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SOUTH CAROLINAS PREMIER WEEKLY

INDEX | INSIDE | DEATHS |


TO SUBSCRIBE
TO THE
GREER CITIZEN,
CALL US
TODAY AT
8772076
HELPING ASHLEY NICOLE
Benefit set
for 4-year-old with
cancer
A3
Odelle Few, 97
Irene V. Hart, 94
Phillip Homer McSwain,
94
Richard E. Mulder, 83
Bernice H. Painter, 90
Martha M.J. Rhodes, 67
Ella Stine Watson, 92
NOTABLE |
THEYVE GOT THE BEAT
Greer, Byrnes
marching bands
preview
B6
LIVING HERE |
CLASSIFIEDS B45
COMMUNITY CALENDAR/NEWS A2
CRIME A9
ENTERTAINMENT B8
OBITUARIES A6
OPINION A4
OUR SCHOOLS B7
SPORTS B14
WEATHER A6

Minority Business
Summit is Aug. 21
The Greater Greer Chamber of Com-
merce will host a Minority Business Sum-
mit 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Aug. 21 at Grace Hall,
108 Trade St.
Presented by Greer Memorial Hospi-
tak, the summit is a free one-day event
featuring dynamic breakout sessions
and speakers, networking and new ideas
specifcally designed to help all busi-
nesses and organizations.
For more information, please contact
Katie Witherspoon at 877-3131, ext.103.
RENEWED RIVALRY: Rebels, Jackets face off in jamboree Friday B1
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014 GREER, SOUTH CAROLINA VOL. 101 NO. 33 75 CENTS
Campus to
be renamed
for Bensons
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
Jim Benson started his
career at 17 years old,
bringing used cars to Greer
from Pennsylvania to sell.
On a rainy Friday, Benson
gave back to the commu-
nity where he got his start,
presenting the Greenville
Tech Foundation with a
large check.
It may be raining out-
side, but the sun is shining
in here, said Keith Miller,
Greenville Tech president.
I can feel it, absolutely.
Youll feel it, too. Were
here today to make an out-
standing announcement
from some outstanding
individuals, such as Jim
and Evelyn Benson Jim
Benson is the definition of
a self-made man.
The Bensons donated $2
million to the Greenville
Tech Foundation its
largest gift ever. Another
$1 million will be paid
over five years.
Its hard to put in words
how many lives theyve al-
ready touched and how
many lives this gift will
help us to continue to
touch, Miller said.
I guess what I want to
emphasize is what Jim
and Evelyn represent, he
SEE DONATION | A6
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
The show must go on
and so it did. After pre-
viously cancelled events,
Fridays Tunes in the Park
continued on despite un-
favorable weather.
As a result, Keddy Men-
doza finished atop the
Greer Idol Teen competi-
tion and Josh Jordan took
the 2014 Greer Idol title.
To avoid another cancel-
lation for the final round
of the competition, the
event was forced indoors
and was held in the Greer
City Hall event center.
Along with the Greer
Idol Teen title, Mendoza
also took home a $500
prize for her performance
against four other con-
testants. Jordan was also
awarded a cash prize of
$1,500, after beating out
two other contestants.
Talent seems to run in
the family as both of this
years Greer Idol winners
are related to previous
Greer Idol winners. Ked-
dy is the younger sister
of 2013 Greer Idol win-
ner Keifer Mendoza, who
gave a guest performance
Friday singing a medley
comprised of songs he
performed last year, along
with newer songs. Josh is
related to former Greer
Idol winner Dana Jordan,
who won in 2011. She is
Joshs aunt.
The Greer Idol Teen per-
formed Barbra Streisands
Dont Rain on My Pa-
rade and Celion Dions
Its All Coming Back to
Me Now. Mendoza com-
peted against performers
Sophia Noyes, Taylor Lee,
Toni Teems and Devon
White. Jordan performed
Jake Owens Eight Second
Ride and Garth Brooks
More Than a Memory.
He competed against per-
formers Lauren Painter
and Stephen Young.
In between and follow-
ing the final Greer Idol
Teen and Greer Idol com-
petitions, the Carolina
Coast Band performed as
part of the Tunes in the
Park series.
This year and last years
Tunes in the Park perfor-
mances were weather-reli-
ant, causing several days
of the competitions to be
rescheduled or cancelled.
This year, two nights of
the five-day, which in-
cludes the competitions
Freedom Blast kickoff,
were forced reschedule
due to weather.
airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
A flash flood in Greer took a dan-
gerous turn last Saturday night.
A significant portion of road on
Memorial Drive Extension gave way
during the downpour, leaving two
vehicles trapped in a sinkhole.
Evidently it just washed around
the drainage pipe and the road
gave way, Lt. Jim Holcombe with
the Greer Police Department said.
When the cars came, the road
was just gone. One came from one
direction and one came from the
other.
Holcombe said first responders
helped with the rescue and shut
the road down.
One of the drivers called 911
and when the first responders got
out there, it was basically a fire de-
partment rescue from there, he
said.
Three people were taken to the
hospital as a result of the crash.
The vehicles, a 2014 Chevy and
a 2015 Kia, containing four total
occupants, were pulled out on
Sunday by a heavy-duty tow truck,
Holcombe said.
SEE FLOODING | A3
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Keddy Mendoza, right, receives a congratulatory hug from
fellow competitor, Sophia Noyes, after being named Greer
Idol Teen 2014 Friday.
Jordan, Mendoza win Idol titles
Josh Jordan

Greenville
Tech given
$3 million
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Jim and Evelyn Benson donated $2 million to the Greenville
Tech Foundation its largest gift ever. Another $1 million
will be paid over fve years.


WHEN IT RAINS, IT POURS
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Two cars crashed into a sinkhole on Memorial Drive Extension in Greer on Saturday night after a fash food forced
the road to give way. Three people were transported to the hospital, according to authorities.
Flash flood has dangerous impact
On Trade
Street
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
The Blue Ridge Brewing
Company will open its sec-
ond location in downtown
Greer at the former Caz-
bah, located at 308 Trade
St., as soon as possible,
according to owner Bob
Hiller.
Were in the process of
getting blessing right now,
so I dont have a date right
now, but (we will open) as
soon as possible, Hiller
said.
Hiller opened his Green-
ville location in 1995 after
lobbying in South Carolina
to legalize production and
sale of alcoholic beverages
on the same premises.
I personally was work-
ing to get the law changed
in South Carolina to allow
brew pubs and, when we
got that changed, I was
pretty much poised and
ready to go and looking
for a building to put a
brew pub in, he said.
Now, 19 years later, the
company is expanding to
open its second location
in Greer, where they will
offer offers six to seven
brewed beers, other craft
beers, wine, appetizers,
salads, entrees, sides,
sandwiches, pizzas and
desserts.
Its going to resemble
the Greenville location.
The menu should be iden-
tical. Other than that,
were going to utilize the
space and the upstairs
bar as best we can, Heller
said.
SEE BUSINESS | A6
Blue Ridge Brewing coming soon

A2 THE GREER CITIZEN COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014
Sanders
Heating & Air Conditioning
(Formerly Service Experts)
Indoor air quality experts since 1951
864- 288- 7671
621 Keith Drive
Greenville, SC 29607
www.SandersHeatCool.com
6
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y
$25 SERVICE CALL
with repairs
when you mention you saw us in
The Greer Citizen
Call Cindy or Dawn for appointment.
GODS PANTRY
IN DESPERATE NEED
Gods pantry needs
volunteers, supporting
churches and friends, as
giving is down and the
needs are up, and children
home from school are un-
able to get three meals a
day, and the warehouse is
out of vegetables.
Items can be dropped off
at 100 Enoree Road, Greer,
on Thursdays from 10 a.m.
noon; 2481 Racing Road,
Greer, on Thursdays 1 4
p.m.; or 700 E. Main St.,
Duncan, on Wednesdays 9
11 a.m.
For questions or to vol-
unteer call 963-4441.
THRIFT STORE
TAKING DONATIONS
The Community Chest
Thrift Store, located at
52 Groce Road, Lyman, is
open Thursday and Fri-
day 10 a.m. 6 p.m., and
Saturday 10 a.m. 2 p.m.,
hours may extend if vol-
unteers are available and a
need arises.
Donations of gently used
ladies clothing, accessories
and home dcor items are
being accepted and can be
dropped off at the MTCC,
located at 84 Groce Road,
Lyman, or to setup larger
donations or to volunteer
contact Lyn Turner at 439-
7760.
DRIVERS NEEDED FOR NEW
MEALS ON WHEELS ROUTE
GCM needs drivers for
new Meals on Wheels Greer
route. A Meals On Wheels
driver must be a qualified
driver with a valid drivers
license and have a heart
for serving others.
MOW several delivery
routes in the greater Greer
area. Meals are delivered
Monday - Friday. For more
information call 877-
1937.
ROAD TO RECOVERY
DRIVERS NEEDED
The American Cancer
Society needs volunteer
drivers to transport pa-
tients to local treatment
centers.
Anyone interested in
volunteering as a driver
must have a good driv-
ing record, valid drivers
license, automobile insur-
ance and a vehicle in good
working condition. The
American Cancer Society
provides free training for
this program.
For more information,
contact the local office at
627-8289.
SHARONS CLOSET NEEDS
TOWELS, SHEETS, BLANKETS
Sharons Closet needs
towels, sheets and blan-
kets.
New or gently used items
accepted Monday through
Friday 8 a.m. 4 p.m. at
783 S. Line St. Ext., Greer.
GCM NEEDS CANNED
FOOD, SOUP AND PASTA
The Food Pantry needs
boxed gelatin, soup,
canned vegetables and
fruit and pasta.
Donate at the ministry,
738 S. Line St. Ext., Greer,
between 8 a.m. 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Visit gcminc.org or call
879-2254 for more infor-
mation.
GREER RELIEF NEEDS
DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS
Weekly Costco donates
bread and pastries to Greer
Relief. Greer Relief needs
volunteers who are willing
to pick up donations and
deliver them to Greer Re-
lief for distribution.
Contact Greer Relief at
848-5355 for more infor-
mation.
GCM SCHOOL SUPPLY
DRIVE TAKING DONATIONS
The drive is taking
school supply donations
through Aug. 22. Appli-
cants can fill out forms
and must have a photo ID
of parents/guardian and
social security card.
Donations are accepted
8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday
- Friday. Call 877-1973.
l icanbikegreenvillesc@
gmail.com.
QUITSMOKING PROGRAM
OFFERED ON AUGUST 15
QuitWell 101 will pro-
vide tools to help smokers
quit during a session on
August 15 at 10:30 a.m. at
the GHS Life Center. The
event is free. Registration
is required. Call 522-3237
to register.
KNOW YOUR NUMBERS:
CHOLESTEROL
The informational pro-
gram will be held on Au-
gust 15 at 12:30 p.m. and
August 22 at 8:30 a.m. and
9:30 a.m. at the GHS Life
Center.
The event is free. Reg-
istration is required. Call
455-5173 to register.
99TH LEDBETTER REUNION
SET FOR AUG. 16, 17
The 99th Ledbetter,
Long, Jackson, Blassin-
game and Hagood Family
Reunion celebration is set
for Saturday, Aug. 16, at St.
Peters Episcopal Church
Picnic Shelter in Green-
ville, and Sunday, Aug. 17,
at Freetown Community
Center in Greenville.
Contact Pastor James
Ledbetter, Jr. at 864-244-
8762 or Paulette Ledbetter
at 803-414-0804.
GIRLS ON THE RUN
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
Volunteers are needed
for the fall season of Girls
on the Run. Being a runner
isnt required, just indi-
viduals enthusiastic about
healthy development.
Volunteer training ses-
sions on August 17 and
August 24 from 8:30 a.m.
4 p.m. at the GHS Life
Center. To Volunteer, call
455-3252.
LEARN ABOUT FOODS AND
NUTRIENTS AUG. 18
More than Fat will be of-
fered on August 18 at 8:30
a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 12:30
p.m. at the GHS Life Cen-
ter. Learn about the heart
healthy benefits of specif-
ic foods and nutrients.
The event is free. Regis-
tration is required.
Call 455-4010 to regis-
ter.
HUB CITY FARMERS
MOBILE MARKET OPEN
Through August 19 the
Hub City Farmers Mo-
bile Market will be at the
Pinewood Resource Center
Parking Lot in Spartanburg
from 12:30 - 2 p.m. to of-
fer fresh and local produce
and eggs.
PROSTATE HEALTH: WHAT
EVERY MAN SHOULD KNOW
The Greenville Health
System will offer an infor-
mational session on pros-
tate health on August 20
from 12:15 1:15 p.m. at
the GHS Life Center.
The event is free. Regis-
tration is required. Regis-
ter at ghs.org/healthevents
or call (877) GHS-INFO.
BREAST CANCER
NETWORKING GROUP
Meet and share experi-
ences with other breast
cancer survivors on Au-
gust 20 from noon 1 p.m.
in the lobby of the Cancer
Institute of Greenville
Health System.
For more information,
call 455-5809.
DIABETES 101
ON AUG. 22
Learn about the basics
of diabetes on August 22
from 1 2 p.m. at the GHS
Life Center.
The event is free and no
registration is required.
For more information, call
455-8752.
WALK FOR FOOD ALLERGIES
AT HERITAGE PARK, AUG. 23
A walk for food allergies
will take place at Heritage
Park on August 23, with
registration from 8:30
9:30 a.m., then a ceremony
at 9:30 a.m. and the walk
following.
The event is free to par-
ticipants and funds are
raised through sponsoring
participants. The event is
held in association with
Food Allergy Research and
Education.
Visit foodallergy.org for
more information.
LEARN ABOUT METABOLIC
SYNDROMES RISK FACTORS
Learn about the risk fac-
tors that make up the met-
abolic syndrome and steps
for prevention on August
25 at 8:30 am., 9:30 a.m.
and 12:30 p.m. at the GHS
Life Center.
The event is free. Reg-
istration is required. Call
455-4010 to register.
SAFE EXERCISING
PROGRAM ON AUG. 27
Learn about the compo-
nents of a safe exercise
program on August 27 at
8:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m. at
the GHS Life Center.
The program is free, but
registration is required. To
register, call 455-4037.
GIRLS ON THE RUN
BEGINS SEPT. 17
The Girls on the Run and
Girls on Track programs,
which combine training
for a 5K with esteem-en-
hancing workouts for girls
ages 8 15, begins Sept.
17.
The cost of the program
is $199 and scholarships
and payment plans are
available. Visit ghs.org/
girlsontherun to register.
To volunteer, call 455-
3252.
FREE DIABETES
SUPPORT GROUP
The support group
meets the second Monday
of every month from 6
7:30 p.. at the GHS Life
Center.
For more information,
call 455-4003.
CANCER SURVIVOR
EXERCISE AND YOGA
The exercise class is
held every Tuesday 10:30
11:30 a.m., and the yoga
class is held every Wednes-
day 4 5 p.m. Both classes
are held at the Cancer In-
stitute of Greenville Health
System, 900 W. Faris Road,
Greenville.
The classes are free and
registration isnt required.
For more information, call
455-5809.
CANCER PATIENTS AND
SURVIVORS WALKING CLUB
Patients, survivors and
caregivers are invited to
walk as a group everything
Thursday at 12:30 p.m. in
the lobby of the Cancer
Institute of the Greenville
Health System.
For more information,
call 455-5809.
SURVIVE AND THRIVE
SUPPORT GROUP
Cancer survivors meet
on the third Thursday each
month from 2 3 p.m. to
offer support and reduce
stress. Meetings are held
in the lobby of the Cancer
Institute of the Greenville
Health System.
For more information,
call 455-5809.
HEALTHY WEIGHT
SUPPORT PROGRAM
The healthy weight man-
agement support program
is for cancer survivors
and the class meets the
first and third Thursday
of the month from 3:30
4:40 p.m. at the Cancer
Institute of the Greenville
Health System.
To register, call 455-
2862.
TODAY, AUGUST 13
MTCC TOUR MEETS at the
MTCC, at 84 Groce Road in
Lyman at 10 a.m. Potential
volunteers and interested
parties can tour the facility
and learn about programs
ofered.
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 14
ALZHEIMERS ASSOCIA
TION SUPPPORT GROUP in
the second foor classroom at
Greer Memorial Hospital, 830
S. Buncombe Road, at 7-8:30
p.m. For more information
call the Alzheimers Associa-
tion at (800) 272-3900 or visit
www.alz.org/sc.
KIWANIS CLUB AT 6:30 p.m.
at Laurendas Family Restau-
rant. Call Charmaine Helfrich
at 349-1707.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 16
COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary
Christian Fellowship, 2455
Locust Hill Road, Taylors.
Limited supplies available on
a frst come, frst serve basis.
UPSTATE FIBROMYALGIA
SUPPORT Group at the
Hampton Inn on Fishermans
Drive (behind Earthfare) by
Pelham & 85 at 11 a.m. Call
Rita Forbes at 968-0430 or
Lisa Gambrell-Burns at 268-
5907.
KINGDOM ASSEMBLY
OUTREACH Center will be
handing out free groceries to
qualifed applicants from 10
a.m. - noon at 3315 Brushy
Creek Road, Greer. Call 848-
2728 or visit www.kingdo-
maoc.com.
MONDAY, AUGUST 18
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
GRACE PLACE IN Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 19
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its clothing closet open
from 6-8 p.m. Grace Place is
located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
GAP CREEK SINGERS will
rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m.
at The Church of the Good
Shepherd, 200 Jason St.,
Greer. For further informa-
tion or to schedule a perfor-
mance contact Wesley Welsh,
President, at 877-5955.
BARBERSHOP HARMONY
CHAPTER at 7 p.m. at Memo-
rial United Methodist Church,
201 N. Main St., Greer. Call
877-1352.
DISABLED AMERICAN
VETERANS and Auxiliary
at 7 p.m., 721 E. Poinsett St.,
Woodmen of the World. Call
Preston Johnson at 979-7758.
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
THE LIONS CLUB at Lake
View Steak House, Higway 14
at 5:30 p.m.
THE SOAR LUNCHEON from
11 a.m. - 1 p.m. at Victor Gym.
Bring a covered dish and/or
dessert.
WEDNESDAY,
AUGUST 20
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21
THE TAYLORS LIONS Club
at 6 p.m. at the Clubhouse,
500 East Main St., Taylors. Call
Allen Culver at 350-6939.
THE TAYLORS LIONS Club
at noon at the Taylors First
Baptist Church Ministry Cen-
ter (old Post Of ce) on Main
Street, Taylors. The meeting
will last approximately one
hour. Call Jerry Hatley at
268-0567.
Calendar deadline is
noon on Tuesdays. All list-
ings are subject to editing
and/or omission due to
space constraints. Please
submit information about
area events, meetings, etc.
to Amanda Irwin at 877-
2076, email to airwin@
greercitizen.com or mail
to The Greer Citizen P.O.
Box 70 Greer, SC 29652.
COMMUNITY
NEWS
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR


PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Give me a G
The countdown to a new school year is nearly over and football season is right around the corner. That means only one
thing for the Greer High cheerleading squad: its time to get to work. The Yellow Jackets began practice last week in
preparation for the upcoming season.

FROM PAGE ONE
I guess I just feel lucky,
Richard Cooper, the driver
of the Kia, told our news
partner Fox Carolina dur-
ing a recent interview.
The ground was washed
completely away, and the
car weight made it collapse
even more and more.
Holcombe said such
heavy rain can bring dan-
gerous consequences.
As far as having a very
short amount of time and
a flash flood-type inci-
dent, it came up on us
pretty quickly, he said.
Weve had some flooding
before, but [this time] the
roads just didnt take it
very well.
Personally, my front
tires have gone into a
sinkhole where the pave-
ment gave out one time,
but Ive never seen that
much road give way, he
continued. When they get
some water underneath
them, theres no telling
what could happen.
Officials say the section
of Memorial Drive Exten-
sion near Second Baptist
Church will be closed until
further notice.
Holcombe said the de-
partment responded to
flood calls in other areas
around Greer over the
weekend.
There wasnt that many
accidents, it was just
flooding, he said. We
had some flooding in dif-
ferent areas on [Highway]
29, Jones Avenue and
some other areas.
Another sinkhole forced
twelve families out of an
apartment building at
Legacy Crescent Park off
Wade Hampton Boulevard
and Suber Road on Mon-
day evening.
Emergency officials were
expected to investigate the
damage, but no further in-
formation was available at
press time.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Wellford Council ap-
proved a resolution for
the purchase of property
on North Street Extension.
The property has a pump
station located on it with
an easement, but the prop-
erty is now for sale for
$2,500.
If we have anything we
need to do on that pump
station, like expand it
and we are going to have
to expand that pump sta-
tion at some point we
will own the property and
we wont have to go back
and get another easement
or right of way anything
like that. Well actually
own the property. Going
back to that point in time
when we actually have to
have it, it will cost us more
to buy it, Mayor Tommy
Watson said.
Watson added that Well-
ford owns the other pump
station properties and for-
mer pump station sites in
the town.
During the police re-
port, it was reported the
department handled 389
calls and 271 cases, which
include traffic tickets, in
July. One case handled by
the department included
an incident on July 23,
during which, six children
were taken into protective
custody from 2661 John
Dodd Road.
It was brought to our
attention by a concerned
citizen, and once we took
those (children), we actual-
ly got some national news
media exposure on it As
a result of that exposure
on CNN, four of these chil-
dren, theyve been miss-
ing for two years, and the
mother was able to locate
them and after the next
court hearing she should
be able take them, Wat-
son said.
According to the report,
the children were living in
deplorable conditions. Jar-
rod Wiggins, 41, and Dean-
na Boubaris, 22, were each
charged with six counts of
child neglect. All six chil-
dren are siblings, but four
of the children were taken
from their mothers home
in Florida by their father,
Wiggins, and have been
missing for two years.
The new garbage ser-
vices offered in Wellford
only picks up household
garbage, but backdoor
pickup is available to indi-
viduals who are unable to
bring their containers to
the curb is available. Pres-
ently, 18 residents use the
backdoor pickup service.
Services to pickup lumber
and leaves arent currently
available to Wellford resi-
dents, however Watson
said the town is looking
for a wood chipper that
would enable the town to
begin picking up and dis-
posing of those items.
Watson said the town
is also looking into a re-
cycling program for the
town that would have a
pickup fee but through
the program any money
generated from the recy-
cled items would go back
to the town.
Our general fund bal-
ance is in pretty good
shape for this time of year.
We have $123,000 in the
general fund at this time.
A couple things Ill point
out in the financial report
is our public service fee
of $71,000 this is what
goes to pick up our trash
and some other things
around town, Watson
said.
The mayor reporter
there are eight new hous-
ing starts in Brighton Val-
ley with a total build out of
about 35 homes in phase
one on Syphrit Road. The
next phase would be an
additional 40 homes if the
developer chooses to go
forward with the second
phase.
We talked to the High-
way Department once
again about the under-
passes. Theyre promising
October 1. They also prom-
ised summer, but there
was a problem with the bid
process and theyre telling
me now those should be
completed in faith no later
than October, Watson
said.
Joey Owens, a Class A
sewer operator, began last
week as a Wellford em-
ployee. Owens is expected
to be present at the next
Wellford Council meeting,
which is Aug. 2 at 6 p.m. at
Wellford Town Hall.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014 NEWS THE GREER CITIZEN A3
UNDER
NEW
MANAGEMENT
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Southern Thymes
4-year-old
is battling
lung cancer
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
Ashley Nicole Norris is
battling lung cancer at 4-
years-old, but those close
to the family say her spir-
its remain high.
A benefit fundraiser will
be held for Norris on Sat-
urday, September 6 from
noon - 8 p.m. at Fairview
Baptist Church, located on
Locust Hill Road in Greer.
The funds will help the
family cover expensive
medical costs, event orga-
nizer and family member
Steve Lee said.
You can only imagine
what shes going through
because of all that radia-
tion and chemo, Lee said.
It burns us adults up
bad enough as it is, much
less it being a 4-year-old
child.
Norris has already had
two surgeries to remove
her left kidney and a spot
on her lung, according to
Lee. He said she is current-
ly undergoing chemother-
apy at Greenville Memorial
Hospital.
Her lifestyle changed
overnight, Lee said. They
found out about the can-
cer about two weeks af-
ter her fourth birthday. A
knot had come up on her
side and they went and
had it checked out to see
what it was. Thats when
they found the cancer.
Fairview was happy to
help with the fundraiser.
Theyve been visiting
our church and we just
saw a need there, said
Patty Miller with Fairview
Baptist. Everybody in
the community has really
come together on this.
Sponsors for the event
include the Wink Caf,
Mid-Way Auto, AutoZone,
Garfield Signs and Quality
Foods.
Those wishing to help
can make a donation to
the Ashley Norris Benefit
Fund at Greer State Bank,
1111 W. Poinsett St. The
event will offer hot dogs,
hamburgers popcorn,
snow cones and other en-
tertainment. Volunteers
are needed.
For more information,
contact Lee at 417-6038.
More than 40 competi-
tion cookers from as far
away as Oklahoma are
coming to downtown
Greer to see who can pre-
pare the best chicken, pork
and beef.
With a chance to win
$9,000 in prize money,
the cookers will showcase
their talents at this years
Sooiet Relief BBQ Benefit,
a fundraiser for Greer Re-
lief.
The free event is set for
Friday, Aug. 22 from 610
p.m. and Saturday, Aug.
23 from 10 a.m.10 p.m.
It will include live enter-
tainment on the Greer
Memorial Hospital main
stage. Tickets to purchase
food, beverages and kids
rides will be available for
$1 each.
Vendors will be sell-
ing items such as fresh
squeezed strawberry lem-
onade, boiled peanuts and
homemade ice cream. Spe-
cial ride wristbands will be
available for unlimited rid-
ing throughout the event.
Friday night will fea-
ture a blood drive and
the Wing Fling ($15 ticket,
7-10 p.m.), with cookers
competing for the popu-
lar vote on the best grilled
and smoked wings. On
Saturday, the BBQ Tasters
Choice competition ($15
ticket, 12-4 p.m.) will give
participants a chance to
taste BBQ and make a win-
ning selection.
Advance Tickets are
available for the Wing Fling
and BBQ Tasters Choice.
Since 1936, Greer Re-
lief has been providing
emergency assistance for
those in need in the Great-
er Greer Area. The 2014
Sooiet Relief BBQ Ben-
efit is a sanctioned Kansas
City BBQ Society (KCBS)
State Championship event
to benefit Greer Relief, a
501(c)3 non-profit.
Benefit scheduled for Norris
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
A beneft fundraiser for Ashley Nicole Norris, a 4-year-old
cancer patient, will help Norris family with medical costs.
Sooiet Relief BBQ Benefit
returns to Trade Street
FILE PHOTO | THE GREER CITIZEN
Last years Sooiet Relief BBQ Beneft, a fundraiser for Greer Relief, featured several local
and regional vendors.
Wellford approves
pump station purchase
WANT TO HELP? |
What: Beneft fundraiser
Where: Fairview Baptist
Church ball park
When: Saturday, Sept. 6,
noon-8 p.m.



Theyve been visiting our church and we
just saw a need there. Everybody in the
community has really come together on
this.
Patty Miller
Fairview Baptist Church

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I
ts not that Im saying Im the worlds
best speller.
Someone who came in around the
middle of the pack during grade school
spelling bees (a pack being a classroom
of 20 students) certainly cant feign
superiority over their peers. Add to
this English parents who used two Ls
for marvellous and wrote bills with a
cheque,- well, you end up with a kid
who didnt know which way was up.
And lets not even start on the pronun-
ciation of aluminum... Mom, I love you
dearly and miss you every day, but, trust
me, there is no i after that n!
However, I enjoy knowing how to spell
reasonably well. I even enjoy learn-
ing how to spell a word I didnt know,
beforehand, and I make a concentrated
effort to commit it to memory.
So in todays world of online grammar
and spell check, really, there is no valid
excuse for sending anything out that
isnt correct. Now, texting is one thing;
thats a method of communication (or at
least thats what theyre calling it) thats
meant to be pithy and dumbed down,
all for the sake of alacrity (look it up- I
had to, and use it in a sentence at work
tomorrow: Bill, Id like that report fin-
ished with alacrity, or Kids, once your
homework is done with alacrity, you can
watch television,), because, evidently,
its hugely important to respond that
youve laughed out loud to every item.
And to be fair, sometimes spell check
purposely leads you astray. For example,
each time I happen to type, Obama, it is
immediately switched to Osama. (Note
to self: research political affiliation of
creator of spell check)
At any rate, all Im saying is, for Petes
sake, make an effort! Listen, Ive made a
spelling error that was missed by both
me and my editors, making it to a pub-
lished column. When taken to task by a
reader, I was both humbled and grateful
and have tried my best to be on my toes
since then. Yet now, it seems everywhere
I look, particularly at online newspapers,
there are multiple, glaring errors. Are
companies so consumed with updating
their sites every five minutes that every-
thing becomes slap dash?
And the worst, oh, Law (I meant to
misspell that), the worst, are the classi-
fieds- unless youre a comedian, because
then they are the best. Sometimes I trawl
Craigs List just for the material. Some-
times Im browsing for an actual item
and fall over by what appears before my
not-so-prudish eyes in bold print. Take
the description of a Horse For Sale,
somewhere around Laurens, South Caro-
lina, that popped up a couple of days
ago. If Im lyin, Im dyin:
Spirited, Genital
Trust me: Ive owned horses since I
was eight years old and I both teach and
train them. Somehow, this particular
equine characteristic has alluded me.
I suppose we should at least be grate-
ful for the comma, otherwise it would
sound as though it was describing a side
effect of that drug where the couple
ends up holding hands in two, claw-foot-
ed, bath tubs, or, failing that, perhaps
the name of a pub somewhere in North
Yorkshire.
Perhaps there are more important
things in life, however, I truly feel that
learning to spell well should be a prior-
ity. Honestly, it determines how one is
perceived both professionally and per-
sonally. A well-written letter or resume
is, frankly, mandatory for success in life.
Ask any corporate CEO. Ask President
Osama.
EDITORIAL |
OPINION
A4 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014



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without limitation, those resulting from claims
of libel, violation of rights of privacy, plagiarism
and copyrights infringement. All material in
this publication may not be used in full or in
part without the expressed written consent of
management.
Established 1918
The Greer Citizen
The Greer Citizen
is published every Wednesday by
The Greer Citizen, Inc.
317 Trade St., Greer, S.C. 29651
Telephone 877-2076
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Publication No. 229500
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T
he Greer Citizen accepts Let-
ters to the Editor. Letters
should be 125 words or less
and include a name and a phone
number for verification.
The Greer Citizen reserves the
right to edit any content.
Letters to the Editor can be
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |
IM JUST
SAYING
PAM STONE
THE UPPER ROOM |
CURIOUSLY
AMANDA
AMANDA IRWIN
Staf reporter
Finding opportunities to
volunteer and give back
From sadness
to joy
Read Corinthians 1:3-7
M
ay our Lord Jesus Christ
himself and God our
Father, who loved us and
by his grace gave us encourage-
ment and hope, encourage your
hearts and strengthen you in
every good deed and word. -2
Thessalonians 2:16-17 (NIV)
Today I decided to go to the
mall because I felt discouraged
and needed a distraction. As I
walked through the crowds, I
saw a couple from my church
and stopped to talk with them.
Soon they were telling me
about the concerns they had
for a family member who
didnt have a relationship with
God. As I listened, I realized
that when we belong to Gods
family we feel free to share one
anothers troubles. The issues
they spoke of weighed heavy
on their hearts, and I became
so sympathetic to their story, I
forgot about my own sadness.
Soon I found myself encourag-
ing the, and in doing so, my
own burdens were lightened.
By the time we parted, we
were all smiling. We shook
hands and went our separate
ways. Giving us good thoughts,
encouraging words, and love to
hare, God lifted our burdens.
Thought for the day: We can
encourage others by inviting
God to speak and act through
us.
Prayer: Dear God, thank you
for our brothers and sisters in
Christ who share our burdens
and show us your love. We pray
as Jesus taught us, saying, Our
Father, which art in heaven,
Hallowed be thy name. They
kingdom come. They will be
done in earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this ay, our daily bread.
And forgive us our debts, as we
forgive our debtors. And lead
us not into temptation, but
deliver us from evil: For thine
is the kingdom, and the power,
and the glory, forever (Matt.
6:9-13 KJV)
Theres never a shortage of opportunities to
help out in Greer and with so many charitable
organizations stationed right in downtown the
call for help is always there. If youre looking
for a way to get involved maybe you could an-
swer.
August is a busy time of the year, but you
could say that about any month if you ask the
folks at Greer Community Ministries (GCM). Op-
erating the Meals on Wheels program is no easy
task and Greer Community Ministries is always
in need of people who can simply pick up a
route every now and then.
GCM provides Meals on Wheels in the Greer
area, including Blue Ridge, Duncan, Lyman, Tay-
lors and Wellford in both Greenville and Spar-
tanburg counties. Every Monday through Friday,
volunteers come to 738 S. Line St. Ext. and help
deliver more than 300 daily meals to people in
this community.
It may not seem like a big deal to you, but the
seniors who rely on that meal count on volun-
teers to lend a hand. Learning more is as simple
as calling 877-1937.
In the next few weeks, there will also be other
opportunities to help someone in need. The
family of Ashley Nicole Norris is currently go-
ing through a difficult time and could also use
some help. Norris is battling lung cancer at age
4 and a benefit fundraiser will be held for her
family on Saturday, September 6 from noon - 8
p.m. at Fairview Baptist Church, located on Lo-
cust Hill Road in Greer.
Family members say the 4-year-old has al-
ready had two surgeries to remove her left kid-
ney and a spot on her lung, and she is currently
undergoing chemotherapy at Greenville Memo-
rial Hospital. Right now, plenty of volunteers
are needed and those interested can call 417-
6038.
If barbecue and live entertainment are more
your speed, you can come out to the fourth an-
nual Sooiet Relief BBQ Festival to help support
Greer Relief on Aug. 22-23. Volunteers are still
needed for the event (call 848-5355), but you
can also help by just participating. Greer Relief
provides emergency relief for those in our area
and the annual event is one of the biggest ways
the community can continue supporting the or-
ganization.
Everyone knows how important the work of
the Greer Soup Kitchen and Daily Bread Minis-
tries is to the homeless in the city. While the
doors for volunteers are always wide open,
Daily Bread is also in the middle of a campaign
to raise money to build a homeless shelter. The
shelter will provide a safe area for families go-
ing through a difficult time. If you have the re-
sources to help, make a quick call to 968-0323.
Another great way to give back is coming up
soon at the Upstate South Carolina Law Enforce-
ment Memorial Softball tournament.
This event raises money to help the families
of fallen officers (who were killed in the line of
duty) in the Upstate.
Now in its third year, the tournament takes
place right in Century Park.
The fund for fallen officers was established af-
ter Laurens County Sheriffs Deputy Roger Rice
was killed during a search for a murder suspect
on July 14, 2011. He had only been with the Lau-
rens County Sheriffs Office for 18 months and
he left behind a wife and two children.
Food, games and raffle tickets will be avail-
able. More information can be found at scup-
stateofficersmemorial.com. On the website, you
can make a donation to the cause. Those do-
nating $50 or more will get a free tournament
t-shirt.
Maybe none of these things sound like some-
thing you want to be involved in, but you can
help in some way.
You can write a check, give a few hours on a
Saturday afternoon or help fill a backpack for a
kid heading back to class. There are hundreds
of folks trying to make a difference in our grow-
ing city and whether they succeed or not is up
to us.
Check your spelling
So in todays world of on-line
grammar and spell check,
really, there is no valid excuse
for sending anything out that
isnt correct.
Three sizes
bigger
B
eing the bigger person
its not something Ive
mastered. Even as an adult
Ive never been certain why I
have to choose to be the bigger
person rather than just giving
someone a piece of my mind.
But as of late, Ive been biting
my tongue until it bleeds and
Ive grown three times in size
I swear because my character,
patience and temper have been
tested in abundance lately.
Over the weekend I found
myself in an unfortunate situ-
ation that was uncomfortable,
unforeseen and in which the
right words simply fell short.
Following some personal trials
my cousin, who is like a sister
to me, called off her wedding
two days before she was sup-
posed to get married. It wasnt
an easy decision, but it was
a necessary one of which my
entire family was supportive.
But, when a bridesmaid and
friend of hers spent excessive
amounts of time complaining,
constantly talking about herself,
her own problems and demand-
ing the pity of everyone in the
room time and again rather
than taking time to see how my
cousin whod just called off her
wedding was doing, I didnt bite
my tongue. I let it fly.
It accomplished nothing. I
didnt feel better, she wasnt
any more considerate and I
walked away feeling angry,
annoyed and guilty knowing I
said things I shouldnt have. As
a result, Im going to try to turn
over a new leaf. Im going to try
to focus on the positive side of
even my least-liked person. In
retrospect I realize that reacting
to unfavorable personalities or
actions doesnt change anything
for the better, it simply further
exhibits my lack of temper-con-
trol.
Following this weekends
events, I came to realize getting
angry over someones lack of
perspective doesnt change their
perspective. The only perspec-
tive I have control over is my
own. Im challenging myself
along with my dear readers to
reevaluate the way we perceive
others, especially in extenuating
circumstances. Too often, I walk
away from situations shaking
my head in disappointment,
rather than seizing the oppor-
tunity to encourage personal
growth.
That being said if you see me
out and about, dont feel the
need to test my patience just
yet Rome wasnt built in a
day.
Saria Carter Saccocio,
MD, FAAFP, MHA, was re-
cently named chief medical
officer (CMO) and senior
vice president/medical af-
fairs for Bon Secours St.
Francis Health System.
The selection of Dr. Sac-
cocio is the result of a dili-
gent selection process that
involved extensive partici-
pation of our medical staff
in the decision-making
process, said Bon Secours
St. Francis Medical Staff
President Chris Smith, MD.
Dr. Saccocios impres-
sive experience in clinical
leadership, administration
and academ-
ics plus her
background
in fam-
ily practice
me d i c i n e
has distin-
guished her
as a strategic physician
leader ready to make valu-
able contributions to Bon
Secours St. Francis.
Dr. Saccocio received her
Doctor of Medicine degree
from the University of
Florida and her Executive
Master of Health Adminis-
tration from the University
of North Carolina (Chapel
Hill). She completed her
family medicine residency
at the University of Miami
(Florida).
Saccocio has served in
numerous clinical lead-
ership and faculty roles.
She joins Bon Secours St.
Francis after serving since
2010 as chief medical of-
ficer at Danville Regional
Medical Center in Danville,
Va., a 250-bed community
hospital. Prior to that, Sac-
cocio was associate direc-
tor of the Floyd Family
Medicine Residency Pro-
gram in Rome, Ga.; medi-
cal director, Hospicecare
of Southeast Florida (Ft.
Lauderdale); and in private
practice.
Faculty appointments
include associate profes-
sorships at Edward Via
College of Osteopathic
Medicine (Blacksburg, Va.)
and Philadelphia College
of Osteopathic Medicine
and clinical associate pro-
fessorships at Mercer Uni-
versity, Nova Southeastern
University and Florida
State University.
BUSINESS
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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A5
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Asking
for a
raise
Q: Whats your advice
on asking for a raise at
work when you have
more responsibility than
a co-worker but the same
title on paper? After being
with my company four
years, I feel like I should
make more money and I
have the right to complain
about this.
DR: Sorry, no. You dont
have a right to complain.
You agreed on your pay,
and you are doing your
job the way your charac-
ter and integrity tell you
to do the job. If some-
one else is a slacker in
the same position, that
doesnt mean a whole lot
in terms of your personal
compensation.
Ive got several people
at my company who hold
similar positions and
make similar money.
Some of them have been
here for years, while
others are relatively new.
I dont pay people for
how long theyve been in
the building, and I dont
want anyone on my team
who doesnt give 100
percent. Now, that may
be a different issue than
pay, but at the same time
I dont want someone who
gives 50 percent and I pay
them 50 percent. I want
everyone at 100 percent,
but that kind of thing
isnt your problem. Its
the companys problem,
because she works for
them and not you.
If you honestly feel
like you deserve a raise
because of your effort
and performance, thats
fine. Sit down with your
leader and make a logical
and reasonable argument
for why you deserve more
money. But dont bring
up your co-worker and
what he or she makes
in the discussion. Thats
just not relevant. What is
relevant is your worth and
the value you bring to the
organization.
But a comparative
analysis with someone
else on staff just isnt a
good idea. Id stay away
from that.
Paying
the insurance
penalty
Q: My wife and I live
in New York, and weve
had whole life insurance
for several years. Theres
a seven percent penalty
if we cash out the poli-
cies now. If we wait a few
years, we wont have to
pay into the premiums
anymore. Should we cash
out the policies anyway?
DR: The reason you
wont have to pay into the
premiums anymore is be-
cause you built up enough
savings, and they are not
paying you enough on the
savings to amount to any-
thing. The amount they
should have been paying
you versus the way they
were ripping you off will
buy the life insurance.
Its not like you can pay
for it because you still
have probability of death.
As long as theres a prob-
ability of death theres a
cost to life insurance. The
only question is whether
youre paying out of your
savings account or your
checking account. In this
case, youre paying out of
savings.
The seven percent fig-
ure is just your surrender
charge, so Id get out of
that policy soon. Heres
the problem, if you die
today, do you know what
theyll pay? Face value.
They wont pay face value
plus the savings you paid
for. In other words, youll
lose your savings.
DAVE
SAYS
DAVE
RAMSEY


Charter
school
names
leaders
There is a new leader-
ship team at Greer Middle
College for the 2014-2015
school year.
David Atchley, the
founder of a consulting
business that focuses on
knowledge-based busi-
nesses and non-profit or-
ganizations, has accepted
the position of interim
executive director for the
school.
Atchley works with area
organizations such as
Clemson University, Hope
Academy and A Childs
Haven. He also has admin-
istrative experience in aca-
demic organizations. He
served as a vice president
at Mary Baldwin College,
vice president at Presbyte-
rian College, and associate
vice president at Wofford
College.
Atchley will provide
general oversight to the
school while working on
the capital campaign for
the new building.
Jimmy Armstrong has
accepted the position of
interim principal. Arm-
strong has more than 22
years experience in vari-
ous roles and holds South
Carolina certificates for
superintendent, secondary
administration, secondary
supervisor and physical
education K-12.
His most recent experi-
ence is from Crescent High
School, where he served in
administration for the last
nine years.
James Dillard will serve
in the position of inter-
im assistant principal at
Greer Middle College. Dil-
lard is a veteran educator
with 19 years in various
administrative, teaching
and coaching roles. He
holds South Carolina cer-
tificates for superinten-
dent, secondary principal
and secondary supervi-
sor. His most recent ad-
ministrative experience is
from Broome High School,
where he served as assis-
tant principal.
The only thing we have
to fear is fear itself.
In my opinion, a tru-
er statement was never
made. Fear has made the
citizens of our country
impotent. Fear of political
correctness, fear of loss of
business, fear of not be-
ing accepted, fear of the
unknown, fear of failure,
fear of ridicule, fear of be-
ing mistaken, fear of being
misunderstood and fear
of political retribution (es-
pecially true in the state I
used to live in).
Multiply these fears by
100, 1,000, 1,000,000--the
power of fear is debilitat-
ing.
Do not be afraid. Con-
sider the consequences.
We are losing our coun-
try.
We are losing our Judeo-
Christian heritage.
We are losing ground
morally.
We are losing our chil-
dren (think Common Core
and Melissa Harris Perry,
the political author. She
said that we have to break
away from our idea that
kids belong to their par-
ents, or kids belong to
their families, and recog-
nize that kids belong to
whole communities.)
Dont think for one min-
ute that YOU cannot make
a difference. Stand up for
what you believe in.
Politically, search out
leaders who represent
your value system. Do not
vote for a PARTY--vote for
an INDIVIDUAL.
I call on you to rise
up, not in anger, but in
strength given to you by
your morality and faith.
I ask you to reach out to
your family, neighbors,
friends, acquaintances
and any other platforms
that may be available to
you and ask them to join
you in your quest to recap-
ture our country. I think it
is time to put the old sage
advice of never talk about
politics or religion out to
pasture.
I truly believe that it is
now or never. We are at a
crossroads.
I recently moved from
a state that is morally,
spiritually and financially
bankrupt. I know what it
is like to take a stand and
receive countless you go
girl private emails, but
yet have no visible support
because of fear. Their re-
ligion has become greed
and avarice. This has to
change. Think Chick-fil-
A, Hobby Lobby, Tyson
Foods, Interstate Battery,
Forever 21 and other com-
panies who have not been
afraid to intentionally in-
clude their values in their
packaging and distribu-
tion.
Whatever happens next
is truly up to YOU/US.
Marina Peterson
Greer
Plans to
open next
summer
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
The Village at Greer, a
new assisted living and
memory care facility,
broke ground at 715 S.
Buncombe Rd. on Friday
and is expected to be open
to house residents in the
summer of 2015.
Services offered include
all facility maintenance,
three meals a day, healthy
snacks and drinks, weekly
housekeeping and laundry
services, medication super-
vision, twice a week trans-
portation to physicians
appointments, personal
grooming assistance, web
accessed communication,
licensed nurses available
as needed and around-the-
clock staff.
As currently planned,
the two-story facility is
expected to have 89 units
that will be comprised of
both single rooms and
rooms to accommodate
couples. Currently, pets
arent permitted at the fa-
cility but the policy could
change, according to
Thrive Brand Manager Lisa
Howell.
A nursing home is a cat-
egorically different thing
its 24 hour medical
assistance for people that
require a pretty advanced
level of care. Assisted liv-
ing is exactly what it says,
most of our residents can
still function on certain
levels, they just require
assistance with certain
daily tasks of living, said
Howell.
The facility will combine
the elderly and the use of
technology.
Were describing it as
assisted living like youve
never seen before. Since
were building it from the
ground up, were incorpo-
rating a lot of technology
and a lot of programs that
are proven to help seniors
to have better quality of
life, not just longer, How-
ell said.
Some of these technolo-
gies include Wi-Fi through-
out the building, a quite
care system that monitors
changes in patterns for
seniors to determine if
or when they need more
assistance, wireless call
system, a pendant system
that tracks where they are
in the building, a smart
lock system that allows
residents to unlock doors
with their bracelet rather
than a key.
Our never too late sys-
tem helps connect them
to the internet so they can
see things and connect
with technology, things
like that we have a team to
help guide them through
that process, she said.
But a lot of it though is de-
signed to make their lives
easier, its not put in place
in such a way that theyll
necessarily interact with it
if that makes sense.
The fact that we use
technology the way we do
is a really, really big com-
ponent that sets us apart
at this point. In about five
years more communities
are going to be running to
catch up with us, Howell
said.
For more information
about the assisted living
facility, visit villageat-
greer.com.
Village at Greer breaks ground
RENDERING | SUBMITTED
Pictured is a drawing of what The Village at Greer, a new assisted living and memory care facility on South Bumcombe
Road, will look like. It will open in the summer of 2015.



LETTER TO THE EDITOR |
Were describing
it as assisted living
like youve never
seen before.
Lisa Howell
Thrive brand manager
Stand up for what you believe
Saccocio named chief medical officer
Saccocio
A Arrangement Florist
877-5711
The Upstates Premier Florist
1205 W. POINSETT STREET GREER OPEN MON.-FRI. 8:30-6 SAT. 9-3
www.aarrangementfowers.com
Greers Freshest Flowers Master Designer Shop
VOTED BEST IN THE UPSTATE
OBITUARIES
The Greer Citizen
A6 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014
ONLINE |
View Obituaries
online at
greercitizen.com
OBITUARIES
Can be emailed to billy@
greercitizen.com or dropped
of at 317 Trade St. Deadline:
noon Tuesday. Cost: $40; with
photo $55.
Odelle Few
Miss Odelle Few depart-
ed her earthly life Aug. 10,
2014. She was 97 years
old, born Nov. 6, 1916 the
eldest child of Mr. and
Mrs. Ernest Gary and Ra-
chel Annis Forrester Few.
Surviving are her two
brothers, Henry Esley
(Linda) Few, John Billy
(Martha) Few and her sis-
ter-in-law, Sina (Wilson)
Few. She is also survived
by many nieces, nephews
and their children and
grandchildren.
Odelle leaves behind
her good friends, Mr. and
Mrs. Ronnie and Debbie
Turner.
She was predeceased by
brothers, Wilson G. Few
and E. Benson Few also
her sisters, Thelma (J.C.)
Rentz and Hazel (Allen G.)
McIntyre.
Odelle was a lifelong,
faithful member of Me-
morial United Methodist
Church. She taught Sun-
day school for many years
and participated in church
activities as long as she
was able. Odelle was
blessed with many friends
throughout her life.
She retired from Pied-
mont Shirt Mfg., Green-
ville, in 1979.
The funeral service was
held at The Wood Mortu-
ary at 4 p.m. on Tuesday,
Aug. 12. Burial was at
Fews Chapel United Meth-
odist Church Cemetery, N.
Hwy 101, Greer.
The family wishes to
extend their grateful ap-
preciation to the staff of
Bayberry Retirement Inn
and Journey Hospice Care.
Memorials may be made
to Memorial United Meth-
odist Church, 201 N. Main
Street, Greer, 29650, Fews
Chapel United Method-
ist Church, 4000 N. Hwy
101, Greer, 29651 or Jour-
ney Hospice Care, 665 N.
Academy St., Greenville,
29601.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Irene V. Hart
Irene Virginia Hart, 94,
died Aug. 11, 2014 at Al-
pha Health and Rehab.
A native of Spartanburg
County, daughter of the
late James A. and Lelia
Pittman Hart, she was a
retired employee of Union
Carbide Battery Mfg and a
member of Praise Cathe-
dral.
Surviving are two broth-
ers, Charles and Theron
Hart; three sisters, Mae
Hart, Gerlene Brown and
Dottie Seay and many lov-
ing nieces and nephews.
Graveside services will
be held at 11 a.m. on Fri-
day, August 15, at Hillcrest
Memory Gardens conduct-
ed by Pastor Bill Waters.
Visitation will be held
after the service at the
gravesite.
The families are at their
respective homes.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rials may be made to Greer
Community Ministries,
P.O. 1373, Greer, 29652.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Phillip Homer McSwain
Today we celebrate the
life and legacy of Rever-
end Phillip Homer Mc-
Swain, 94, who died, Aug.
8, 2014.
Reverend McSwain was
born on Jan. 18, 1920, and
raised in the community
of Greenville, South Caro-
lina. He began his ministry
in the Church of God as
an evangelist at the age
of seventeen. He married
Annette Pearl McSwain in
1939 and they began a 66-
year ministry together.
He served as a state
evangelist for South Caro-
lina. Reverend McSwain
pastored churches in
South Carolina, Michigan,
and Ohio. In addition,
he built and pastored
the prestigious National
Church of God in Washing-
ton, D.C. He also planted
30+ churches out of this
congregation. He served
the Church of God as a
popular and respected
administrative bishop in
Maine, Massachusetts, In-
diana, Kentucky, Virginia,
North Carolina and Ten-
nessee. Reverend McSwain
concluded his service to
his denomination as a
missions representative.
His love of missions, es-
pecially the countries of
Africa and India, was a sig-
nificant part of his adult
ministry.
He loved his family and
was an avid collector of
coins and knives.
He was preceded in
death by his wife, Annette
Pearl Sweezy McSwain,
parents, Mary Amanda Mc-
Swain and Preston Avon
Homer McSwain; brothers:
John and JB, and sisters,
Maggie, Ruthie, Lucy and
Annie Mae.
He is survived by his
loving daughter Myrna
McSwain Alford, his son-
in-law, Dr. Delton Lynol
Alford; one brother Wil-
liam McSwain; his grand-
children, Susan and Scot
Carter, Candy and Tim
Price, and Lesley and
Andy Smith; and his great-
grandchildren Kaity Cart-
er, Caroline Carter, Emma
Smith, Ansley Smith and
Noah Price.
The family received
friends on Sunday, Aug.
10, 2014 from 2 p.m.- 4
p.m. at the Dixon Chapel
of North Cleveland Church
of God, Cleveland, Tennes-
see.
A Celebration of Life
and Ministry service was
conducted at the Praise
Cathedral Church of God
on Monday, Aug. 11, at 2
p.m., officiated by Dr. Del-
ton Alford, Reverend Jerry
Madden, and Reverend
James Byrd.
The family received
friends from 1 p.m. until
the funeral hour at the
church.
In lieu of flowers, the
family suggests that con-
tributions can be made to
the Noah Alford Price Care
Fund at YouCaring.com.
Grissom Serenity Funer-
al Home & Cremation Ser-
vices, Mark S. Grissom, Fu-
neral Director, has charge
of the arrangements.
Richard E. Mulder
Veteran
Richard Eugene Mul-
der, 83, of 2 Beaver Brook
Court, Taylors, died Aug.
6, 2014 at his home.
A native of
Indianapolis,
Indiana, son
of the late
William Freddie and Etta
Phelps Mulder, he was a
U.S. Army Veteran of the
Korean War, a retired em-
ployee of the U.S. Postal
Service and a member
of Jackson Grove United
Methodist Church.
Surviving are his wife,
Margery Arnold Mulder of
the home; five daughters,
Patricia Jane Christ of Ak-
ron, Ohio, Linda Karlene
Pawlowski of Orwell, Ohio,
Barbara May Mulder of
Atlanta, Georgia, Michelle
Kay Janson of Senoia,
Georgia and Jo Anne
Chipps of Pumpkintown; a
son, Richard Eugene Mul-
der II of Rockford, Illinois;
a brother, Freddie William
Mulder of Mansfield, Ohio;
twenty-five grandchildren
and twenty-nine great-
grandchildren.
A memorial service was
held 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug,
16, 2014 at Jackson Grove
United Methodist Church.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Bernice H. Painter
Bernice Hall Painter, 90,
widow of George Dewey
Painter, went home to
be with Jesus on Aug. 6,
2014.
Mrs. Painter was a true
lady and an extraordinary
mother. She will be missed
by all who knew and loved
her, but none will miss her
more than her children.
She was a retired employ-
ee of Bayberry Retirement
Inn and a member of His
Vineyard.
She is survived by a son,
William Rodney Painter;
a daughter, Emily Denise
Cooley (Tom); a brother,
Bobby Hall; one grandchild
and three great-grandchil-
dren; and daughter-in-law,
Irene Painter.
She was predeceased
by a son, George Terrell
Painter.
Funeral services were
held at 4:30 p.m. on Fri-
day, Aug. 8, at The Wood
Mortuary, conducted by
Rev. Keith Kelly. Burial
followed in Hillcrest Mem-
ory Gardens.
Visitation was held prior
from 3:30-4:30 p.m. at The
Wood Mortuary.
The family is at the
home.
Memorials may be made
to His Vineyard, P.O. Box
2328, Greer, S.C. 29652.
A special thanks is to be
given to Interim Hospice
for their excellent care.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Martha M.J. Rhodes
Martha Jean M.J.
Rhodes, 67, of 105 River
St., Greer, died Aug. 9,
2014 at her home.
A native of Greer, daugh-
ter of the late Mattie Oliver
Burrell, she was a retired
employee of Dollar Gen-
eral.
Surviving are two sons,
Billy Rhodes of Easley and
Michael Rhodes of the
home and one cousin Allen
Craze Oliver of Greer.
Visitation will be held
6-8 p.m. on Wednesday at
the home.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Ella Stine Watson
On March 13, 1922 Ella
Demaris Stine was born
in Sulphur, Louisiana to
her parents Irwin E. Stine
and Lydia Heard Stine. El-
la was the first born of 6
children. She is prede-
ceased by her brothers,
Coy Stine and Marvin Stine
and sisters, Ruth Stine
Goodwin and Ruby Stine
Mattwell. She has one
surviving brother, Carroll
Stine of Sulphur, Louisi-
ana.
Ella grew up on the fam-
ily farm in Carlyss, La. She
graduated from Sulphur
High School in 1939. Ms.
Stine married Robert B.
Watson on Jan. 11, 1955
and was together until
his death in 2003. During
their marriage they lived
all over the world and
made lifelong friends.
Ella was never blessed
with children but she was
a wonderful and loving
aunt to many nieces and
nephews and great-nieces
and great-nephew.
Her home was always
welcoming and she en-
joyed having visitors
anytime. She could re-
member people and dates
better than any of us. When
she spoke you listened.
Ella moved from Louisi-
ana to South Carolina in
2008. She lived there until
her death on Aug. 5, 2014.
Aunt Dee had a wonder-
ful life and will truly be
missed.
Much gratitude is given
to the staff at The Cottages
at Brushy Creek, Camellia
Cottage for their kindness,
patience and compassion
shown to her. She could
not have been in a better
place.
Many thanks are extend-
ed to Gentiva Hospice for
their great care in her final
days.
Visitation was held from
5 p.m.-8 p.m. on Saturday,
August 9, 2014 at John-
son Funeral Home in Lake
Charles, La.
Funeral services were
held on Sunday, Aug. 10, at
2 p.m. at Johnson Funeral
Home, followed by burial
in Mimosa Pines Cemetery
in Carlyss, La. where she
was buried next to her lov-
ing husband Robert.
Online condolences may
be made at thewoodmor-
tuary.com.
Dry Weekend Weather
Sunshine, dry weather and warm temperatures
have arrived and will continue into the week-
end. After a week of mostly dry weather we
will see mild weather continue for Saturday
and Sunday. Rain chances remain low after
we saw record rainfall over the past weekend.
Highs on Saturday and Sunday will climb
back to the upper 80s and low 90s. Overnight
lows will fall to the middle 60s. Have a great
weekend!
Byrnes Football Jamboree
Where: Byrnes High
(Greer vs Byrnes)
Date: Friday, Aug. 15
6-10 p.m.

Temps: Mostly clear and warm.
Mid 80s at start.
89
69
4.40
33.76
+4.07
6:48 AM
8:19 PM
Aug. 17 Aug. 25 Sept. 2 Sept. 8
82/62 SUN 84/63 ISO
85/63 PS 88/65 PS
84/74 ISO 87/75 ISO
86/77 ISO 87/78 ISO
90/68 PS 91/70 SUN
87/67 PS 91/69 SUN
92/70 PS 94/73 SUN
89/65 SUN 90/68 PS
82/62 Sunny
84/63 Iso. showers
83/63 Sunny
85/64 Iso. showers
87/66 Sunny
90/68 Partly sunny
88/68 Sunny
92/70 Partly sunny
85
62
84
63
87
66
87
66
90
68
90
69
91
71
Wednesday Thursday Friday
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
Weekend Outlook


FROM PAGE ONE
said. What they repre-
sent is people that have
worked hard throughout
their lives to become suc-
cessful, but they havent
forgotten where theyve
started and the people
that helped them become
successful.
The campus has been
renamed the Benson cam-
pus, along with a build-
ing bearing the couples
names.
Benson has been in-
volved with the Greenville
Tech Foundation for about
11 years, where he learned
about the important work
it does, he said.
I believe in this school,
Benson said. I was born
and raised here in Greer,
so I really want to support
it.
Benson never envisioned
becoming the namesake of
a college campus, when he
first started working.
No, no, all I was wor-
ried about was what I was
going to do that night, he
said.
The donation is a testa-
ment to the community,
said Mark Owens, Greater
Greer Chamber of Com-
merce president.
As a chamber, were
thrilled to see someone
be so generous as the Ben-
son family, Owens said.
Greenville Tech, now the
Benson campus, does so
much for this community,
for our current workforce
and also helping bringing
new businesses. Its a great
testament of hard work
and community leaders,
moving this community
forward together.
Donations like the Ben-
sons help maintain the
quality of Greers work-
force.
Like everyone, first and
foremost, we are so grate-
ful to the Bensons for their
continued investment in
the Greer community, De-
aton said. Its just mind-
boggling, their generosity
and all the good things
theyre doing. Obviously,
the health of this commu-
nity is so dependent on the
quality of our workforce.
Jim Benson has been a
constant supporter of
the school, said Les Gard-
ner, Greenville Tech Foun-
dation development direc-
tor.
Jim agreed to chair a
campaign to raise funds
for the Greer campus a
number of years ago
Fred (Payne, Greenville
County councilman) and I,
guys that like to win, had
set a goal of $30,000. We
thought that was a good
sum that would have giv-
en some needed help to
the campus and students.
When we sat down with
Jim to discuss the goal,
he chuckled and he said,
Greer can do betterHe
further set off $100,000
on the table, as a challenge
to match every dollar we
raised from this commu-
nity. With Jims challenge,
a lot of Jims time in spent
in making connections and
some fantastic assistance
form the community, we
succeeded in raising bet-
ter than $210,000.
In the years that fol-
lowed, Jim has been a con-
stant supporter of the stu-
dents at Greenville Tech.
When you ask him why, his
response is always in so
many words, Because they
need it and Im blessed to
be able to do it.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
DONATION: Benson becomes namesake
What [the Bensons]
represent is people
that have worked
hard throughout
their lives to become
successful, but they
havent forgotten
where theyve
started and the
people that helped
them become
successful.
Keith Miller
Greenville Tech president
FROM PAGE ONE
Hiller said after the Ca-
zbah was not successful
at the location and closed
after losing money, he de-
cided to open a second lo-
cation there because it is a
better suited for the area.
The previous business
was losing money and was
not being successful so it
had to be closed. I believe
that Blue Ridge Brewing
will be a much better fit
for downtown Greer. I
think it will do very well.
In other words, Im step-
ping in where the other
people left, he said.
The new location will be
open seven days a week
and will serve dinner and
lunch, and brunch on Sun-
days.
We want people to
know that we plan to bring
all the good things that
weve been working on so
hard and for so long in
downtown Greenville. We
want to bring those into
downtown Greer and be
a part of the community,
he said.
For more information
about the Blue Ridge Brew-
ing Company, visit blu-
eridgebrewing.com.
BUSINESS: Hopes to succeed on Trade

MUSICAL PERFORMANCE
AT ABNER CREEK
Abner Creek Baptist
Church will host a chil-
drens musical perfor-
mance titled: Jailhouse
Rocks: Shake, Rattle, and
Roll on Sunday, Aug. 17
at 6 p.m.
It will be an upbeat mu-
sical that teaches children
that true freedom comes
from being born again
through Christ Jesus.
The church is located
at 2461 Abner Creek Rd,
Greer.
For more information,
visit abnercreekbaptist.
com.
DANNY FUNDERBURK
AT NEW COVENANT CHURCH
Danny Funderburk, one
of the most distinctive and
beloved voices in all of
gospel music, will perform
in concert 6 p.m. Sunday
at New Covenant Assem-
bly of God Church.
The church is located
at 2425 Racing Road, off
Highway 357, in Greer.
For more information,
call 848-4521.
HOW THE WEST WAS SUNG
AT FINE ARTS CENTER
The Palmetto Statesmen
Chorus will present its
50th annual show entitled
How
The West Was Sung on
Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. at the
Fine Arts Center, 150 E.
Main St., Duncan. Gold
medalist quartet Vocal
Spectrum will be the fea-
tured guest.
Vocal Spectrum was the
Barbershop Harmony Soci-
etys international cham-
pion in 2006 and contin-
ues to actively represent
the barbershop style both
in concert and recording.
The Statesmen Chorus
and Quartets have chosen
familiar tunes from the
old west set in a scripted
performance. In chaps and
hats, the chorus will sing
Happy Trails, How The
West Was Won, Ragtime
Cowboy Joe and many
more. Chapter quartets
will offer Dont Fence
Me In, Shenandoah, The
Yall Come Back Saloon,
and Ridin Down The
Canyon.
One Accord quartet,
always well received on
stage, will open the show
after intermission.
Tickets are $20 each and
are available at 877-1352,
by email at robertlee10@
bellsouth.net or at www.
palmettostatesmen.org.
Remaining tickets will be
sold at the door and each
ticket may be placed in a
door prize drawing at the
theater.
Men who sing are invited
to attend Chapter meet-
ings at Duncan United
Methodist Church, 139 W.
Main St., Duncan, Mondays
at 7 p.m. or call 322-0165.
ABNER CREEK HOSTING
SIMULCAST SEPT. 13
Abner Creek Baptist
Church will be hosting:
THE WORD: CLOSER TO
HOME with Beth Moore.
The Living Proof Live Si-
mulcast will take place
Saturday, Sept. 13 from
9:30 a.m.-4:15 pm.
Tickets are $25 per per-
son (including lunch) and
are available online at ab-
nercreekbaptist.com.
The simulcast will be
broadcast at 2461 Abner
Creek Road in Greer.
APALACHE GOLDEN
HEARTS CALENDAR
A one day trip is sched-
uled August 18 for the
Golden Hearts (place
and time to be announced
later).
The seniors will meet at
Petes Restaurant in Greer
on August 28 at 6 p.m. for
the evening meal.
EBENEZER WELCOME
OFFERING FREE FOOD
The Bread of Life Food
Pantry at Ebenezer Wel-
come Baptist Church, 4005
Highway 414, Landrum, is
open on Thursdays from
2-4 p.m.
The pantry is open to
families in need of as-
sistance. Photo ID is re-
quired.
For more information,
call 895-1461.
SINGLES BIBLE STUDY
AT PELHAM ROAD BAPTIST
Pelham Road Baptist
Church, 1108 Pelham
Road, Greer, hosts a Sin-
gles Bible Study each Sun-
day from 6-8:30 p.m.
GRIEFSHARE OFFERED
AT FAIRVIEW BAPTIST
Fairview Baptist Church,
1300 Locust Hill Road,
Greer, will host Grief-
Share, a support group led
by Carol Allen, on the sec-
ond Sunday of each month
from 4:45 - 6:30 p.m.
For more information,
contact Carol Allen at 292-
6008.
SPANISH CLASS
REGISTRATION UNDERWAY
Registration is underway
for Three Rivers Baptist
Association (TRBA) Span-
ish Classes.
The 12-week session be-
gins Monday, Sept. 8, at the
TRBA office, 881-A Tiger-
ville Road, Travelers Rest.
Advanced classes start at
5 p.m.; intermediate at 6
p.m.No beginners classes.
Cost is $35 including book
and materials.
For more information or
to register, visit threeriv-
ersba.org.
BY KATIE CRUICE SMITH
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
Abner Creek Baptist
Church is teeing off again
to raise money to support
church-planting efforts in
Toronto, Ontario.
The second annual Tee
It Up for Toronto Cap-
tains Choice Handicap
Foursome will be held on
Saturday, Sept. 6, at 1 p.m.
at the Willow Creek Golf
Course.
We partnered with a
church in Toronto Trinity
Life which was planted by
two pastors and launched
about a year ago, said
Scott Ogle, the lead pastor
at Abner Creek.
Weve partnered with
them financially and
through Gospel-efforts,
and our goal is to send a
team there in the spring.
The golf tournament is
a way for the church to
raise funds for the church
plant, which is one of sev-
eral church plants that
are being set up through
the North American Mis-
sion Board in certain un-
churched cities through-
out North America.
The money [raised]
goes directly to them to
be used at their own dis-
posal, Ogle said. They
mostly use it for their dai-
ly outreach.
Last year, the church
raised over $2,000 for the
church plant, and they
hope to see that amount
increase at this years
tournament although
there is no specific goal
in mind. Other churches
throughout the country
have partnered with the
church as well.
Its a very nice golf
course, Ogle said. But
we struggle with getting
women to come and play.
The tournament is open
to both men and women.
Several members from our
church come out, and they
reach out to other peo-
ple. It helps us because
it exposes people to our
church and to what were
about.
There will be prizes for
first and second place, and
everyone who participates
will receive a $10 gift card
from Golfsmith.
Currently, the church is
still looking for hole spon-
sors. For just $100 a hole,
the companys logo will be
displayed at the hole.
The tournament costs
$60 per person, and pre-
registration is going on un-
til August 16. To register,
go to abnercreekbaptist.
com or call Doug Bortone
at 313-3487.
RELIGION
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A7
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PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Heres your sign
Jon Bander, of Garfeld Signs, puts the fnishing touches around a new sign on the old
Greer library building on School Street. First Presbyterian Church will dedicate the
building, which is expected to house classrooms, in coming weeks.
CHURCH
NEWS
Donates
$5,000 to
Greer STEP
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
Memorial United Meth-
odist Church has issued
a challenge to other area
churches: step up to help
Greers homeless.
Rev. Joseph Curtis pre-
sented Nancy Webb, Daily
Bread Ministries board
member, with a second
$5,000 check toward Greer
STEP (Shelter To Empower
People).
Your church has helped
us for years, Webb told
Curtis. Not only with vol-
unteers, but financially.
Its been a blessing.
But Curtis doesnt want
Memorial United Method-
ist to be the only church
standing behind the shel-
ter. Its the only church
that has given any signifi-
cant funding, Webb said,
but theyre in the begin-
ning stages of reaching
out.
Im hoping that this,
and theyre hoping this,
will inspire other churches
to go, Oh, well we cant let
the Methodists be the only
ones, Curtis said. So
maybe First Baptist and
Presbyterian and every-
body else will step up and
start giving some money.
People dont realize
Greer has a homeless pop-
ulation, Webb said.
People cant believe
that we have people living
in Greer living in tents,
she said. But we do. They
come in and eat at our
kitchen. We would like to
eradicate that so that that
is no longer a problem, an
issue (The shelter) is the
natural next step for us.
Webb has been involved
with the soup kitchen for
17 years since the days
of a one-room boy scout
hut with a refrigerator
that was held together
with a bungee chord.
Weve come a long way,
but its always been the
hand of God on it, all the
way through, she said.
Thats one reason we
know right now the time
is right. God is ready. Hes
putting the right people
in the right spots and we
know that He has a bless-
ing over it.
Curtis is in his third year
as Memorial United Meth-
odists pastor. The shelter,
which will be located at
509 and 511 E. Poinsett
St., will be modeled after
Greenvilles Triune Mercy
Center.
Ive been involved in a
lot of churches as a min-
ister, he said. This is a
need everywhere. Its al-
ways a problem. First of
all, its a problem when its
just men by themselves.
Finding a place for a man
seems to be hard. There
seems to be a lot of things
for women and women
and children. The whole
family unit, though you
just dont find anything
like that... It just seems to
be the standard. If a family
can stay together through
this transition, thats won-
derful.
Memorial United Meth-
odist has been involved
with the ministry since the
beginning.
We have a long his-
tory with Daily Bread
Ministries, Curtis said.
The founder was in our
church this church has
had a long history with
this. Its just a continu-
ation of that. We just be-
lieve in helping local mis-
sions.
Church members have
also stepped up, Curtis
said, raising about $9,000.
The other $10,000 has
come from the churchs
mission endowment fund,
he said.
The individual mem-
bers of the congregations
are the ones that stepped
up and supported it, Cur-
tis said.
The shelter will break
ground Oct. 1.
Abner Creek
will Tee It Up
for Toronto

Memorial United Methodist issues challenge
KATIE JONES | THE GREER CITIZEN
Rev. Joseph Curtis, left, presented Nancy Webb, Daily Bread Ministries board member,
with a second $5,000 check toward Greer Shelter To Empower People.


New Covenant Assembly of God
presents
Danny
Funderburk
New Covenant Assembly of God
(In the old Apalache Baptist Church off Hwy. 357)
2425 Racing Road Greer, SC
848-4521
One of the most distinctive and beloved voices
in all of Gospel music.
www.dannyfunderburkministries.com
Sunday, August 17th 6 p.m.
301 McCall St. Greer
848-5500
Highway 14 Greer, SC
879-7311
Management & Employees
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Asphalt Paving Site Preparation
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400 W. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greer
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Rental Car Competitive Rates
State of the Art Equipment & Facilities
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989-0099
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Riverside Baptist Church 1249 South Suber Road Greer
And they were calling to one another: Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty;
the whole earth is full of his glory. - Isaiah 6:3
BAPTIST
Abner Creek Baptist Church
2461 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 877-6604
Airport Baptist Church
776 S. Batesville Rd., Greer 848-7850
Apalache Baptist
1915 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 877-6012
Bible Baptist Church
6645 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-7003
Blue Ridge Baptist Church
3950 Pennington Rd., Greer 895-5787
BridgePointe
600 Bridge Rd., Taylors 244-2774
Burnsview Baptist Church
9690 Reidville Rd., Greer 879-4006
Calvary Baptist
101 Calvary St., Greer 877-9759
Calvary Baptist
108 Forest St., Greer 968-0092
Calvary Hill Baptist
100 Edward Rd., Lyman
Calvary Road Baptist Church
108 Bright Rd., Greer 593-2643
Camp Creek Baptist Church
1100 Camp Creek Rd., Taylors
Cedar Grove Baptist Church
109 Elmer St., Greer 877-6216
Community Baptist Church
642 S. Suber Rd., Greer 848-3500
Double Springs Baptist Church
3800 Locust Hill Rd., Taylors 895-1314
Ebenezer-Welcome Baptist Church
4005 Highway 414, Landrum 895-1461
El Bethel Baptist Church
313 Jones Ave., Greer 877-4021
Emmanuel Baptist Church
423 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-2121
Enoree Fork Baptist Church
100 Enoree Dr., Greer 268-4385
Fairview Baptist Church
1300 Locust Hill Rd., Greer 877-1881
First Baptist Church
202 W. Poinsett St., Greer 877-4253
Freedom Fellowship Greer High 877-3604
Friendship Baptist Church
1600 Holly Springs Rd., Lyman 877-4746
Good News Baptist Church
1592 S. Highway 14, Greer 879-2289
Grace Baptist Church
760 W. Gap Creek Rd., Greer 879-3519
Grace Place
407 Ridgewood Dr., Greer 877-7724
Greer Freewill Baptist Church
110 Pine Ridge Dr., Greer 968-0310
Heritage Chapel Baptist Church
218 Alexander Rd., Greer 989-0170
Highland Baptist Church
3270 Hwy. 414, Taylors 895-5270
Hillcrest Baptist Church
111 Biblebrook Dr., Greer 877-4206
Hispanic Baptist Iglesia Bautista Hispana
199 Hubert St., Greer 877-3899
Holly Springs Baptist Church
250 Hannon Rd., Inman 877-6765
Locust Hill Baptist Church
5534 Locust Hill Rd., Travelers Rest 895-1771
Maple Creek Baptist Church
609 S. Main St., Greer 877-1791
Milford Baptist Church
1282 Milford Church Rd., Greer 895-5533
Mount Lebanon Baptist Church
572 Mt. Lebanon Church Rd., Greer 895-2334
New Hope Baptist Church
561 Gilliam Rd., Greer 879-7080
New Jerusalem Baptist Church
413 E. Poinsett St., Greer 968-9203
New Life Baptist Church
90 Becco Rd., Greer 895-3224
Northwood Baptist Church
888 Ansel School Rd., Greer 877-5417
ONeal Baptist Church
3420 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0930
Pelham First Baptist Church
2720 S. Old Highway 14, Greer 879-4032
Peoples Baptist Church
310 Victor Avenue Ext., Greer 848-0449
Piney Grove Missionary Baptist Church
201 Jordan Rd., Lyman 879-2646
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church
1002 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-6436
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
4899 Jordan Rd., Greer 895-3546
Providence Baptist Church
2020 Gibbs Shoals Rd., Greer 877-3483
Rebirth Missionary Baptist Church
2375 Racing Road, Greer 877-0449
Riverside Baptist Church
1249 S. Suber Rd., Greer 879-4400
Second Baptist Church
570 Memorial Drive Ext., Greer 877-7061
Southside Baptist Church
410 S. Main St., Greer 877-2672
St. Johns Baptist Church
2 Groveland Rd., Taylors 879-2904
Suber Road Baptist Church
445 S. Suber Rd., Greer 801-0181
Taylors First Baptist Church
200 W. Main St., Taylors 244-3535
United Family Ministries
13465 E. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 877-3235
Victor Baptist
121 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 877-9686
Washington Baptist Church
3500 N. Highway 14, Greer 895-1510
Welcome Home Baptist Church
1779 Pleasant Hill Rd., Greer 901-7674
CATHOLIC
Blessed Trinity Catholic Church
901 River Rd., Greer 879-4225
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Riverside Church of Christ
2103 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 322-6847
CHURCH OF GOD
Church of God - Greer
500 Trade St., Greer 877-0374
Church of God of Prophecy
2416 N. Highway 14, Greer 877-8329
Eastside Worship Center
601 Taylors Rd., Taylors 268-0523
ONeal Church of God
3794 Berry Mill Rd., Greer 895-4273
Pelham Church of God of Prophecy
139 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 801-0528
Praise Cathedral Church of God
3390 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 879-4878
EPISCOPAL
Good Shepherd Episcopal
200 Cannon St., Greer 877-2330
LUTHERAN
Abiding Peace Ev. Lutheran Church
401 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 288-4867
Apostolic Lutheran Church
453 N. Rutherford Rd., Greer 848-4568
Immanuel Lutheran Church & School LCMS
2820 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville 297-5815
Redeemer Lutheran Church, ELCA
300 Oneal Rd., Greer 877-5876
METHODIST
Bethel United Methodist Church
105 E. Arlington Ave., Greer 879-2066
Covenant United Methodist Church
1310 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 244-3162
Ebenezer United Methodist Church
174 Ebenezer Road, Greer 987-9644
Faith United Methodist Church
1301 S. Main St. (S. Hwy. 14), Greer 877-0308
Fews Chapel United Methodist Church
4000 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-2522
Grace United Methodist Church
627 Taylor Rd., Greer 877-7015
Lee Road United Methodist Church
1377 East Lee Rd., Taylors 244-6427
Liberty Hill United Methodist Church
301 Liberty Hill Rd., Greer 968-8150
Liberty United Methodist Church
4276 Highway 414, Landrum 292-0142
Memorial United Methodist Church
201 N. Main St., Greer 877-0956
Mountain View UMC
6525 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-8532
Sharon United Methodist Church
1421 Reidville Sharon Rd., Greer 879-7926
St. Mark United Methodist Church
911 St. Mark Rd., Taylors 848-7141
St. Paul United Methodist Church
3856 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-5570
Victor United Methodist Church
1 Wilson Ave., Greer 877-5520
Woods Chapel United Methodist Church
2388 Brown Wood Rd., Greer 879-4475
Zoar United Methodist Church
1005 Highway 357, Greer 877-0758
PRESBYTERIAN
Blue Ridge Presbyterian Church
2094 Highway 101 North, Greer 483-2140
Devenger Road Presbyterian Church
1200 Devenger Rd., Greer 268-7652
Fellowship Presbyterian Church
1105 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 877-3267
First Presbyterian Church
100 School St., Greer 877-3612
Fulton Presbyterian Church
821 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 879-3190
OTHER DENOMINATIONS
Agape House
900 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 329-7491
Anglican Church of St. George the Martyr
427 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 281-0015
Bartons Memorial Pentacostal Holiness
Highway 101 North, Greer
Bethesda Temple
125 Broadus St., Greer 877-8523
Beulah Christian Fellowship Church
1017 Mauldin Rd., Greenville 283-0639
Calvary Bible Fellowship
Holiday Inn, Duncan 266-4269
Calvary Chapel of Greer
104 New Woodruff Rd. Greer 877-8090
Christ Fellowship
343 Hampton Rd., Greer 879-8446
Christian Heritage Church
900 N. Main St., Greer 877-2288
Christian Life Center 2 Country Plaza 322-1325
Christian Outreach 106 West Rd. 848-0308
El-Bethel Holiness 103 E. Church St. 968-9474
Faith Family Church
3339 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-0207
Faith Temple
5080 Sandy Flat Rd., Taylors 895-2524
Glad Tidings Assembly of God
Highway 290, Greer 879-3291
Greer Mill Church 52 Bobo St., Greer 877-2442
Harmony Fellowship Church
468 S. Suber Rd., Greer 877-8287
Harvest Christian Church
2150 Highway 417, Woodruff 486-8877
International Cathedral of Prayer
100 Davis Avenue Greer 655-0009
Lifesong Church
12481 Greenville Highway, Lyman 439-2602
Living Way Community Church
3239 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0544
Mountain Bridge Community Church
1400B Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 350-1051
New Beginnings Outreach
104 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 968-2424
New Birth Greenville
3315 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 848-2728
New Covenant Fellowship
2425 Racing Rd., Greer 848-4521
New Hope Freedom
109 W. Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer 205-8816
New Life in Christ 210 Arlington Rd. 346-9053
Point of Life Church
Wade Hampton Blvd. Duncan 426-4933
Springwell Church
4369 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 268-2299
Trinity Fellowship Church
3610 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 877-0419
1700 N. Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville 244-6011
United Anglican Fellowship
1001 W. Poinsett St., Greer 629-3350
United Christian Church
105 Daniel Ave., Greer 895-3966
United House of Prayer
213 Oak St., Greer 848-0727
Upstate Friends Meeting (Quaker)
39 Hillcrest St., Lyman 877-9392
Upstate Tree of Life
203 East Bearden St., Greer 848-1295
Victorian Hills Community Church
209 Victor Ave. Ext., Greer 877-3981
Vine Worship Center
4373 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-8175
A8 THE GREER CITIZEN PAGE LABEL WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014
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Christian Day Care
30 YEARS IN BUSINESS
REGISTERED WITH DSS
1 mile from BMW - 887 Robinson Road
864-877-0529
Now taking applications for infants and older
A former deputy of 19
years with the Greenville
County Sheriffs Office
has been arrested after
authorities were called to
his home in reference to
him being intoxicated. Ac-
cording to reports, he was
threatening to blow up his
house. Vic Lamar Vickers,
51, of 289 Pine Dr., Pied-
mont, has been charged
with breach of peace,
misconduct in office and
breach of piece. Vickers
resigned as a deputy in
2013.
Deputies responded to
Vickers home address on
June 30.
Upon arrival, deputies
were unable to get Vickers
to voluntarily come out of
the house, which was occu-
pied, by both Vickers and
his 14-year-old son. The
SWAT team responded to
the scene and was even-
tually able to talk Vickers
out of the residence. Vick-
ers son was not injured
during the incident and
a search of the premises
concluded that there was
no evidence of explosive
devices.
The search did, however,
yield property belonging
to the Greenville County
Sheriffs Office that had
been entrusted to Vickers
during his employment as
a deputy with the sheriffs
office.
According to authori-
ties, Vickers took these
items with fraudulent in-
tent for his own personal
gain. Vickers was trans-
ported to St. Francis Hos-
pital for evaluation after
the incident. His bond at
the Greenville County De-
tention Center was set at
$11,093.
FORMER DAY CARE
WORKERS CHARGED
WITH CHILD NEGLECT
Two employees at an In-
man day care have been
arrested and charged af-
ter authorities say they
abused children at Main
Street USA Day Care in In-
man. Sonya Smith Fredo,
44, of 260 Harmony Dr.,
Campobello, and Anas-
tasia Stacy Faith Whit-
lock, 32, of 209 Fraley Dr.,
Inman, have both been
charged with two counts
of unlawful neglect of a
child on two juvenile male
victims under the age of
10-years-old, and one of
the victims suffers from
Down syndrome.
According to incident
reports from the Spartan-
burg County Sheriffs Of-
fice, a woman contacted
the police after her son,
who attended the day
care, obtained video via
cell phone of two teach-
ers abusing kids. One vid-
eo showed a child being
thrown to the floor by one
teacher and another video
showed a teacher blowing
a dog whistle in childrens
faces.
The videos were turned
over to authorities and a
judge issued warrants on
both Fredo and Whitlock,
who were both eventually
arrested and booked at
The Spartanburg County
Detention Center. Once
booked, Whitlock was
charged with a third count
of unlawful neglect, and
that victim is her biologi-
cal child.
Both of her children
have been turned over to
their biological father.
(Note: All information
contained in the following
blotter was taken directly
from the official incident
reports filed by the Greer
Police Department, The
Spartanburg County Sher-
iffs Office, The Greenville
County Sheriffs Office or
The Duncan Police Depart-
ment. All suspects are to be
considered innocent until
proven guilty in the court
of law.)
DUS
Kendrick Terrell Fowler,
30, of 2020 Fort Prince
Blvd., Wellford, has been
charged with driving un-
der suspension, faulty
equipment and possession
of a suspended drivers li-
cense.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
on routine patrol when
he observed a blue Chevy
pickup traveling with an
inoperable brake light.
The officer ran the license
plate on the vehicle and
found it to be registered
to Fowler who had a sus-
pended license.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and Fowler. After making
contact with Fowler, he
presented a suspended
drivers license.
Fowler was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
DUS
Sandra Kay Hand, 67, of
4307 Skyland Dr., Greer,
has been charged with
driving under suspension
(second) and open con-
tainer in a moving vehicle.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol when he ob-
served a minivan stopped
at the red light on Highway
29 at Memorial Drive with
its driver side door open.
The minivan then contin-
ued south on Highway 29
before turning in front of
an oncoming vehicle and
into the Quality Inn park-
ing lot.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and its driver Hand. Upon
approaching the vehicle,
the officer learned that
Hands license was sus-
pended. She was placed
under arrest and an open
container of beer was
found inside the vehicle.
She was transported to the
Greer City Jail.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Brian Teague, 41, of 240
Davis Road A, Greer, has
been charged with faulty
equipment, misrepresent-
ing ID to law enforcement
and driving under suspen-
sion.
Thomas Fisher, 28, of
26 Seth St., Greenville, has
been charged with posses-
sion of drug parapherna-
lia.
Fisher also has a posses-
sion of methamphetamine
charge pending.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
on routine patrol in the
area of North Line Street
Extension and E. Wade
Hampton Boulevard when
he observed a tan Mazda
traveling with a busted
windshield.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehi-
cle and its driver Teague.
Upon approaching the ve-
hicle, the officer observed
the two passengers inside
to be acting very nervous.
The officer asked
Teague for his license and
requested identification
from both passengers.
Teague was unable to
present a drivers license
and instead gave the offi-
cer a false name.
Eventually Teague pro-
vided the officer with his
real name. The officer
searched the vehicle and
located Teagues suspend-
ed drivers license.
The officer also located
a glass pipe with meth
residue and a half-gram
of what appeared to be
meth inside a pack of ciga-
rettes.
One of the passengers,
Fisher, told the officer
that the drugs and pipe
belonged to him.
Teague and Fisher were
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
DUI
Bobby Dean Spearman,
57, of 3985 Highway 11,
Travelers Rest, has been
charged with DUI with a
blood alcohol level of 0.16
percent or greater.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol at the in-
tersection of West Wade
Hampton Boulevard and
Brannon Drive when he
observed a black Fiat
traveling at a high rate of
speed swerving in and out
of traffic.
The officer caught up to
the vehicle and initiated a
traffic stop on it and its
driver, Spearman.
Upon making contact
with Spearman, the of-
ficer observed him to be
impaired with slurred
speech.
A series of field sobriety
tests were given to Spear-
man that he failed.
Spearman was arrested
and transported to the
Greer City Jail where he
blew a 0.17 percent on a
breathalyzer.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Justin Kenneth McA-
bee, 27, of 3408 Jug Fac-
tory Road, Greer, has been
charged with failure to
appear, faulty equipment,
beginners permit viola-
tion, possession of drug
paraphernalia, simple pos-
session of marijuana and
no proof of insurance. He
also has a fugitive from
justice warrant pending.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol when he
observed a black Dodge
traveling southbound on
North Main Street with in-
operable brake lights and
a cracked windshield.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and its driver, McAbee.
When the officer made
contact with McAbee, he
presented the officer with
a moped license and in-
formed him that he didnt
have his insurance card or
registration in his vehicle.
The officer ran McAbees
information and found
him to be in violation of
his beginners permit and
that he also had an active
failure to appear warrant
with the Greer Police De-
partment.
McAbee was placed un-
der arrest and a search
warrant yielded a broken
pipe and a plastic contain-
er containing a green leafy
substance.
He was transported to
the Greer City Jail.
It was also learned that
McAbee had an active war-
rant in the State of Georgia
for terroristic threats.
The State of Georgia told
the Greer Police Depart-
ment that they would ex-
tradite McAbee.
INTERFERING, DRUNK
Curtis Lee Ballenger, 53,
of 129 Broadus St., Greer,
has been charged with in-
terfering with police and
being drunk in public.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
uniformed patrol in the
area of Broadus Street and
Sunnyside Drive in refer-
ence to autobreakings and
burglaries that had been
occurring in the area.
The officer saw a subject
(Ballenger) staggering on
the shoulder of Broadus
Street. The officer made
contact with Ballenger
and noticed his eyes to be
bloodshot and his speech
to be slurred.
He was detained for be-
ing drunk in public and
when the officer asked
him for his name, Balleng-
er provided a false identi-
fication.
A search of his person
produced a South Caro-
lina ID card that provided
the officer with Ballingers
identity.
Ballinger was charged
with interfering with po-
lice and being drunk in
public.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Aldo Rangel, 29, of 304
Chartwell Dr., Greer, has
been charged with: simple
possession of marijuana,
expired tag, uninsured
vehicle fee and no state
drivers license.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
conducting routine patrol
on West Poinsett Street
when he ran the tag of a
vehicle that came back as
expired.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and its driver, Rangel.
When the officer made
contact with Rangel and
asked him for his license,
he informed the officer
that he didnt have a li-
cense and only had a pass-
port.
Rangel also was unable
to produce registration or
insurance information for
the vehicle.
He was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City jail where a marijua-
na joint was found in his
boot.
BREACH OF TRUST
Dustin Arrington, 27, of
1002 Old Anderson Road,
Greer, has been charged
with breach of trust.
According to incident re-
ports, an officer was sent
to Benson Chrysler Jeep
Dodge to speak with a vic-
tim of a breach of trust.
The victim told the offi-
cer she brought her vehicle
to Benson to have her oil
changed and tires rotated
but that when the service
department returned her
car, her blue tooth and ear
buds that she had left in-
side the vehicle were miss-
ing.
The officer spoke with
the subject (Arrington)
who had serviced the car
but Arrington originally
denied taking the items.
Another employee in-
formed the officer that the
blue tooth was in a trash-
can near Arringtons work-
station.
The officer then asked
Arrington where the ear
buds were and Arrington
told the officer that they
were in the other trash-
can.
Arrington was then
placed under arrest and
transported to the Greer
City Jail. He told the officer
that he didnt know why
he had taken the items.
Arrington was placed on
trespass notice from Ben-
sons at the request of a
manager.
POLICE AND FIRE
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A9
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Vic Lamar Vickers Sonya Smith Fredo
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CRIME REPORT |
After
kidnapping
Greer
woman
A Spartanburg man and
woman are behind bars
facing numerous charges
after they allegedly kid-
napped a Greer woman
and drove her back to their
Spartanburg home before
attempting to kill her.
Taiwan Jevon Hardy,
38, and Felicia Hayes, 22,
both of 129 S. Cleveland
Park Dr., Spartanburg,
have each been charged
with: attempted murder,
kidnapping, possession of
a weapon during a violent
crime and assault and bat-
tery first degree.
According to incidents
reports, obtained from
The Spartanburg Police
Department, officers re-
sponded to an address on
Cleveland Park Drive.
Saturday night regarding
a report of a suspicious
person.
Upon arrival, officers
located a female subject
hiding behind the shed of
a residence. The officers
learned through talking to
the subject that she was at-
tempting to get away from
her ex-boyfriend who had
kidnapped and assaulted
her.
She told officers that
Hardy kidnapped her at
the Travelers Inn and
forced her into a car be-
fore driving her to his resi-
dence on Cleveland Park
Dr. Hayes assisted Hardy
with the kidnapping.
Arrest warrants state
that Hardy and Hayes
burned the victim with a
hot machete inside the
residence and attempted
to drown her in a bathtub.
The victim was eventu-
ally able to escape the
residence and hide from
Hardy and Hayes.
Officers observed bruis-
ing, redness, and lac-
erations on the victims
thighs, arms, and back.
She was transported to
The Spartanburg Regional
Medical Center.
Both Hardy and Hayes
were arrested and trans-
ported to The Spartanburg
County Detention Center.
Taiwan Jevon Hardy Felicia Hayes
Pair charged
with attempted
murder, assault


S
outh Carolina lawmak-
ers were busy during
this past legislative
session. Listed are the
issues that were under-
taken:
Balanced Budget/No
Tax Increases: Once
again, the General Assem-
bly passed balanced bud-
gets that prioritized our
states spending needs
without raising taxes.
The latest budget
includes a 2 percent raise
for state employees,
expanded education op-
portunities and devoted
significant resources to
the Department of Com-
merce to continue to grow
our states economy and
reduce unemployment.
Texting While Driv-
ing Ban: There is now a
statewide law banning
texting while driving. The
legislation allows you to
text while stopped at a
stoplight or stop sign, but
not while the vehicle is
moving (except in case of
emergency).
Emmas Law: To com-
bat drunk driving, this
new law provides for a
more expansive use of
ignition interlock devices
installed on the vehicles
of those driving under the
influence. The interlock
is designed to prevent a
vehicle from being started
and operated by some-
one who has consumed
alcohol.
CWP Restaurant Carry
Approved: It is now per-
missible for law abiding
citizens with a Concealed
Weapons Permit to carry
a firearm into restau-
rants and bars that serve
alcohol. The CWP holder
is not allowed to consume
alcohol and businesses
may restrict or prohibit
the carrying of concealed
weapons into their estab-
lishments by posting the
proper signs.
Ethics Reform Fails:
The Senate let ethics
reform die on the final
day of the session. Op-
ponents ran out the clock.
The House had approved
a compromise bill before
the end of the regular
session. Well start over in
January.
Election Laws: This year
the legislature approved a
bill giving the State Elec-
tion Commission over-
sight of county boards
of voter registration and
elections during 2013, we
fixed the problem that
caused the 2012 ballot
debacle by passing legisla-
tion that treats candidates
and incumbents alike
when it comes to filing for
elections.
Road and Bridge Im-
provements: In 2013 the
Legislature made signifi-
cant strides in repairing
S.C.s roads and bridges
by increasing funding by
more than $600 million.
This was done by redirect-
ing money and not raising
taxes. Unfortunately, the
legislature didnt follow
through with additional
money this year. Fixing
our deteriorating roads
must be a priority! Legis-
lation did not make it out
of Senate that would have
directed car taxes for
Roads and Bridges.
Obamacare Nullifica-
tion: The House passed
legislation in 2013 that
would prohibit the en-
forcement of Obamacare
in South Carolina. It did
not make it through the
Senate.
The S.C. Fair Tax: Com-
prehensive tax reform is
difficult to accomplish;
there is much resistance
inside and outside the
Statehouse. The SC Fair
Tax legislation got its first
committee hearing ever
during this session, but it
didnt move forward. We
will see the Fair Tax issue
come forward again in
the next session. Hope-
fully, we will continue a
comprehensive tax reform
for South Carolina.
Solar Energy Bill: The
newly passed solar bill
encourages utilities to
develop solar energy
sources, allows for solar
equipment leasing to resi-
dential and commercial
customers and generally
promotes the growth of
the states solar energy
industry.
Growing Small Busi-
ness: The Legislature
passed the Micro-enter-
prise Development Act
that establishes within
the S.C. Department of
Commerce a program
to coordinate and facili-
tate the development of
micro-lending (loans of up
to $25,000) and micro-en-
terprises (businesses with
five or fewer employees)
in the state.
School Choice Success:
A school choice program
was adopted by SC. The
budget provision pro-
vides for scholarships to
low-income students with
disabilities.
Read to Succeed:
Legislators approved
a comprehensive K-12
initiative that promotes
reading proficiency in the
states public schools. The
emphasis is on early inter-
vention to assist students
who are not demonstrat-
ing an ability to read at
grade level. If necessary,
students may be retained
in the third grade if
they fail substantially to
demonstrate grade-level
reading proficiency.
Replacing Common
Core: The General As-
sembly approved legisla-
tion to develop and adopt
statewide education
standards and assess-
ments for the states K-12
public schools that best
fit South Carolina. This is
the intent and should not
be watered down.
School Safety Task
Force: Keeping kids safe
in school is a top priority.
We passed a bill establish-
ing a temporary task force
to develop standards for
districts to create effec-
tive school discipline and
mental health interven-
tion services.
Candid Camera: Dont
pass a stopped school
bus. We approved the use
of digital video recordings
to enforce traffic viola-
tions involving the unlaw-
ful passing of stopped
school buses. Tickets
will be issued to motor-
ists based on the images
obtained from a digital
video recording device
mounted on a school
bus. Keeping kids safe in
school is a top priority.
Julians Law: This law
authorizes the states aca-
demic medical centers to
conduct expanded access
clinical trials, approved by
the federal Food and Drug
Administration (FDA), to
investigate the value of
cannabidiol as a treat-
ment for patients suffer-
ing from severe forms of
epilepsy.
Jaidons Law: This legis-
lation provides enhanced
authority for removing
children from abusive and
dangerous homes. Parents
with substance abuse
problems are to submit to
drug screenings and com-
ply with court-ordered
treatment programs in
order to avoid the loss of
their parental rights.
Protecting Our Elderly:
The General Assem-
bly passed legislation
creating the Vulnerable
Adult Guardian Ad Litem
Program within the
Lieutenant Governors
Office on Aging to serve
as a statewide system
to recruit, train, and
supervise volunteers to
serve as court-appointed
representatives of vulner-
able adults best interests
in family court abuse,
neglect, and exploitation
proceedings.
Grandparents Rights
Expanded: This session
saw passage of one of the
most important pieces
of legislation regarding
families to move through
the legislature in many
years. Grandparents now
have standing in court,
and at the same time the
law preserves the priority
standing of good parents.
Protecting Children:
We approved legislation
protecting those who
report child abuse or
neglect from retaliation
by employers. Employees
may not be dismissed,
demoted, suspended or
retaliated against for mak-
ing a report of child abuse
or neglect that is required
or permitted by law.
Children and Sex:
Legislation was passed
to develop a K-12 age-ap-
propriate instruction in
sexual abuse and assault
awareness and preven-
tion to be used in the
states public schools. The
General Assembly also
approved a bill enhanc-
ing state laws that target
child pornography.
Motorcycle Respect:
The General Assembly
approved legislation
prohibiting discrimination
against motorcycles in
public transportation poli-
cies. That means motor-
cyclists are not restricted
in their access to any
highway, bridge, tunnel or
parking facility.
Electronic Auto Insur-
ance: You may now use
electronic verification
from a smartphone when
you are asked to show
proof of automobile
insurance.
For Our Military: We
passed numerous bills to
help our warriors. Going
forward it will not be
illegal to give veterans a
preference in employment
in S.C. We also approved
a break on property taxes
for those who are de-
ployed or reassigned. For
soldiers suffering from
PTSD or other mental
impairments, if they run
afoul of the law they may
be diverted to a treatment
program rather than face
jail time. We also estab-
lished a criminal penalty
for those who make false
claims about serving in
the U.S. Armed Forces or
receiving a medal, ribbon,
or other military decora-
tion. These are the heroes
and we need to take care
of them.
A10 THE GREER CITIZEN NEWS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014
309 Northview Drive
848-1935
Keeping track of the issues
YOUR VOICE
IN COLUMBIA
REPRESENTATIVE
RITA ALLISON
From
Regional
Foundation
The Spartanburg Re-
gional Foundation con-
tinued their annual sup-
port of Greer Community
Ministries (GCM) this year
by providing a $10,010
grant for a new accessible
entrance at the ministrys
location at 738 S. Line St.
Ext.
The original French
doors will be replaced and
a smooth threshold will
be installed, giving better
access to the facility for
senior adult and handi-
capped clients.
There is currently a
raised threshold and le-
ver door handles at the
entrance making entry
difficult for clients using
canes, walkers or wheel-
chairs, said Cindy Sim-
pler, executive director.
We are replacing these
doors with a set of auto-
matic doors that can be
opened with the push of a
button.
The Spartanburg Region-
al Foundation completed
a $30,000 gift ($10,000
over a three-year period)
in 2013. Those funds were
used to help purchase
a 2011 Ford/Starcraft
Xpress 15-passenger bus
for the senior dining pro-
gram.
We appreciate the con-
tinued support of the Spar-
tanburg Regional Founda-
tion, Simpler said.
GCM receives $10,010
grant for new entrance
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Greer Community Ministries received a $10,010 grant from the Spartanburg Regional
Foundation. From left, Foundation trustees Garrow Crowley and Lynne Black present a
check to GCM staf members Rob Robinson and Hannah Rainwater.

SPORTS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014
B
BLAME
CANNADA
BILLY
CANNADA
Battling
the
high tide
A
re you guys okay?
Thats the text I got
from my mom Sunday
night. I dont know if your
mom has ever texted you
something similar, but its
kind of unsettling.
Nervous and curious to
find out why she would
be asking me this all the
way from West Virginia, I
responded quickly.
Yeah, were fine. Why
wouldnt we be?
I watched my phone for
her reply, thinking about
calling to speed up the
process. Am I in dan-
ger? I thought. What if
theres something terrible
going on near me and I
dont know about it be-
cause I dont have cable?
I wondered. I knew we
shouldve gotten cable!
Your flooding was on
the national news. I was
just checking to see if you
had any damage.
Relieved I wasnt in
immediate danger, the
text began to make sense.
It had rained without
ceasing the night before
(as most of you are well
aware).
My wife and I did
receive loud text alerts
Saturday night telling us
a flash flood was on the
way.
As a new homeowner,
I remember strolling the
grounds checking for
possible leaks. We hadnt
seen this much rain since
wed moved in and I want-
ed to make sure the roof
wasnt going to fall in.
With everything check-
ing out, I began to head
back upstairs. A quick
glance out the window
proved just how bad
the rain actually was. It
was dark but the ground
seemed to be moving. It
didnt look like our front
lawn. It looked like a
pond. Thinking I was see-
ing things, I opened the
door and went out on the
porch for a better look.
Our entire yard (nearly
half an acre) was drown-
ing.
Shannon! Youve got to
see this, I shouted.
My wife got up to gaze
out the window with
me and we were both
amazed.
Do you think its go-
ing to make it up to the
house, she asked.
Theres no way, I told
her, not really sure if I be-
lieved what I was saying.
We sat there for several
more minutes hoping to
avoid the major expense
of flood repair.
Fortunately, a little
water build up in the yard
was the extent of our
damage. Unfortunately,
others were not so lucky.
A little more than a mile
away on Memorial Drive
Extension, a bridge was
giving way, causing car
wrecks and a nasty scene.
Greer residents woke up
to flooded basements and
thousands of dollars in
damage.
With unexpected dan-
gerous weather like that,
Im just be thankful to be
safe and maybe a little
lucky.


Locally owned and operated
for over 45 years.
49
39
29
Expires 9-31-14
$
$
$
Aug. 23-24
at Century
Park
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Local officers are team-
ing up to help raise money
for families of fallen com-
rades.
The Upstate South Car-
olina Law Enforcement
Memorial Softball Tourna-
ment is set to take place
on Aug. 23-24 at Century
Park in Greer.
The event will include
games for kids, food, a
charity raffle and plenty
of softball.
We started the tourna-
ment three years ago as
a memorial for Deputy
[Roger] Rice at the Laurens
County Sheriffs Office,
Bethany Hembree, one of
the events organizers,
said. The first year we did
it most of our proceeds
went to his familys foun-
dation. Then we started
our own, known as the Up-
state South Carolina Law
Enforcement Fallen Offi-
cer Fund.
The tournament has
grown, she said. This
year, weve got 10 teams
competing and seven de-
partments participating.
Agencies participating
include the Laurens Coun-
ty Sheriffs Office, Green-
ville City Police Depart-
ment, Simpsonville Police
Department, Fountain Inn
Police Department, Green-
ville County Sheriffs Of-
fice, Greenville Detention,
Cherokee County Sheriffs
Office and the Greer Police
Department.
Well have inflatables
and food. Well also have
SEE TOURNAMENT | B4
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
With plenty of experi-
ence to boast, the River-
side girls tennis team is
prepared to defend its
region championship this
fall.
Riverside scrimmaged
Greenville on Monday. The
Lady Warriors will open
play against St. Josephs on
Aug. 25 and will host Spar-
tanburg on Aug. 28.
We have our top seven
returning this fall, Elsey
said. Theres a little
change in the lineup, but
we have a lot of the same
talent with a wonderful ad-
dition coming up from the
JV team. We have every ex-
pectation that were going
to have a great season.
Riversides top return-
ers include Faith Moyers,
Kayla Clement, Hallie Fite,
Karen Zhao, Anju Saxena,
Caroline Bertling and Em-
ily Godwin.
Theyre actually better
than they were last year,
she said. They know
exactly what theyre up
against and to have your
whole squad returning is
SEE RIVERSIDE | B4
Takes on
Rebels
this Friday
BY LELAND BURCH
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
A young, small Greer
team held its own early
against powerhouse Gaff-
ney in the first pre-season
football scrimmage on
Thursday night. But the
combination of too little
sleep during Camp Swarm
and Gaffneys superior
size eventually wore down
the Yellow Jackets, leaving
questions unanswered.
That was only our third
practice in pads, so its
really hard to say how
good we can be this sea-
son, said Greer Coach
Will Young. The Gaffney
scrimmage was advanced
a day because of impend-
ing rain, leaving less time
for practice.
Young measures prog-
ress from scrimmage to
scrimmage and will be
looking for fewer mistakes
this week.
We want to be better at
Pickens (Tuesday night),
and then I want to see
improvement when we go
against Byrnes on Friday
night in the Byrnes Jambo-
ree. I am not worried about
winning or losing. I am
focusing on getting ready
for the first game against
Clinton, and I think scrim-
maging Pickens will help
us do that.
Meet the Jackets Night
is set for Tuesday, Au-
gust 19, when the Yellow
Jackets will host Boiling
Springs for a 6 p.m. scrim-
mage at Dooley Field. The
final pre-season outing is
on Friday, Aug. 22 against
defending state champion
Daniel High in the Daniel
Jamboree.
Young labeled the first
full week of fall practice
as OK. On his agenda
this week is to have some
of our seniors to step up
and lead a little bit, by ex-
SEE GREER | B4
Greer plays host to Gafney
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Yellow Jackets saw their frst scrimmage action of the season during a scrimmage against Gafney at Dooley Field
last Thursday. Greer will face Byrnes this Friday during the Byrnes Jamboree.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
A softball team from the Greer Police Department participates in the annual two-day
tournament designed to raise money for families of of cers killed in the line of duty.
Greer Police organize
benefit softball tourney

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Anju Saxena is expected to play a key role on the Riverside
tennis team this season.
Lady Warriors set
to defend region


Kara Blackwell
I am really
interested in our
kids giving it
everything theyve
got and playing
smart.
Will Young
Greer head football coach



B2 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The Blue Ridge Tigers
strapped on the pads for
this fall, last Friday night,
but the occasion was near-
ly spoiled by rain.
The Tigers hosted
Chesnee in a scrimmage
that lasted nearly an hour
and, despite the rain, head
coach Shane Clark said his
team was able to get in a
little bit of work.
It started raining about
five minutes before they
got here, so we changed
the format and changed
a lot of what we wanted
to do, Clark said. It was
very wet. We went straight
for about an hour and
got a chance to work on a
few things and find some
things we definitely need-
ed to be working on. It was
something we needed.
Blue Ridge was sup-
posed to compete in the
FCA Jamboree on Satur-
day, but the event was
washed out. The Tigers
were able to reschedule a
scrimmage with Riverside
on Tuesday.
We were lucky that they
were able to pick us up in
the first place, he said. It
gave us another chance to
work against somebody
and find out a little more
about what we got.
Judging his teams per-
formance against Chesnee,
Clark said his team still
needs to shake off some
rust.
Friday was our first day
[in pads] and it was kind
of what you expect, Clark
said. Were anxious to get
out there and go again.
Blue Ridge has plenty
of scrimmages left on the
schedule before kicking
off the season at Wade
Hampton on August 29.
The team will travel to the
Woodruff Jamboree on
Thursday and will host its
own jamboree on Friday,
August 22 at 6 p.m.
Hopefully these guys
will continue to focus and
use these things as prepa-
ration. Thats what we
need them to do, he said.
Were gearing everything
toward week one. Its go-
ing to be a big game open-
ing up with Wade Hamp-
ton. Theyre always a good
team, so hopefully well
use all these opportunities
we get.
Clark said despite the
busy schedule his team
remains focused on one
thing.
Thats where it matters
week one, Clark said.
Nobody talks a lot about
what happens in these
scrimmages. Week one
is where it matters and
thats where our focus is
right now.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The new look Warriors
got a small glimpse of
what this season may
hold last week during the
teams first scrimmage
against Easley.
While the matchup was
nothing more than a dress
rehearsal for a Riverside
football team that has
spent plenty of time re-
vamping its offense this
offseason, head coach Phil
Smith said the Warriors
saw exactly what they
wanted to see.
It was a typical first
scrimmage, Smith said.
There were some good
spots and there was a lot
of bad things that, obvi-
ously, are correctable.
Youre going to see that
in your first scrimmage
and thats what you want
to see.
Riverside would have
made an appearance at the
FCA Jamboree this past
weekend, but weather did
not cooperate.
It was fun to go up
against somebody dif-
ferent, Smith said of his
teams showing against Ea-
sley. We were finally able
to see a different look and
bang on somebody other
than our own teammates.
Smith said the defense
held its own against the
Green Wave.
I thought the defense
came out strong and
played really well the first
part of the scrimmage,
he said. The offense did
some good things. We
missed some assignments
on some run blocks, but
Easleys got a pretty good
defense.
The Warriors passing
attack was also strong.
We were able to throw
the ball tremendously
well, Smith said. Ryan
Cerino had two receivers
catch over 100 yards. Cory
Bridges had 106 and Will
Urich had 102.
There were a lot of
bright spots, he said.
Were way ahead of where
we were this time last
year. The hard work they
put in over the summer re-
ally showed in the scrim-
mage. They were moving
around a lot better. They
made some mental mis-
takes, but the good things
is those are correctable.
Smith said his team is
continuing to develop and
create an identity for it-
self.
They knew going into
this season what we were
going to be doing, he said.
They know our coaching
styles and philosophy.
They know how were go-
ing to practice. Everything
is head and shoulders
above where it was last
year. We know our expec-
tations this year and weve
hit the ground running.
Weve had some of the
best practices weve ever
had [this week] and com-
ing off of Fridays scrim-
mage, I think were headed
in the right direction.
Riverside scrimmaged
Blue Ridge earlier this week
and participate in the J.L.
Mann Jamboree this Satur-
day. The Warriors will face
Christ Church at 7 p.m.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
After a week into fall
practice and scrimmages,
Riverside volleyball coach
April Raymond said her
team is looking strong.
The Lady Warriors
scrimmaged at Southside
Christian last Friday, win-
ning several matches and
gaining confidence.
I feel really good about
it, Raymond said. We
have a lot of height on our
team, which weve had in
the past, but we only have
10 girls on the team that
returned. Were stressing
staying healthy and strong
and doing a lot of condi-
tioning. Were just taking
a lot of preventative mea-
sures to keep everyone
healthy.
Riverside returns setter
Erin Rose-Innes, who Ray-
mond believes will be a
big factor on the team this
year.
She has been on varsity
all four years and she was
a captain for us last year,
Raymond said. Shes just
a stabilizing factor. She
knows the game really well
and does a really good job
of running an offense.
Sarah Johnson, an out-
side hitter, continues to
improve and will also help
provide stability.
She had a great start
last week, Raymond said.
Shes still improving and
Im sure she will be picked
up to play somewhere in
college.
Raymond is also expect-
ing positive minutes from
Mackenzie Proulx
I feel like theyre all
pretty solid players, she
said. I dont think we have
a weak spot right now as
long as we are able to stay
healthy.
While her team is off to
a running start, Raymond
said consistency will be
the key to staying in con-
tention for the region
title.
We need to work on
our consistency, Ray-
mond said. Sometimes
girls dont always have
that competitive edge and
instead of keeping up the
intensity throughout the
game, you could tend to
back down a little bit. We
cant allow the competi-
tion to get closer than they
should be. We have to be
mentally tough through-
out the whole match.
The schedule will include
plenty of tough challenges
for the Lady Warriors.
The region is tough. Its
always tough, she said.
Dorman will be strong. I
think Spartanburg is go-
ing to be good this year.
Theyve got a great player
coming back so they will
be tough. Mauldin is going
to be good this year. Its
just going to be difficult
all the way around.
Riverside will open its
season on Aug. 26 during
a tri-match with T.L. Hanna
and Gaffney. The lady War-
riors will continue scrim-
mages until then, playing
matches with Pickens and
Eastside next week.
Warrior volleyball
begins 2014 campaign
Riverside sees first
action against Easley
PHIL BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Running Rebels
Byrnes frst team held on for a win over Rock Hill during a three-team scrimmage.
The Rebels also played Union County last Friday morning. Byrnes will host its annual
jamboree this Friday at the school.

PHIL BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Quarterback Ryan Cerino
delivers a pass.
Tigers make the most
of soggy scrimmage
North Greenville football
is just around the corner
and team practices got un-
derway this week. Jeff Far-
rington, a Greer high grad,
enters his second season
at the helm of the program
and, despite a sub-par 5-6
record last season, the
head coach has high hopes
for 2014.
North Greenville returns
seven starters to an of-
fense that averaged 412.5
yards per game and 27.9
points per game last sea-
son, bringing back seven
starters on defense.
Following is a team
breakdown by position.
OFFENSE
Quarterbacks: The Cru-
saders begin 2014 with a
familiar face under center.
Junior Nelson Hughes re-
turns after a sophomore
season in which he set
numerous school records,
including completion per-
centage (66.6 percent)
and passing yards (3,202)
while totaling 24 touch-
downs and 10 intercep-
tions. Incoming freshman
Will Hunter will compete
for playing time after a
successful high school
career that him throw for
more than 10,000 yards
and 101 passing touch-
downs. Hunter rushed for
more than 600 yards and
19 touchdowns on the
ground. Sophomore trans-
fer Mike Calabro brings
depth and experience after
spending a season at Flori-
da Atlantic University.
Running Backs: The Cru-
sader backfield will also
be an area of recognizable
faces. Junior Trey Walker
started all 11 games a sea-
son ago, leading the attack
with 170 carries for 877
rushing yards. He proved
his versatility in the pass-
ing game with 30 recep-
tions for 230 yards and
three scores through the
air.
Sophomore Simeon Byrd
also returns after total-
ing 324 all-purpose yards
and five total touchdowns
in nine games played last
season. Fellow sophomore
Ashton Heard provides
speed, agility and versatil-
ity to the backfield, fully
recovering from a knee
injury. Incoming freshman
Tristen Jackson will hope
to make an impact after
totaling more than 1,000
all-purpose yards and 16
total touchdowns as a
senior at Jefferson High
School in Georgia.
Wide Receivers/Tight
Ends: The graduation of
Freddie Martino (146 re-
ceptions, 1,680 yards,
12 touchdowns in 2013)
leaves an open spot at the
No. 1 receiver position,
and a number of players
looking to take his place.
Sophomore Tyrecous Gar-
rett caught 26 passes for
321 yards and two touch-
downs in 11 games last
year, while junior Tyrell
Hillary saw action in every
game, totaling 15 recep-
tions for 185 yards from
the slot. Senior Thomas
Weeks III is fully recovered
from a broken collarbone.
Robbie Brown and senior
transfer Rob Greene (Wof-
ford College) provide ad-
ditional targets for North
Greenville.
Incoming freshman
Mason Sanders provides
size (66, 215 pounds)
and a stout resume (85
receptions, 1,450 yards,
22 touchdowns as a se-
nior at Boiling Springs
High School), while fel-
low freshman Kyle Brandt
adds to the size advantage
(66, 190 pounds) after
catching 34 passes for 437
yards and six touchdowns
as a senior at South Pointe
High a year ago. Fresh-
man Javon Smith is also
expected to produce in the
passing game with quick-
ness, agility and the ability
to lineup at multiple posi-
tions.
Brock Frisbee and Blake
Bensch saw plenty of time
on the field at tight end
for North Greenville last
season. Transfer Ricki De-
los Santos comes to North
Greenville after two sea-
sons at Nassau Communi-
ty College and is expected
to provide an immediate
impact with his experi-
ence and athleticism in the
passing game.
Offensive Line: North
Greenvilles offensive line
will need to fill a few holes
left by the graduation
of two seniors. Eight of
the returning 10 linemen
saw action on the field
in 2013, whether it be on
offense or on the special
teams unit. The linemen
allowed just 18 sacks on
the season and helped the
Crusaders to 120.6 rush-
ing yards per game and
14 touchdowns on the
ground. Senior Armani
Delaney (17 career games,
11 starts) and junior Mat-
thew Rochester (15 games,
14 starts) return to give
the team significant ex-
perience up front. Senior
transfer Charles Coleman
comes to Tigerville after
spending three seasons at
the Citadel, having played
in 21 games at the NCAA
Division I level.
Sophomores Armon
Lindsay, Cory Hoesli, Dil-
lon Alford and Parks Wal-
lington each saw playing
time last season. Fresh-
man Cameron Stepp is
also expected to compete
for a spot, along with fel-
low freshmen Jordan Wat-
son and Gage Smith.

DEFENSE
Defensive Line: Junior
LeeShawn Cromedy and
sophomore Caleb Adkins
are the units most expe-
rienced players until the
return of junior Antonio
Barron from a knee injury
suffered in the teams fi-
nal game last season.
Redshirt freshmen Ren-
wick McNeil II, Anthony
Blair and Johnny Burch
will have a chance to make
an impact in the trenches,
while sophomore Shaquan
Burney makes the move
to the defensive line af-
ter playing nine games at
middle linebacker last fall.
Incoming freshmen Delton
Bradford (64, 305 lbs) and
Nick Adams (62, 260 lbs)
will provide immediate
size and will compete for
time up front.
Linebackers: Commonly
an area of strength for the
Crusaders, the linebacker
corps is looking to replace
one of its top producers,
coping with the departure
of defensive captain Brael-
en Meredith (89 tackles, 13
tackles last season). Senior
Nick Rodgers (81 tackles,
one tackle for loss, one
sack) returns to provide
experience and leader-
ship in the middle, while
sophomores Sam Houston
(43 tackles, two tackles
for loss) and Quan Weeks
(26 tackles, two tackles for
loss) will also see time in
the middle of the field.
On the outside, junior
Taylor Anderson moves
from the secondary after
back surgery sidelined
him for the 2013 season.
Fellow junior Jalen Ham-
mett is also expected to
have an immediate impact
on the outside. Junior Dar-
ius Custard moves from
running back to linebacker
to provide athleticism and
depth. He saw time primar-
ily on the special teams
unit a season ago. Seniors
Rashad Simmons and John
Higgins also return to pro-
vide leadership and expe-
rience on the defensive
side of the ball. Incoming
freshman Mycheal Payden
gives North Greenville ver-
satility on the outside and
is expected to compete for
playing time early.
Secondary: The North
Greenville secondary re-
turns all but two members.
Sophomore safeties KJ Mc-
Donald and Tony Godbolt
return as the last line of
defense. Seniors Quantel
Mack and Andre Hennie
both make the move from
corner to safety, as fresh-
man Trae Bonner also
aims to compete for play-
ing time in the secondary.



North Greenville football: a new look for a new year

We cant allow
the competition
to get closer than
they should be. We
have to be mentally
tough throughout
the whole match.
April Raymond
Riverside volleyball coach
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014 SPORTS THE GREER CITIZEN B3
At Sundays
Sprint Cup
race
In a battle between two
drivers with everything on
the line, AJ Allmendinger
held off Marcos Ambrose
in breathtaking fashion to
win last Sundays Cheez-It
355 at the Glen and claim
an almost certain spot in
the Chase for the NASCAR
Sprint Cup.
In the closing laps, All-
mendinger and Ambrose
bumped each other, leaned
on each other, raced each
other side-by-side through
the esses without wreck-
ingastoundinglyand
swapped the lead before
Allmendinger secured his
first NASCAR Sprint Cup
Series victory with a pass
in Turn 6 with just over
one lap left.
The 2.45-mile road
course at Watkins Glen
International gave both
drivers their best chance
to qualify for the Chase,
and it was Allmendinger
who prevailed in a two-
lap battle that that was a
long-time coming, thanks
to three red-flag periods
needed to repair safety
barriers at the track.
Kurt Busch ran third,
hoping during the final
two laps that Ambrose and
Allmendinger would take
their aggression over the
line and give him a chance
to win. Rookie Kyle Larson
kept his Chase hopes alive
with a fourth-place run,
and Carl Edwards came
home fifth.
Joey Logano, Kevin Har-
vick, Greg Biffle, Matt
Kenseth and Brian Vick-
ers completed the top 10.
Dale Earnhardt Jr. finished
11th and took the series
lead from pole winner Jeff
Gordon, who ran 34th af-
ter losing four laps while
his team diagnosed and
repaired an electrical-sys-
tem failure.
On the next-to-last lap,
Allmendinger controlled
the restart and held the
lead through Turn 1, but
Ambrose applied pres-
sure up through the es-
ses, gained ground when
Allmendinger ran wide in
the bus stop chicane and
got past the No. 47 JTG/
Daugherty Chevrolet af-
ter setting up a pass with
a tap at the exit from the
bus stop.
But Allmendinger stayed
to Ambroses outside
through Turn 5 and leaned
on the No. 9 Ford through
Turn 6, gapping Ambrose
down the front straight
and pulling away for the
win.
Yeah, I mean I knew our
car was slick on restarts
on the tires, and I knew
Marcos was going to try to
move me out of the way if
he had the opportunity,
Allmendinger said. To his
credit, he didnt wreck me.
He just moved me like he
should have. I went down
into the next corner and
leaned on him a little bit
to see if I could get a gap
and get them racing be-
hind me.
I knew if I could just get
a three- or four-car-length
gap, they werent going to
get back to me. That was
just a fun race. Thanks to
the fans for enduring the
red flags, the track work-
ers for putting the track
back together a couple of
times. Everybody at home,
if you didnt love that you
are not a fan of racing.
Despite the exchange of
the lead on the 89th of 90
laps, Ambrose felt the race
may have been decided on
the previous restart on
Lap 86, when Ambrose
took the lead after a side-
by-side race through the
esses only to lose it when
Allmendinger out braked
him into Turn 1 before
two separate incidents in-
volving Denny Hamlin and
Alex Kennedy caused the
sixth caution of the after-
noon.
I slid coming off Turn
11 after I got the lead (on
Lap 86), and he was able to
get it back before the cau-
tion dropped, Ambrose
said. That was probably
the difference between
winning and losing the
race right there.
If I could have held
the lead when the cau-
tion came out, I would
have probably had the
advantage on the restart
and been able to fend him
off. But thats just racing.
Its what it is, what its all
about. You try to land him
on a restart, take a couple
of chances. Im pleased we
got through the Ss side
by side without wrecking
the whole field, because
it could have easily hap-
pened out there.
The final few laps were
worth the wait, but the
wait was longer than any-
one might have anticipat-
ed.
A violent crash on Lap
56 near the exit from the
Carousel (Turn 5) halted
the action for an extended
period, as track workers
made repairs to severely
damaged Armco barriers
between Turns 5 and 6.
Destroyed in the wreck
were the No. 31 Chev-
rolet of Ryan Newman,
which turned sideways
and smashed into the
guard rail to the right of
the racing surface, and
the No. 95 Ford of Michael
McDowell, which plowed
into Newmans car as it re-
bounded from the barrier
and backed hard into the
guard rail on the left side
of the course.
Newman was running
behind Biffle right before
the crash.
From my standpoint,
Biffle jumped the curb
and hit the splitter or
something up on the curb
and got out and got across
the grass, Newman said.
And I probably could
have given him a little bit
more (room), but I tried
to time it so I could shoot
past, but he slowed down
when he got back on the
race track.
Newman shot across the
track into the barrier as he
was trying to avoid Biffle.
McDowell, on the other
hand, hand no chance to
avoid Newmans Chevy.
Im not sure what hap-
pened, McDowell said. I
saw the 16 (Biffle) get wide
and the 31 (Newman) come
back across the track. I
didnt have time to adjust
or move. I tried not to hit
Ryan in the door there.
That was pretty much it.
I was just along for the
ride.
The stoppage lasted
more than 81 minutes,
and after pit stops under
caution when the race
resumed, Allmendinger
passed Edwards for the
top spot on Lap 61. He
stayed out front, maintain-
ing a lead of more than 1.5
seconds over Ambrose,
who moved into second
place on Lap 66.
And then came the win.
This is what I live for
this is all I talk about, All-
mendinger said. I dont
want to hear that AJ might
be the next first-time win-
nerIm tired of hearing
that.
On Sunday, Allmending-
er made sure he wont ever
hear those words again.
Recovering from an
early spin after contact
with Kyle Buschs Toyota,
Marcos Ambrose held off
Busch in the closing laps
of last Saturdays Zippo
200 at the Glen to win
the series-best fifth road
course race of his Nation-
wide Series career.
The Australian driver
has won four consecutive
NNS starts at 2.45-mile
Watkins Glen Internation-
al, having triumphed in
three straight from 2008
through 2010 and this
year after a three-race hia-
tus from competition at
the Glen.
Though Ambrose knows
full well the big prizesa
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series
victory in the Cheez-It 355
at the Glen (1 p.m. ET on
ESPN) and a berth in the
Chasewill be contested
on Sunday, he was eager
to savor the NNS win.
I just want to enjoy to-
day, Ambrose said. You
get to victory lane, and its
special. I would love to re-
peat, but its a lot of work
tomorrow. I want to think
about this and get a good
nights rest and come at-
tack them tomorrow.
During an exchange of
pit stops with 32 of 82 laps
left, Ambrose surged past
Joey Logano as the driver
of the No. 12 Team Penske
Ford exited pit road. When
the sequence of stops
cycled through, Ambrose,
who had pitted one lap
earlier than Logano, held
the lead, with Logano run-
ning second.
Ambrose kept the top
spot after a restart on Lap
63 that followed the fifth
and final caution of the
race. With five laps left,
Busch roared past Logano
but couldnt get to the
bumper of Ambroses No.
9 Richard Petty Motors-
ports Ford in time to make
a move for the win.
Logano came home
third, followed by pole
winner Brad Keselowski
and Matt Kenseth. Rookie
Chase Elliott ran sixth and
extended his series lead to
12 points over JR Motor-
sports teammate Regan
Smith, who finished 17th.
The way Logano saw it,
losing the spot to Ambrose
during the cycle of green-
flag stops was crucial.
That was definitely
a key moment, Logano
said. If I was able to get
in front of him there all
I needed was three-tenths
of a second probably,
and that would have been
enough position into that
corner to beat him through
the esses and get position.
I felt like, if I got clean air
and ran hard, that I could
have gapped him.
I think at the end of the
race, he would have caught
me and the 54 (Busch)
also. It would have been
close. Im not going to say
we would have won the
race. It would have been
close. Our car was good on
the short run. Marcos was
steady all the way through
and the 54, late in the run,
was really fast. If I didnt
run so hard and had clean
air and didnt burn the
tires off, would I have last-
ed longer? Yeah.
Would it have been
enough to beat him? Well
never know. But I feel it
would have been closer for
us, for sure.
Ambrose agreed.
I think if I hadnt cleared
him right there, he would
have been gone, Ambrose
said. Maybe I could have
stalked him a little bit and
got him in traffic, but we
had a fast enough car to
lead like that, but it would
have been really tough to
pass.
Before the battle with
Logano was even a consid-
eration, Ambrose had to
recover from a Lap 6 spin
in the bus stop chicane af-
ter he and Busch collided
near the entrance.
He ducked out late, and
then the spotter was late,
Ambrose said. I was al-
ready committed to that
line, and he thumped my
left rear there. It wasnt in-
tentional. Ive got no mal-
ice against him whatsoev-
erhe spun out, too.
Busch wasnt quite as
charitable in his assess-
ment of the mishap.
We didnt qualify as
well as we needed to and
tried to make a move on
somebody who didnt give
a crap, and then he just
turned into me and spun
us out, so that put us be-
hind, Busch said. We
came back and got sec-
ond.
In a quirky sort of way,
the accident may have
helped both drivers.
Both Ambrose and Busch
brought their cars to pit
road for fuel and fresh
tires under caution on
Lap 13. Knifing his way
through traffic, Ambrose
worked his way back to
fifth before pitting again
under green on Lap 20,
covering stops made by
Keselowski (Lap 18) and
Logano (Lap 19).
If youd told me thats
how we were going to do
the race, I would have said
thats a bad strategy,
Ambrose quipped. But it
worked out for usfirst
and second. For two guys
doing pirouettes in the bus
stop, thats pretty cool.
And it just shows you
how these races are never
over. You cant quit. Just
because youre in the grass
backwards doesnt mean
your race is done.
PHOTO | COURTESY OF NASCAR.COM/GETTY IMAGES
Marcos Ambrose, driver of the No. 9 Stanley Ford, celebrates with a burnout after winning the NASCAR Nationwide Zippo 200 at Watkins Glen International on August 9. Ambrose
held of Kyle Busch in the closing laps to seal the victory.
Marcos Ambrose holds off Busch for win
If youd told me thats how we were going
to do the race, I would have said thats
a bad strategy. But it worked out for
usfirst and second. For two guys doing
pirouettes in the bus stop, thats pretty
cool.
Marcos Ambrose

Allmendinger stakes claim to chase spot
PHOTO | COURTESY OF NASCAR.COM/GETTY IMAGES
AJ Allmendinger, driver of the No. 47 Scott Products Chevrolet, celebrates in Victory Lane
after winning the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Cheez-It 355.
I knew if I could
just get a three- or
four-car-length gap,
they werent going
to get back to me.
AJ Allmendinger
B4 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014
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FROM B1
a face painter, Hembree
said. At around noon, the
medical transport helicop-
ter from Greenville Health
Systems will do a demon-
stration.
The fund for fallen of-
ficers was established
after Rice was killed dur-
ing a search for a murder
suspect on July 14, 2011.
He had only been with the
Laurens County Sheriffs
Office for 18 months and
he left behind a wife and
two children.
Our fund, specifically,
will benefit Upstate fami-
lies, Hembree said. It
is specifically for family
members of officers killed
in the line of duty. All the
proceeds from the event
are put into that fund.
Fortunately, we havent
had any issues like that
[in Greer], she said. In
the event that we do have
something bad happen,
we want to be able to help
those families, just like
our officers help them on
a regular basis.
Hembree said the soft-
ball tournament provides
a way for folks in the com-
munity to see local officers
in a different light.
We do want to encour-
age people to come out
and support their local
law enforcement and com-
munity. We want people
to see these officers have
some fun instead of just
seeing them in uniform.
FROM B1
ample. Were getting good
production from our ju-
niors right now.
I think we have enough
talent in our first 22 play-
ers to be successful, al-
though we still have to im-
prove, Young continued.
We arent that far off in
most spots from where we
have been in recent years,
but depth is a big prob-
lem. Those kids behind
the ones really need to
step up, so hopefully we
can help improve them.
The youthful Yellow
Jackets have only one se-
nior, Xavier Wright, start-
ing in a skill position on
offense. Yet the offense
sparkled at times against
Gaffney. Junior Quarter-
back Mario Cusano com-
pleted 15 of 23 passes,
including a 60-yard touch-
down toss to Dorian Lind-
sey.
Mario did some good
things, especially throw-
ing wise, Young noted.
But we gave up some
sacks by our offensive line
and our running backs,
and we have to correct
those. Gaffney was doing
some line stunts that we
had not worked against.
Then too, our kids were
more focused on having
fun at camp, and they paid
a price for that. It was a
good lesson learned.
Troy Pride, a junior wide
receiver who transferred
from Riverside, scored on
a 60-yard run, and veteran
junior place kicker Nick
Roberson delivered a 35-
yard field goal.
Gaffney also scored on
big plays including passes
of 65 and 19 yards, runs of
50, 38 and five yards, and
a 19-yard fumble recovery
return.
C.J. Collins recovered a
fumble to stop a Gaffney
drive. Hes fast, strong
and just a great kid. And
we had others who played
well, although our defense
was hit hard by gradua-
tion, said Defensive Coor-
dinator Travis Perry.
Only four starters, all se-
niors, return on that side
of the ball: Jackson Tipton
and Deandre Moren in the
secondary, Nakeem Hoke
at tackle, and Tyler Wright
at linebacker. Unfortu-
nately, Wright has been
sidelined with a knee in-
jury suffered at a Western
Carolina University sum-
mer camp. We hope to
get Tyler back for the first
game, but we dont know,
Perry said. Tyler is the
heart and soul of our de-
fense. Hes like a quarter-
back out there, and we are
a better team when hes
on the field. But the good
thing is some other kids
are getting reps at line-
backer now, and that will
help us build a little depth
which is what we need the
most.
The Yellow Jackets also
lost starting defensive
lineman Jordan Hawthorne
to a knee injury during a
summer wrestling camp
in Oklahoma. That was a
blow, because Jordan was
one of our biggest kids. He
will be out 8-10 months,
Perry said.
Young said his staffs
big thing is make sure
we are getting better, and
if not we need to change
some things. So we plan
to move a few kids around
this week in practice, try-
ing to find the best posi-
tions for them.
When Greer faces By-
rnes, an old rival no lon-
ger on the regular season
schedule, Young said, I
am really interested in our
kids giving it everything
theyve got and playing
smart. Thats all we ask,
and all we expect from
them Friday night.
FROM B1
quite unusual and excit-
ing.
Elsey is also expecting
strong play from Ellinor
and Rebecka Lindahl, Juhi
Saxena, Somer Hoskins
and Maddy Gilstrap.
The biggest challenge
is always going to be the
team were playing that
day, she said. We have
a strong region with great
schools and great coach-
es. Between Spartanburg,
Dorman and Wade Hamp-
ton, we just have a great
region. It makes every
match we play important.
Every time we walk out
onto that court, we need
to be playing our best and
ready to go.
We need some fire in
the belly, Elsey contin-
ued. Weve got great girls
with great skills, but we
need that fire. We have to
want it.
Elsey has been working
closely with her junior
varsity coach, Bekki Ben-
jamin, to continue to de-
velop upcoming players.
We cant just focus on
this year, weve got to fo-
cus on the years to come,
she said. Weve got a
small JV this year and they
are looking good. Our var-
sity girls continue to help
and encourage them.
As for this season, goals
remain the same.
We were region champs
last year so, of course,
thats our goal again this
year, she said. But, we
also know that we need
to play and stay on top.
Other teams are going to
be looking to beat us.
Sports
historys
greatest
hits
BY MARK VASTO
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
W
hat were the top
moments in sports
history?
That question presented
itself amid a round of
coffee and doughnuts one
morning. It had to be an
iconic moment, some-
thing that was replayed in
the highlight reel of your
mind. In no particular
order, the argument was
made for the following:
1. Babe Ruths called
shot. Footage of the mo-
ment, an at-bat against
the Chicago Cubs during
a World Series, actu-
ally exists. Regardless of
whether you believe he
called the shot or not,
the moment has become
the de facto standard for
mimicry in sports. Every-
one who has ever swung
a baseball bat has at one
time or another, pointed
to the stands.
2. The Miracle on Ice
This is self-explanatory.
The story of the 1980 U.S.
Mens Hockey team and
their gold medal-winning
ways has everything you
want in a story, even the
foil, the Russians. Its
an underdog story, and
it comes packaged with
Al Michaels timeless
call: Do you believe in
miracles? YES!
Also, its a cautionary
tale: Herb Brooks, the
mens head coach, will
forever be remembered
as wearing that ridiculous
bell-bottom, scotch-plaid
suit during the game.
Incidentally, the win over
the Russians was not the
gold-medal game; it was a
semifinal, and Team USA
won gold over Finland in
the finals. (Brooks wore
a classic blue suit in that
game ... figures.)
3. The Hail Mary and
The Immaculate Recep-
tion
Today, football is
considered the national
pastime, supplanting
baseball. This is directly
attributable to the on-
field battles between the
Chuck Knolls Pittsburgh
Steelers and the Tom
Landrys Dallas Cowboys.
The exploits of Roger
Staubach, Terry Bradshaw,
Franco Harris and Tony
Dorsett were not only
riveting to watch, they
inspired sports writers to
coin phrases. Staubachs
profession of faith to a
reporter after launching
a last-minute, despera-
tion pass to win was the
precursor to Tim Tebows
touchdown genuflect and
is now a part of football
cannon.
While The Hail Mary
pass entered the lexi-
con and the playbooks
in ways the unplanned
Bradshaw to Harris via
Fuqua Immaculate Re-
ception never can, those
who remember how every
primetime television show
featured The Dallas Cow-
girls and their relevance,
understand just how
integral these two teams
are to American culture as
a whole.
4. Ali defeats Foreman
Ask anybody who the
greatest fighter of all time
was, and youll get vari-
ous answers. Ask anybody
who the greatest heavy-
weight-boxing champion
of all time was, and you
will get Muhammad Ali.
Though he was at his
peak in 1966, his fights
with Cleveland Williams
and Sonny Liston merely
showcased his skills.
A decade later and after
a hallmark Supreme Court
case regarding the Viet-
nam War, Ali beat the guy
who everyone thought
was unbeatable in George
Foreman. Unfortunately
for Foreman, who made
zillions off of his entre-
preneurial skills (Foreman
Grill, anyone?), he will
always be remembered
as the foil, the erstwhile
dope in the hit me until
you get so tired I knock
you out rope-a-dope
strategy that Ali em-
ployed.
A SPORTING VIEW |


MEMORIAL SOFTBALL
TOURNAMENT AUG. 2324
The Greer High Police De-
partment will play host to
the annual Upstate South
Carolina Law Enforcement
Memorial Softball Tourna-
ment from Aug. 23-24.
The event, taking place
at Century Park, will in-
clude games for kids, food
and a charity raffle. Teams
are participating from the
Laurens County Sheriffs
Department, Greenville
City Police Department,
Simpsonville Police De-
partment, Fountain Inn
Police Department, Green-
ville County Sheriffs De-
partment, Greenville De-
tention and the Cherokee
County Sheriffs Office.
Proceeds from the event
will go to benefit families
of officers killed in the
line of duty.
For more information,
visit scupstateofficersme-
morial.com.
YELLOW JACKET FOOTBALL
BACK IN ACTION
On Aug. 12, the Yellow
Jackets will travel to Pick-
ens for a scrimmage with
the Blue Flame at 6 p.m.
Greer will kick off
against Byrnes on Aug.
15 at 6 p.m. the Byrnes
Jamboree. On Aug. 19,
the Yellow Jackets will
host Meet the Jackets at
Dooley Field, followed by
a scrimmage with Boiling
Springs. Events begin at 6
p.m.
On Aug. 22, Greer will
travel to Daniel for a
scrimmage at 6 p.m.
GREER HIGH FOOTBALL
TICKETS AVAILABLE
Reserved seat tickets
for the Greer High foot-
ball regular season home
games are available for
purchase at the school,
beginning on Wednesday,
Aug. 6.
Tickets will be sold from
9 a.m.-noon each day.
For more information,
call Rebecca Barbare at
355-2588.
CAROLINA RAVENS YOUTH
FOOTBALL REGISTRATION
Registration is now un-
derway for the fall season
of Carolina Ravens youth
tackle football (ages 6-12)
and cheerleading (ages 5-
13).
To register online, visit
ravensfootballsc.com. For
more information, call
423-4550.
REGISTRATION OPEN
FOR GOODWILL MUD RUN
Registration has opened
for the fall edition of the
Goodwill Mud Run, which
will take place on Satur-
day, Sept. 13 at SC-TAC
(formerly the old Donald-
son Center).
Teams of four will run
3.5 miles while navigat-
ing 35 unique obstacles in
this Marine Corps inspired
course.
Event officials say the
funds raised from the
mud run will help further
Goodwills mission of pro-
viding job training and job
placement services that
assist South Carolina resi-
dents searching for em-
ployment.
For more information on
the Goodwill Mud Run, vis-
it the official event website
at goodwillmudrun.org.
PARIS MOUNTAIN PRO
GRAMS AND HAPPENINGS
Paris Mountain State
Park will hold programs
for interested participants
on Saturday, Aug. 23.
The Friends of Paris
Mountain State Park will
host a program at 10 a.m.
called Fun with Math on
the Trail. Participants will
join Marge Scieszka as she
takes math into the out-
doors. Those in attendance
will be asked to wear com-
fortable hiking shoes and
meet at park center for
this two-hour program.
No registration is required
and there is no fee for the
program beyond park ad-
mission.
Interpretive Ranger
Cathy Taylor will present
a program at 1 p.m. called
Turtle Trail Naturalist
Hike, presenting tools,
tips, and hand-outs to
encourage the pursuit of
natural wonder. The pro-
gram costs $7 per person
and will begin at the Park
Center. Registration is re-
quired. There is a limit of
25. To register, call the of-
fice at 244-5565 or e-mail
ctaylor@scprt.com.
The programs are part
of the parks Fourth Sat-
urday series of events.
For more information, or
to register for the 1 p.m.
program, call 244-5565
during office hours from
11 a.m. 5 p.m., or email
ctaylor@scprt.com. The
parks Web site is www.
SouthCarolinaParks.com.
The Friends of Paris Moun-
tain web site is at www.
pmspf.org.
SPORTS
ROUNDUP
RIVERSIDE: Taking aim
at region championship



TOURNAMENT: Will
take place Aug. 23-24


GREER: Faces date with
old rival Byrnes in jamboree
[Our fund] is
specifically for
family members of
officers killed in the
line of duty. All the
proceeds from the
event are put into
that fund.
Bethany Hembree
Event organizer
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Events at Paris Mountain State Park kick of for local
residents on Saturday, Aug. 23.
VACATION RENTALS
ADVERTISE YOUR VACA-
TION PROPERTY FOR
RENT OR SALE to more than
2.6 million S.C. newspaper
readers. Your 25-word clas-
sied ad will appear in 107
S.C. newspapers for only
$375. Call Donna Yount at the
South Carolina Newspaper
Network, 1-888-727-7377.
HOMES AND LAND FOR
SALE
Lexington, SC- 4.88 acres,
mostly hardwoods, secluded
& private, 6mi. to downtown
Lexington, 45 min. to Ft.
Jackson, $10,000 per acre,
803.776.2866 or email wad-
dle68@bellsouth.net
Foreclosure - NC Mtns Hand-
crafted log cabin on 2 ac.
w/stream. Lg loft open living
area private setting needs
work. Only $67,100 wont
last! 828-286-2981
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
FOR RENT: ONE BEDROOM
FURNISHED duplex apart-
ment in nice neighborhood
close to downtown. $400 per
month. 877-2946
8-13, 20
SUMMERTREE APTS.:
Now accepting applications
for 1BR & 2BR apts. located
at 115 Gap Creek Rd. in Dun-
can. Credit and background
check required. Section 8
vouchers welcomed. Units
designed for persons with
disabilities and/or rental as-
sistance subject to availability.
Call (864) 439-3474 or TDD#
(800) 735-2905 or stop by
Mon. Fri., 5:30 p.m. 7:30
p.m. to nd out more. Equal
Housing Opportunity. Profes-
sionally managed by Partner-
ship Property Management,
an equal opportunity provider
and employer. Apply Today!
8-13, 20, 27
HELP WANTED
THE GREATER GREER
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
is currently seeking a full-
time Director of Membership
Engagement. The position
responsibilities include imple-
mentation of Chamber mem-
ber retention and engagement
plan, and the planning/ex-
ecution of Chamber member
events and programs. Can-
didates should submit a re-
sume and cover letter to Mark
Owens before August 22,
2014 at jobs@greerchamber.
com. For a full job description
visit greerchamber.com.
8-6, 13, 20
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSIS-
TANT Scheduling travel and
expense reporting. Coordina-
tion of offsite meetings, i.e.
booking rooms, developing
agendas, send your cover
letter and salary expectations
to: eank6248@gmail.com
8-6,13
FARM MANAGER NEED-
ED on small cattle farm in
Spartanburg County. Must
have experience and work-
ing knowledge with cattle,
bailing hay and farm equip-
ment. Manager must live on
farm. Three bedroom house
provided. Please contact
lscruggs12754@yahoo.com.
8-13, 20, 27
NATL COMPANY HIRING
LOCALLY. Manangement/
Sales. Great Pay, Rapid
Promotions, Paid Vacation,
Retirement Plan. Interviews
this week. No Experience
required. We Train. Call
864-498-5177 to schedule
your personal interview.
7-23-30,8-6,13
DRYWALL WORKERS
NEEDED. Metal framers,
hangers, and nishers.
$16.10/hour plus benets.
We E-Verify and drug test.
Call 423-322-7002 for inter-
view and evaluation.
8-6,13,20
CIRCLE OF ANGELS
HOME HEALTH CARE
immediately hiring health
care professionals. RNs,
LPNs, CNAs, PCAs, and
bilingual Stafng Coordina-
tor.
Apply by resume at circleo-
fangel@att.net or attend our
hiring event Friday,
August 22, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.,
2375 East Main Street,
Suite A101, Spartanburg,
SC 29307. 864-579-3346.
8-13, 20
SPECIAL OPS U.S. Navy.
Elite training. Daring mis-
sions. Generous pay/ben-
ets. HS grads ages 17-30.
Do you have what it takes?
Call Mon-Fri 800-662-7419
COLONIAL LIFE is seeking
B2B sales reps. Commis-
sions average $56K+/yr.
Training & leads. Sales ex-
perience required, LA&H
license preferred. Call Elisa-
beth at 803-391-5536.
HELP WANTED DRIVERS
DRIVERS: MONEY &
MILES New Excellent
Pay Package. 100% Hands
OFF Freight + E-Logs. Great
Home time/Monthly Bonus.
1 yr. OTR exp./No Hazmat
877-704-3773
8-6,13
DRIVERS: CDL-A COM-
PANY DRIVERS. Quickway
Transportation is Hiring.
Home Every Other Day, Ex-
cellent Benets, High Earn-
ings.
Call: 877-600-2121.
www.quickwaycarriers.com
8-13
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL
DRIVER OPPORTUNITIES
$1000 Sign On Bonus for
Exp Drivers
-Be home most weekends
-Southeast regional runs
-Guaranteed weekly
minimum pay
Excellent communication
skills, dedication and
timelines expected
Drivers are based out of
the ATL Terminal.
Must be 21-years or older
with Class-A CDL.
At least 6 months OTR
experience required.
Call Super Service at
888-408-5275
8-13
HOLLAND LOGO HERE
DRIVERS! HOLLAND IS
HIRING at its Spartanburg
terminal. 21yr old w/ 1 year
or 50k miles exp, w/ tanker
& hazmat. Local drivers are
home daily, Regional Drivers
are home weekly. Company
paid health insurance. Find
your direction at Hollandre-
gional.com/careers! EEO/
AAE Minorities/Females/
Persons with Disabilities/
Protected Veterans
www.hollandregional.
com/careers
8-13,20
OTR DRIVERS- Local car-
rier needs company drivers.
Southeast & Midwest lanes,
home most weekends. Va-
cation, Holidays, Ins., Ard
Trucking, 1702 N. Gov. Wil-
liams Hwy, Darlington SC.,
843-393-5101
Experienced OTR Flatbed
Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on to
Qualied drivers. Home most
weekends. Call: 843-266-
3731 / www.bulldoghiway.
com EOE
GUARANTEED PAY!
CLASS-A -CDL FLATBED
DRIVERS NEEDED! Lo-
cal, regional, OTR. Great
pay package/benets/401k
match. 1yr exp. required.
Call JGR 864-488-9030 Ext.
319, Greenville and Gaffney
SC locations. www.jgr-inc.
com
ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER
JOBS in 107 S.C. newspa-
pers for only $375. Your 25-
word classied ad will reach
more than 2.6 million read-
ers. Call Donna Yount at the
S.C. Newspaper Network, 1-
888-727-7377.
FOR SALE
DESIRABLE SPACES IN
WOODLAWN Memorial Park.
Priced below market value.
Call Jill at 828-526-4706 or
Bill Pace at 864-200-1554.
7-30.8,6,13
TWO BURIAL PLOTS FOR
SALE at Woods Memorial
Gardens! Plots are $1090.00
each OBO. Please contact
907-4299 leaving message
for additional information.
8-6,13, 20, 27
TWO BURILA PLOTS IN
WOOD MEMORIAL PARK.
Priced $400 below market
value. $1580.00. Call 864-
877-1968.
8-6,13, 20
ALMOST NEW JOHN
DEERE lawn tractor. D110,
450 miles, 42-inch cut, 19.5
hp. Owner unable to use.
Asking $1450. 864-895-
6598.
8-6,13
DirectTV. 2 Year Savings
Event! Over 140 channels
only $29.99 a month. Only
DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS
of savings and a FREE Ge-
nie upgrade! Call 1-800-908-
5974
DISH TV Retailer - Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.)
& High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation!
CALL Now! 1-800-635-0278
REDUCE YOUR CABLE
BILL!* Get a whole-home
Satellite system installed at
NO COST and programming
starting at $19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to new
callers, SO CALL NOW 1-
800-631-7038
SERVICES
REECE ROOFING
THIRD GENERATION. For
all your roong needs, call
864-431-9198 or 864-401-
3693. 40 years experience.
10% off thru August.
6-188,20
DIVORCE is tough enough
already! Dont let it hurt your
wallet too! DIVORCE with
or without children $150.00
Guaranteed. Includes
name change and property
settlement agreement. Call
1.888.247.5150 - 24/7.
EDUCATION
Employers need work-at-
home Medical Transcription-
ists! Get the online training
you need to ll these posi-
tions with training through
Technical College of the
Lowcountry. Train at home to
work at home! Visit Career-
Step.com/SouthCarolina to
start training for your work-
at-home career today.
MISCELLANEOUS
AIRLINE CAREERS begin
here - Get trained as FAA
certied Aviation Technician.
Financial aid for qualied
students. Job placement
assistance. Call Aviation In-
stitute of Maintenance 866-
367-2513
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Tuesday, August 19, 2014, is
the last day to redeem win-
ning tickets in the following
South Carolina Education
Lottery Instant Game: (653)
Instant Jackpot
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS THE GREER CITIZEN B5
EMERYS
TREE
SERVICE
Fertilization
Thinning
Removals
Stump Grinding
Fully Insured
Free Estimates
895-1852
HELP WANTED
327 Suber Road
1 & 2 Bedroom
879-2015
NOW LEASING!
JORDAN
MINI-WAREHOUSES
FOR RENT
Jordan Rental Agency
329 Suber Rd.
Greer, SC 29651
879-2015
3
-
8
-
t
f
n
c
Last weeks answers
The Greer Commission
of Public Works has a job opening
listed on their website
www.greercpw.com
Please go to the website and look under
about and then click on careers
to view the opening and information.
You can call Ken Holliday
at Greer CPW 848-5500 for questions.
Please return applications to Greer CPW
by Friday, August 15, 2014.
97 SATURN 1G8ZH5285VZ191119
13 NISSAN 3N1AB7APXDL722994
99 CADI 1G6KD54Y2XU746028
06 CHRY 3A4FY58B86T20733
89 JEEP 1J4FJ58L9KL632560
58 STUD GG1405905
95 BUICK 2G4WB52L791470974
06 CHEV 1GNEC13Z76R109564
97 FORD KNJLT05H4V6223405
09 BUICK 2G4WD58269118146
04 PONT 1G2NF52E24M570546
10 JEEP 1J4HA6H16AL112490
05 HOND 2HGES165958504253
03 TOYT 5TBBT441X3S439355
98 DODG 1B7FL22P3WS743076
12 HARLEY 1HD1FBM15CB656980
99 JEEP 1J4FF68S8XL630675
94 TOYT JT4VN13D2R5141387
8-6,13,20
NOTICE
The following vehicles have been abandoned in Spartanburg
County to Copart Auto Auctions. If you are the registered
owner of any of the following vehicles please call Copart at
864-877-9113 or come to 2465 Highway 101 South, Greer, SC
29651 to reclaim vehicle. You must provide proof of owner-
ship and pay all required accrued charges. Copart will pro-
ceed with the Abandonment/Lien Sale Process if no contact is
made by the owner/lien holder within 30 days from the frst
date of this publication.
This Ad has been designed for the exclusive use of the customer advertising
in Job News. Use of this ad outside of Job News is prohibited.
Yard House is HIRING IMMEDIATELY!
Greenville, SC!
Excellent benets, competitive hourly wages & tips for some!
* LlNE & PREP CDDK * EXPEDlTDR
* SERVER * BARTENDER * BARBACK
* HDST * BUSSER * DlSHWASHER
Apply at our website NOW!
http://bit.ly/greenvilleyh
EOE M/F/D/V
Your Job Specics
JN Source Code : SOF 140818b1___________________________
Publication Date(s): 8/18_________________________________
This Ad has been designed for the exclusive
use of the customer advertising in the
publication listed. Use of this ad outside of
the listed publication is prohibited.
Publication: Greer Citizen ________________________________
Market: Ft. Lauderdale___________________________________
Ad Size : 4.9x4 _________________________________________
Recruitment Consultant: Tiffany Price ______________________ Ph: 954-252-6640 ______________________________________
VACATION RENTALS
HOMES AND
LAND FOR SALE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
HELP WANTED
DRIVERS/
HELP WANTED
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
CALL FOR SERVICES
MISCELLANEOUS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
EDUCATION
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
If you drove through
Duncan in the past few
weeks and it would be
hard to miss the Rebel
Regiment. The Byrnes
marching band has been
rehearsing 1-4 p.m. and
6-9:30 p.m. daily with
students and instru-
ments scattered seem-
ingly everywhere.
This years Rebel Regi-
ment has 245 members,
said Kaci Cotter, associ-
ate band director. Its
primarily ninth-12th
grade students with a
few eighth graders.
Its huge, Cotter
said. Were doing a real-
ly good job of recruiting
kids and getting them
excited about this.
The Rebel Regiment is
hoping to return to the
5A competition, where
last year it won the Up-
per State Championship.
The Rebel Regiment will
also travel to Alabama
to perform in the Bands
of America competition.
Were hoping to go
back to the 5A state
contest, perform well,
hopefully have another
Upper State Champion-
ship, she said. We just
want to get the kids ex-
cited about this program
and keep pushing the
numbers, having a good
time. They love it.
Cotter, a music teacher
starting her sixth year at
D.R. Hill, is a Rebel Regi-
ment alumnus herself.
I went through Dis-
trict Five. I went through
the band program here
I marched for five years.
I was a drum major with
them. Then I went to
USC in Columbia and
majored in music edu-
cation. I had a job in
Columbia for a here and
then this job came open
and I jumped on it. Ive
been here ever since.
The students get a
sense of accomplish-
ment from competing
and performing, Cotter
said.
We work really, really
hard, she said. Its not
just about the competi-
tions and those sorts
of things. They learn to
work hard and be really
efficient with their time,
time management skills,
things like that. How
to set goals and what
you have to do to reach
them.
Cotter gets a different
sense of accomplish-
ment.
I love watching these
kids grow, she said.
They start out coming
in at band camp and
theyre so scared and
so timid. They dont re-
ally know what theyre
getting themselves into.
Just seeing the transfor-
mation from these kids
into these young adults
throughout the year
Im a mother and theyre
all my babies.
Brady Ward, a senior
and one-fourth of the
spectacular drum ma-
jors, is looking forward
to this year.
Its looking great. We
have a great competi-
tion schedule this year.
Start off in Rock Hill
its one of our directors
favorite competitions.
We love going there. Its
a great prelims finals
run early in the season,
Ward said.
After that, the band
holds its own competi-
tion, a fundraiser that
brings in a lot of booster
money, he said.
It really propels us
throughout the whole
entire season finan-
cially, Ward said. Hes
been playing in the band
since he was in the fifth
grade and loved it ever
since.
We have a great all-
around band program
not just marching en-
semble, but band alto-
gether a great program.
They start you and just
propel you all the way
up to marching and
even past that to our
higher symphonic wind
ensemble here at Byrnes
and really prepare you
for the next step.
Ward hopes to rekin-
dle the fire at the Upper
State Championship.
And, heck, then go
for the gold, he said.
Thats the goal.
The band will also host
Meet the Rebel Regiment
at 8 p.m. Aug. 14 at the
Byrnes soccer field.
For more information,
visit byrnesband.org.
LIVING HERE
The Greer Citizen
B6 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
Every year, Greer High
band director Jeff Nor-
man has one goal: His
students will perform
better at the end of the
year than they did at the
beginning of the year.
Norman does not pay
attention to numbers
or rankings or what six
people in a box are going
to tell [his students].
I have no clue where
theyre going to finish,
but I do know they are
going to be much better
than what they were at
the beginning, he said.
Theyve already proven
that.
Since the end of July,
the 95-member G Force
has been putting in 12-
hour days to get ready
for the year.
We are now into the
third and final week of
camp. We had one re-
hearsal today and we
have a parent demo Fri-
day, Norman said. Its
pretty much the same
process. Trying to get
the kids to understand
the process, just setting
up what were going to
do for the coming fall.
Like I said, anytime you
get a brand new group
of kids involved in this,
theyre not quite to the
point where they under-
stand what all is going
on with it yet.
This years band is
a fairly young group,
Norman said.
We seem to have that
youth thing down pretty
well, he said. These
kids, while they have
been young and while
some of them have been
struggling, they have
worked their butts off.
Its nice to have a group
of kids that, while the
talent level might not
be quite where you
would think it would be,
theyve got motivation
and effort for at least
trying to do the right
thing, as best they can
Ill take that any day of
the week.
Part of the bands past
success can be attrib-
uted to the mentoring
relationships between
the more experienced
members and the newer
ones. The G Force band
has placed third the
past two years at the
state competition.
What happens a lot of
times is that the young-
er kids are so over-
whelmedRather than
getting upset about what
someone cant do, is to
take the time of when
they cant do it and sit
down with them to help
them get through it,
Norman said. That has
been more so than every
this year with the young
group. When a kid gets
down because that this
is beyond them, Ive
seen the older band
members say, Its going
to get better. What can I
do to help?
Norman has been
teaching for nearly 30
years and is beginning
his eighth year at Greer
High. He got his musical
start as a child.
My mother started
me in piano lessons
and I did not want to
do that, did not want a
part of that, he said.
Then I started getting
to a point where I en-
joyed it a little bit more.
Then somehow I ended
up scoring high on some
aptitude test and next
thing I know, in seventh
grade, they put me in
band and Ive been do-
ing it ever since. That
was a long time ago.
He knew he wanted
to be a band director
while he was in band his
sophomore year of high
school.
I had a band director
that was very passion-
ate about what he did.
We knew he was some-
body we could go and
talk to if we needed to.
He was the ultimate fa-
ther figure kind of deal.
He left after my junior
year, which was very
difficult. I knew ever
since I was a sophomore
in high school that this
was what I wanted to
do. I dont know what
really drove me to that
because I came into this
business kicking and
screaming.
His success is seeing
his student succeed.
Personally, what I
gain from it is watch-
ing them go through the
process to where they
feel successful at some
point. For a lot of these
kids, this is all they
have. There are kids
that come to school
that academics take sec-
ond thing. Theyre here
because they enjoy band
and they do the academ-
ics because thats what
they have to do to stay
in band. For me, it be-
comes a thing of watch-
ing get to a point of
where they feel success
at some level. Then they
get to a point that they
can finally enjoy some
of the lessons we go
through together.
More information is
available at greerbands.
org.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Young Greer band prepares for success
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Greer High color guard puts in some practice
outside the school gym.
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Since the end of July, the 95-member G Force band at Greer High School has been putting in 12-hour days to get ready for the year. Director
Jef Norman said his group will continue to improve.








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Rebel Regiment grows to 245 members
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
The Rebel Regiment is hoping to return to state
championship competition this season.
SCC ANNOUNCES
SUMMER DEANS LIST
The following Spartan-
burg Community College
students have earned
deans list honors for sum-
mer term 2014.
Campobello
Crystal L. Cantrell
Logan M. Collins
Lisa C. Conner
Debbie Harris
Ray Mims
Aaron B. Owenby
Duncan
Elizabeth A. Caldwell
Lordwin K. Estacio
William S. Fortner
Jerry D. Fuller
Carol A. Gilbert
Teresa D. Haulbrook
Vitaliy Kravchuk
Jeremy B. Parker
Greer
Dean F. Allen
Rusty C. Edwards
William T. Freeman
Mary A. Ivester
Chandy Lowery
Patrick A. Lowery, Sr.
George C. Manos
Michael A. Shankle
Inman
Michael D. Ballenger
Kristin M. Brown
Hunter B. Camp
Kasey E. Crocker
James Curry
Samuel T. Dalton
Collin J. Dewart
Justin Fisher
Gary L. Gatlin
Nicholas D. Halford
Courtney D. Hall
Joshua C. Hall
Ralph E. Hawkins
Nicole M. Hyder
Jeremy B. King
Ivan N. Korneychuk
Heather M. McCravy
Jason T. Mosley
Brendan A. Moss-Turner
Igor A. Onufriychuk
Sarah M. Pierce
Cody W. Reynolds
Andrey V. Ryzhkov
Sergey P. Sayko
Tiffany M. Tombs
Wayne A. Turner
Pavel Ulanov
Olga A. Vechirko
Mariya P. Vishnyak
Nancy E. Wasness
Ingrid M. Wilson
John Yancey
Landrum
Jake M. Collins
Whitney A. Shehan
Lyman
Julia L. Lee
Ronnie M. Massey
William L. Menares
Katlyn C. Moody
Amanda J. Patton
Theodore J. Sulzen, IV
Winston B. Washington
Moore
Charles E. Braden, Jr.
Jacob C. Cook
Gloria S. Couch
Leonardo G.
Frias-Carrillo
Devonne P. Good
Austin R. Kimberly
Marta L. Macias
Maria F. Osma
Lisa B. Polson
Andre Pyatt
Dmitriy Shtanko
Saul A. Ventura
Tyler L. Westmoreland
Taylors
Meneasha Y. Brown
Wellford
Kourtney K. Battle
Sara J. Fink
William D. Hood
Mindi D. Pruitt
James A. Wright
Registration is going on
now for fall 2014 semester
which begins Aug. 18. In-
terested individuals can
apply online at www.sccsc.
edu, or contact any SCC lo-
cation for assistance.
For a complete listing of
fall class schedule offer-
ings, visit sccsc.edu/aca-
demics/search.aspx.
DIDOK RECOGNIZED
AS ORIENTATION LEADER
Phillip Didok of Taylors
served as an Orientation
Leader during summer
2014.
Orientation leaders
serve as guides for new
students, who are making
the transition from their
previous environment to
the diverse academic, in-
tellectual and social cul-
ture of the University of
South Carolina Upstate.
These students serve as
a positive representative
of the university to new
students and their guests
and answer questions
about both social and aca-
demic aspects of Univer-
sity life.
Other duties include:
Facilitating new stu-
dents introduction to the
University by maintaining
an open, helpful attitude
and using effective com-
munication techniques
Promoting interaction
among new students dur-
ing small group discus-
sions, icebreakers, meals,
and activities
Facilitating small group
interactions on various
topics, including course
enrollment and student
life issues
Explaining academic ad-
vising and course enroll-
ment procedures for all
undergraduate schools
and answering basic ques-
tions about requirements,
course loads, and elective
classes
Supervising activities
while living among new
students attending Sum-
mer Orientation sessions
Facilitating social ac-
tivities for new students
through direct involve-
ment and participation
Working closely and co-
operating with other Ori-
entation Leaders and Ori-
entation and New Student
Programs staff to develop,
prepare, implement, and
evaluate Orientation pro-
grams
Providing administrative
support for the program,
including preparation of
Orientation materials
Working with Orienta-
tion and New Student Pro-
grams staff to assist with
and support all aspects of
the Orientation program,
including move-in day and
fall orientation
The University of South
Carolina Upstate offers
more than 40 bachelors
degree programs in the
liberal arts and sciences,
business administration,
nursing and teacher educa-
tion, and masters degrees
in education, informatics
and nursing.
Among the fastest grow-
ing universities in South
Carolina, USC Upstate is a
diverse and dynamic com-
munity of 5,500 students
from across the Upstate,
36 states and 51 countries.
Visit uscupstate.edu
GREENVILLE HIGH STUDENT
RECEIVES SCHOLARSHIP
Self Insurers Fund is
pleased to announce that
recent Greenville Senior
High Academy graduate
Matthew G. Carter was
the recipient of a $1,000
award from the Self Insur-
ers Fund 2014 Scholarship
Program. An independent
panel of judges who evalu-
ated his commitment to
educational excellence,
community service and
extracurricular activities
selected Carter.
A celebration dinner
honoring Carter was held
July 16 at The Palmetto
Club in Columbia. Self In-
surers Fund presented the
scholarship.
Carter will attend Clem-
son University this fall. He
is the son of Debbie and
Mike Carter, owner of the
Renaissance Company, a
Self Insurers Fund poli-
cyholder. Home Builders
Insurance Services is the
agency of record for the
Renaissance Company.
Self Insurers Fund, estab-
lished in 1995 by leaders
within the South Carolina
residential and commer-
cial construction industry,
provides workers com-
pensation insurance cov-
erage to over 1,100 resi-
dential and commercial
construction industry
contractors and subcon-
tractors throughout South
Carolina. Self Insurers
Fund awards scholarships
annually to graduating
high school seniors, high
school graduates and cur-
rent college students who
are the child or dependent
of a current Self Insurers
Fund policyholder or of a
policyholders employee.
For more information,
please visit schbsif.com.
OUR SCHOOLS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN B7
SCHOOL
NEWS
HIGHER EDUCATION |


Districts continue meet-
the-teacher, orientations
Greenville County
Schools began back-to-
school orientations and
meet the teacher events
this week. Following is a
schedule for local schools.
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
Brook Glenn: 5-6:30
p.m., Monday, Aug. 18,
Soar to New Heights Back
to School Night.
Brushy Creek: Monday,
Aug. 18, Meet the Teacher.
Last names A-L: 4:30-5:30
p.m. Last names M-Z: 5:30-
6:30 p.m.
6:30 p.m., Monday, Sept.
8, PTA/Open House.
Buena Vista: 5:30-6:30
p.m., Thursday, Aug. 14,
Kindergarten Orientation.
Monday, Aug. 18, Meet
the Teacher Pop In Pre-
view. Kindergarten-first
grade: 3 p.m.; Second-third
grade: 4 p.m. Fourth-fifth:
5 p.m.
Chandler Creek: 3:30-
6:30 p.m., Friday, Aug. 15,
Meet the Teacher. PTA,
clubs and transportation
will be available to answer
questions and assist fami-
lies.
6:30 p.m., Monday, Sept.
8, PTA Open House.
Crestview: 5 p.m.,
Thursday, Aug. 14, K4 and
K5.
Friday, Aug. 15, First-
fifth grades: Session 1,
4:30 p.m.; PTA Meeting,
5:10-5:25 p.m.; Session 2,
5:30 p.m.
Mountain View: Monday,
Aug. 18, Meet the Teacher.
Grades K4 and K5, 9 a.m.
First-fifth grades: 5-7 p.m.
Skyland: 4-6:30 p.m.,
Thursday, Aug. 14, Meet
the Teacher.
Taylors: 3-6 p.m., Thurs-
day, Aug. 14, Meet the
Teacher.
6:30 p.m., Monday, Sept.
8.
Tigerville: 1:30-4:30
p.m., Friday, Aug. 15, Meet
the Teacher Drop-In.
Monday, Sept. 8: PTA
Spaghetti Dinner, 5:30
p.m.; Open House, 6 p.m.
Woodland: 8:30 a.m.-
noon, Friday, Aug. 15,
Kindergarten parents will
meet in small groups, by
appointment, with their
teacher. Meet the teacher:
first-second grades, 2-3
p.m.; third-fifth grades,
3:30-4:30 p.m.
MIDDLE SCHOOLS
Blue Ridge: Friday, Aug.
15, Back to School Orien-
tation. Sixth Grade: 9-11
a.m., students with last
name starting with A-M; 1-
3 p.m., students with last
name starting with N-Z.
Monday, Aug. 18, Back
to School Orientation. Sev-
enth grade: 2:30-4 p.m.;
Eighth grade: 4:30-6 p.m.
Greer: 5:30-7 p.m.,
Thursday, Aug. 14, Sixth
Grade Orientation.
Monday, Aug. 18, 5 p.m.,
Eighth grade orientation;
6:30 p.m., seventh grade
orientation.
Northwood: Thursday,
Aug. 14, 1-2 p.m., Eighth
Grade Orientation; 2:30-
3:30 p.m., Seventh Grade
Orientation.
9 a.m.-noon, Friday, Aug.
15, Sixth Grade Orienta-
tion/Boot Camp. Parent
Meeting at noon.
6:30-8 p.m., Mon-
day, Sept. 15, PTA Open
House.
Riverside: Friday, Aug.
15. Seventh Grade Orien-
tation: A-M, 8:30-10 a.m.;
N-Z, 10-11:30 a.m. Eighth
Grade Orientation: AM,
12:30-1:45 p.m.; N-Z, 1:45-
3 p.m.
Monday, Aug. 18, Sixth
Grade Orientation, A-M,
8:30-10 a.m.; N-Z, 10-11:30
a.m.
6 p.m., Thursday, Sept.
11, Open House.
HIGH SCHOOLS
Blue Ridge: 6:30 p.m.,
Monday, Sept. 29, Fall
Open House.
Eastside: Wednesday,
Aug. 13, Student Orienta-
tion Schedule. 10 a.m.-
noon, 12th grade; 1-3 p.m.,
11th grade.
Thursday, Aug. 14, Stu-
dent Orientation Schedule.
10th grade, 10 a.m.-noon;
ninth grade, 5-6 p.m. (last
names A-K); 6:30-7:30 p.m.
(last names L-Z)
6:30 p.m., Monday, Aug.
25, PTSA Open House.
Riverside: 8:30-11:30
a.m., Thursday, Aug. 14,
Grade 12.
12:30-3:30 p.m., Thurs-
day, Aug. 14, Grade 11.
Thursday, Aug. 14,
Grade 9: 5:30-6:30 p.m.,
last names A-G; 6:30-7:30
p.m., last names H-N; 7:30-
8:30 p.m., last names O-Z.
8:30-11:30 a.m., Grade
10.
10-11:30 a.m., Friday,
Aug. 15, Self-Contained
Special Education.
7 p.m., Monday, Aug. 25,
PTA Open House.
CAREER CENTER
J. Harley Bonds: 9 a.m.-
5:30 p.m., Thursday, Aug.
14, Meet and Greet Drop-
in.
For more information,
visit www.greenville.k12.
sc.us.
Spartanburg District
Five back to school events
calendar can be found at
www.spart5.net.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Greenville High graduate Matthew Carter received the Self Insurers Fund 2014
scholarship. Left to right are Mike Carter, owner of the Renaissance Company, Debbie
Carter and scholarship recipient Matthew Carter.
ELEMENTARY
Tuesday: BBQ Chicken Leg,
Roll, Whole Grain, Pimento
Cheese Sandwich, Fruit and
Vegetable Bar
Wednesday: Turkey Pot
Roast, Roll, Whole Grain,
Veggie Burger with Cheese,
Lettuce(Shredded) & Tomato,
Vegetation Station, Chicken
Noodle Soup, Mashed Pota-
toes, Assorted Canned Fruit,
Assorted Fresh Fruit
MIDDLE/HIGH
Tuesday: Grilled Chicken
Salad, Cheese Enchilada,
Turkey Sandwich, Roll, Whole
Grain, Steamed Corn, Garden
Salad, Assorted Canned Fruit,
Assorted Fresh Fruit
Wednesday: Southwest
Chicken Salad, Turkey Pot
Roast, Roll, Whole Grain,
Grilled Cheese Sandwich,
Chicken Noodle Soup,
Mashed Potatoes, Green
Beans, Assorted Canned Fruit,
Assorted Fresh Fruit
CORN
Serving idea: Sprinkle corn
kernels as a pizza topping.

LUNCH
MENUS
GREENVILLE COUNTY |
HARVEST OF MONTH |
$
$
$
$
O
ne Itemat Regular Price
Coupon Coupon
COUPON FOR IN-STORE OR ONLINE USE!
Cash Value 1/10.
Coupon
Code:
Offer good for one item at regular price only.
One coupon per customer per day. Must present coupon at time of purchase.
Offer is not valid with any other coupon, discount or previous purchase.
Excludes CRICUT products, Tim Holtz Vagabond Machine, Silhouette CAMEO Machine,
candy, helium tanks, gift cards, custom orders, special orders, labor, rentals or class fees.
A single cut of fabric or trim by the yard equals one item.
Online fabric & trim discount is limited to 10 yards, single cut.
TAYLORS
Wade Hampton Blvd & Fairview Road
Rating: 7 out of 10
Run time: 165 minutes
Rated: R for adult language
A
t the very least, you
should see Boy-
hood because youve
never seen anything like it
before.
Director Richard
Linkater (Before Sunrise,
Dazed and Confused)
spent 12 years shooting
the project, using the
same four central charac-
ters for the duration. The
end result is a coming-
of-age tale that is both
genuine and messy, a
nearly three-hour medita-
tion on growing up in the
wreckage of a fallen fam-
ily structure.
When the epic kicks off,
our protagonist Mason
(Ellar Coltrane) is just
6-years-old, living with
his older sister Samantha
(Linklaters daughter Lore-
lei) and divorced mother
Olivia (Patricia Arquette)
in a small Texas town. His
father (Ethan Hawk) gets
the kids on the weekends
and during the summer,
but neither holds down a
decent job nor knows the
first thing about parent-
ing.
Eventually, the family
moves to Houston, where
Olivia goes back to school
and marries one of her
professors, who turns out
to be an abusive alcoholic.
The trio is forced to move
once again, and Olivia
eventually finds work
teaching psychology at a
small college. She marries
an Iraq veteran and tries
to keep Samantha and
Mason from going astray
as they head towards
adulthood.
The plot is tough to
summarize because there
isnt much of one. Linklat-
er doesnt so much tell a
story as he does depict
the experience of the title.
The films early moments
are its most haunting and
beautiful, with Arquette
and Coltrane embody-
ing the thematic con-
trast between guilt and
innocence. Linklater and
Hawk hold their own in
supporting roles, though
the latters part is riddled
with deadbeat dad clichs.
As time goes by, the
film loses its emotional
punch. Coltranes per-
formance deteriorates
over a decade and some
sequences feel clunky
and forced (especially one
where the teens are drink-
ing beer and talking about
girls).
By the time he heads
off to college, Masons
character is neither
particularly magnetic nor
compelling, and Boy-
hood ends more with a
whimper than a scream.
You do have to hand it
to Linklater though, for
envisioning such a long-
term project and having
the guts and skill to carry
it through to completion.
There are likely more
movies like it to come, but
only time will tell the full
measure of its influence.
INTO THE WOODS, JR.
AT CANNON CENTRE
All of your favorite char-
actersCinderella, Little
Red Riding Hood, Jack
(and his beanstalk) and the
Witchmeet and interact
in this whimsical original
story.
The musical centers
on a baker and his wife
who wish to have a child;
Cinderella, who wishes
to attend the kings festi-
val; and Jack, who wishes
his cow would give milk.
When the baker and his
wife learn that they cannot
have a child because of a
witchs curse, the two set
off on a journey to break
the curse and wind up
changed forever.
This free show is at 7
p.m. Aug. 15, 16, 22 and
23 at the Cannon Centre,
204 Cannon St.
GREER OPRY HOUSE
HOLDS LINE DANCING
Classic Country Band
with Ed Burrell at 8 p.m.
Admission is $9. Free line
dancing from 6:30-7:30
p.m. each Saturday night.
STOMPING GROUNDS
HOLDS MUSIC EVENTS
Stomping Groundshosts
Old Time Jam with Bob
Buckingham, every first
and third Tuesday of the
month. Buckingham in-
vites anyone who has a
banjo, guitar, bass, fiddle,
etc. to come and jam from
7-9 p.m. Even if you dont
play, come listen to this
group of musical folks.
For more information, call
Bob at 423-5576.
Stomping Grounds
now has a Celtic Ses-
sion 7-9 p.m. every other
Wednesday. This is an
open session to Irish/
Scottish folk music and
anyone can participate.
Please call Alan Dillman
for more information at
828-329-2640.
CHORALE HOLDS
AUDITIONS
The Greenville Chorale
will be holding auditions
for experienced singers on
Sunday, Aug. 17.
Must be proficient in
sight singing. Interested
candidates call 235-1101
for an appointment.
GLT PRESENTS
SPLISH SPLASH 2
The Greenville Little
Theatre presents Splish
Splash 2 Aug. 14-17. The
tribute to the 1950s is
back; it will be an unfor-
gettable night of music
from that fabulous de-
cade. GLTs incredible Up-
state talent performs such
songs as Splish Splash,
Summertime Blues, Book
of Love, Great Balls of Fire,
Mack The Knife, and more.
There will be 4 perfor-
mances.
Tickets prices are $30
with discounts available
for seniors, children, and
groups of 10 or more.
Show times are 8 p.m.
Aug. 14-16 at 8 p.m. and 3
p.m. Aug. 17.
Call the box office at
233-6238 or visit greenvil-
lelittletheatre.org for more
information. Greenville
Little Theatre Box Office
is located at 444 College
St., Greenville, and is open
Monday through Friday
from 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
LUNCH & LEARN: WALNUT
GROVES COLONIAL GARDEN
Join Walnut Grove Plan-
tation gardener Tim Fos-
ter for a virtual tour of the
plantations colonial gar-
den and a discussion of
the cultural significance
of 18th century foods in
modern times.
The presentation will
explore the various ethnic
groups that contributed to
the gardens and food of
the 1765 plantation and
our tables today. Copies
of Wesley Greenes Veg-
etable Gardening the Colo-
nial Williamsburg Way, the
definitive book on 18th
century gardening, will be
available for purchase for
a special price of $25.
Lunch & Learn will be
12:30-1:30 p.m. Aug. 15 in
the west conference room
at Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter. Catered lunches will
be available through Pal-
metto Palate, reserved in
advance through SCHAs
online gift shop and at the
Spartanburg Regional His-
tory Museum.
Tickets and a limited
amount of lunches will be
available at the door. Tick-
ets are $5 for entrance to
the event or $15 for the
event and lunch.
Visit spartanburghistory.
org/tickets to purchase in
advance, or reserve at the
History Museum in person
or by phone at 596-3501.
PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT
CHAPMAN CULTURAL ART
Photographers William
(Skip) Woodward and Ter-
ry Davenport will be the
featured exhibiting artists
for August 2014 in the
Artists Guild of Spartan-
burg Gallery at Chapman
Cultural Center in Spar-
tanburg. The exhibit, For
The Love Of Light, will be
up through Aug. 28.
Admission is free. The
exhibit reception will be 6-
9 p.m. Aug. 21.
HISTORY EXHIBIT: MAPS
ALIVE! AUG. 131
Spartanburg Regional
History Museum is cur-
rently exhibiting Maps
Alive!, a collection of his-
toric and artistic maps of
Spartanburg, South Caro-
lina, and the surrounding
area, provided by local
volunteer and map enthu-
siast Ron Swain.
Free and open to the
public Tuesday-Saturday,
10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun-
day, 1-5 p.m. at Chapman
Cultural Center. Ends Aug.
31. For more info, please
call 596-3501.
ART EXHIBIT: COLORS
AUG. 115
Spartanburg Art Museum
is showcasing more than
50 works of art for this an-
nual exhibition. All works
were created by COLORS
students from across the
County at seven sites dur-
ing the past school year.
As an outreach program
of SAM, COLORS provides
underserved youth a cre-
ative outlet to work with
artists after school in a
safe and supportive en-
vironment. Exhibition on
view through Aug. 15.
Free and open to the
public Tuesday-Saturday,
10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun-
day, 1-5 p.m. at Chapman
Cultural Center.
For more info, please
call 582-7616.
ART EXHIBIT: FOR THE LOVE
OF LIGHT: AUG. 128
Artists Guild of Spartan-
burg will host Two Photog-
raphers: For the Love of
Light, a photo exhibit by
members Terry Davenport
and Skip Woodward, Aug.
1-28. Free and open to the
public Monday-Saturday,
10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun-
day, 1-5 p.m. at Chapman
Cultural Center.
Public reception will be
Thursday, Aug. 21, 6-9
p.m., free and open to the
public.
For more info, please
call 764-9568.
RETROSPECTIVE
DANIEL CROMER EXHIBIT
Art Exhibit: Daniel
Cromer: A Retrospec-
tive: Aug. 1 - Sept. 27
Spartanburg Art Museum
is exhibiting impressive
watercolors by Daniel
Cromer who, after living
and working in New York
and London as a success-
ful commercial artist, re-
turned to his Spartanburg
roots to devote his time
and talents to creative
practice. His watercolor
landscapes and portraits
are immediately recogniz-
able, and are in corporate
and private collections
across the Southeast. This
expanse of A Retrospec-
tive illustrates the depth
of Cromers talents and
his love for painting.
Showing July 17-Sept. 27
at Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter in Spartanburg Art Mu-
seum, Tuesday-Saturday,
10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday,
1-5 p.m. Free.
For more info, please
call 582-7616.
SUNDAYS UNPLUGGED:
AUG. 17, 24, 31
Every Sunday afternoon,
1-5 p.m., Chapman Cul-
tural Center is open for
the publics relaxed enjoy-
ment.
In addition to visiting
Spartanburg Art Museum,
Artists Guild of Spartan-
burg Gallery, Spartanburg
Regional History Museum,
Spartanburg Science Cen-
ter, and the Student Gal-
leries, a local musician
provides free live music
2-4 p.m.
For more info, please
call 542-ARTS.
ARTFUL THURSDAYS:
AUG. 14, 21, 28
Carolina Foothills Ar-
tisan Center in Landrum
sponsors weekly Artful
Thursdays where local
artists demonstrate their
craft.
For more info, please
call 461-3050.
HISTORY LUNCH & LEARN:
AUG. 15
Spartanburg County
Historical Association
will host a public Lunch &
Learn lecture about 18th
century food on Friday,
Aug. 15, 12:30-1:30 p.m. at
Chapman Cultural Center.
The speaker will be Tim
Foster, gardener at Walnut
Grove Plantation, and he
will present a virtual tour
of the Plantations garden
as he discusses the cul-
tural significance of 18th
century food in the mod-
ern world.
Admission is $5 or $15
with boxed lunch provid-
ed by Palmetto Palate. For
more info, please call 596-
3501.
PINKALICIOUS AUDITION
WORKSHOP: AUG. 16
Spartanburg Youth The-
atre will hold an audition
workshop at Chapman
Cultural Center on Sat-
urday, Aug. 16, 9 a.m.-12
p.m., for its upcoming mu-
sical Pinkalicious. Partici-
pants must be in grades
3-12.
The cost is $25, and pre-
registration is required.
Please call 585-8278 to
enroll or for more infor-
mation.
HUB CITY BOWLMAKING
SESSION IS AUG. 16
Hub City Empty Bowls
will host its fourth out of
five bowl-making sessions
at Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter on Saturday, Aug. 16,
10 a.m.-noon and 1-3 p.m.
The public is invited to
make handmade pottery
bowls at no charge. Profes-
sional-grade clay and in-
struction will be provided.
The bowls will be used
on Saturday, Sept. 27
Soup Day at Chapman
Cultural Center to raise
money for TOTAL Minis-
tries in its efforts to fight
hunger in Spartanburg.
For more info, please
call 621-2768 or visit Hub-
CityEmptyBowls.com.
SEE EVENTS | B10
ENTERTAINMENT
The Greer Citizen
B8 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014
DVD previews
COUCH THEATER |


THINGS
TO DO
MOVIE
REVIEWS
WILLIAM
BUCHHEIT
Adam Sandler in Blended
By Sam Struckhof
NEW RELEASES
FOR WEEK OF AUGUST 25
DOG OF THE WEEK
Blended (PG-13) --
Adam Sandler and Drew
Barrymore play single
parents who cant stand
each other after going on
a disastrous blind date. By
sheer coincidence, Sandler
takes his three daugh-
ters to the same resort in
South Africa as Barrymore
and her two sons. Then
its a safari through dense
patches of Sandler-humor
and sappy bogs of Sandler-
schmultz.
There are some mo-
ments of dry humor, or
genuine wit -- but each
time its a surprise in the
regular routine of poop
jokes, bouncing bodies
and make-fun-of-the-
weirdo gags. Theres also
the backdrop of trouble-
some African stereotypes.
If you want an easy night
of lowbrow laughs with
the family, look elsewhere.
Blended might give you
the boring and uncomfort-
able evening you were try-
ing to avoid.
PICKS OF THE WEEK
The Normal Heart (R)
-- Mark Ruffalo stars as
a Ned Weeks, an activist
fighting in the early days of
the HIV/AIDS crisis. Set in
the early 1980s, Ned sees
friends slowly die as the
disease spreads through
New Yorks gay communi-
ty. There isnt any medical
treatment available at this
point, and its not really a
priority. Weeks is a pas-
sionate and controversial
activist, unwilling or un-
able to tone down.
This HBO made-for-TV
feature is based on the
1985 play of the same
name. The play was an
outcry for support, and
delivered a demand that
people remember what
happened and how a kill-
er disease was ignored
because it was prevalent
among gays. That energy
is still present, but anger
is only a fraction of the
emotional weight in the
movie adaptation.
Trust Me (R) -- Howard
(Clark Gregg, from TVs
Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.
and the Iron Man mov-
ies) is a Hollywood talent
agent for child stars. Hes
trying to make it to the
top, despite a run of bad
luck and fierce competi-
tion from his slimy rival
(Sam Rockwell). Howard
gets one more shot when
he finds Lydia (Saxon Shar-
bino), a strident 13-year-
old actress who could star
in the next big teen block-
buster. Gregg -- also the
films writer and director
-- plays a charming under-
dog, making this dramedy
worth checking out.
The Double (R) -- In a
dimly lit office built like
a bunker, Simon (Jesse
Eisenberg) works away
his little life as one of the
people who goes mostly
unnoticed. Then a guy
named James (also Eisen-
berg) comes into the of-
fice, and he fits right in.
Simon and James look ex-
actly alike, except Simon is
nervous and quiet, where
James is cocky and im-
pulsive. James is so much
better at life that he starts
to move in on Simons life,
talking to his crush (Mia
Wasikowska) and winning
all the praise at work. This
movie is just off-putting
enough to have fun with
social anxiety.
TV RELEASES
Portlandia: Season 4
The Walking Dead: Sea-
son 4
Criminal Minds: Season
9
Elementary: Season 2
Revenge: Season 3
Boyhood a messy, unique coming-of-age tale
PHOTO | COURTESY OF IFC FILMS
Director Richard Linkater has created a one-of-a-kind flm in Boyhood. It is a three-hour
meditation on growing up in the wreckage of a fallen family structure.

BY DANA BLOCK
THE BOLD AND
THE BEAUTIFUL
Hope was faced with
a difficult decision. Dea-
con hoped that Brooke
would give him another
chance romantically. Bill
was tipped off about Wy-
atts elaborate plan. Liam
received an unexpected
phone call that com-
pletely rocked his world.
Oliver seduced Aly with
a romantic gesture and a
subtle reminder of their
enchanting medieval eve-
ning. Word spread quickly
throughout Forrester Cre-
ations regarding the inci-
dents that took place in
Paris and Monte Carlo. Bill
threw caution to the wind
and asked Brooke to mar-
ry him. Deacon hoped to
gain the upper hand in a
scheme. Quinn was inter-
rogated about her role in
Wyatt gaining possession
of the diamond. Brooke
became increasingly wor-
ried about her daughters
well-being after she hadnt
been heard from since the
photo shoot. Wait to See:
Quinn and Deacon join
forces.
DAYS OF OUR LIVES
A jealous Theresa
warned Eve to stay away
from Brady. Hope was
shocked to learn that Aid-
en had a date with Jenni-
fer. Kristen stunned all her
enemies with her return to
Salem. A livid Sami con-
fronted Nicole for her part
in Eric not being able to
return to the priesthood.
Kristen turned to Stefano
for help. Marlena coun-
seled Brady on his next
move regarding Kristen.
Sonny felt guilty about the
secret that he was keeping
from Will. Clyde started to
make big plans for his fu-
ture in Salem. Sami had an
explosive confrontation
with Will after reading his
article. Clyde made a deal
with Ben. Rafe pleaded his
case to Jordan. Wait to
See: Nicole gets a chance
to confront Kristen.
GENERAL HOSPITAL
Levis true colors were
revealed and lives were in
jeopardy before his wed-
ding to Maxie began. Sam
told Patrick that she want-
ed to work with him to
find out who put Rafe up
to the crash. Olivia let Son-
ny know whether or not
they had a future togeth-
er. Lucas extended a din-
ner invitation to both Brad
and Felix. Britt barged in
on Nikolas and Elizabeths
cozy lunch together. Ol-
ivia made a formal apol-
ogy to Carly. Sonny gave
Milo some romantic tips.
Franco and Nina found
themselves in a compro-
mising position. Nikolas
allowed Britt to stay at his
house after she got kicked
out of her apartment. Car-
ly learned about Francos
whereabouts. Nina discov-
ered that Ava was preg-
nant. Wait to See: Sabrina
returns from Puerto Rico.
THE YOUNG AND
THE RESTLESS
Neil decided to buy a
house for Hilary. Mean-
while, Hilary and Devon
were declaring their feel-
ings for one another.
Sharon confronted Ian
by asking about Mariahs
mother. Nikki continued to
struggle with her sobriety.
Christine walked in just in
time to see Paul comfort-
ing Nikki. Chelsea invited
Billy to her sons birthday
party. Abby interrupted an
awkward moment between
Stitch and Victoria. Kelly
urged Jack not to leave
town to see Phyllis. Mean-
while, Victor privately
met with Phylliss doctor.
Nick did some research
into Mariahs past. Jill and
Colin returned from their
trip to find a letter from
Katherine. Esther had
some urgent news. Wait
to See: Summer introduces
Austin to Phyllis.
(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
DEAR DR. ROACH: For
the past eight months, I
have had a twitch in the
inside of my right ear. I
can hear it twitching, and
I can feel it. It seems to get
worse when I talk on the
phone (its my phone ear),
but sometimes I wake up
with it twitching.
It feels like when your
eye twitches, only its in-
side my ear. I could liken
the movement to a snap-
ping of fingers. Its more
a vibration than a crunch.
I do hear a sound when it
happens, similar to when
you get water plugging up
your ear. So it plugs/un-
plugs with each twitch.
I have gone to my gener-
al practitioner for help. He
referred me to an ear spe-
cialist. They did a hearing
test, which I passed with
flying colors. Other than
that, they didnt have any
solution to my problem.
It is very bothersome and
seems to be getting worse.
I think it may be stress-
related, but I dont know
what to do to make it stop.
Can you help me? -- P.C.
ANSWER: This sounds
like a spasm of one of the
muscles that control the
tension of the eardrum,
the tensor tympani and
stapedius muscles. These
muscles protect our ears,
to some extent, from loud
noises. Just like you can
have a spasm or twitch in
your eye muscles -- or in-
deed any muscle -- these
muscles cause a unique
sound sensation in the
ear when they repeatedly
twitch with high frequen-
cy. The plugging/unplug-
ging sensation is likely the
Eustachian tube, which
controls the pressure in
the ear, opening and clos-
ing.
The bad news is that I
dont know of anything
to make it stop. The good
news is that it wont affect
your hearing. Very rarely,
it can be a sign of a nerve
or muscle disease, but it is
likely a normal phenom-
enon that many people
have but few notice and
articulate it as well as you
have.
***
DEAR DR. ROACH: My
mother, 88 years old, re-
cently switched her medi-
cine for hypertension
from timed release, which
she has been taking for 10
years, to one that is not
timed release, because
the timed release was too
expensive. Im worried.
Has she compromised her
health by doing this? Her
cardiologist gave her the
go-ahead. -- J.R.
ANSWER: In my opinion,
timed-release versions for
high blood pressure are
preferable to non-timed-
release because the level
of the medication in the
blood can go up and down
to a greater degree with
the regular-release formu-
lation. However, it does
depend on the medication,
and her cardiologist knows
more than I do about her
particular situation.
***
DEAR DR. ROACH: Be-
cause of my knee replace-
ment, I am recommended
to have four amoxicillin
500-mg tablets before a
dental procedure. I am
concerned about taking
2,000 mg every time. Is it
too much? -- C.C.H.
ANSWER: Amoxicillin
is a very safe medication,
and a single dose of 2,000
mg is standard for people
who require treatment to
prevent infection. The ma-
jor concern is allergy, so
anyone with a documented
history of reaction to peni-
cillin-like drugs should get
an alternate medication.
Dr. Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer in-
dividual letters, but will
incorporate them in the
column whenever pos-
sible. Readers may email
questions to ToYourGood-
Health@med.cornell.edu.
To view and order health
pamphlets, visit www.rb-
mamall.com, or write to
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475.
OUT ON A LIMB by Gary Kopervas |
AMBER WAVES by Dave T. Phipps |
RFD by Mike Marland |
THE SPATS by Jef Pickering |
SOAP UPDATES


TO YOUR
GOOD HEALTH
KEITH
ROACH, M.D.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014 FUN AND GAMES THE GREER CITIZEN B9
Ear twitch
wont affect hearing
Kristof St. John stars as
Neil on The Young and
The Restless
DEAR PAWS COR-
NER: My border collie
mix, Rex, was difficult
to housetrain when he
was a puppy, but things
smoothed out for sev-
eral years. Now suddenly
hes pooping all over
the house again. I scold
him, he looks ashamed
and whines, but then it
happens again. How do a
retrain an old, stubborn
dog? -- Clark in Kansas
City
DEAR CLARK: Take Rex
straight to the vet. When
an adult dog that had no
issues with housetraining
for several years suddenly
develops issues, its not a
problem of stubbornness.
Something else is going
on.
Incontinence is a some-
what common problem
in senior dogs, as they
develop various physical
problems with bladder,
kidneys or muscles. In
adult dogs that havent
reached their expected
senior age, eliminating in
the house can signal an
infection or other disease.
In both cases, pets need
to be evaluated by a vet-
erinarian.
Working out an appro-
priate treatment may take
additional testing and, de-
pending on Rexs diagno-
sis, a bit of time to work
out the right medications
to give, if any. Youll also
need to accommodate
his problem, hopefully
on a temporary basis,
by setting up disposable
pee pads appropriate to
his size in each room he
frequents.
A side anecdote: When
my mothers aging Ger-
man shepherd became
incontinent, she rolled out
spare carpet strips wher-
ever he walked or rested.
These she could clean or
dispose of when he had
an accident.
Train Rex to use the
pads similar to his
original housetraining
outdoors.
Its important to keep
up his routine as much as
possible: Take him for his
walks at the same time as
usual and feed him at the
same time (unless other-
wise directed by the vet).
Send your questions
or comments to ask@
pawscorner.com.
B10 THE GREER CITIZEN LIVING HERE WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2014
7-ON-7: Team
s com
pete in passing tournam
ents
INSIDE
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TO SUBSCRIBE
TO THE
GREER CITIZEN,
CALL US
TODAY AT
ODAY A
ODAY A
DINING IN STYLE BJU construction
near completion
A9
NOTABLE
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JERSEY GIRLS Steal the stage in
Jersey Boys
C1
LIVING HERE
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Minority Business
Open House is July 16
The Greater Greer Chamber of Com-
merce has announced a Minority Business
Open House will be held on July 16. Pre-
sented by Greer Memorial Hospital, this free
open house will be at the Greater Greer
Chamber of Commerce from 5:30-7:30 p.m.
Building on our inclusiveness initiatives
that begun early last year, I look forward to
welcoming the entire business community
to the Chamber on July 16, said Allen
Smith, President/CEO of the Greater Greer
Chamber of Commerce.
Registration is available online at greer-
chamber.com.
. 100
. 100
. 100
. 100 NO NO NO NO. 25 50 C
. 25 50 C
. 25 50 C
. 25 50 C
. 25 50 C
. 25 50 C
. 25 50 C
. 25 50 C
. 25 50 CENT
ENT
ENT
ENT
ENTSSS
BY AMANDA BRADFORD
STAFF WRITER
Off the Rack, located at
806 West Wade Hampton
Blvd. in Greer, is a quaint
clothing boutique with
Tiffany blue accent tables
and the sign on the back
wall reads, Be your own
kind of beautiful.
Donna Rackley and her
daughters, Brittany Rack-
ley and Brandi Rainey,
opened the clothing bou-
tiques doors on June 9 in
hopes of offering fashion-
able clothes at affordable
prices.
This is all new to us,
even though Ive run a
beauty shop for 20 years,
this is totally out of my
comfort
zone,
Donna
said.
Although the store is
Donnas second business,
she explained she opened
it for her daughters.
The girls here are who
really, more Brittany than
anything, wanted to open
SEE BOUTIQUE | A6
On June 11, 122 voters
of the 1,516 registered
voters, around eight per-
cent, cast ballots in the
Duncan Municipal Elec-
tions resulting in the re
tions resulting in the re-
election of Mayor John
election of Mayor John
Hamby. In July, Hamby
will begin his fourth term
as Mayor of Duncan. Only
nine write-in votes were
cast for various people for
Mayor, compared to the 93
votes Hamby received.
Like I said, there wasnt
a whole lot of turnout was
there? Weve got 1,500
something voters. I was
disappointed we let 122
people decide what we
was gonna do for the next
four years, Hamby said.
everything right, be con
servative with the money
(and) try and keep us in
good shape, he said.
He added this year the
town will be raising mon-
ey for the Streetscape and
Pocket Parks Project, how-
ever the funds will not
SEE ELECTION | A6
Mims was unanimously
reappointed as Municipal
Judge.
No nominations were
made for the two positions
on the Airport Environs
Planning Commission or
the three positions on the
Planning Commission. The
appointments will be ad
dressed for the final time
at the next council meet
ing because the terms do
not expire until June 30.
The first reading of an
ordinance to adopt the
2012 International Build
ing Codes was heard and
passed with a four to
one vote, with council
man Wryley Bettis voting
against the adoption. The
codes were adopted at a
state level recently, which
requires them to be en
forced at a municipal level.
The new codes will go into
effect on July 1.
In addition to the man
dated code changes, coun
cil agreed grass be deemed
overgrown when more
than 12 inches tall, screens
should be installed in win
dows in existing homes,
as the code requires heat
but not air conditioning
to be supplied in homes,
and heat supply required
in homes and workspaces
from Sept. 1 through May
1. These were approved
based on recommenda- EE COUNCIL | A6
Fam
ily w
ants
to donate
w
ood
BY JULIE HOLCOMBE
STAFF WRITER
No more great-grandkids
will carve toy car tracks
under the Rayna Drive old
oak tree. After surviving three
other strikes over its 150-
plus years, lightning from
a recent storm claimed the
giant white oak that mea-
sured 23 feet, 10 inches
circumference at its base.
The strike split about a
third of the branches from
its trunk exposing the
trees hollow center and
revealing its decay, mean-
ing the remainder needed
to be cut down.
It just breaks my heart.
I cry every time I see it,
Gail Barnett said Thurs-
day.
The tree had been a part
of Barnetts family for over
50 years as one of six tall
oaks that dotted the prop-
erty her father, W. Dennis
Smith, purchased in 1960.
Her dad, a local contrac-
tor who built homes in
Dogwood Acres and Val-
ley Haven, would eventu-
ally build himself a brick
home on the site. Gail and
her husband, Jimmie, also
lived there for 20 years be-
fore passing it on to their
daughter and son-in-law,
Anita and Mike Davis, who
still live there.
Five generations have
been raised in this house,
Mike Davis said.
Barnett, who still lives
in the neighborhood along
with several other family
members, has fond mem-
ories shared around the
tree. She recalls a snow
that blanketed azaleas
at the base when her dad
owned the home; a hook in
the trees trunk that held a
yard sale sign (it had four
inches exposed when it
was put in 30 years ago
and only one inch is still SEE TREE | A6
L
ig
h
tn
in
g
d
o
w
n
s
c
e
n
tu
r
y
-o
ld
o
a
k
Its just old and sentimental for us.
Gail Barnett
C
o
u
n
t
y
v
o
t
e
s
o
n
r
e
c
r
e
a
t
i
o
n
p
l
a
n
C
o
u
n
t
y
v
o
t
e
s
o
n
r
e
c
r
e
a
t
i
o
n
p
l
a
n
ILE PHOTO
Parks such as the Pavilion Recreation Complex could be
F
a
m
ily
o
p
e
n
s
b
o
u
tiq
u
e
HE GREER CITIZEN
Donna Rackely, left, and her daughter, Brittany Rackely, opened the doors of their new
Donna Rackely, left, and her daughter, Brittany Rackely, opened the doors of their new


(Im) gonna do everything right, be
conservative with
the money (and) try
the money (and) try
and keep us in good
and keep us in good
shape.
John Hamby Duncan Mayor
TON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
When lightning struck the Rayna Drive white oak, the
resulting split revealed the extent of the trees decay.
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Gail Barnett explains how one-third of this giant oak tree
came down during a recent storm.
Read it and reap!
Community newspapers alive and well
Team
s com
pete in passing tournam
ents
B1
WWW.GREERCITIZEN.COM
AROLINA
AROLINA
AROLINA
AROLINA
ation Districts decision
last week to disband, the
Greenville County Council
voted whether to absorb
the department as a part
of Greenville County fol-
revenues because of fewer
residents in its district.
Following recent state
legislation passed in favor
of allowing special pur
pose districts statewide
the option to disband, the
Over time, when a citys
annexed it actually de-
creases our tax base. And
so, if you look back on
SEE RECREAT
ECREA
ECREA ION | A6
V
au
gh
n
w
in
s W
ard
4
seat BY AMANDA STAFF WRITER
mously reappointed to
the Board of Architectural
Review and Henry Hank
Mims was unanimously
reappointed as Municipal
Judge.
No nominations were
made for the two positions
on the Airport Environs
Planning Commission or
the three positions on the
Planning Commission. The
appointments will be ad-
dressed for the final time
at the next council meet-
ing because the terms do
not expire until June 30.
The first reading of an
ordinance to adopt the
2012 International Build-
ing Codes was heard and
C
o
u
n
t
y
v
o
t
e
s
o
n
r
e
c
r
e
a
t
i
o
n
p
l
a
n
Parks such as the Pavilion Recreation Complex could be
afected by Greenville County Councils vote.
AMANDA BRADFORD |
D
u
n
c
a
n
r
e
-e
le
c
ts

H
a
m
b
y
a
s
m
a
y
o
r
75
%
read all or most
of the newspaper
compared to 73% in 2011 and 78% in 2010
* In a survey of small U.S. towns
and cities with newspapers of a
circulation 15,000 or less. Source:
Reynolds Journalistm Institute.
96
%
of readers pay for the
newspaper
43.8
%
keep the paper for
more than 10 days
77.4
%
read the paper for local
news and information
69
%
think the newspaper
provides valuable
local shopping and
advertising information
46
%
use the newspaper for
their political and voting
decisions
Jr 0rrrr 0itirn
317 Trade St. Downtown Greer PO Box 70
greercitizen.com
PAWS
CORNER
SAM MAZZOTTA
King Features
The Park Hop, presented
by Spinx, will culminate
with a closing celebration,
sponsored by Cunningham
Recreation, today from 3-
7 p.m. in Greer City Park.
Children and families who
participated in Park Hop
are invited to celebrate
with a family style picnic.
Participants are encour-
aged to pack a basket
with their favorite healthy
foods, blankets and their
favorite games or toys.
There will be music,
healthy food samples, a
short scavenger hunt and
a closing ceremony, where
adventure themed prizes
will be awarded with the
help of Greenville Drive
emcee, JDew, and mascot,
Reedy Rip It. For more in-
formation, visit www.park-
hop.org.
This collaborative coun-
ty-wide initiative was
made possible with the
help of numerous part-
ners, including Greenville
County Parks, Recreation,
and Tourism; the City
of Greenville; the City of
Greer; the City of Mauldin;
the City of Fountain Inn;
the City of Simpsonville
and Paris Mountain State
Park.
The Park Hop campaign
featured 17 local parks
with a clue to be identified
in each one with the help
of the Park Passport or
the Questalot mobile app
that provided a mobile
version of the passport.
Once clues were identified
participants could turn in
their answers in order to
win prizes.
Park Hop was a summer
long adventure for both
children and families alike
to enjoy. The program was
created not only to pro-
vide low cost physical ac-
tivity opportunities, but to
connect residents to some
of the over 100 parks and
recreation facilities locat-
ed throughout the county,
and build a sense of com-
munity as well. said Park
Hop coordinator Melissa
Fair.
Park Hop celebrates
successful second year
Adult dog forgets
its housetraining
HABBIT
Animal ID:
23503754
Breed: Domestic
Shorthair / Mix
Age : 4 months
6 days
Gender: Male
Color: Grey / White
Spayed/Neutered:
No
Declawed: No
To adopt: (864) 467-3950
Located at: Greenville Animal Care Services,
328 Furman Hall Road, Greenville, SC, 29609
Email:petpr@greenvillecounty.org
PET OF THE WEEK |
FROM B8
FREE CONCERT
AT CHAPMEN CENTER
Singer-Songwriter Con-
certs are held every Sun-
day, 2-4 p.m. at the Chap-
man Cultural Center, with
genres and artists varying
week-to-week. The Aug.
17 free performance is by
Anna V.
Pop/alternative solo-
ist Anna V is a classically
trained singer-songwriter
and pianist native to Spar-
tanburg. Though she has
filled the roles of vocalist
and bassist in several local
bands, Anna V made her
solo debut last year. Her
style is a unique blend of
various influences such as
Tori Amos, Nine Inch Nails
and assorted 80s New
Wave bands. Her classical
training, singer-songwriter
experience and taste for
electronic sounds gives
Anna V a distinct musical
quality.
All Sundays Unplugged
activities include free ad-
mission to Artists Guild
of Spartanburg, Spartan-
burg Art Museum, Spar-
tanburg Regional History
Museum and the Student
Galleries. Spartanburg Sci-
ence Center is open for a
small fee.
For more information
on Sundays Unplugged,
please contact Chapman
Cultural Center at 542-
ARTS or visit Chapman-
CulturalCenter.org.
PINKALICIOUS AUDITIONS:
AUG. 18, 19
Spartanburg Youth The-
atre will hold auditions
for Pinkalicious the musi-
cal on Monday and Tues-
day, Aug. 18 and 19, 5:30-
7:30 p.m. in the theater at
Chapman Cultural Center.
Actors must be in grades
3-12 in order to audition.
Actors need to prepare a
one-minute monologue
and 16 bars from a mu-
sical theatre type song.
Please call 583-4891.
FALL DANCE REGISTRATION:
AUG. 20, 21
Ballet Spartanburg will
register for fall dance
classes on Wednesday and
Thursday, Aug. 20 and 21,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. in the Dance
Center at Chapman Cul-
tural Center.
Classes start Aug. 25.
For more info, please call
583-0339.

ARTWALK: AUG. 21
On the third Thursday of
each month, art museums
and galleries in Spartan-
burg stay open late 5-9
p.m. so patrons can see
what is new on the local
art scene.
On Thursday, Aug. 21,
Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter will have several ven-
ues open to the public:
Spartanburg Art Museum,
Artists Guild of Spartan-
burg Gallery, Spartanburg
Regional History Museum,
and the Student Galleries.
All are open with free ad-
mission, and most provide
wine-and-cheese type re-
freshments. For more info,
please call 542-ARTS.

HOW THE WEST WAS SUNG
AT FINE ARTS CENTER
The Palmetto Statesmen
Chorus will present its
50th annual show entitled
How
The West Was Sung on
Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. at the
Fine Arts Center, 150 E.
Main St., Duncan. Gold
medalist quartet Vocal
Spectrum will be the fea-
tured guest.
Vocal Spectrum was the
Barbershop Harmony Soci-
etys international cham-
pion in 2006 and contin-
ues to actively represent
the barbershop style both
in concert and recording.
The Statesmen Chorus
and Quartets have chosen
familiar tunes from the
old west set in a scripted
performance. In chaps and
hats, the chorus will sing
Happy Trails, How The
West Was Won, Ragtime
Cowboy Joe and many
more. Chapter quartets
will offer Dont Fence
Me In, Shenandoah, The
Yall Come Back Saloon,
and Ridin Down The
Canyon.
One Accord quartet,
always well received on
stage, will open the show
after intermission.
Tickets are $20 each and
are available at 877-1352,
by email at robertlee10@
bellsouth.net or at www.
palmettostatesmen.org.
Remaining tickets will be
sold at the door and each
ticket may be placed in a
door prize drawing at the
theater.
Men who sing are invited
to attend Chapter meet-
ings at Duncan United
Methodist Church, 139 W.
Main St., Duncan, Mondays
at 7 p.m. or call 322-0165.
PUBLIC MEETINGS SEARCH
FOR CREATIVE PEOPLE
Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter is leading a county
wide effort called Culture
Counts to identify and
map all cultural resources,
creative industries, and
creative people living and
working in Spartanburg
County.
A comprehensive iden-
tification of the communi-
ties cultural resources is
the first step in any plan-
ning process. Public meet-
ings will be held in several
communities in the Coun-
ty in August and Septem-
ber to gather data from
citizens on what cultural
resources exist.
The public is invited to
attend meetings in their
communities: Sept. 4 at
Chapman Cultural Center
in downtown Spartanburg.
There will be two meet-
ings each day, one at 11
a.m. and the other at 6:30
p.m. Both will last one
hour. Those who cannot
attend may visit the center
for a physical survey or
complete the survey on-
line at goo.gl/DNjryL
EVENTS: Anna V to perform Aug. 17
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Anna V, a Spartanburg native, will perform at the Chapman
Cultural Center on Aug. 17 from 2-4 p.m.
U
nrelated program-
ming note: That
giraffe still hasnt
had her baby. I think shes
doing this to spite me.
On with the show!
Its no secret that I love
novelty checks. Theyre
just so much more fun
than regular checks or
cash. It is one of my life
goals to give or receive a
novelty check. They also
make for a better photo,
but thats neither here nor
there.
Whenever I cover
donations, I always cross
my fingers for a nov-
elty check. At the John
I. Smith Foundations
$100,000 donation to
Daily Bread Ministries,
once I caught sight of the
novelty check, I excitedly
whisper-shouted to pho-
tographer Mandy Fergu-
son my discovery.
On Friday, when I was
at Greenville Tech for the
Benson familys donation,
I was really excited to see
there was a novelty check
-- a giant one. This check
was almost too big for
its stand. It was flopping
over on each end it was
so big.
Then I peeked into the
information packet pro-
vided. I had no idea the
Greenville Tech Founda-
tion would be receiving
a $3 million donation
Friday morning. Going to
the presentation, I knew
it was the foundations
largest gift ever. Call me
ignorant or naive, but I
was expecting a few hun-
dred thousand dollars.
I was blown away to
learn the Bensons were
donating $3 million.
In covering Greer, Ive
learned that the commu-
nity is a pretty generous
one. Ive seen nonprofits
in dire need of something
with nothing but faith and
hope that the community
would pull through. And
they would.
Its heartwarming to
witness this kind of thing.
And its heartwarming
to see folks like Bensons
-- self-made people enjoy-
ing tremendous success
and giving back locally.
Ive only met Jim Benson
a few times, but he seems
to be a genuinely good
guy. (And even if hes not,
hes fooling us all).
Its even heartwarming
to see evidence of the
American dream still ex-
isting. There are so many
things that can get in the
way of pulling yourself
up by your bootstraps,
like crippling student loan
debt, health problems or
family obstacles (I prom-
ise thats as political as I
will get).
I hope one day Ill be
able to help as the Benson
family has done.
Les Gardner, the Green-
ville Tech Foundation
development director,
explained why Jim Benson
has been so generous to
the foundation:
Because they need it
and Im blessed to be able
to do it.
Indeed.
Novelty checks
and tremendous generosity
KEEPING UP
WITH JONES
KATIE
JONES