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eye Zambia

Editor
Sean Potter

Advertising: Sean Potter
Helen Walden
George Makulu
Administration:
Val Potter
Distribution:
Helen Walden
George Makulu
Moses Chirwe

Design & Layouts:

Stan Potter

Contributors:
Anthea Rowan
Anthony Dalton
Cephas Sinyangwe
Chikwe Chiluba
Dan Boylan
Davis Mulenga
Dick Jones
First Quantum Minerals
Gethsemane Mwizabi
George Makulu
Godfrey Msiska
Humphrey Lombe
Humphrey Nkonde
Kansanshi Mining plc
Kate Nivison
Kelvin Mukupa
Konkola Copper Mines
Lechwe School
Mopani Mining
Roy Kausa
Shapi Shachinda
Tom Cockrem
T.W. Jenkins
William Osborn
Zambian Ornithological Society

Republic of South Africa

Sean Potter
38 Mandy Road, Reuven 2091,
Johannesburg, RSA
P.O. Box 82117, Southdale 2135, RSA
Tel: +27 (0) 83 522 0144
Fax: +27 (0) 86 517 5972
e-mail: zamtrav@mweb.co.za

Zambia:
Copperbelt:

Helen Walden
P.O. Box 22255, Kitwe, Zambia.
Tel: +260 (0) 21 2 226 378
Cell: +260 (0) 977 746 177
E-mail: shark@coppernet.zm

CONTENTS
March/April 2014
Issue No. 83

Features
4-5
6

8-11
12-15
18-22
25

26-27

28

30-31

32-33
34
35-36
38-39
40-42
44-45

Top global invesTors eye Zambia


Sentinel catalyst for Zambias
industrialisation, says Chenda
Hong Kong
Downtown in Dakar
Cotonou
Stagnant World Markets Boost Interest
in Africas Big Seven Expo
Munenga Mulala: The making of a great
Zambian young pilot
Is there a panacea to a competitive
mining tax regime?
57th Copperbelt Mining Agricultural &
Commercial Show
Look to educationto dent poverty
Whats the point of Khaki
Top Fuel Dragsters
The record breaking railway
Busanga
M&C Repairs large DC motor on site
at Konkola Copper Mine

Hong Kong

12

Downtown in Dakar

18

Contonou

32

Record breaking train

35

Top Fuel Dragsters

40

Busanga

Regulars
2-3
Map of Zambia
16
Sudoku, Crossword & Quiz
46
Birds of Zambia - The White-headed
Vulture
47 Recipes
48
Crossword & Quiz answers

Kids Corner

Lusaka:

George Makulu
P.O. Box 34537, Lusaka, Zambia.
Cell: +260 (0) 976 949 219
E-mail: makulug@gmail.com

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without the prior written permission of the Copyright owner.
Published and copyright by Logivest 42 (Pty)Ltd

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Cover

Top Global Investors Eye Zambia

Luxury
Accommodation
ZAMBIA

Lake Tanganyika
Kaputa

0km

50km

100km

150km

200km

Buluya

Kamina

Kasaba Bay
Chiengi

Lake
Mweru Wantipa

Lake
Mweru

TANZANIA

Mpulungu

Mbeya
Congo

D.R. OF THE
CONGO

ku
fu
Lu

Mporokoso

Nchelenge

Nakandi

Mbereshi

Cham

Kapatu

besh

Kawombwa

i
Kalangu

Nseluko

ra
Mununga

Mambilima
Falls

Chinsali

Nsambo

Luap
ula

Ikelenge

Mansa

mb

wu

Lu

Mofu

Chilubi

Chama

Mbali

Kalembila

Twingi

Chililabombwe

Mutanda

Mufulira

ny

Livingstone
Memorial

Chingola

gw
an

Mu

ula

ANGOLA

Capital: Lusaka

Lwiwikila

Mukulu

ap

We
s

Lu

Lubambe

Mpika
Lu

ng
tL
u

Chembe

Solwezi

Kanchibya

Luapula

Lumwana

Chambeshi

Samfya

Lubumbashi

Mwinilunga

Ch

Lake
Bangweulu

Lu
a

Kasoba

Likasi

ng

sh

be

am

am

Driving: Left hand side of the road. Legal driving


age is 18 years old. All foreigners and visitors are
required to carry an international drivers licence.

Lundazi

ad

zi

Kapalala Luwombwa

Kalulushi
Chavuma

Chizela

Ndola

Kitwe

Kawana

Mfuwe

Zambezi

Lu

ng

Kanona

Serenje

Luanshya

Kasempo

MALAWI

eb

gu

Lu

Kabompo

fw

un

em

Mpongwe

gw

n
ua

Mkushi

Chipata

Lukanga

fu

Dongwe

ns

Lu

Lilongwe

Kapiri Mposhi
Katete

Lukulu

ez

Lu

Lukanga Swamp
Luena

Za

gu

Kabwe

Kafu

mb

gin

Kaoma

Nyimba

fwa

sem

Lun

MOZAMBIQUE

m
p

Mongu

Lui

LUSAKA

Ka
Namwala
Ngoma

fue

Kafue

Mazabuka

Ka

fue

Kataba

Senanga

Lake Cahora Bassa


Luangwa

zi
be

Zam

Chirundu

Sitoti

Tete

Monze

Sitoti

Shangombo

Siavonga

IBIA

NAM

ke

ulo

hif

La

Kalomo

Sic

Ngweze

Sinazongwe

Mambova

ZIMBABWE

Maamba

Livingstone

BOTSWANA

International dialling code: (+260), Lusaka


21 (0) 1, Ndola and the Copperbelt 21 (0) 2,
Livingstone 21 (0) 3.
Airport Departure Tax: International
ZMW158.40, Internal ZMW58.00 including
Security Tax.

Official Language: English


Harare

The Zambian Traveller is distributed to tourists, business and professional people within Zambia,
surrounding states and from overseas. It is available on board both domestic and international chartered
fl ights from Zambia. Presented to both business and tourist visitors to the Republic of Zambia through
hotels, guest houses, embassies, government departments, major companies, ZNTB offices in Lusaka,
Pretoria, New York and London. Also distributed via tourist shops and outlets, travel agents and tour
operators within the region. Bulk copies are supplied to various mines on the Copperbelt and advertisers
for own circulation. Available on board Luxury coaches to and from Zambia.
2 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Weight and Measures: Metric system.

Population: Zambia has a population of


approximately 13 million (Census 2010)

Katima
Mulilo

Chipepo

ariba

lom

Ngamwe
Falls
Sesheke

Machile

do

Choma

Lomja

on

Mulobezi

zi
be

Kw

m
Za

Ngenye Falls

Pemba

Ko

Voltage: 240 volts (square pin plugs).

Quality
Food
High Places

JBC does CampChingola


Management & runs
3 Camps for
Murray & Roberts
Lubambe Mufulira
Kitwe

Time: Difference 2 hours ahead of GMT.

Petauke

a
Lu

Limulunga

Mumbwa

Kalabo
Skongo

sh
gu
lun
Mu Dam

an

Vaccinations: Yellow Fever (Compulsory)


and Cholera. Anti-malaria precautions are highly
recommended.
Foreign Currency: There are no restrictions
on the importation of foreign currency into
Zambia. The only requirement is that all cash and
travellers cheques should be declared through
customs at point of entry.

Kasama
wa

Lufi

Isoka

Liwingu
Kashiba

Entry Requirements: Foreign Nationals


require entry visas, which are available at the
point of entry.

Currency: Kwacha (ZMW)


Major Traditional Exports: Copper and
cobalt.

Better Rooms.....
Better food.....

Cell: 0977 746177

e-mail: helen@jbc2003.com
For Reservation and enquiries:
call +260-212-311 414, +260-967-651 414
or email:guesthouse@jbc2003.com
or visit us at
31-33 Kitwe Rd, Chingola, between the two round abouts as
you are entering from Kitwe towards Chingola town centre.

Non-Traditional exports: Primary


agricultural and horticultural products, gemstones,
timber, electricity, cement and textiles.
Major Imports: Crude oil, chemicals and
machinery, iron, steel and manufactured goods.
Always
Professional

JBC owns and operates High Places.


Always
JBC
operates Mining camps for Murray
& Roberts at Mopani, Kitwe and
Professional
Lubambe, Zambia.
Enquiries: john@jbc2003.com
Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

Clive Newall, FQM President talks to journalists during an on-spot


check of construction progress at Sentinel Mine with 33 representatives
of worlds top investors

Top Global Investors


Eye Zambia
Cover picture: Philip Pascall with part of the 33-strong delegation
of global investors on a conducted tour of the $2 billion underconstruction Sentinel Mine by First Quantum.

as Kansanshi Mine that has paid $2 billion in


the last five years.
FQMs Sentinel, projected to produce
300,000 mtpa of copper, is Zambias single
largest investment. It is expected to create
more than 2000 direct jobs for Zambians, and
tens of thousands indirectly, boost diversified
growth and open up the western corridor of
Zambia.

Cover story

Norman McDonald, Invesco,Vice-President


who was among the 33 representatives of
the global top investors observed that FQM
practices in Zambia were consistent with
balancing the trade-offs between investor
interest and responsibility to Zambians.
We have observed that FQM has done well in
balancing investor interest and responsibility
to host communities and Zambians. That is a
key driver for investment to flow coupled by
a predictable tax regime.
Morgan Stanley, Merrill Lynch, Goldman
Sachs,Citibank, UBS and Fidelity were among
the delegation of investors. Others were
Credit Suisse, Scotia, Threadneedle, Exane
BNP Paribas and Bank of Montreal.
Davis Mulenga is a public relations
specialist, and FQM is one of the clients
he serves.

Newall also envisaged that the $100


million Enterprise, a Nickel deposit can be
accelerated once the market conditions
became attractive.
A key consideration is the removal of the
10 percent export duty as the deposit is too
small to justify investment in a smelter. We
are engaging government on this issue as
the benefits are mutual.

A world marvel: The sag mills at the under-construction Sentinel Mine


will be the largest in operation in the world when the
mine is commission in July 2014.

By Davis Mulenga

he increasing attractiveness of Zambia as an investor haven recently came into sharper


focus when Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and others with investment portfolios
worth trillions of dollars jetted into the country for an on-spot assessment.
Top of on their list was the $2 billion underconstruction Sentinel Mine at Kalumbila,
150 kilometres west of Solwezi where
Philip Pascall, First Quantum Minerals (FQM)
Chairman and CEO and Clive Newall, FQM
President took them on a conducted tour to
inspect the construction progress.
This visit by representatives of the worlds
top investors signals investor confidence in
Zambia. They manage portfolios running
into trillions of dollars. Their presence in
Zambia reflects the nation in positive light as
4 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

an investor destination., said Newall.


He stressed that: The visit will enrich them
with knowledge of the fundamentals that
Zambia has put in place to attract greater
foreign investment. Of course the key criteria
are stability and predictable fiscal policies.
Newall assued the investors that FQM will be
on course for commissioning of Sentinel Mine
in the second quarter of 2014, indicating
that the tax revenue government will earn
from the new mine will be in the same order

Steaming ahead: Part of the construction work at the $2 billion under-construction Sentinel Mine scheduled for second quarter commissioning.

Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

By Davis Mulenga

ommerce, Trade and Industry Minister Emmanuel Chenda has hailed the $2 billion
under-construction Sentinel Mine by First Quantum Minerals (FQM) as a catalyst
for Zambias industrialisation drive.

Company news

Sentinel catalyst for Zambias industrialisation,


says Chenda

Mila Kunis photographed by Peter Lindbergh

read in Lusaka and what I have found on the


ground.
Tristan Pascall, Kalumbila Minerals Assistant
General Manager told the minister that the
entire construction of the mine was nearly
blown away by the hyped displacement of
locals that was never there in the first place.

From left, Emmanuel Chenda, Commerce, Trade and


Industry Minister on a recent tour of the $2 billion
under-construction Sentinel Mine.

The minister, who recently toured the


construction site, 150 kilometres west of
Solwezi, said that his ministry will collaborate
with other line ministries to remove any
hurdles to the commissioning schedule set
for July 2014.
This will add greater impetus to the
industrialisation drive of the PF government,
especially that the planned Multi-facility
Economic Zone will attract sustainable
satellite industries.
Therefore, it is vital to speedily address
any impediments such as land title and
electricity for the commissioning to happen
on schedule. The direct and indirect benefits
are enormous. When the mine becomes
operational, it will put more money in
peoples pockets.
The minister also cautioned the naysayers,
indicating that there was no match between
the perceived issues at Kalumbila and what
he found on the ground.
I wanted to see the hundreds of displaced
people as a result of the construction of the
Chisola Dam. I never saw any. Im converted
as there is no match between the reports we

6 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

It was by a whisker that we got the project


going. If the dam construction had been
delayed by a couple more weeks, the whole
project would have been blown off course
because the mine cannot function without
the dam.
Pascall also echoed the ministers sentiment
that Sentinel will be a key driver for
industrialisation of Zambia noting that sheer
size and advanced technology of the mine
will put Zambia at the forefront of copper
mining.
Everything about this mine is about scale.
The sag mills are the largest that will be
operational in the world. The rope shovels
are gigantic, and one can easily park three
Land Cruisers in there. What this shows
is that this will be among the largest and
technologically advanced mines in the world.
Effectively, Zambia will be at par with leading
copper producers such as Chile.
On the planned MFEZ, FQMs Kevin Thomas
disclosed that the mining company had
already attracted investments to a tune of
$45 million covering the entire economic
waterfront.
The interest to invest in the MFEZ is shooting
through the roof, and it would be a huge
relief once the land title issue is settled. We
have a supermarket, banks and petrol station
ready to go up like yesterday with title in
place.

Beauty by nature
Zambian emeralds by Gemfields, the worlds leading
supplier of responsibly sourced coloured gemstones.
gemfields.co.uk +44 (0)20 7518 3400

Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

HONG KONG

Richard Rhys Jones discovers sleepy fishing villages, colourful markets, a giant Buddha and
the worlds longest suspension bridge
satay sticks and delicate raw
Japanese sashimi are your choice,
theyre all here for the tasting.
International matches are a
regular attraction in this sportscrazed centre. You could be there
when Djokovic plays tennis against
Federer, or South Africa and New
Zealand clash in the annual Hong
Kong Sevens rugby tournament.
And if you visit in June you can
watch the colourful Dragon Boat
Festival, a boisterous event
spawned by Chinese legend.

Victoria Harbour is a continuous bustle of cruise ships, freighters, barges, sampans, junks sight-seeing launches and ferries

MORE THAN JUST A CONCRETE JUNGLE

y arrival in Hong Kong, a world-class city


thats successfully combined Chinese
tradition with Western customs, was not
conducive to a long stay.

A friend in the tourism industry recommended


that we stay at the Lee Garden Guest House, which
conjured up a picture in my mind of a handsome
colonial-type building in a spacious garden. Wrong
image!
I had the name and address of the place written
in Mandarin for the taxi driver who drove us into
Kowloon from the airport, so was very puzzled when
he pulled up outside a multi-storey building and
pointed to a sign saying Lee Garden Guest House,
8th floor.
We tumbled into the 1930s-era elevator with its
concertina door, and a Chinese woman answered
the door bell and booked us in. My wife asked:
Does your fee include breakfast? She replied: No
blekfast you pay now! I handed her the money and
we were shown our room. Very compact! It was just
big enough for a double bed and a table with a small
colour TV that had Chinese-language channels only.
There was an interior air-conditioner above the bed
and a plastic curtain hiding an alcove with a washbasin, toilet and shower. In all my travels, I have
never slept in a tinier windowless room anywhere in
the world, so it was just as well that we arrived with
small overnight bags after placing our large suitcases
in a locker at the airport!
The next day dawned cool and drizzly and our
exploration of Hong Kong began after breakfast at
the nearby Holiday Inn.
Despite my initial disappointment, I found several

8 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

reminders of the colonial influence, including the


elegant Government House, home to 24 British
governors from 1855 until Hong Kong was handed
back to China in 1997. The Hong Kong Police Band
no longer sports a royal crest on its uniforms but
its members wear kilts and march to the skirl of the
bagpipes. Cricket is still played in Chater Garden in
Central District and, after a hot day at the wicket,
cricketers retreat to pubs that serve hand-drawn
pints with fish-n-chips. Taking afternoon tea, the
most genteel of English traditions, is also popular in
some of the citys leading hotels, though youre just
as likely to be nibbling on steamed dumplings as
scones with jam and cream.
Another oddball relic is The Boom at Noon when
a Hotchkiss QF 3-Pounder naval gun is fired in
Causeway Bay park, a tradition going back to 1860.
Noel Coward immortalised it in his song about Mad
Dogs and Englishmen when he wrote:
In Hong Kong
They strike a gong
And fire a noon-day gun
To reprimand each inmate
Whos in late.
Most of Hong Kongs 7 million inhabitants trace
their roots back to Guangdong, Chinas southernmost
province. But joining them are residents from all
around the world. Long serving as a gateway to
China, the city is multi-cultural in the truest sense
of the word. Its not uncommon for professionals to
speak Cantonese among friends, English in the office
and Mandarin on business trips.
The best place to grasp the diversity and scale
of the city is Victoria Peak, which rises 552 metres

Street scene in down-town Kowloon


above the sea. We took a Star
Ferry from Kowloon Peninsula to
Hong Kong Island and caught the
red funicular tram (circa 1888)
to the Peak observation deck for
fantastic panoramic views of the
harbour, Lantau Island and the
New Territories bordering mainland
China where the 100-kilometrelong Maclehose Trail threads
across green-clad mountain
ranges.

capital. Cantonese cuisine is most


plentiful but it competes with
other Chinese dishes like mouthwatering Peking Duck, aromatic
tea-smoked Szechuan pigeon and
succulent garlic prawns (my wifes
favourite). The rest of Asia is also
well represented by Thai, Indian
and Malaysian curries and do-ityourself barbecues from Korea
and Mongolia. And if spicy, meaty

The Museum of History in


Chatham Road is essential
for history buffs wanting an
informative overview of Hong
Kongs past. The Hong Kong
Story takes you from the Devonian
Period 400 million years ago to
the 1997 handover to China. Its
very well done and an ideal way
to spend a couple of hours. The
Hong Kong Tourist Association
has recognised that culture is a
big attraction and provides guides
to accompany tourist groups to
temples and museums. Apart from
the Museum of History there are
others like the Flagstaff House
Museum of Tea Ware, the Museum

The usual image of this EastWest crossroad is of towering


skyscrapers, but stretched out
behind them are lush tropical
parks, exotic flowering plants, and
wooded valleys that are home to
monkeys, black-eared kites and
cockatoos. Hiking the trails is a
popular weekend activity, for a
meander through rolling hillsides
creates a feeling of being a million
miles from the city bustle
As for food, the best chefs from
all over the world are cooking in
the citys mind-boggling 9000
restaurants (one for every 770
residents). Michelin-star chefs and
street-side cooks are dicing and
tossing fresh broccoli, choi sum,
swordfish, shrimp, tenderloin and
other delights in Asias culinary

Long queues of hopeful visitors wait for the red funicular tram to
Victoria Peak
Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

HONG KONG
Continued

The 2.2- km-long Tsing Ma bridge, the worlds longest suspension bridge
of Medical Sciences and the
Sheung Yiu Folk Museum.
The City of Lights lives up
to its name every evening at 8
p.m. when 40 buildings on both
sides of the harbour perform their
spectacular Symphony of Lights,
and the best spot to enjoy this
15-minute laser show is the Tsim
Sha Tsui waterfront promenade.
The accompanying narrative
with lively music is in English
on Mondays, Wednesdays and
Fridays.
Another major attraction is the
worlds largest seated outdoor
Buddha, a 26-metre-high statue
unveiled in 1993 at the Po Lin
Monastery on Lantau Island,
site of the new airport. Lantau is
bigger, far less crowded and more
mountainous than Hong Kong

Island and the views from the bus


taking visitors to the statue are
surprisingly rural. This island can
be reached by ferry or by road and
rail over the 2.2- km-long Tsing
Ma bridge, the worlds longest
suspension bridge, which links the
Chek Lap Kok airport to the city
centre.
The small island of Cheung Chau
offers a great day trip out of the
noisy, crowded city and into a
friendly fishing community of boat
people and villagers. Here, in a bid
to keep down air pollution, buses
and cars are banned in favour
of little three-wheeled tuk-tuks
that nevertheless also spew out
noxious fumes.
Getting around is easy in Hong
Kong, for you have a choice of
the Mass Transit Railway (MRT),

double-decker buses, trams, minibuses or maxi-cabs. The vessels


of the Star Ferry Line, which has
been operating for more than 100
years, provide the most scenic and
inexpensive mode of travel across
Victoria Harbour. Other ferries
provide links to outlying islands
such as Lantau, Lamma, Cheung
Chau and Peng Chau.
On a walk through Central
District we noticed building
workers climbing bamboo
scaffolding on the exterior of
skyscrapers under construction
and were informed that, even in
high-tech Hong Kong, bamboo is
strong, flexible and can be erected
four times faster than steel.
Another interesting fact is how
the ancient Chinese art of Feng
Shui (which literally means wind

One of the many maroon-coloured buses that constantly take


sight-seers to the Victoria Peak view site
and water) permeates the city. High-rise apartments and small houses in
villages are never built without the approval of a Feng Shui master.
The belief in luck provided by the two elements is so strong that two
of Hong Kongs major buildings, the Hopewell Centre and Repulse
Apartments, were designed to create harmony with nature. Contractors at
the 80-storey Hopewell Centre built a pool over a revolving restaurant to
prevent it being consumed by fire-breathing dragons. And the apartment
block was given a huge hole in the middle of the building to clear the
dragons path.
Hollywood Road and its offshoots in Central are the best areas for
antiques and collectibles. Amble among silk carpets, Neolithic pots,
Ming Dynasty horsemen and Mao souvenirs that jostle for space next to
ornate Qing cloisonn and intricate Chinese wedding cabinets. Street-side
vendors will offer you ancient opium pipes, pocket watches and historic
photos while the aromas of cedar and lacquer varnish waft from busy
furniture shops.
Nathan Road in Tsim Sha Tsui is the place for bargain-price electronic
goods, but youll have to know your prices and products and be
prepared to haggle. And if mall shopping is your scene, the huge modern
malls will leave you speechless. Mall shops are open till late seven days
a week and there are street markets that dont get going until 9 p.m. in a
city that never sleeps.

Passengers on cruise liners like this help swell Hong Kongs annual tourist numbers to an incredible 48 million

10 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Hong Kong is known as one of the worlds most expensive cities


and, in keeping with this reputation, dining, entertainment and hotel
accommodation are certainly not cheap. The nightly rate for a room
only in top hotels is $240. So make sure your credit card is well loaded
before you go or youll have to be satisfied with the delights of multistorey guest houses like the Lee Garden. But please remember that your
overnight stay will not include blekfast!

11

DOWNTOWN IN DAKAR -

West Africas most sophisticated capital city

Kate Nivison
and the Chinese have now arrived in force. In effect
this means that over a quarter (an unusually high
proportion) of the entire population of this vast, dry
country now lives in greater Dakar. During rush hour
in the downtown historic and administrative district
of Plateau, or in crowded quarters such Mdina and
Gueule Tape, it can certainly feel like it.

help to imagine a cartoon giraffes


head, side-on, with its long muzzle
pointing south and its stubby
horns aiming at the Americas.
The oldest and most important
part is the downtown cheek area,
with the port where the mouth
would be. Cap Manuel is the tip
of the delicate snout the most
southerly point of a breezy, scenic
promontory on which stands the
Palais de Justice, shady avenues
of expensive residences and two
of Dakars famously well-equipped
hospitals.

Atlantic view and new mosque, from the Western Corniche

akar, the capital of


Senegal and its chief
port, has one of those
locations made in
heaven. Put your finger on the
spot where the ample curve of
Africas Sahara coast bulges
furthest into the Atlantic, and
thats Dakar, on a large peninsular
all to itself.
Any way you look at it, this is
a highly desirable cross-roads
location. Go north for Europe
(nearest point, Portugal); go west
and you cant miss the Caribbean
and the Americas. Travel east into
the parched interior for the ancient
towns of the Saharan camel
caravan trade routes Kayes,
Bamako, Djenn, Timbuctu and
Sokoto. Sail south along the coast
and discover, as the Dakarois are
quick to tell you, that this is where
the real Africa begins. Taking
a local fishing pirogue to any of
West Africas other ports is still a
risky undertaking. Its amazing to
see pirogues with flags from as far
away as Ghana bobbing low in the
water around Dakars complicated
coastline. But flying is definitely
quicker, and has been since Dakar
was a hub for French aviation
pioneers establishing an aerial

12 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

postal service to South America


in aircraft not much bigger than
some of todays fishing canoes.
As for the town itself, the
intricate shape of the Cap Vert
peninsula means that getting your
head round the layout of Dakar
is a challenge, and not just for
first-time visitors. Even taxi-drivers
have trouble, especially when the
numerous building projects make
traffic diversions inevitable. It may

Stretch the giraffes head shape


further to see that rugged Pointe
des Almedies, together with the
rocky bay-and-beach resort of
Ngor, make up the horns headbutting into the Atlantic. The
much-visited Pointe des Almedies
is actually the furthest western tip
of Africa. Conveniently, just below
the horns, is the international
airport. The mane of the long,
straight neck indicates a quite
different kind of coast flat,
sandy and backed by lagoons,
the most famous being the Pink
Lagoon where visitors flock to see
its waters glow pink with algae
growth.

Dakarois are known for their commercial instincts

Ngor beach resort, a favourite for water sports


To wrap it up for the giraffes head, theres the
Ile de Gore on the sheltered side of the Cap Vert
peninsular, looking as insignificant as a leaf dropped
by the munching giraffe, and yet this island was the
key to Dakars rise to regional prominence.
When the Portuguese arrived in 1444, Cap Vert
was already occupied by thriving communities of
traders and fishermen, so the newcomers chose
instead to fortify and settle offshore on this pleasant
island. Within a century, Gore had become the
local focus of the transatlantic slave trade, with both
the Portuguese and mainland merchants profiting
from its horrors. Its museums and historic buildings
commemorate the slave trade, and for many visitors,
it has the status of a pilgrimage of remembrance.
Gore is easily reached by regular ferry (an interesting
half-hour crossing in itself) but, once visited, it is
never forgotten. Often Gore is the only part of Dakar
that whistle-stop visitors see in detail, yet there is so
much more to experience in todays cosmopolitan
city.
It was the French who finally won the colonial battle
and, 50 years after independence, their influence
is still much in evidence. The fusion of French
ambience, institutions, architecture and education
with the vitality of indigenous Muslim desert cultures
rich in commercial, musical and artistic traditions
is what makes todays Dakar such a vibrant and
fascinating place. There are 1.5 million people in
metropolitan Dakar, and almost 3 million within the
whole conurbation which now reaches the once
separate historic port of Rufisque via the south-east
coast road. This growing population includes 20,000
French expatriates proud to call it home. Large
communities of Lebanese and Moroccan traders,
Cape Verdeans and Ghanaians have all added their
own distinctive dress-codes, cuisines and music,

Many of Dakars landmarks can be easily covered


by a half-day city tour or strolling down its central
boulevards and avenues bearing familiar names
from the past General de Gaulle, Louis Pasteur,
F.D. Roosevelt, Georges Pompidou . . . Not far from
the Place de lIndependance are two huge markets,
Sandaga and Kermel. Sandaga is noted for its
colourful arrays of quality textiles, imported designer
copy fashion goods and wonderfully spicy local
food. An army of teenage guides, paid a percentage
by canny traders, are only too willing to help locals
and tourists alike through the maze of stalls towards
the best deals (further tips expected).
For an oasis of calm and cool after a truly African
experience, follow the Boulevard de la Rpublique for
a stop at the Cathedral, named Sacr Coeur after its
Paris counterpart, but designed with a courteous nod
to traditional architecture. Inevitably, la Rpublique
leads on to the handsome white Presidential Palace

Back street market, central Dakar


Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

13

DOWNTOWN IN DAKAR
Continued

They say the view is good, although no better than


from a plane coming into the airport not far away.
People are mad at it, frowned the guide, adding
with an almost Gallic shrug, It does not even look
African!
Maybe every capital should have its landmark folly,
but Dakar has no shortage of other monuments
to its historical, religious and cultural status in the
region, whether its for music, dancing and nightlife,
fashion and shopping, or traditional artefacts and
modern artwork. In the square nearest the imposing
Grand Mosque is a silvery metal modernist statue of
a prancing horse called Maalaw, the favourite steed
of a legendary Senegalese warrior. The Museum of
Dakar, renowned for its ethnographical collections,
has been renovated, and the nearby Village des Arts
houses the finest work of regional artisans, including
an exhibition of a local speciality sand painting.
Sand, in an amazing variety of natural colours,
is mixed with sap from the iconic baobab tree to
produce unique and durable export-quality pictures.

Famous Red Guard at the Presidential Palace, Dakar

The famous Paris-Dakar Rally may have moved


elsewhere, but international film, arts, and music
festivals abound, celebrating among others, the
rhythms of Youssou NDour, one of the citys
favourite sons who now has presidential ambitions.
Overlooking the ocean further along the Western
Corniche is one of Africas newest, largest and

complete with photogenic guardsmen in their red


tunics and distinctive tall hats. This prime wooded
site overlooks the pleasant Plage des Enfants
(Childrens Beach) and the Eastern Corniche.
A taxi ride south from here is invaluable for the
sea views along the Eastern Corniche, including
Gore Island. The Corniche then loops round rocky
Cap Manuel and heads back north as the Western
Corniche for more wide-open vistas of fishing boats
braving the Atlantic rollers. This elegant, palm-lined
route has a surprise all its own one of the strangest
sights to be found anywhere along the African
coast, or possibly anywhere. How to describe this
extraordinary presidential brain-child? Standing on a
100-metre hill overlooking the Atlantic, is a gigantic
metallic statue of a barely clothed man, woman
and child. A clue to its sheer size is that it was built
quite deliberately to be slightly taller than New Yorks
Statue of Liberty. Called African Renaissance and
opened in 2010, it was put together by the North
Koreans from imported 3cm-thick bronze sheeting
and cost around US$ 27 million. Strangely, the man
is holding the child out to the Americas, while the
woman seems uncertain what to do about it.
The scale of this apparition dwarfs puzzled visitors,
whether local or international, as they gaze up almost
50 metres to the mans head. Inside it is a viewing
room for 15 people, reached by an expensive lift.

14 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Ancient Baobab, the national tree of Senegal, outside


the Village des Arts

Stylish fountain monument to a legendary heros horse


chicest venues, the Sea Plaza Shopping Mall. This South-African
designed, state-of-the-art retail and eating palace is convenient for a
selection of high-end hotels. But for a less rarefied sampling of sea, sand,
water-related fun and local dining, try the resort area of Ngor. A sea-food
lunch overlooking wooded Ngor Island under blue desert skies quickly
explains Dakars popularity with travellers in search of year-round sun and
a unique cultural signature, and also among the discerning Senegalese
themselves. In fact the city itself, with its commercial bustle, new projects
and creative buzz is its own best monument to the regions authentic
African Renaissance.

The shady grounds of the Presidential Palace, Dakar

15

Across
1. Attempted
4. Kidnap
7. Golf assistants
8. Possesses
11. Permit
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16. Knock out
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20
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Down
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Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

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17

COTONOU

BENINS COLOURFUL COMMERIAL CAPITAL

By: Kate Nivison

lagoon at Cocotiers, and plenty


of smaller ones. The best Fetish
Market (for traditional medicine
and Vodun-related goods) is near
the old port, where there is also a
photogenic sculpture park.

Remembering the Slave Trade; Gate of No Return on the Bight of


Benin shore

Zemidjahns (motorcycles) are a main feature of the traffic

ts become something of a clich to advise visitors


new to West Africa to expect the unexpected.
But when it comes to Cotonou, the largest town
and commercial capital of the Republic of Benin,
certain things can be taken for granted. The first is
that it will be situated on a narrow, low-lying coastal
plain fringed by long beaches and marshy lagoons,
as are most West African ports. In fact Cotonou
itself stands on a large sand spit, backed by shallow
but extensive Lake Nokou. The site is
bisected north-south by a canal (known
confusingly as the Lagune de Cotonou,
dredged in French colonial time as an
outlet for the lake into the Bight of Benin
to ease rainy season flooding.
The second given is that the traffic
will be hairy-scary, especially for
entire families sharing a motorcycle
or zemidjahn (pronounced zemi-john)
with their shopping. With only two road
bridges crossing the Lagune, there are
invariably serious bottlenecks for eastwest transport. A third certainty is that
someone will very soon mention either
the slave trade or voodoo (the correct
name of this officially recognised religion
being Vodun), since both are highly

18 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

significant aspects of the history and culture of the


town, and indeed the whole country. In all these
respects, Cotonou does not disappoint.
Now for some unexpecteds. Who would imagine
that not far from the centre of town, you could really
believe you are in a Far Eastern floating market,
complete with large straw hats and sunshades,
being punted along among piles of bright fruits

Part of the old commercial port, Cotonou

and vegetables by gossiping,


bargaining women? Or that in
the early 1700s, the Kings of
Dahomey who ruled this area
founded an army of women
soldiers who were expected to
fight to the death? As King Guzo
(of whom more later) explained to
them in a strikingly motivational
speech: When you go to war, if
you are taken prisoner you will
be sacrificed and your bodies
will become food for vultures
and hyenas. French accounts
from as late as the 1890s speak
of 4,000 fanatically brave virgin
warriors in three brigades, by this
time dubbed Amazons by the
invading colonial powers. The last
of these remarkable women died
in retirement in 1974.
Most of what makes Cotonou
the town it is today lies to the
west of the Lagune, and that
includes the older port area, the
train station, the Commissariat
Central, most of the embassies
and banks and the inevitable Place
de la Revolution (although not the
French one). France is distantly
echoed in many place names
the Avenue de la Rpublique
leads from the Nouveau Pont
(New Bridge) via the Avenue de

la Victoire to the monumental


Place de lEtoile Rouge (Red
Star Square), a relic of Benins
unhappy eighteen-year espousal
of Marxism. Wedged between
the Avenue de la Victoire and
the Lagune is Cotonous largest
market, Dantokpa all twenty
sprawling, bustling, steaming
hectares of it. Theres another
huge market on this side of the

No surprise that the old port is


approached by the Old Bridge
(Pont Ancien), which struggles to
shoulder its cargo of articulated
trucks, taxis, zemidjahns and
hand-carts across to the Avenue
Clozel. This route passes the
Roman Catholic Cathedral, in the
unexpected class only because
its startling, horizontally striped
red and white tile-work exterior
makes a popular photo stop.
Nearby is the Central Mosque a
reminder that almost a quarter
(and growing) of Beninois are
Muslims. Around 27% belong to
some form of Christian church,
of which there is a considerable
variety, including Roman Catholics
(7%). Avenue Jean Paul II was
named to honour this popular
popes two visits, and the last
pope also visited twice. In time for
Pope Benedicts 2011 visit, the
International Airport was renamed
after Benins Cardinal Bernardin

Governors House, Old Portuguese Fort, Ouidah


Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

19

COTONOU
Continued

name Cotonou actually means


river of death, which is said to
relate to the now canalised river
being used to bring slaves to the
coast from the interior. It could
equally reflect the persistence of
malaria in the marshy lagoons,
but it was certainly the slave
trade more than any other which
dominated this coast for centuries.

Cocotiers market to the west of the Lagune de Cotonou


Gantin, a good friend of his. The
late cardinal was the highest
ranking Catholic prelate Africa
has produced, and certainly the
only one to have an international
airport named after him. Parallel
to Avenue Jean Paul II and to
the beach is the Boulevard de la
Marina where many of the better
hotels and restaurants have a
prime location, with plenty of fresh
seafood on the menu.
Venturing east of the Pont
Ancien through the industrial
zone and suburbs will eventually
lead to Porto Novo, which is not
only what its name suggests, but
also the seat of government, and
so officially the capital of Benin.
Only three hours further east is
the Nigerian border, a somewhat

porous affair where cheap petrol is


smuggled into Benin by kamikaze
motorcyclists and various other
means, to fuel the huge numbers
of zemidjahns, many of which
double as taxis on Cotonous
hectic streets. The main reason
for their enormous popularity is
economic; motorcycles used to
cost around US$ 3000, but thanks
to the arrival of Chinese-made
models, thats now down to US$
700.
Hopes are that Porto Novo
will become a viable alternative
to overcrowded Nigerian ports
such as Lagos for trade with
Benins hinterland which includes
landlocked Burkina Fasa, Niger
and even distant Mali. At this point
its worth remembering that the

Python Cult devotees sing a welcome

20 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Cotonou itself was only a fishing


village for most of that time, and it
was the port of Ouidah (or Whydah
as it was then known) that was
the centre of slaving activity. So
it is to Ouidah that many visitors
will go to see what survives of the
old Portuguese Fort and similar
mementoes of that dreadful time.
Ouidah is only an hours drive
west from the centre of Cotonou,
and makes a memorable half/
full-day excursion. What truly
shocks is the admirable and often
painful honesty with which local
involvement in the slave trade is
depicted. Should anyone doubt
it, heres another quote from the
fearsome King Guzo or Gizo (of
Amazon fame) who in 1840 told
the British (by this time doing
their best to stop it) that hed do
anything for them except give up
slavery: The slave trade is the
ruling principle of my people. It
is the source and glory of their
wealth. The mother lulls the child
to sleep with notes of triumph over
an enemy reduced to slavery.
Visiting the museum at the fort,

Shrine of the Sacred Pythons, showing the


Circle of Life

Mural of the Python Cult Priestesses in procession


followed by the newly rebuilt Gate
of No Return on the shore where
the slaves were loaded onto ships
for the Americas is a sobering
experience all round.
Ouidah is also widely publicised
as the spiritual home of Vodun
(aka Voodoo) and the main
attraction here is the Sacred
Forest of Kpass, reputed to be
the home of the Python Cult still
very popular in Benin. Entry is
through a carved wooden entrance
gate where priestesses perform
a welcome dance. The Python
Shrine is reached by well-kept
paths meandering through groves
of impressively large and obviously
very old rainforest trees, and
enlivened by larger-than-lifesize
statues of Vodun gods and animals.
Beside the shrine is a coloured

Sacred Forest entrance gate

carving of a python swallowing


its tale a symbol of the eternal
cycle of life. The shrines live-in
pythons (large but not poisonous
and defanged anyway) may not
always be at home to visitors,
but an audience with a Vodun
priest can usually be arranged,
along with some drumming, and
dancing from the white-aproned
priestesses.
A quite different kind of
excursion, and a welcome
escape from Cotonous hectic
traffic, is to the stilt village of
Gonvie on the northern shore
of Lake Nokou. A gentle boat
ride across takes about an
hour, and it is here that you find
floating markets and scenes
more reminiscent of Vietnam
or Thailand. With a population
of around 20,000,
Gonvie claims to be
the largest of its kind
on the continent. Even
young children are out
poling canoes, and
its sometimes called
the Venice of Africa.
Although it falls a little
short on Renaissance
palaces and baroque
churches, theres a
lot of variety in styles
and building materials,
from tiny split-plank-

21

COTONOU
Continued

Traditional Calendar symbols in bold appliqu work


and-thatch dwellings on wobbly mangrove poles to
brightly painted streets of balconied residences
and shops with tiled or pan roofs. Planked walkways
form precarious links between the settlement clusters
among watery creeks often clogged with the glossy
leaves and lilac-flowered spikes of water hyacinth.
Here, or in any of the numerous craft markets, look
out for vividly coloured cotton appliqu wall hangings.
Theses local specialities, especially the ones featuring

Cotton wall map showing the site of Cotonou on the


Bight of Benin
a hefty Amazon carrying away a hapless male victim,
make truly unique souvenirs of Cotonou.

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23

Stagnant World Markets Boost


Interest in Africas Big Seven Expo

24 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

frica is fast becoming the New Frontier, bucking


the trend of stagnant world markets. Its population
of almost one billion people comprises a rapidly
expanding middle class with ever-increasing wealth
and disposable income. There is a growing demand for a wider
variety of products, foods and flavours, with more overseas and
local suppliers eager to oblige.
Africas Big Seven (AB7), the continents largest food and
beverage trade show, is now the most effective networking and
business opportunities platform for manufacturers, producers,
and suppliers to tap into Africas vibrant new markets. AB7 and
the co-located SAITEX (Southern African International Trade
Exhibition) expo take place from 22 to 24 June at Gallagher
Convention Centre, Midrand, South Africa.
Earlier Show Dates
This years AB7 and SAITEX show dates have been brought
forward a month sooner, to the third week in June, says John
Thomson of Exhibition Management Services, organisers of
AB7. This provides our overseas clients with more time to
act on business leads from the show, and also accommodate
our many Muslim exhibitors and visitors who wish to observe
Ramadan.
Larger Global Interest in AB7
Theres even greater interest in AB7 this year, with exhibitor
enquiries from afar afield as Mexico, Poland, the Baltic States,
and the Commonwealth of Independent States in Asia,
continues Thomson.
Nearly 1000 exhibitors from 45 countries took part in AB7
and co-located SAITEX in 2013, including the BRICS nations,
Brazil, India, Russia and China. The show also had exhibitors
from the UK, Malaysia, Pakistan, Spain, Thailand, Zambia and
Zimbabwe, as well as Nepal, Lithuania and Vietnam. Over
16000 visitors from 50 countries attended the 2013 event,
including visitors from 27 African countries.
Success Stories
A big AB7 success story from 2013 is McKinley Chocolates,
a small chocolatier based in the eastern Free State. As a small
rural company, the response we had was astounding, says
co-owner Gavin Boyd. We had inquiries from five airlines, four
national hotel chains and six international hospitality groups. We
are definitely coming back this year!
For us, AB7 was truly successful, says John Mahasha from
food processing and canning company Apol Foods. We had
enquiries from the Middle East, Ghana and the Ivory Coast, and
followed up on 17 positive business leads for our company. The
show also gave us opportunities to meet other players in our
industry, and meet like-minded business people.
The South African National Halaal Authority exhibits at
AB7 to create awareness around Halaal produce in Africa,
according to Executive Officer Solly Mahomedy. We handled
numerous questions regarding how to go the Halaal route and
received 25 leads last year, mostly from overseas countries like
China, Poland, Iran, Pakistan and India wanting to export their
products to local companies here. We are busy advising our
clients that we will be at AB7 2014 and look forward to seeing
them at our stand again!
AB7 is a very positive show, says Dillon Greef of Smart
Way Foods, a manufacturer of chilli mixes in assorted flavours.
The company produces half a million bottles a day. By the
third show day, we had filled the fourth leads book; AB7 is
the perfect platform for meeting our perfect target audience!
exclaims Greef.

AB72014 takes place from 22 to 24 June 2014 at Gallagher


Convention Centre, Midrand, Johannesburg.
More About AB7 and SAITEX
To watch a video of SAITEX and AB7, go to www.youtube.
com and type in the top search window: Saitex & Africas Big
Seven.
For more information contact Lineke van der Brugghen,
Exhibition Management Services.
Tel: +27 11 783 7250. Fax: +27 11 783 7269.
E-mail: admin@exhibitionsafrica.com
Website: www.exhibitionsafrica.com

Exhibitors from every continent showcased their products and


services at Africas largest food and beverage event.

McKinley Chocolates stand was a hive of activity at AB7!

With over 16000 exhibitors to AB7 and SAITEX last year,


exhibitors could access a huge market.
Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

25

Munenga Mulala: The making of a great Zambian young pilot


By Nebert Mulenga
War. The Tour of Duty series
were characterised by heavy
presence of helicopters.
That was in the 1990s when
Munenga born on May 21,
1980 was growing up as a
primary school pupil at Lusakas
Lotus primary school.
Fast-forward that to 20 years
later: the 33-year-old man is
now walking his dream and fast
losing count of the times he
has handled planes and graced
the skies as a pilot.

lipping the pages of a


borrowed in-flight magazine,
young
Munenga
Mulala
suddenly found a picture
that would remain stuck on his mind
and shape the destiny of his life for
years to come.
It was the picture of an aircraft
cockpit, the cabin where the pilot
sits and operates from. It was
so glamorous, colourful with so
many dials and things to look at,
recounts Munenga.
From that time on, I got
convinced that this is the best job
in the world (for me) and the aspect
of wanting to get in the skies and
fly the aircraft from one point to the
next gave me that motivation and it
grew from strength to strength.
In the ensuing days, everything
around him seemed to only evolve
around aircraft. He suddenly
developed a profound interest in
watching planes in the sky and in
listening to their sounds as they
flew past Munengas family house
in Kabwata Estates.
He would get glued for hours on
end to every episode of such drama
television series as Steve Duncanes
Tour of Duty whose story line
evolved around an American
infantry platoon during the Vietnam

26 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Thanks in part to Mopani


Copper Mines (MCM) Plc, which
after spotting the young mans
determination, supported him
to undertake his aviation studies
in South Africa, where he recently
graduated with a commercial pilot
license.
The tale of his proverbial rise
from walking the ground to flying
the skies has been one embedded
in
determination,
focus
and
hardworking. Growing up in a
country where aviation is littleappreciated and virtually a closedup field in relation to society, there
were very limited prospects from
which he could draw inspiration.
He
recalls
that
throughout
his childhood, every person he
approached for advice gave him
more reasons why he should give
up on his dream than those who
encouraged him to embrace and
nurture the dream. And the absence
of a national airline, following the
demise of Zambia Airways, did not
help matters.
It was so painful for most part,
where you have this drive but are
more or less cocooned in this
atmosphere where its always
impossible, (you are) always
being discouraged, remembers
Munenga.
Most people I met and spoke
to, who were former employees of

our national flag carrier (Zambia


Airways), would always advise to
say just choose other careers that
would be worthwhile and pay you
well.
But Munenga refused to give
up. In fact, he says, the more
discouragement he received, the
deeper the desire grew to pursue
his dream. On completion of high
school education at Kamwala
secondary school in 1999, he
passed with distinctions in pure
sciences and mathematics.
His parents naturally pushed him
to apply for a place at the University
of Zambia, where he was accepted
in 2000.
I was accepted in the School
of Humanities after my parents
forced me to apply. But my heart
was not fully convinced because I
never wanted to pursue any other
form of education apart from that
which would make me a pilot, says
Munenga, who still lives with his
parents in Kabwata Estates.
Financial challenges would later
bar him from taking up his place
at the countrys highest learning
institution. But in looking back
today, he reckons it could have

been fate manifesting in lack of


finances.
It was at that point that he decided
to step out of the cocoon and
start hunting only for opportunities
that would put him on the path to
realising his dream.
I immediately tried to enlist with
the Zambia Air Force as an officer
cadet since I knew they had the
capability of helping me to become
a pilot owing to the fact that its
their specialisation. But due to
undisclosed reasons, I was not
picked. I tried for a further two
times the following two years but I
couldnt make it, he explains.
His opportunity finally came when
the Department of Civil Aviation
advertised for assistant air traffic
controllers, a position that would see
him stationed at the former Lusaka
International Airport helping in
controlling aircraft, offering safety
guidelines and advising air crews
on weather conditions.
This was the closest alternative
I had to flying because I was like a
pilot (but) on the ground. I thought
it was going to be very easy for
me to transition from (being) an

air traffic controller into the


cockpit as a pilot because the
similarities between the two are
so overwhelming.

Copper Mines Plc for sponsorship.


After assessing his commitment to
the dream, the mining company
accepted to sponsor him.

At some point, you literally


go through the same type of
training, except that the pilot
has to go in the air and do the
respective practicals. But the
air traffic controller sits on the
ground, he says.

According to MCM chief executive


officer, Danny Callow, the decision
to fund Munengas dream was
part of the companys long-term
commitment to supporting and
empowering ambitious Zambian
youths.

Being
stationed
at
the
Kenneth Kaunda International
Airport meant coming into close
contacts with planes and flight
crews almost on a daily basis.
It was during this time that he
started gathering information
on the kind of schools where
one could train to become a
pilot.

Sponsoring
someone
for
a
flight
training
programme
is unprecedented but is a
manifestation of our deep-rooted
desire to make a difference in the
lives of the people around us,
says the CEO, whose company is a
leading mining employer with over
18,000 workers.

Munenga says with the help of


relatives and friends, he started
a serious programme of saving
any little income that came his
way. In two years, he had saved
up to US$16,000 from which he
sponsored himself to an aviation
school in South Africa, where he
graduated with a Private Pilot
License (PPL).
But then, he was grossly limited
in terms of the aircraft he could
handle with a PPL, which only
entitles the holder to fly privatelyowned planes. To be able to fly
commercial and chartered planes,
Munenga needed to upgrade his
qualification to a Commercial Pilot
License (CPL). But the
cost was prohibitive.

It is our policy to look at not


just empowering the mining (host)
communities but also those outside
these communities like Munenga.
So, we looked at the young mans
determination, drive, ambition and
potential; it was these qualities
that persuaded us to make this
significant investment into his life.
For Munenga, who returned
to Zambia in January 2014 after
graduating with a CPL from the
African Union Aviation Academy in
Mafeking, gracing the skies today
no longer exists just as pictures
in borrowed in-flight magazines
and Tour of Duty television drama
series.
It is his very lifestyle.

The cost of commercial


flight training was far
beyond me. I needed
over $20,000 (about
K110,000) and there
was no way I was going
to raise that money,
states Munenga.
It was then that he
approached
Mopani
Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

27

By Davis Mulenga

Polite Car Hire


op-ed

Is there a panacea to a competitive mining tax


regime?

Prompt and Efficient Service

s there a panacea to a competitive mining tax regime? The significance and relevance
of the question was amplified when 33 representatives of global investors who
included Goldman Sachs, Merrill Lynch and Credit Suisse recently took an on-spot
check of Zambias attractiveness as an investor haven.

Norman McDonald, Vice-President of


Invesco, a Canada-based investment firm
was emphatic that: Investment in mining
is skewed towards countries whose mining
tax is competitive with the rest of the
world.
Is Zambias mining tax competitive with the
rest of the world? Unanimously, the answer
would be in the negative from the mining
operators. They argue that the effective tax
rate in Zambia is 48 percent, making it one
of the highest tax rates in the world.
Mining companies pay a Mineral Royalty
Tax (MRT) at 6 percent on revenues. After
deducting the MRT, an additional 30 percent
Profit Tax that reflects revenues minus the
cost of producing copper is deducted. Along
with the PT, a Variable Profit Tax (VPT) of up
to 15 percent is also charged on profit.
Disconcerting for the mining companies
are calls from civil society and other interest
group to extract more tax from the mines.
The latest prescription of improving tax
collection to developing nations by the
Organisation for Economic Cooperation
Development (OECD) could hold the key to
a sustainable solution of increasing benefits
from the mines while keeping a competitive
tax regime.
Though the OECD report is given against a
backdrop of helping developing countries
identify alternative sources of funding for
development in light of decreased donor
support, it provides gems that could help
Zambia with the conundrum of mining
taxation.
28 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

POWERFUL, EFFICIENT AND SAFE POWER


TO PUT MATERIALS IN MOTION.
NDOLA OFFICE

Mobile Numbers

Ndola Airport
P.O. Box 73435
Ndola, Zambia
Tel: +260 212 620172
Fax: +260 212 614216
E-mail: polite@zamtel.zm
Norman McDonald, Vice-President Invesco, a Canada-based
investment firm, talks to reporters during the tour of under-construction
Sentinel Mine by the worlds largest investors

The report highlights examples where


investing in improved tax administration
and collection resulted in positive returns,
even in most challenging governance
environments. Cited in the OECD report
is El Salvador where USAID for tax reform
has allowed the Central African country to
boost government revenue by $350 million
annually.

LUSAKA OFFICE

0955 431522
0966 780453
0955 882992
0977 787803
0955 788541

Mobile Numbers

Tel/Fax: +260 211 221025



0977 705698
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The encouraging results should add greater


impetus to government efforts of improving
tax administration and collection. Currently
developing nations, including Zambia
collect less than 14 percent of their gross
domestic product (GDP), on average.
To meet the Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs), the United Nations (UN) estimates
countries domestic revenues have to
constitute at least 20 percent of GDP.
Davis Mulenga is a public relations
specialists. He writes in his own
personal capacity. His views neither
represent the views of the publisher
nor the clients he serves.

Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

29

zaminex

57th Copperbelt Mining Agricultural & Commercial Show


28th May 1st June 2014

T
Copperbelt Mining agriCulture
and CoMMerCial show

his year is Zambias


50th Anniversary of
Independence and on this
the 57th Copperbelt Mining
Agricultural & Commercial Show we
have chosen the theme Sustainable
& Environmentally Responsible
Development Beyond Zambias
Jubilee.
The economy of the country
continues to grow and there is a
lot of development in many sectors
and it is vital that the momentum
is sustained. It is however equally
important that this growth is
managed in an environmentally
responsible manner both in the
present time as well as into the
future.
Our Show continues to go from
strength to strength and we are
confident that this year will be
another great year. We will have a
good mix of exhibitors from various

sectors of the economy and we


will be looking to attract business
visitors from all different industries
and commercial enterprises so that
serious business and interaction can
take place during the trade days of
the Show.
We will also have a great deal of
entertainment for the general public
during the weekend which will be
aimed at all family members.
We already have over thirty
confirmed bookings for exhibition
stands and we plan to exceed last
years figure of one hundred and
twelve standholders and we have the
capacity to do this. So please if you
want to exhibit your products and
services to a wide audience, then
contact the Show Manager to avoid
disappointment.
Our Show administration has
always prided itself on its hospitality
and excellent business facilities and

this year will be no different. So we


would like to welcome you all to our
57th Copperbelt Mining Agricultural &
Commercial Show 2014 so do come
and have a good and worthwhile visit
to Kitwe on Zambias Copperbelt in
this the countrys jubilee year.

W.J. Osborn MBE


Chairman - CACSS

28 MAY - 1 JUNE 2014


KITWE ZAMBIA
TH

For Stand Bookings:


Karen ONeil
Tel:

00260 212 238011 / 238012 /


239064
Fax:
00260 212 238013
Cell: 00260 966 783075
e-mail: cacss@zamnet.zm or
karen.oneil@cacss.co.zm
PO
20944,
30 Box
March/April
2014Kitwe,
Zambian Zambia
Traveller

ST

For Catalogue Advertising:


Sean Potter
e-mail: zamtrav@mweb.co.za
Cell: 00270 83 522 0144
or Helen Walden
e-mail: shark@coppernet.zm
Cell: 0026097 774 6177

Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

31

In the area of teacher support training, FQM is running


Kansanshi Quality Improvement Programme (KanEquip)
to improve the capabilities of teachers at the cost of
K7 million.

Look to education
to dent poverty

The catalogue goes on to include a university bursary


scheme exclusively for Zambians, adult literacy and
support to tertiary institutions. The investments by FQM
in education are borne out of our conviction that
benefits from the nations minerals must flow to
Zambians in a significant and sustained manner.
Investment in education is one meaningful and tangible
way to achieve that goal because if every Zambia was
educated they would be better off in many aspects.
There are many scientifically grounded arguments in
support of our view. For example, a highly educated
nation broadens the tax revenues for government,

ere are the stakes the most staggering conceivable: On one hand, more happiness
and prosperity with better education. On the other, infinite cycle of poverty. But to which
shall we incline?

Opinion

Opinion

Further credence is borne by the K75 million 1,200


desk school at Kabitaka to cater for learners from preschool to O level, with the phase one for 360 already
open.

increases savings and investment and leads to a more


entrepreneur society. Furthermore, the nations wealth
is attributed to better education, and so is strong
governance and participation of citizens in the social,
political and economical system.
According to Sara Lafrance, a renowned educationist,
there is recognition that education becomes an
indispensable factor in developing human capital for
economic growth.
As result, FQM also may have made a grounded decision
in making education a top area of investment in its
CSR programmes. As statisticians put it, if one outcome
seems overwhelmingly preferable, take it.

The author is FQM Country


Manager. He was the first Zambian
to command the combined armed
forces, and served in the Zambian
government as a minister and
diplomat.

The investments by FQM in education are borne out of our conviction


that benefits from the nations minerals must flow to Zambians in a
significant and sustained manner.

By General Kingsley Chinkuli

The wager is increasingly getting on top of the agenda


in the private sector, and First Quantum Minerals (FQM)
has chosen the course that there is an infinity of an
infinitely happier and more prosperous life to gain with
better education.

The minister said that education is the cornerstone of


any nations development, and had an inducement to
the private sector: It goes without saying that growth
and profitability of any organisation depends on how
well skilled and innovative its workforce was.

Consistent with that view, we have invested more than


K300 million in various initiatives to complement
government efforts in revamping the education
standards in Zambia.

It turns out that the ministers inducement was


something FQM had already enthusiastically embraced
in its corporate social responsibility (CSR) programmes.
One such example is the Kwambula (ignite in Kaonde)
Apprenticeship Programme, run in conjunction with
the Ministry of Education at the Solwezi Trades Training
Institute (SOTTI). The programme, with a budget of
K10 million, is geared to close the artisan skills gap in
power electrical, metal fabrication and boiler making.

Alex Ngoma, Deputy Minister of Education, Science,


Vocational and Early Education, who I recently shared
a platform with when my company handed over 360
books valued at K165,000 to the University of Zambia
(UNZA) School of Mines, also contends that addressing
the challenges of education at all levels early learning,
primary, secondary and tertiary arguably represented
the biggest opportunity to create more sustained
prosperity in Zambia.

32 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Investing a further K6 million in improving the physical


infrastructure of schools and teachers houses at nine
basic schools in Solwezi also represents FQMs appetite
for an improved education system.

Apprentices at the FQM-inspired three-year apprenticeship programme at Solwezi Trades Training Institute (SOTTI).

Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

33

Whats the point of khaki?

Top fuel dragsters

By Anthea Rowan

STRATEGIC
PARTNERS

But it doesnt explain why tourists to Africa have


developed such a zealous fondness for it? Why do they
wear it? Not because its cooler than ice-cold white,
certainly. Because it doesnt show the dirt? Possibly.
It looks dirty before youve even put it on! Because
theyre going for a game drive and want to creep up on
the wildlife, unseen? Hardly: not when theyre crammed
into a black and white mini van with a zillion camera
shutters clicking paparrazi-style alongside 23 other
vehicles similarly occupied and engaged. Even if their
khaki uniforms rendered them invisible to animals, I
reckon theres a pretty good chance that the pride of
lion, herd of elephant, cheetah and cubs might spot
the fleet of vehicles surrounding them, get up and
disappear, out of sight. Which means the wearing of
khaki was a waste of time.

nybody who doesnt know what khaki is


has had their eyes shut for too long. But
for those of you who have (had your eyes
firmly closed), its a fabric woven of either a
sort of swampy green or a rather grubby beige. The
word khaki comes from the Persian khak meaning
earth or dust coloured. (Not wrong there then).
You can blame Brigadier Sir Harry Burnett Lumsden
for its adoption by westerners; his British regiments
began wearing it in the mid-1800s in India. By
1885 all British troops stationed in India sported it
in preference to previously worn white. Donned by
soldiers during both Boer wars and by the Americans
during the Spanish American War, it became de
rigueur for military uniforms.
Right, so that explains its origins. And I can quite
understand why a soldier, who needs to shuffle
stealthily on his tummy through the undergrowth
during battle, must wear it (mainly so hes not seen
by his similarly khaki-clad enemy which strikes me as
a pretty good reason to dress oneself head to toe in
the stuff).

34 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

The number of pockets rivals that of zips; theyve


even got pockets in the backs of their multi-zipped
jackets. The backs! What are they, contortionists?
Have you ever tried to reach around to your back as if
getting something out of a pocket located between your
shoulder blades? Simply not do-able!
Do you ever wonder what they do with their safari
outfits when they get back to the Home Counties or the
American Midwest? Im sure they never wear it once
theyve left the continent. Have you ever seen anybody
in Tesco dressed as if jungle-bound? I certainly havent.
What a waste, dont you think, especially when it was
(judging by the creases suggesting recent liberation
from cellophane packaging) bought brand new for their
African holiday.
Sometimes I feel a trifle mean as I cant help but
chuckle when I find myself sitting alongside ranks of
visitors to a game park all dressed identically in pea
green. (Except for my daughters, who are brilliantly
attired in offensive game-repelling Barbie pink).
I suppose its the excuse visitors give back home for
not spotting a leopard. Those noisy little girls dressed
too loudly (too loud all round frankly) for the bush.
Nothing to do with the other 23 vehicles, of course,
which rather gave not to say chased the game
away.

ave you ever wondered what the fastest thing on earth was? This is a very
difficult question to answer as there are so many different variables, land,
sea or air? Human, animal or machine?
Both scholars of all things fast and those people possibly a little more
ignorant, can argue for ages with different viewpoints rendering different
opinions. But when it comes to the fastest acceleration on the planet, hands
down the king has to be the Top fuel dragster.
Called Top Fuel because these cars are run on a mix of approximately 90%
nitromethane and 10% methanol (also known as racing alcohol) rather than
conventional petroleum as we know it. These cars are purpose-built for drag
racing, with an exaggerated layout that in some ways resembles open-wheel
circuit racing vehicle. However, top fuel dragsters are much longer, much
narrower, and are equipped with large wheels on the back and small wheels in
front, all in order to maximize their straight-line acceleration and speed.
When it comes to out and out number crunching, the thought of what these
poor drivers (or should we rather call them pilots) go through in these very short
spaces of time is nothing short of terrifying, and the only thing going through
more torture than the 4G suffering driver, is the engine!
Under full throttle, a dragster engine consumes 7 litres of nitro per second,
the same rate of fuel consumption as a fully loaded 747 but with 4 times the
energy volume.
The supercharger takes more power to drive than a standard hemi engine
develops.
Dual magnetos apply 44 amps to each spark plug. This is the output of an arc
welder in each cylinder.
At stoichiometric (exact) 1.7:1 air/fuel mixture (for nitro), the flame front of
nitromethane measures 3900 Celsius.
Spark plug electrodes are totally consumed during a pass. After 1/2 way, the
engine is dieseling from compression-plus the glow of exhaust valves at 760
Celsius. The engine can only be shut down by cutting off its fuel flow.
If spark momentarily fails early in the run, unburned nitro builds up in those
cylinders and then explodes with a force that can blow cylinder heads off the
block in pieces or blow the block in half.
To exceed 483 kph in 4.5 seconds dragsters must accelerate at an average of
over 4Gs. But in reaching 321 kph well before 1/2 track, launch acceleration is
closer to 8Gs.

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And whats with the zips? Zips at the tops of sleeves,


zips in the bottoms of trousers, zips in their ridiculous
hats (which they button up on one side so that their
left ears get really badly sunburned). Zips halfway up
trousers so that the wearer can turn longs into shorts
(what do they do with the bits they unzip? Put them
in their camera bags? Or stuff them into one of the
millions of pockets that adorn the same pair of trousers:
pockets to the rear, at the front, halfway down, above
and below their zips).

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Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

35

Top fuel dragsters


Continued

If all the equipment is paid off, the crew worked for


free, and for once NOTHING BLOWS UP, each run costs
US$1000.00 per second.
Dragsters reach over 483 kph per hour before you have
read this sentence.
Did you know
that the nitromethane-powered engines of NHRA Top
Fuel dragsters and Funny Cars produce approximately
7,000 horsepower, about 37 times that of the average
street car?
that an NHRA Top Fuel dragster accelerates from 0
to 100 mph in less than .8-second, almost 11 seconds
quicker than it takes a production Porsche 911 Turbo to
reach the same speed?
that an NHRA Top Fuel dragster leaves the starting line
with a force nearly five times that of gravity, the same force
of the space shuttle when it leaves the launching pad at
Cape Canaveral?
that an NHRA Funny Car is slowed by a reverse
force more than seven times that of gravity when both
parachutes deploy simultaneously?
that NHRA Top Fuel dragsters and Funny Cars consume
between 18 and 23 litres of fuel during a quarter-mile run,
which is equivalent to 50 litres per kilometre?
that NHRA Top Fuel dragsters and Funny Cars use
between 45 and 54 litres of fuel for a complete pass,
including the burnout, backup to the starting line, and

quarter-mile run?
that NHRA Top Fuel dragsters can exceed 450 kph in
just 200 metres?
that from a standing start, NHRA Top Fuel dragsters
accelerate faster than a jumbo jet, a fighter jet or a Formula
One race car?
that a fuel pump for an NHRA Top Fuel dragster and
Funny Car delivers 295 litres of fuel per minute, equivalent
to eight bathroom showers running at the same time?
that depending on size and angle, the large rear wing on
an NHRA Top Fuel dragster develops between 1800 and
36000 kilograms of downforce?
that the 17-inch rear tyres used on NHRA Top Fuel
dragsters and Funny Cars wear out after four to six runs, or
about 3.5 kilometres? Some brands of passenger-car tyres
are guaranteed for 60 000 kilometres.
that it takes just 15/100ths of a second for all 7,000
horsepower of an NHRA Top Fuel dragster engine to reach
the rear wheels?
that its desirable for an NHRA Top Fuel dragster to
race with its front wheels inches off the ground for about
the first 60 metres of the run. This ensures proper weight
transfer to the rear wheels, a crucial part of a good launch
and quick run.
that the nitromethane used to power the engines of
NHRA Top Fuel dragsters and Funny Cars costs about
US$6.60 per litre?

CHALLENGING
MOTIVATING
REWARDING
Be part of the team
operating one of
the largest copper
mines in the world.
With investment of over $2 billion
dollars, First Quantum Minerals
is creating new and exciting
employment opportunities for
people in the north-west of Zambia.
Were developing three new mines,
located 150km west of Solwezi,
collectively known as Trident.
Sentinel, a copper mine, is the first
of them to be commissioned and is
on schedule to begin operations in
the middle of 2014. When its fully
operational it will produce in the
region of 300,000 tonnes of copper
per year.

To support the lives and livelihoods


of our employees at Sentinel, their
families and the local community
were also investing in a brand
new town. Not simply a town for
the mining community but a new
economic zone that will attract
businesses and residents in great
numbers. A town open to all.
With the new infrastructure, facilities
and opportunities it offers, we hope
to attract the best local talent for
Sentinel. Weve already begun
our search for the right people to
receive industry-leading training for
specialist roles.
Our ultimate goal is creating a
success story in the region. One
that leads the mining industry and
helps to maintain Zambias strong
economic growth record of the past
few years. One that has a lasting
positive impact on peoples lives.

Were offering major opportunities at Sentinel for dedicated


people who want to build something great with their careers
and lives. So if you have experience in mining, geology,
engineering metallurgy or fleet maintenance, visit our website
to discover more about the opportunities we have now.

36 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

www.first-quantum.com/careers
Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

37

The record breaking railway


An African industrial transport feature by D. J. Rivers.

In a remote corner of South Africa lies a long and undisturbed freight railway line which holds a world
record of staggering, breathtaking statistics.

he Sishen Iron Ore Mine


is one of the largest open
cast mines in the world. It is
located in the Northern Cape
Province of South Africa in the
District of Postmasburg, some
280km northwest of Kimberley,
between Vryburg and Upington.
It produces massive amounts of
refined iron ore and transports
it, across the desert to the
port of exit. The mine crater is
approximately 1.5 km wide and
11km long at it deepest point it
is almost 400m deep.
The mined ore is transported
out of the crater to the crushing
plant in a fleet of 70 of the
worlds largest, diesel and
electric powered trucks, whose
maximum haulage capacities
exceed a staggering 150 tons.
The vehicles can convert from
diesel power to electrical power
which allows huge savings of fuel
consumption and also doubles
their speed on the steep climb
out of the pit.
The adjacent smelter plant has
the capacity to process some 30
million tons of ore annually and
reclaim 25 million tons of top
quality iron ore. About 25% of
the processed ore is used on site
by ISCOR, and the remainder
is conveyed to Saldanha Bay
to be exported overseas. China

38 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

imports the largest loads and


British Steel is the largest single
client.
Even from the initial discovery
of the rich vein of ore,
geologists, accountants and
transport managers realised
that extracting the ore and
transporting it to a exit port
would present major engineering
and logistical problems. And it
did. It would require the a vivid
imagination, the very latest
technology, some sleepless
nights and lots of $$$.. Today,
30 years on, the mine continues
to yield mega tons of ore, and
will continue to do so for the
next 40 years.
Earlier, surveyors had
discovered a 4, 000 million
ton deposit of high-grade iron
ore and a feasibility study
recommended a new, largescale iron-ore export project be
opened, with the extracted ore
transported to Saldanha Bay for
export. A railway line connecting
the mine head to the harbour
was built as a result.
This railway line crosses a
large part of the West Coast
area. If the natural harbour at
Saldanha had not been there,
the engineers would have had
to identify another deep water

port and connect it to the mine


head with a rail link. The early
navigators discovered the vast,
natural harbour at Saldanha
during the 1500s and only the
lack of fresh water prevented
it from being a the main port
of entry into southern Africa.
Its potential was not lost on
later generations and as early
as the early 1900s this safe
deep anchorage was known to
locals and European developers
and it was a known fact that
the harbour was big enough to
accommodate the entire British
fleet.
Construction on the railway line
started in June 1973 and the first
ore train arrived at the Saldanha
ore terminal in May 1976. On
27 September 76, the first ore
shipment departed, bound for
Europe. The rail link cuts through
a parched, scrubby, uninhabited
semi desert It is 861km long
and is fully electrified. There are
only three bends along the entire
route with a maximum radius of
1km. The only tunnel is the 840m
Bobbejaansberg Tunnel near
Elands Bay. The line falls gently
from 1,500m to sea level.
In 1989 a world record was
set when the worlds longest
and heaviest freight train
ever assembled, hauled a

staggering 71,210 tons of iron ore from Sishen to Saldanha Bay. The
achievement is recorded in the Guinness Book of Records as follows:
Total length of train - 7.3 km
Distance covered - 861km and a maximum speed of 80km/h
No of locomotives - 7 diesel and 9 electrical, 3 up front, the rest
pushing from behind
No of loaded freight trucks - 660
Average speed - 38,00km/h, in a time of 23 hours.
Transnet have recently invested Rand 1.7 billion ($US 277 million)
on refurbishing and improving the Sishen-Saldanha freight link. This
will allow the transport of iron ore freight to increase by 6 million tons
to 30 million tonnes annually. A thoroughly sound investment, we are
informed!
And they say they do things bigger and better in Texas... I think
not!!

In 2010 Transnet Freight Rail placed the first of seventy-six Class 15E
heavy electric freight locomotives with a Co-Co wheel arrangement in
service on the SishenSaldanha iron ore line

Busanga

Jeff Pieters explores the plains, wetlands and the rich and varied wildlife of northern Kafue.
shallow pans of lush grazing
pockets. This is the favourite time
to observe the huge numbers of
wildlife. Sightings of lion, cheetah
and leopard are common. There
will also be roan and sable, puku
antelope, wildebeest, eland and
zebra, blue wildebeest, Vervet
monkeys and yellow baboons and
huge herds of grazing buffalo.
Oribi are found throughout the
park, but are especially common
here. Elephant pods, once
depleted, are now a common
sight along the Lufupa River.
Large numbers of the graceful and
timid lechwe antelope fill the vast
plains of Busanga in their tens of
thousands.

Busanga Bush camp

wo hours drive from


Lusaka lie the Busanga
Plains, a vast triangle,
wedged into the northwest sector of Kafue. A sprawling
wilderness, watered by the dark
green Lunga, Lufupa and Kafue
Rivers. The Busanga swamps are
permanently waterlogged and off
limits to all vehicles. Further south,
the plains cover a much larger
area and are subject to seasonal
flooding. The plains begin to dry
out in June and the resulting
growth of grasses attracts great
hordes of grazing animals.

which makes it an ideal refuge for


game and bird-life. From July to
October the waters recede and
the plains are accessible by 4WD
vehicles. Along the edges of the
plains, the Kafue is made up of
many other diverse habitats, from
lush green riverine bush to dense
woodland, to semi arid bush and
scrub-land. Along the rivers are
oxbow lagoons which evaporate in
the dry into dambos, to create

The huge Busanga Plains are


spread across 750 sq klms of
open countryside and the region
is considered to be Kafues Jewel
in the Crown. The grassy plains
lie further south and are a much
larger area that is subject to
seasonal flooding. This only starts
to dry out around June (its totally
impassable by all vehicles until
then), when its possible to visit
and see large herds of red lechwe.
The Busanga Swamps are
permanently flooded and are
home to the secretive sitatunga,
which has completely adapted
to swamp life. They are powerful
swimmers but quite timid and
if disturbed, can bound off with

a series of springs and leaps aided by their large


hooves which have developed to allow them to walk
on the floating papyrus islands. When disturbed, they
stand motionless or even submerge themselves under
the water, with just their nostrils showing, until the
danger has passed.
The plains are made up of a variety of eco systems,
ranging from swamps, large grassy plains and shallow
dambos to thick Miombo woodlands, supporting
a wide collection of seasonal and resident wildlife.
Occasional sightings include the blue duiker and
yellow-backed duiker in the scrub and woodland
areas as well as the more common species,
Liechtensteins hartebeest and the sable antelope.
These are important wetlands for the threatened
Wattled Crane, the Red Lechwe and Sitatunga.
The plains provide refuge to large numbers of
migratory water birds during the dry season which
later fly off to smaller wetlands around Kafue
National park during the wet. It is therefore an
important refuge area during the dry season. Some
occasional visitors to arrive before the rains include
the Spur-winged goose, the threatened Wattled
Crane, Southern Crowned Crane and the Common
Pratincole.
Depending on the season, visitors might travel
by 4X4 or by Mokoro (traditional dug-out canoes) to
access the plains. Due to them being submerged for
most of the year, the seasonal flood plains attract
large flocks of Open Billed Storks, which spiral
majestically on rising thermals above the plains.
Below, Crowned and the Wattled cranes can often are
seen foraging through the grass and undergrowth for
beetles and insects.
The predominant vegetation in the Kafue is Miombo
woodland, these areas are typically semi-continuous
small tree and shrub dominated landscapes. Bush
fires, which easily ignite in the drier months, have

Fish eagle
equipped these trees with a fire-resistant bark. A less
common eco-type in Kafue are riverine forests and
the Mopane woodland. These areas are particularly
associated with the mighty Baobab which is found
mainly in the south of the park.
For visitors with an interest in the birdlife,
ornithologists have recorded over 400 species of
birds in the woodlands, waterways and open plains of
Busanga in a single season. Resident, seasonal and
migratory birds including such rarities as Chaplins
Barbet, Green-headed Sunbird, Pels Fishing Owl,
Anchietas Sunbird, Wattled Crane, Spoonbills,
Bocages Akalat, Black-tailed Waxbill, Blackbreasted
Snake Eagle, Scaly-throated Honeyguide, Goliath
Heron and, of course the Fish eagles.
The Busanga plains are remote and not particularly
suitable for day trippers. Visitors should allow several

Busanga is considered by many


to be one of Africas most beautiful
and unspoilt wilderness areas.
The plains and swamps are
littered with numerous small
islands which in turn are
dominated by huge wild date
palms and wild fig trees. The
low lying lands are covered with
extensive stretches of savannah
and papyrus. For most of the year
the vast plain is flooded, the main
flood season is from March to May,

40 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Sable antelope

Vervet Monkey

Sitatunga
Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

41

Busanga
Continued

Mokoro (traditional dugout canoe)


days to experience the vastness of the swamp and
plains and diversity of game and bird life. There
are numerous bush-camps providing all types of
accommodation, from 5 star (unashamed) luxury
to modest bush-camps to basic camping sites.
The upmarket camps offer a fly-in service, a full
range of activities include safari game drives (and
night drives), river safari cruises and walking safaris
accompanied by armed and qualified guides, who
have gained an in-depth knowledge about the area
and its wildlife. Independent travellers (4WD are
essential) should seek advice from Park officials
before entering Busanga and bring sufficient water,
food and fuel, cell-phones and GPS.

Elephant

This is a superb, unspoilt and undisturbed part


of Kafue National Park. A lush and ever changing
landscape of endless open savannah and floodplains.
It boasts an impressive list of game and bird life
and countless, scenic panoramas, unchanged in
millennia. Distances are long and the tracks unpaved.
Visitors should allow ample time to savour the raw,
natural beauty and the incredible diversity of the
wildlife.

All Rooms Have:


Free Broadband Wi-Fi Internet
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Digital Satellite TV

Busanga swamps and plains, vast, scenic and


unspoilt... like nowhere else on earth!

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Boabab tree

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Fax: +260 212 225036 Website: www.edinburgh.co.zm

Buffalo

42 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Wildebees

M&C REPAIRS LARGE DC MOTOR ON SITE AT KONKOLA COPPER MINE

arthinusen & Coutts recently


performed a comprehensive onsite repair of a large DC winder
motor at Konkola Copper Mine in

Zambia.

The 8 250 kW motor, which is one of the


largest slow-speed DC motors in operation
worldwide, was acquired by Konkola from a
South African gold mine several years ago
and was installed on the multi-rope winder at
Konkolas No.4 Shaft.
After successfully completing a four year
shaft sinking programme at Konkola, the
motor indicated some overheating while the
mine was in the process of converting the
winder from shaft sinking to permanent duty
operation, Ian Solomon, M&Cs field services
manager, says.

Solomon says Adam Hughes, M&Cs


resident engineer in Zambia, made an
important contribution to the success of
the project with his invaluable input of
engineering expertise and provision of local
resources. The success of this project has
further enhanced the good reputation M&C
enjoys in Africa for repairing rotating electrical
equipment in fast turnaround times, he adds.
While planning is important, flexibility above
all is a key requirement. You have to have the
ability to adapt to changing circumstances
and produce uncompromising quality in the
face of often daunting time constraints and
logistical problems, as applied in this case,
Solomon concludes.

Positioning of the field frame top half.

Inspection of the top field frame half prior to


fitting.

Fitting of the brush gear onto the field frame for


the 8250 kW AEI mine winder.

Working on the brush gear on the field frame.

View of the brush gear from the back of the


motor.

One of the M&C skilled technicians connecting


the halving joint.

Cleaning the damper bar joints of the field frame


field coil.

Bottom half of field frame being positioned into


the pit.

The repair job assigned to us had to be


done on a breakdown basis to ensure that any
disruption of the mines construction schedule
was kept to a minimum.
M&C immediately sent a team to the mine
to assess the condition of the motor under
the supervision of sister company ACTOM
Industry, the suppliers of the electrical winding
system. They were closely followed by a team
equipped to do all the repair work on site.
The motor had to be fully dismantled. Careful
preparation beforehand for mobilising of the
materials and resources was an essential
procedure, as most of these were unavailable
locally.
The repair work, performed 24 hours a
day in about six days, involved cleaning,
re-soldering and re-insulating all the
compensating bars and compole connections
on the field frame. It also required continual
testing of the components to ensure integrity
of each progressive task. All work was carried
out under the supervision of ACTOM Industry,
Solomon says.
In addition, the commutator had to be
skimmed and polished with special custommade brush boxes fitted onto a portable lathe
that was installed on the existing brush gear.

44 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

45

White-headed Vulture
(Trigonoceps occipitalis)
The White-headed Vulture (Trigonoceps
occipitalis) is an Old World vulture endemic
to Africa. It has a pink beak and a white
crest, and the featherless areas on its head
are pale. Its has dark brown upper parts and
black tail feathers. The feathers on its lower
parts and legs are white. It spends a lot
of time soaring looking for food. at night it
roosts in tall trees near water.

dropped by, or stolen from, other raptors.


They take these to one side, eating them
away from the main huddle. They also take
stranded fish, termites and locusts when
they can find them.
They are rarer than previously believed, its
conservation status was changed from Least
Concern to Vulnerable in the 2007.

It is a medium-sized vulture, 7285 cm


in length and 207230 cm in wingspan.
Females weigh more than males, they
usually weigh around 4.7 kg, while males
weigh 4 kg or less.
These vultures occur singly or in pairs and
are often the first to arrive at a carcass. Like
the Lappet-faced Vulture they are able to eat
skin, ligament and bones, however, unlike
the Lappet-faced Vulture they are clean
feeders (ie they do not get blood on their
feathers when they feed). Although they
get to a kill first they tend to feed on scraps

46 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Zambian Traveller March/April 2014

47

CROSSWORD & SUDOKU


SOLUTIONS
from page 16

t
a
c
o
W
a
b
h
o
r
s
W

20

13

20

26
20

r
W
a
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p
W

20

20
20

20
20

20

20

i
n
d
o
o
r
s
W
r
s
A
W
2

20

21

23

20

e
W
d
W
W
o
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k
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d

20

20
20

20

17

d
r
i
p
W
a
W
l
W
i
W
W

20

20

12

20

20

20

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W
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W
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e
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d
a
m

20

20

24

20
20

a
i
s
l
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W
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W
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W

20
20
20

22
20
20
20

b d u c
Wa W W
W h a s
l e t
W i Wa
m a i l
a W W k
t o r s
u We W
r a i n
e Wg W
d i n e
5

20
20

20

20

10

11

20

t
t

20

20

14

20

18

20

16

19

20

20

20

20

25

27

s
o
o
n
W
W
s

15

20
20

1
2
4
9
5
7
3
6
8

6
5
7
8
4
3
2
9
1

8
9
3
2
1
6
5
4
7

7
1
8
3
2
9
6
5
4

9
4
2
5
6
8
1
7
3

5
3
6
4
7
1
9
8
2

2
7
1
6
9
4
8
3
5

4
8
9
1
3
5
7
2
6

3
6
5
7
8
2
4
1
9

General Knowledge
Quiz answers
from page 16
1. Monkey.
2. Marine snail.
3. Michael J Fox.
4. M C.
5. Motown.
6. M*A*S*H.
7. Mammals.
8. My Way.
9. Madeline Albright.
10. Mirrors.

KanEquip

11. Mata Hari.


12. Manfred von
Richthofen, or
The Red Barron.
13. Microwave Oven.
14. Marsupial.
15. Mustard gas.
16. Mrs. Brown.
17. Metamorphous.
18. Miss Marple.

Kansanshi Mines blueprint


to better education.

Educating Zambians,
Developing Zambia!

pictures
Monkeys

Monkeys are known to be highly intelligent and capable primates.


There are more than 260 known species of monkeys in the world.
Monkeys range in size from the Pygmy Marmoset, at 15 cm long
from head to tail and 0.11 to 0.14 kg in weight, to the male
Mandrill, almost 1 meter long and weighing 35 kg. Most monkeys
are tree-dwellers but some live in grasslands.
Monkeys eat a variety of foods, such as fruit, insects, flowers,
leaves and reptiles. Many species of monkeys are regarded as
highly intelligent and often kept as pets. Some have even been
sent to space.

2.

1.

3.

48 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

A Monkey
4.

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