pollution, space limitation like problems also
increasing. To resolve such problem in Dairy wastewater
treatment plant the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket
Reactor (UASBR) should be used very efficiently.
A 38 liter pilot scale UASBR model developed with
reflux to control flow of upper sludge to treat the dairy
waste water. It was operated for 6hrs- 8hrs after culture
developed at different phases like reactor without media
and without recycle(batch reactor) at ambient
temperature, with media and without recycle (batch
reactor), with media and with recycle (Continuous flow
reactor), with media, with recycle at mesophilic (35-390C)
Condition (Continuous flow reactor). After reaching stable
operation condition it was observed that the operation
gives the significant removal efficiency of different
parameters like COD, BOD, TSS, TKN and other
parameters. After comparative study between different
phases, It was found that the most desired result found in
with media and with recycle continuous flow reactor.
The COD removal efficiency was found in the range of
75-91%, BOD, TKN, TSS gives the maximum removal
efficiency. The model study after analysis of result gives
the approximate idea about the usability and its
function.The anaerobic treatment results in formation of
methane (CH4) which can be used as an energy source. By
vertical development of reactor the required space for the
treatment can be minimized.

Keywords
UASBR,Dairy waste water, Different phases for
treatment, Comparative study for different phases

1. INTRODUCTION


India is one of the fast developing countries with growing
number of industries. The situation is similar to that
prevailing in most of the developing countries, which have
not been able to develop adequate civic infrastructure even
when their number of citizens and industries have
increased rapidly. As a result many of cities have grown
into overcrowded and ill-equipped settlements with a
highly polluted environment prone to frequent epidemics
and hardships. Dairy industry has become one of the major
food processing industries of the world in current century
after the inversion of milk preservation techniques and
pasteurization and powderisation technique. In India more
than 273 dairy industries processing and supplying 19
million litres milk soled per day through arranged sales.
But in whole process large amount of waste water
generates, thats why it is necessary to treat that water by
using sustainable method like UASB reactor (i.e. Upflow
Anaerobic Sludge Blanket reactor). The Upflow
Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) process is one of the
recent developments in field of anaerobic treatment. In this
process the use of primary treatment and the filter bed is
completely eliminated. The UASB process is seen as one
of the most cost effective & efficient anaerobic treatment.
The anaerobic treatment results in formation of methane
(CH
4
) which can be used as an energy source. Therefore
anaerobic process followed by aerobic process has proved
to be economical in waste treatment. The UASB process
was developed by Lettinga and co-workers in the late
1970s (Lettingaet al 1980). Initially the reactor was
designed to treat concentrated industrial wastewater and its
application was later extended to several type of
wastewater treatment. Wastewater emerging from
industries posing a threat for the environment and human
health. Waste water is a water containing hazardous waste
from various industries, institutes and residential areas
with high concentration of organic matter, heavy metals,
toxics and hazardous organic chemicals. Therefore it
cannot be directly introduced to any disposal site or water
body and its collection and treatment are necessary to
avoid any possible future environment hazard. In recent
years, anaerobic treatment technology has been chosen as
an attractive option considering the dual benefits of
environmental pollution control and meeting national need
of energy.

2. MATERIALS AND METHOD
The feed stock for the reactor was collected from
Katraj dairy industry, Katraj,Pune,Maharashtra, India.
The material used and procedure followed for this
research is as follows-



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REFERENCES

[1] A. Vetro, H. Sun, P. DaGraca, and T. Poon,
Minimum drift architectures for three-layer scalable
DTV decoding, IEEE Trans. Consumer Electron.,
vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 527-536, Aug. 1998.
[2] A. N. Netravali and B. G. Haskell, Digital Pictures,
2nd ed., Plenum Press: New York, 1995, pp. 613-651.
[3] A. Vetro, H. Sun, P. DaGraca, and T. Poon,
Minimum drift architectures for three-layer scalable
DTV decoding, IEEE Trans. Consumer Electron.,
vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 527-536, Aug. 1998.
[4] A. N. Netravali and B. G. Haskell, Digital Pictures,
2nd ed., Plenum Press: New York, 1995, pp. 613-651.
[5] A. Vetro, H. Sun, P. DaGraca, and T. Poon,
Minimum drift architectures for three-layer scalable
DTV decoding, IEEE Trans. Consumer Electron.,
vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 527-536, Aug. 1998.
[6] A. N. Netravali and B. G. Haskell, Digital Pictures,
2nd ed., Plenum Press: New York, 1995, pp. 613-651.
[7] A. Vetro, H. Sun, P. DaGraca, and T. Poon,
Minimum drift architectures for three-layer scalable
DTV decoding, IEEE Trans. Consumer Electron.,
vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 527-536, Aug. 1998.
[8] A. N. Netravali and B. G. Haskell, Digital Pictures,
2nd ed., Plenum Press: New York, 1995, pp. 613-651.
[9] A. Vetro, H. Sun, P. DaGraca, and T. Poon,
Minimum drift architectures for three-layer scalable
DTV decoding, IEEE Trans. Consumer Electron.,
vol. 44, no. 3, pp. 527-536, Aug. 1998.
[10] A. N. Netravali and B. G. Haskell, Digital Pictures,
2nd ed., Plenum Press: New York, 1995, pp. 613-651.