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DRAFT FORMAT AND STYLE GUIDELINES

for BS ARCHITECTURE THESIS


(ARCHITECTRUAL PROJECT/DESIGN PROPOSAL)



A. General Aspects
1. Paper short size white bond paper (8 x 11); 70 - 80gsm or thicker
except for drawings and tables when needed.
2. Paper Margins
a. Left - 1.5
b. Right, top, & bottom 1.0
3. Text
a. Arial, 12pt, double-spaced and justified
b. Chapter titles Single spaced, capitalized, bold-faced and
centered for Chapter number and title (ALL CAPS & BOLD)
c. Main headings in a Chapter Bold-faced with Each Word
Capitalized except for prepositions and articles that are not the
first word in the headings text.
d. Sub-headings in a Chapter Bold-faced and italicized with
Each Word Capitalized except for prepositions and articles that
are not the first word in the headings text.
4. Indention
a. Chapter Title Centered
b. Main Heading aligned with left paper margin
c. Main Text
i. First word of paragraph Indent by 0.5 from left margin
ii. Paragraph margins same as left paper margin
d. Sub-text
i. Sub-heading titles Indent by 0.5 from left paper margin
ii. Sub-heading text
iii. First word of paragraph Indent by 1.0 from left margin
iv. Paragraph margins Indent by 0.5 from left margin
(aligned with sub-heading title)
5. Spacing
a. General document spacing double space
b. Chapter Titles single-spaced
c. Between main and subheading texts 1 double space
d. Between subheadings and/or main headings texts 2 double
spaces
6. Exception in the case where a main heading or subheading will so be
placed at the bottom of a page, spacing guidelines between headings
should not be followed instead main or sub-headings should be
placed on the next page.

*refer to sample on the next page
SAMPLE CHAPTER PAGE FORMAT

Bottom margins -1.0
Right margin -1.0
Left margins -1.0

CHAPTER 2
REVIEW OF RELATED LOCAL AND FOREIGN LITERATURE
AND CASE STUDIES


A. Main Heading
An,n,dsl,sn gdkjsnman nkkknrhihibvsirkn sknvjosl,f lmfjrnmf zkj
vnkjfhguyrt gnmhdinijorn,ff hkkokfnsmnlakjgof ghgjgjsdjb bmmnkfghoru
nmgkjhidhjg nndkjkskfgnsm nkjfsdjkfnfmngfmnmbnbfjdsiro nmkhgosjsnv nkshis.
nndkjkskfgnsm nkjfsdjkfnfmngfmnkfjosi gjfdjsb jhjg mb. Bfjhrugjbfsla
mbnbfjdsiro nmkhgosjsnv nkshis.

Sub-heading 1
An,n,dsl,sn gdkjsnman nkkknrhihibvsirkn sknvjosl,f lmfjrnmf zkj
gnmhdinijorn,ff hkkokfnsmnlakjgof ghgjgjsdjb bmmnkfghoru nmgkjhidhjg


B. Main Heading 2
An,n,dsl,sn gdkjsnman nkkknrhihibvsirkn sknvjosl,f lmfjrnmf zkj vnkjfh
guyrt gnmhdinijorn,ff hkkokfnsmnlakjgof ghgjgjsdjb bmmnkfghoru. An,n,dsl,sn
gdkjsnman nkkknrhihibvsirkn sknvjosl,f lmfjrnmf zkj vnkjfh guyrt gnmhdinijorn,ff
bnjhklkhfkdnfmnmnnz.


C. Main/Sub-heading (bottom of page, DO NOT PLACE HERE, transfer to next page)
Top of Page margin -1.0
Chapter Title to Main Heading spacing 1 double space
Main/Sub-heading to Sub-heading spacing 1 double space
Main Heading &/or Sub-heading to Main Heading spacing 2 double spaces
Main Heading &/or Sub-heading to Main Heading spacing 2 double spaces


7. Tables and Figures
a. Tables
i. Title above table, single-space, bold-faced and every
word capitalized except for articles and prepositions that
are not the first word of a tables title with one double
space between table title and the table itself.
ii. Text Placement for table titles exceeding one line; text
should be placed depicting an imaginary, inverted
triangle with the first letter of the tables title as reference.
First line of table title should occupy maximum
space available
Words of titles should not be unnecessarily cut or
syllabicated
Discretion as to balance of table title text on
paper is given to student and subsequently to
his/her thesis panel of examiners.
iii. Table-Paper Orientation in the case when a table is
landscape oriented, title must still be above the table and
on the binding side (left margin on portrait orientation).
iv. Margins use the maximum required page margins (1.0
all around except on the binding side; left margin - 1.5)
v. Table exceeding one page when a table exceeds one
page it should be cut in such a way that
flow of text in each row will not be affected or cut
headings for the table should be shown on each
additional table page
notation should be placed below each page of the
table indicating the number of pages the table is
printed on and the table number
Notation should be in Arial, 10pt, bold-faced and
italicized.

Example 1 Portrait Orientation:

Table 1. NBC Minimum Required Off-Street (OFF-RROW) cum On-Site
Parking Slot Requirement, Parking Area and Loading/
Unloading Space Requirements by Allowed
Use or Occupancy


Heading 1 Heading 2 Heading 3






Page 1 of 3 of Table 1


Heading 1 Heading 2 Heading 3


















Page 2 of 3 of Table 1



Heading 1 Heading 2 Heading 3
















Page 3 of 3 of Table 1


Example 2 Landscape Orientation:

Table 1. National Building Code Minimum Required Off-Street (OFF-RROW) cum On-Site Parking Slot
Requirement, Parking Area and Loading/Unloading Space Requirements Allowed by
Use or Occupancy


Heading 1 Heading 2 Heading 3











Page 1 of 3 of Table 1


Heading 1 Heading 2 Heading 3











Page 3 of 3 of Table 1


b. Figures
i. Title placed below figure, single-space, bold-faced and every
word capitalized except for articles and prepositions that are not
the first word of a figures title with one double space between
figure title and the figure itself.
ii. Margins use the maximum required page margins (1.0 all
around except on the binding side; left margin - 1.5)
iii. Figure-Paper Orientation in the case when a figure is
landscape oriented, figure title must still be placed below the
figure in landscape orientation.

c. Need for a longer paper size if it is necessary to use a longer paper
for tables and figures:
i. Paper length should be 11.0 with 1.5 margin on the binding
side.
ii. These sheets must be folded so they maintain the 8 1/2" x
11" format AND CANNOT overlap either the 1.5" binding
margin or the 1.0" margin on the unbound (right) side
two or more folds may be necessary to prevent
pages from being sewn into the binding, or cut
through their fold when the unbound edge is
trimmed
iii. Foldout sheets must be folded to the margin, not the edge of
the page. Neither the loose end, nor the folded edges may
extend beyond the margins on either side.
Your document may contain a maximum of twelve
(12) folded pages only

Example of folds:
* 1
st
fold measurements DOES NOT include right side margin (includes binding margin)
*2
nd
fold measurements does not include binding and right side margins as indicated in c.iii above




8. Page numbers
a. Upper left corner, Arial, 10pt,
b. Text color black text 1, lighter 50%
c. No page numbers on the following:
i. Title page
ii. Preliminaries title pages
iii. Chapter title pages
iv. Reference Materials title pages



B. Specific Guidelines for the Parts of the Thesis
1. Title Page
a. Contains only the following information:
Title of Thesis
Name of proponent
Name & address of College/Department & institution
Month & year of graduation

2. Cover Page
a. Contains the following information:
Title of thesis
Name of department/college & institution
Course/Degree
Name of proponent
Month & Year of graduation
b. General Format
Text Arial, 12 pt
Spacing Single
Title, proponents name & name of institution should be in all
capital letters

3. Approval Sheet shall have the following information
a. Proponents name
b. Advisers name (all in capital letters & bold-faced)
c. Names of thesis panel members (all in capital letters & bold-faced

*refer to the next pages for sample title & cover pages, required texts and spaces between texts









SAMPLE TITLE PAGE

STUDENT HEALTH CENTER AT PALAWAN STATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF COMMUNITY RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
BROOKES POINT CAMPUS


















MARIE FELIPE PARCA BOBER

















Department of Architecture
College of Engineering Architecture and Technology
PALAWAN STATE UNIVERSITY
Puerto Princesa City


March 2015
Title & Proponents Name
ALL IN CAPITAL LETTERS and bold-faced

Font style & size Arial, 12 pt

Distance between Title & Name:
- 19 single spaces
*add one line for titles 2 lines long
*add 2 lines for title 1 line long
Distance between Proponents& Institutions Name:
- 18 single spaces
2 single line spacing
SAMPLE COVER PAGE

STUDENT HEALTH CENTER AT PALAWAN STATE UNIVERSITY
COLLEGE OF COMMUNITY RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
BROOKES POINT CAMPUS











A Feasibility Study Presented to
The Faculty of the Department of Architecture
Palawan State University












In Partial Fulfillment of the
Requirements for the Degree
Bachelor of Science in Architecture









by:

Marie Felipe Parca Bober

March 2015
* Title should always start on
the first line of the page, all in
capital letters and bold-faced
* Month & year of
graduation on the last
line of the page with 1
line/space each
separating proponents
name & the word by
* Discretion is given to
student as to spacing
between texts in the
middle portion of
cover page and the
length of line between
texts as long as the
effect will give a
general balance to
overall text
distribution
SAMPLE APPROVAL SHEET

APPROVAL SHEET

This Feasibility Study entitled STUDENT HEALTH CENTER AT
PALAWAN STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF COMMUNITY RESOURCE
DEVELOPMENT BROOKES POINT CAMPUS prepared and submitted by
Marie Felipe Parca Bober, in partial fulfillment of the requirements leading to the
degree Bachelor of Science in Architecture (BS ARCH) is hereby accepted.



ARCH. EDUARDO F. BOBER, JR., EnP
Adviser



Evaluated by the Panel on Oral Defense with a grade of _______.




ARCH. ARNEL G. TIMBANCAYA
Chairman




ARCH. NORIELYN T. EVANGELIO ARCH. CHRISTOPHER S. MAGRATA
Member Member




Accepted as partial fulfillment of the requirements leading to the degree
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ARCHITECTURE.




ARCH. ARNEL G. TIMBANCAYA
Chairman, Department of Architecture



Date: __________________________



4. Abstract/Executive Summary
a. Abstract*
An abstract is a condensed version of a longer piece of writing
that highlights the major points covered, concisely describes the
content and scope of the writing, and reviews the writing's contents in
abbreviated form. Abstracts are typically 100 to 250 words and follow
set patterns.
i. Key Elements to be included:*
Background: A simple opening sentence or two placing
the work in context;
Aims: One or two sentences giving the purpose of the
work;
Method(s): One or two sentences explaining what was (or
will) be done.
Results: One or two sentences indicating the main
findings (or what you hope to accomplish with the project).
Conclusions: One sentence giving the most important
consequence of the work what do the results mean?
How will they be used?

ii. Questions an abstract should answer:
Why did you do this study or project?
o (Or why are you undertaking the project/study?)
What did you do, and how?
o (What will you do? How?)
What did you find?
o (What do you expect to find?)
What do the findings mean?
iii. Helpful tips when writing an abstract:
Reread your article or proposal with the goal of
abstracting in mind.
o Look specifically for these main parts of the article
or proposal: purpose, methods, scope, results,
conclusions and recommendations.
o Use the headings and table of contents as a guide
to writing your abstract.
After you've finished rereading the article or proposal,
write a rough draft without looking back at what you're
abstracting.
o Don't merely copy key sentences you'll put in too
much or too little information.
o Don't rely on the way material was phrased
summarize information in a new way.

* Retrieved from http://www.conservationleadershipprogramme.org/UserDataWEB/ProjectManuals/Writing%20an%20Abstract.pdf




b. Executive Summary*
An executive summary is usually required for Business,
Engineering and Science reports or proposals. In academic
reports it is often referred to as an abstract and may be shorter in
length. It is a fully developed mini-version or overview of the
report so it is not merely an introduction.
An Executive Summary aims to:
o Provide a brief overview of the whole report so that
readers can read the executive summary alone
without the accompanying report.
o Allow the reader to quickly understand the
information contained in the report
o Persuade the reader that the document is worthy of
being read.
o Provide concise, complete, specific and self-
sufficient information that can be understood in
isolation.
How to write an Executive Summary
o Write the executive summary in your own words,
using a formal writing style. Avoid using jargon.
o State the purpose/aim of the report. For example,
the main purpose of this report is to
o Describe the procedure that you used. The
methodology or analytical process used to process
the data collected.
o Provide the results of the study. The major findings
may include a number of sentences.
o The recommendations (if applicable) should also be
provided.
o Edit the summary to remove minor points; judgment
is required to ensure that the summary is concise.
o Remove unnecessary words and sentences. Check
accuracy of grammar, spelling, sentence and
paragraph structures.
o Use formatting and graphics to highlight the
message. Clarity of the summary can be improved
through use of bullet points and subtitles in the
organizational structure.
This will also make it easier for the reader to
skim read
Process involved in writing an Executive Summary
normally not more than a page in length and should
provide an adequate representation of the entire
document in a shortened form (or may be 150 200
words);


provided on a separate page at the beginning of the report
before the Table of Contents;
An impersonal writing style is used so as to ensure that
the report remains formal;
At least one sentence is provided for each main section of
the report;
The key points in the executive summary should be
presented in the identical order as they appear in the
report so as to encourage logical flow and cohesion.
Write the executive summary only after you have
completed the main document.

*Griffith University (2011). Writing an executive summary. CRICOS No. 00233E. Retrieved April 25, 2014
from http://www.griffith.edu.au/data/assets/pdf_file/0003/320178/writing-an-executive-summary.pdf.

5. Acknowledgment include here the list of people you would like to thank for
the contribution they have made in the conception and completion of your
proposal/research.
6. Optional Preliminary pages are pages which you may want to include like
dedication and preface.
a. both dedication and preface should occupy one page each;
b. dedication page should only be one page long
c. preface maximum of 2 pages
use double spacing for preface, Arial, 12 pt
*Preface is a statement of the author's reasons for undertaking
the work and other personal comments that are not directly
connected to the materials presented in other sections of the
study. These reasons tend to be of a personal nature.
*Retrieved April 25, 2014 from http://gradschool.unc.edu/academics/thesis-diss/guide/ordercomponents.html

d. title for preface should be in capital letters, bold-faced and centered on
page
no page numbers should appear on the title pages
title for dedication page is not needed
Examples:















for my beloved Tatay & Nanay,
and my sweet sister Ana

PREFACE




7. Table of Contents
a. General Format
Text Arial, 12 pt
Title of page all in capital letters, bold-faced and centered
Spacing double space
No italics on this page/s
Include the word CHAPTER with each chapter title
All major headings in the preliminaries and body of the study
should be in capital letters
Only Chapter numbers and titles are to be all in capital letters and
in bold-face
Use leader dots between listings and page number
one double space should separate the preliminaries listing and/or
the main chapter headings
b. Contents
Must contain the main headings indented 5 spaces from the left
margin
Subheadings must further be indented 5 spaces from the main
heading indention and should be single-spaced
If any headings (main or sub) is longer than one line, the second
line should be indented 3 spaces from the main or sub heading
indention as indicated above
Each word of the main and sub headings should be capitalized
except for prepositions within the main or sub headings
c. Consistency
Check for consistency of spacing, alignment and indentions
especially if the table of contents is more than one page long

8. List of Tables, List of Figures, List of Appendices, List of Abbreviations (if
applicable), List of Symbols (if applicable)
a. General Format
Text Arial, 12 pt, all in capital letters, bold-faced, centered,
double space
The word number and page should appear at each end of the
paper for tables, figures, and appendices
Titles of tables, figures, and appendices should be in the middle
and if more than one line long should be so arranged as to depict
an inverted triangle
No leader dots between title and page number
b. Content Each title for tables, figures, and appendices should be
unique (no two titles can be exactly the same)
c. Consistency check for consistency of page numbers between the
listing and the main body of the study as well as capitalization and
spacing.
*see examples on the following pages
SAMPLE TABLE OF CONTENTS

TABLE OF CONTENTS
TITLE PAGE i
COVER PAGE ii
APPROVAL SHEET iii
ABSTRACT/EXECUTIVE SUMMARY iv
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT v
PREFACE (optional)
DEDICATION (optional)
TABLE OF CONTENTS vi
LIST OF TABLES vii
LIST OF FIGURES viii
LIST OF APPENDICES ix
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS (if needed) x
LIST OF SYMBOLS (if needed) xi

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION
Background of the Project....
Statement of the Problem.
Objectives...
Project Objectives.
General Project Objectives..
Specific Project Objectives...
Architectural Design Objectives

1
5
5
6
6
6
7
SAMPLE TABLE OF CONTENTS
ii

General Architectural Design Objectives.
Specific Architectural Design Objectives.
Scope and Delimitation.
Significance of the Study..
CHAPTER 2 REVIEW OF RELATED LOCAL AND FOREIGN LITERATURE
AND CASE STUDIES
Literature.
Foreign Literature.
Local Literature.
Case Studies..
Foreign Case Studies..
Local Case Studies..
Conceptual Framework.
Research Paradigm..
Hypotheses.
Definition of Terms....

CHAPTER 3 METHODOLOGY
Research Design..
Research Locale
Data Gathering...
Sources of Data
Procedure..
7
7
8
8


9
20
20
20
45
67
71
72
73
74


76
77
77
78
78
SAMPLE TABLE OF CONTENTS
iii

Instrumentation.
Project Development.

CHAPTER 4 DATA PRESENTATION AND ARCHITECTURAL
PROGRAMMING
Project Site..
Site Presentation..
Site Analysis..
Project Design
Design Presentation.
Design Analysis
Project Site and Design Interpretation

CHAPTER 5 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN DEVELOPMENTS AND
PRESENTATIONS
CHAPTER 6 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS, AND
RECOMMENDATIONS
Summary of Findings.
Conclusions.
Recommendations.

REFERENCES
APPENDICES.
82
85



90
90
95
101
101
104
105

107

110
112
114

117
118
SAMPLE TABLE OF CONTENTS
iv


9. Chapter 1: Introduction this part of your study is best written after
all the other parts of your study are completed (although it is possible
to write this part after you are done with Chapter 2 of your study).
a. Background of the Study/Project
Include here relevant and general information about your
study which may contain the following:
short history of the site and/or of the study being
undertaken
any controversies, problems, or need that led you
to propose such a project/undertaking
o Why did you propose the project?
o What are the need/s of the
community/entity?
o What problems/opportunities did you
see that led you to this proposal?
Current development/s in the study of architecture
in relation to your chosen proposed project
Cite a few, relevant literature and/or case studies
DO NOT copy and paste information, rephrase
when possible and NEVER FORGET to cite your
source/s

REMEMBER: The key word here is general, do not give specific information that
will be seen in the other parts of your manuscript

b. Statement of the Problem
State either in paragraph or bullet form the specific
problems that led to your project proposal
Answer the question What is the problem that needs to be
solved?
The answer to this question may be in a statement
or question form that will yield specific results
Limit the areas or variables that will be addressed
in your proposal
Consider the SMART rule in formulating your problem
statement:
Specific
Measurable
Attainable
Realistic
Time based

c. Objectives discusses the desired end results of the project,
not how those results will be accomplished.



Wrong: To construct a student center is the method or a way to
accomplish the goal of providing a place for students to
meet to further nurture scholarly purposes

Project/Research objectives discuss who is going to do what, (when they will do
it and how it will be measured optional, dependent on type of project/study).

THE OBJECTIVE FOR THIS GOAL MAY THEN BE

General Project Objective 1: Develop opportunities to further
academic learning and discussions (what) for students
and faculty (who) especially after specified class hours
(when) that will lead to camaraderie and sharing of
knowledge and wisdom.

OR

General Project Objective 2: Increase scholarly pursuits (what)
among students and faculty (who) alike towards a
broader purpose of promoting academic community,
wisdom and accomplishment.

General Project Objectives are like the objective
examples given above. From this single statement a
number of specific objectives can then be formulated.
GENERAL means the whole project proposal
in one statement
GENERAL may also be likened to an
architectural perspective it is the whole
project only stated in words and not through an
illustration

Specific Project Objectives are objectives based on
the general objective. These objectives outline how you
are going to achieve the general objectives.
SPECIFIC represents the details of the project
proposal or the parts that will make the whole;
SPECIFIC in an architectural point of view are
the plans, elevations, sections, foundation
plans, etc. they are parts that when put
together will create the desired structure;
As with the statement of problem it should
adhere to the SMART rule;
also they should somehow be related to the
statement of the problem.



Example Specific Objectives in relation to the General
Objective/s above:
Create opportunities to display academic
accomplishments or performances;
Increase connectivity and accessibility to the
institution and the academic world;

d. Architectural Design Objectives
Are objectives that focus on the realization of the project
objectives in relation to the proposed structure.
To formulate the architectural design objectives the project
objectives are treated in terms of space and design
requirements.
Should state how the project objectives are going to be
attained through the design of the proposed structure.

General Architectural Design Objectives should be
related to the general project objective. It should re-state
the general project objective in terms of how to achieve
the said objective in terms of the structure to be built.

Specific Architectural Design Objectives should in turn
re-state the specific project objectives in terms of what
or what kind of spaces will be provided.

Example:

Statement of the Problem (for the proposed Student Center)
1. How much group outputs do the CCRD Brookes Point professors assign
their students in the span of one semester?
2. Is the use of class lecture time given to students for them to discuss
and/or prepare group outputs? If yes, how many hours? If no, how do
students cope with group requirements?
3. What types of outputs are expected from the students?
4. Is there provision for the use of school facilities for required researches
and performances?
5. What can be done to ensure the safety of students at CCRD Brookes
Point who need to meet after class hours to discuss academic projects
or outputs?


General Project Objective: Increase scholarly pursuits among students and
faculty alike towards a broader purpose of promoting academic
community, wisdom and accomplishment.



Specific Project Objectives:
1. Create opportunities for academic collaboration and production;
2. Ensure a safe and collaboration conducive environment for
student interaction;
3. Increase the potential for campus-wide, inter-campus and inter-
school information dissemination, involvement, and data
gathering;
4. Provide connectivity and accessibility to the institution and the
academic world.

General Architectural Design Objective: Design a space for students to meet and
prepare required academic group outputs.
Specific Architectural Design Objectives:
1. Provide adequate enclosed and open spaces for student
meetings, rehearsals and performances;
2. Allocate a central area to monitor and provide
telecommunications and web connectivity;
3. Strategically place situate connectivity and communication spots
and spaces;
4. Ensure energy efficiency through intentional planning of spaces
that will take advantage of sun and wind orientation and site
location.

e. Scope & Delimitation
Scope should show the specific things/ideas that your
proposal wishes to address. It should give the specific
areas that are included in your proposal
Delimitation should provide the boundaries of what is
not included in your project proposal.

*in short SCOPE states the areas that are included in your proposal and
DELIMITATION states the areas that will not be included in your proposal.

f. Significance of the Study/Target Clientele stated in paragraph
form identifies who are the people or group of people or
institution/s that will benefit from your proposal this may also
include the target client of the proposed project.





10. Chapter 2 : Review of Related Local and Foreign Literature and
Case Studies
a. Literature, Studies/Case Studies are scholarly writings
related to your project proposal
be very critical when choosing your literature and studies
make sure that they have been made/conducted by
people who are experts in their fields
Critically choose information you access from
the internet. It would be helpful if you take note
of the web address or page of the material you
plan to use;
web addresses with a .edu means it comes
from an educational institution BUT NOT ALL
literature with .edu addresses are always
reliable be critical, make sure that the
author is a professor or someone who
specializes in the field of study you are
pursuing;
Look for journals or journal databases some
scholarly articles can be accessed free or with
no charge;
Reports from government and private
institutions or entities may also provide reliable
data
Consider information from books or published
materials these would be a more reliable
source of information.
Make sure to always cite your sources properly refer to
whatever citation format your department is using.
Never cut and paste a whole page unless needed BUT
make sure to use the proper citation and format in such
cases.
Look for literature and studies that support and
contradict your proposal both will be useful in your
presentation, analysis and interpretation.

b. Conceptual Framework*
schematic diagram which shows the variables included in
the study;
arrows or line should be properly placed and connected
between boxes to show the relationship between the
independent and dependent variables;
independent and dependent variables should be clearly
discussed and explained as to how these would influence
the results of the study.
*http://www.dlsu.edu.ph/offices/urco/guidelines/Guidelines.doc



c. Research Paradigm
is essentially a worldview, a whole framework of beliefs,
values and methods within which research takes place;
a broad view or perspective of something (Taylor,
Kermode & Roberts, 2007 p. 5 in The University of Notre
Dame, Australia,n.d.)*

*http://researchonline.nd.edu.au/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?filename=2&article=1030&context=thes

d. Definition of Terms
is not about just defining the words in your study
according only to your own decision
is defining the jargon or technical terms which a person
with no background in architecture will not understand;
giving an operational definition or how the word is
used in the study is the function of this portion of
your study.
it is also giving more than the lexical or dictionary
meaning of unfamiliar terms in your study BUT terms
which connote (mean/suggest) different meaning from the
conceptual or dictionary definitions(URCO,n.d.).
terms should be arranged in alphabetical order, encoded
in bold-face and all in CAPITAL letters and stated in
complete sentences.

11. Chapter 3 : Methodology
An effective methodology section should:
1) Introduce the overall methodological approach for each problem
or question; (Research design)
o Is your study qualitative or quantitative?
o Are you going to take a special approach, such as action
research, or use case studies?
2) Indicate how the approach fits the overall research design;
o Your methods should have a clear connection with your
research questions and/or hypotheses. In other words,
make sure that your methods will actually answer your
questions.
3) Describe the specific methods of data collection you are going to
usee.g. surveys, interviews, questionnaires, observation,
archival or traditional library research. (Data athering/procedure)
4) Explain how you intend to analyze and interpret your results
o Will you use statistical analysis?


o Will you use specific theoretical perspectives to help you
analyze a text or explain observed behaviors?

a. Research Locale
description of the place/area and/or the group of people
involved in the research study
b. Data Gathering
Sources of data
where did you get your data? is it secondary or
primary?
Procedure
describes in detail how the research is going to be
conducted or how it was conducted
Instrumentation
what instruments did you use to gather some of
your data? survey? interview, etc?
was the instrument field tested? especially in
experimental type of researches
c. Project Development


* excerpt from www.psu.edu/dept/cew/WritingProposals.doc


12. Chapter 4 Data Presentation And Architectural Programming
a. Project Site
b. Project Design
c. Project Site and Design Interpretation
d. Architectural Programming Presentation

13. Chapter 5 Architectural Design Development and Presentations
a. Plans, Elevations, Sections, Perspectives, Scale Model
b. Architectural Design Concepts
Architectural Concepts
Design Philosophy
Design Concept
Design Considerations
Form Concept
Material Concept
Form Concept
c. Other relevant presentations

14. Chapter 6 Summary of Findings, Conclusions, and
Recommendations
a. Summary of Findings
Re-state the major findings of your study
b. Recommendations


Based on the findings of the study what can you
recommend?
statements should be addressed towards the
persons/entities mentioned in the significance of
the study
what other things can be done by those who are
beneficiaries of the study for improvement/
development?
c. Conclusions
Re-state the main points of your study and give your
closing statement.
15. References