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THE RED RIVER SUN | WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 2014 7A

redriversun.com
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BAPTIST
From Page 1
with Black Roofing Co.,
Hobart, Okla., and work
began July 23. The project
was finished July 26.
We replaced all the
entire Fellowship Hall,
auditorium and parsonage
to the left of it, and
replaced it all with metal,
Overstreet said. There is
a 40-year warranty on the
paint on the metal.
Although the roof
replacement if finished, the
church has several more
renovations to complete
the project, including
a bathroom, which was
severely damaged by the
leaks.
The womens bathroom
on the inside of the church,
we will have to replace the
ceiling tile because it came
right down through there,
he said. Now, were going
to paint the outside to
match the roof.
With the roof project
complete, FBC leaders are
confident they will not have
to worry about leaks for
many years to come.
It will probably last
the life of the church,
Overstreet said.
By Dee Derr
The Red River Sun
CHILDRESS With
Texas population growing
rapidly, the Texas Department
of Transportation is working
on an official plan to help
aid the state in the coming
decades.
Last week, the Texas
Department of Transportation
(TxDOT) invited the public
to attend an open house-
style public meeting at the
auditorium in Fair Park.
This was just one in a series
of public meetings designed
to educate the public and
to gain input in developing
TTP-2040, the states long
term transportation plan.
This plan will help address
state transportation needs
and include strategies for
development of projects and
services for roads, public
transportation, bicycle
and pedestrian, passenger
rail, freight, aviation and
waterways.
Texas 2014 population is
27,514,427 and is projected
to reach 45,388,036 by
2040, so TxDOTs burden
is unprecedented in terms
of population growth in the
United States. The Lone
Star State is by far the fastest
growing state.
TxDOT transportation
planner Michelle Conkle
said that one of her goals
has been to visit all twenty-
five of the TxDOT districts
in the state of Texas. This
is the twentieth district Ive
visited, there are five more to
go, said Conkle. Roads and
transportation are vital to the
future economic health and
growth of Texas.
During the meeting, the
public had the opportunity to
use an interactive computer
program which is used
to educate as well as to
receive feedback concerning
transportation priorities.
The first section of the
computer program asks the
user to choose the top three
transportation priorities they
would invest money in. The
choices include pavement
conditions, public transit,
traffic congestion, bridge
conditions, non-highway
transit options, and job
creation.
The next section gives three
different scenarios which deal
with the cost and outcome of
investing in particular areas of
the transportation system. It
then asks the user to rate the
scenarios from best to worst.
The last section asks the
user to create their own
transportation investment
budget. The exercise begins
with $5 billion dollars which
the user must invest while
taking into account the many
different transportation needs
state-wide.
Metropolitan areas such
as Dallas or Houston will be
more concerned with reducing
traffic congestion while rural
communities tend to focus
more on the condition of
bridges and road surfaces.
This interactive tool is
designed to provide an
informative experience
concerning of the many
different needs that TxDot
takes into consideration when
planning for the future.
Overall, TxDOT has
learned to do more with less.
One third of the funding
for the state transportation
budget comes from vehicle
registration fees. The
remaining two thirds of
the funding is provided for
through a state gasoline tax
which has not risen since
1991.
According to TxDOT, our
state gas tax is twenty cents
per gallon. Of this tax, fifteen
cents goes to the highway
fund while five cents goes
toward public education. The
average driver pays $9.52 each
month in state fuel taxes and
contributes $7.14 cents each
month to the highway fund.
This analysis is based on the
average driver traveling 12,000
miles per year in a vehicle that
gets 21 miles per gallon.
To put it into perspective,
Childress District Engineer
Marty Smith, said, The
average person pays about
$300 a year in fuel tax to fund
and maintain Texas highways.
Thats less than what most
people spend on cell phones
or cable television service in
a year.
If you would like the
opportunity to use the
interactive tool and provide
feedback concerning Texas
transportation, you can visit
the TxDOT web site at www.
txdot.metroquest.com.
Dee Derr/The Red River Sun
Former Childress District Engineer Terry Keener is seen using
an interactive computer program designed by TxDOT. The
program is used to educate the public and to receive feedback
which is used to plan future transportation priorities.
Strong Texas transportation is vital for growth
Courtesy photo for The Red River Sun
Harmon County Clerk Kara Gollihare tests AT&Ts texting
while driving virtual reality simulator at the Association of
County Commissioners summer meeting in Norman. The
group hosted their annual Summer & Safety Conference and
featured AT&Ts It Can Wait (ICW) simulator in which county
commissioners, staff and their families had the opportunity
to safely experience the dangers of texting while driving.
As texting becomes a more prevalent part of our lives, it is
important that we lead the way and take steps to educate our
local communities about the dangers of texting and driving,
said Gollihare.
Dont text and drive!
WELLINGTON Coffee Memorial
Blood Center will be hosting the Collingsworth
County Boots vs. Badges Blood Drive on
Monday, August 18 from 2 to 7 p.m. at the
Wellington Activity Center, 501 Corsicana St.
Vote for your favorite local hero (law
enforcement or fire). Every eligible donor who
presents to donate will receive a free Boots vs.
Badges t-shirt!
Photo ID or Donor ID is required. You must
be at least 17 years old; 16 year olds may donate
with signed parental consent. Ask about giving
Auto Reds to maximize your donation!
For appointments, please call 331-8800.
Walk-ins are welcome! For more information
visit thegiftoflife.org.
Blood drive scheduled
By Cecilia Vela
Special to The Red River Sun
Hollis may seem like a ordinary town,
but what you might find is that it has an
extraordinary history.
Hollis is a small town known for its great
farmland and friendly citizens, but it is rich in
history itself. Hollis earned its name from a
businessman named George W. Hollis, who,
along with the town site committee, won Hollis
form Texas in a lawsuit when the community
was a part of Greer County, Texas.
After the lawsuit in 1903, he opened the
first general store in town.
Hollis is a close-knit community of people
who help each other out in the time of need.
Although small, it has the heart of big towns,
which says a lot about the people in it and the
legacy some people left behind.
The town has only one stoplight, located
at the corner of U.S. Highway 62 and State
Highway 30, the only two highways that pass
through the town. People use these highways
passing through.
Famous people, like legendary football
coach Darrell Royal, head basketball coach of
University of Kansas Ted Owens and MLB
player Lindy McDaniel are just a few of the
great people who lived in the community.
Hollis may be a small town in Harmon
County, but it goes to show that stars can
be born anywhere and anybody can achieve
greatness.
History doesnt always have to be before you
were born, it could be happening right now.
Hollis has a history of its own that cant be
taken away, and in 2013, history was made
by the high school football team. Everyone
remembers that moment in time when the
team was at the State Football Championship
game. Fans were pumped up and the crowd
was roaring. The cheerleaders were getting
ready for the long, adventurous night ahead
and the band was warming up so they could
be heard across the football field.
Nobody who was there can forget that night
when the Hollis Tigers marched on that field
with their heads held high, ready to take the
Gold Ball home. The story ends with a victory,
and for years to come, everyone will talk about
the time in history when the football team did
the impossible.
Hollis is a town where you are welcomed
with a smile and a hand shake, because we are
proud of who we are.
A small town
with a big legacy