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ANNUAL REPORT 2011 2012

Level 2, 400 King William Street


ADELAIDE SA 5000

Telephone: 08 8226 9000

www.corrections.sa.gov.au
















CEN/12/0753







31 October 2012



The Honourable Jennifer Rankine MP
Minister for Correctional Services
Level 2, 45 Pirie Street
ADELAIDE SA 5000



Dear Minister


It is with great pleasure that I present to you the 2011-12 Annual Report for the Department for
Correctional Services.

The Annual Report not only provides an overview of the highlights and achievements of this year,
it also serves as a means of demonstrating the contribution made by the Department in supporting
the governments commitment to providing for a safer South Australian community.

This report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Public Services Act
2009, the Finance and Audit Act 1987 and the Correctional Services Act 1982 (the Act). It also
adheres to the guidelines provided in the Department of the Premier and Cabinets Circular 13
document.

As per Section 9(1) of the Act, I have provided this report to you no later than 31 October (of this
year).

I hereby commend this Annual Report to you.

Yours sincerely



DAVID BROWN
CHIEF EXECUTIVE
david.brown3@sa.gov.au
Office of the Chief Executive

Level 2
400 King William Street
DX 147

GPO Box 1747
ADELAIDE SA 5001

Tel: 08 8226 9120
Fax: 08 8226 9226

www.corrections.sa.gov.au





CONTENTS

HIGHLIGHTS IN 201112.................................................................................................................................... 7
INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................................................... 8
OUR VISION......................................................................................................................................................... 8
OUR MISSION....................................................................................................................................................... 8
CORPORATE VALUES ......................................................................................................................................... 8
STAKEHOLDERS.................................................................................................................................................... 8
OUTCOMES .......................................................................................................................................................... 8
YEAR IN REVIEW.................................................................................................................................................. 9
STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-14............................................................................................................................... 11
ORGANISATION CHART .................................................................................................................................. 12
OVERVIEW OF THE DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES......................................................... 13
OFFICE OF THE CHIEF EXECUTIVE............................................................................................................................................. 13
STRATEGIC SERVICES ............................................................................................................................................................... 13
OFFENDER DEVELOPMENT....................................................................................................................................................... 13
CUSTODIAL SERVICES.............................................................................................................................................................. 13
COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS ................................................................................................................................................... 13
FINANCE AND ASSET SERVICES................................................................................................................................................ 14
HUMAN RESOURCES ............................................................................................................................................................... 14
1. DELIVERING OUR CRITICAL SERVICES...................................................................................................... 15
INTEGRATED OFFENDER MANAGEMENT ....................................................................................................................... 17
OFFENDER ASSESSMENTS......................................................................................................................................................... 17
OFFENDER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS ................................................................................................................................... 18
INTEGRATED HOUSING EXITS PROGRAM.................................................................................................................................. 18
REHABILITATION PROGRAMS BRANCH..................................................................................................................................... 19
INTERVENTION TEAMS .............................................................................................................................................................. 19
SENTENCE MANAGEMENT UNIT ............................................................................................................................................... 19
PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES .................................................................................................................................................... 20
ABORIGINAL SERVICES UNIT .................................................................................................................................................... 20
ALCOHOL AND OTHER DRUG STRATEGY................................................................................................................................. 21
PRISONER AND OFFENDER EDUCATION................................................................................................................................... 22
PRISON INDUSTRY .................................................................................................................................................................... 22
THE SA PRISON HEALTH SERVICE............................................................................................................................................. 23
CHAPLAINCY SERVICE ............................................................................................................................................................ 24
SAFETY AND SECURITY ...................................................................................................................................................... 25
CUSTODIAL BASED SERVICES.................................................................................................................................................... 25
YATALA LABOUR PRISON......................................................................................................................................................... 25
ADELAIDE REMAND CENTRE ................................................................................................................................................... 26
MOBILONG PRISON................................................................................................................................................................ 26
PORT AUGUSTA PRISON.......................................................................................................................................................... 27
CADELL TRAINING CENTRE...................................................................................................................................................... 28
PORT LINCOLN PRISON........................................................................................................................................................... 29
ADELAIDE WOMENS PRISON.................................................................................................................................................. 29
ADELAIDE PRE-RELEASE CENTRE.............................................................................................................................................. 30
MOUNT GAMBIER PRISON....................................................................................................................................................... 31
SECURITY CLASSIFICATIONS ..................................................................................................................................................... 31
INCENTIVE BASED REGIME....................................................................................................................................................... 31
NOMINATED VISITORS ............................................................................................................................................................. 32
VISITING INSPECTORS............................................................................................................................................................... 32
VISITING TRIBUNALS ................................................................................................................................................................. 32
COMPLAINTS MANAGEMENT .................................................................................................................................................. 32
PRISONER POPULATION........................................................................................................................................................... 33
GENDER.................................................................................................................................................................................. 33
AGE........................................................................................................................................................................................ 33
ABORIGINAL STATUS................................................................................................................................................................ 33
REMAND................................................................................................................................................................................. 33
SENTENCE LENGTH .................................................................................................................................................................. 33


MOST SERIOUS OFFENCE ........................................................................................................................................................ 34
MOST SERIOUS OFFENCE FOR SENTENCED MALES 2010-2012............................................................................................ 34
MOST SERIOUS OFFENCE FOR SENTENCED FEMALES 2010-2012 ......................................................................................... 34
PRISON INCIDENTS................................................................................................................................................................... 35
ESCAPES ................................................................................................................................................................................. 35
ESCAPE RATES FROM 2007-08 TO 2011-12 ........................................................................................................................... 35
ASSAULTS ................................................................................................................................................................................ 35
ASSAULT RATES BETWEEN FROM 2009-10 TO 2011-12............................................................................................................ 35
DEATHS IN CUSTODY............................................................................................................................................................... 35
ILLICIT DRUGS.......................................................................................................................................................................... 36
SEARCH OF PRISONERS ........................................................................................................................................................... 36
INTELLIGENCE AND INVESTIGATIONS UNIT................................................................................................................................. 36
THE ROLE OF COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS................................................................................................................................ 37
SOUTHERN METROPOLITAN REGION........................................................................................................................................ 37
NORTHERN METROPOLITAN REGION ....................................................................................................................................... 38
SOUTHERN COUNTRY REGION................................................................................................................................................. 38
NORTHERN COUNTRY REGION................................................................................................................................................ 39
OFFENDER REPORTS................................................................................................................................................................ 39
OFFENDER PROGRAMS ........................................................................................................................................................... 39
COMMUNITY SERVICE (REPAY SA) ......................................................................................................................................... 40
PROBATION............................................................................................................................................................................. 40
INTENSIVE PROBATION SUPERVISION........................................................................................................................................ 41
PAROLE................................................................................................................................................................................... 41
HOME DETENTION................................................................................................................................................................... 41
INTENSIVE BAIL SUPERVISION (HOME DETENTION BAIL) ............................................................................................................ 42
BAIL ........................................................................................................................................................................................ 42
DRUG COURT CURFEW........................................................................................................................................................... 42
GENDER.................................................................................................................................................................................. 42
ABORIGINAL STATUS................................................................................................................................................................ 43
AGE........................................................................................................................................................................................ 43
NUMBER OF ORDERS............................................................................................................................................................... 43
NUMBER OF INDIVIDUALS......................................................................................................................................................... 43
BAIL SUPPORT PROGRAM........................................................................................................................................................ 44
COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT ........................................................................................................................................... 45
VICTIM SERVICES..................................................................................................................................................................... 45
VOLUNTEER SUPPORT .............................................................................................................................................................. 45
2. BUILDING OUR CAPACITY AND CAPABILITY.......................................................................................... 47
CAPACITY............................................................................................................................................................................ 48
ASSET AND RISK SERVICES ....................................................................................................................................................... 48
RISK MANAGEMENT ................................................................................................................................................................ 48
CONTRACT AND BUSINESS MANAGEMENT .............................................................................................................................. 49
WORKFORCE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT......................................................................................................................... 49
TOMORROWS SENIOR MANAGERS PROGRAM....................................................................................................................... 50
PERFORMANCE DEVELOPMENT ............................................................................................................................................... 50
WORKFORCE PLANNING......................................................................................................................................................... 50
CAPABILITY.......................................................................................................................................................................... 51
HUMAN RESOURCES POLICY AND PROJECTS .......................................................................................................................... 51
WORKFORCE MANAGEMENT.................................................................................................................................................. 51
TRAINEE CORRECTIONAL OFFICER RECRUITMENT .................................................................................................................... 51
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY PROGRAMS................................................................................................................................ 51
EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM......................................................................................................................................... 52
EMPLOYEE RELATIONS ............................................................................................................................................................. 52
EMPLOYEE TRANSFERS/RELOCATIONS ..................................................................................................................................... 52
OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH, SAFETY AND INJURY MANAGEMENT................................................................................................ 53
REVIEW OF ACCIDENT, INCIDENT DATA AND APPLICABLE REMEDIAL ACTION......................................................................... 53
COMPENSABLE DISABILITIES/REHABILITATION INITIATIVES.......................................................................................................... 54
WORKCOVER EVALUATION.................................................................................................................................................... 54
DISABILITY ACTION PLAN......................................................................................................................................................... 55
CARERS RECOGNITION.......................................................................................................................................................... 55
FLEXIBLE WORKING ARRANGEMENTS....................................................................................................................................... 55
WHISTLEBLOWER QUALIFICATION ............................................................................................................................................ 55


GENDER REPORTING............................................................................................................................................................... 56
INFORMATION ANALYSIS ......................................................................................................................................................... 57
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY MANAGEMENT.......................................................................................................................... 57
DATA WAREHOUSE ................................................................................................................................................................. 58
INTRANET................................................................................................................................................................................. 58
PUBLIC WEB SITE ..................................................................................................................................................................... 58
3. LEADING AND MANAGING OUR ORGANISATION............................................................................... 59
STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT ...................................................................................................................................................... 60
SHAPING CORRECTIONS ......................................................................................................................................................... 60
EFFECTIVE CORPORATE PERFORMANCE.................................................................................................................................. 61
CIVIL CLAIMS.......................................................................................................................................................................... 62
FREEDOM OF INFORMATION.................................................................................................................................................... 62
POLICY DEVELOPMENT ........................................................................................................................................................... 62
MANAGEMENT OF PRISONERS AT RISK OF SUICIDE OR SELF HARM .......................................................................................... 63
STAKEHOLDER SUPPORT........................................................................................................................................................... 64
LEGISLATION ........................................................................................................................................................................... 64
ENERGY MANAGEMENT .......................................................................................................................................................... 65
MEDIA LIAISON AND CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS........................................................................................................... 65
RESEARCH MANAGEMENT ...................................................................................................................................................... 65
CORPORATE FINANCE ............................................................................................................................................................ 66
SUMMARY OF FINANCIAL RESULTS ........................................................................................................................................... 66
SUMMARY INCOME STATEMENT ............................................................................................................................................... 67
OPERATING EXPENDITURE BY PROGRAM................................................................................................................................. 67
INDEX.................................................................................................................................................................. 70
APPENDICES 1 9............................................................................................................................................. 72
APPENDIX 1 - AUDITOR GENERALS REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 2011-12 ......................................... 73
APPENDIX 2 - ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 2011-12............................................................................................................. 103
APPENDIX 3 - ENERGY USAGE 2011-12 ....................................................................................................................... 103
APPENDIX 4 - CUSTODIAL SERVICES STATISTICAL INFORMATION 2011-12....................................................... 104
TABLE 1 - INTAKES BY RACIAL IDENTITY AND GENDER 2011-12 .............................................................................. 104
TABLE 2 - PRISONERS IN CUSTODY AND AVERAGE PRISON POPULATION IN 2011-12...................................... 104
TABLE 3 - PRISON CAPACITIES AND AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION 2011-12..................................................... 104
TABLE 4 - ESCAPES FROM DCS CUSTODY 2011-12.................................................................................................... 105
TABLE 5 - ESCAPES FROM DCS FROM 2007-12 .......................................................................................................... 105
TABLE 6 - INCIDENTS IN PRISON 2011-12 ..................................................................................................................... 105
TABLE 7 - PRISONER/STAFF INCIDENTS 2011-12 ......................................................................................................... 105
TABLE 8 - SENTENCED DISCHARGES BY TIME SERVED AND MAJOR OFFENCE - 2011-12 ................................. 106
TABLE 9 - FORMS OF DISCHARGE BY INSTITUTION - 2011-12 ................................................................................... 107
APPENDIX 5 - COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS STATISTICAL INFORMATION 2011-12.......................................... 108
TABLE 1 - COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS ORDERS AND INDIVIDUALS - 2011-12................................................... 108
TABLE 2 - AGE AND SEX OF INDIVIDUALS WHO COMMENCED ORDERS - 2011-12........................................... 108
TABLE 3 - COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS ORDERS COMMENCED - 2011-12......................................................... 109
TABLE 4 - COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS ORDERS CLOSED - 2011-12..................................................................... 110
TABLE 5 - HOME DETENTION - 2011-12......................................................................................................................... 110
TABLE 6 - COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS REPORTS COMPLETED - 2011-12............................................................ 111
APPENDIX 6 - HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT STATISTICAL INFORMATION - 2011-12.......................... 112
TABLE 1 - DCS EMPLOYEES BY CLASSIFICATION STREAM, DIVISION AND GENDER - 2011-12 ......................... 112
TABLE 2 - NUMBERS - GENDER STATUS - 2011-12..................................................................................................... 113
TABLE 3 - NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES BY SALARY BRACKET - 2011-12....................................................................... 113
TABLE 4 - STATUS OF EMPLOYEES IN CURRENT POSITION - 2011-12....................................................................... 113
TABLE 5 - NUMBER OF EXECUTIVES IN CURRENT POSITION, GENDER AND CLASSIFICATION - 2011-12 ........ 113
TABLE 6 - AVERAGE DAYS LEAVE PER FTE EMPLOYMENT - 2011-12 ...................................................................... 114
TABLE 7 - NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES BY AGE BRACKET BY GENDER - 2011-12...................................................... 114
TABLE 8 - NUMBER OF ABORIGINAL AND/OR TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER EMPLOYEES - 2011-12..................... 114
TABLE 9 - CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY - 2011-12 ..................................................................................... 114
TABLE 10 - NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES WITH DISABILITIES REQUIRING WORKPLACE ADAPTATION - 2011-12.. 115
TABLE 11 - NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES USING VOLUNTARY FLEXIBLE WORKING ARRANGEMENTS - 2011-12.. 115
TABLE 12 - NUMBER OF INVESTIGATIONS INTO BREACHES OF THE CODE OF ETHICS - 2011-12...................... 115
TABLE 13 - ACCREDITED TRAINING PACKAGES BY CLASSIFICATION - 2011-12 ................................................. 116
TABLE 14 - LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT TRAINING EXPENDITURE - 2011-12 .............................................. 116
TABLE 15 - OHS NOTICES AND CORRECTIVE ACTION TAKEN - 2011-12............................................................... 116


TABLE 16 - AGENCY WORKERS COMPENSATION EXPENDITURE - 2011-12 (COMPARED WITH 2010-11)...... 117
TABLE 17 - MEETING SAFETY PERFORMANCE TARGETS - 2011-12.......................................................................... 117
TABLE 18 - WORKERS COMPENSATION STATISTICS - 2011-12 ................................................................................. 118
APPENDIX 7 - FREEDOM OF INFORMATION - INFORMATION STATEMENT ........................................................... 119
APPENDIX 8 - OVERSEAS TRAVEL - 2011-12................................................................................................................ 120
APPENDIX 9 - LEGISLATION THAT GOVERNS THE OPERATION OF THE DEPARTMENT ........................................ 121


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 7

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

HIGHLIGHTS IN 201112

Implemented a medium intensity program for sex offenders with learning
and/or intellectual disabilities

Developed a program for female prisoners with complex needs and/or
mental health issues

Implemented the BHP Prisoner Reintegration Employment Opportunity
Program (PREOP) and Sierra Programs at Port Augusta Prison

Continued the construction of a new cell block at Port Augusta Prison

Continued the design and procurement of additional prisoner
accommodation at Mount Gambier Prison

Implemented the operational compliance monitoring program in all prisons

Completed the procurement for the Mount Gambier Prison contract

Continued the Northfield program of works to upgrade and construct access
security, kitchen, medical centre and construction of a new high
dependency unit at the Yatala Labour Prison

Continued the Northfield program of works to develop the Master Plan for
upgrade works at the Adelaide Womens Prison and the Adelaide Pre-release
Centre

Commenced the planning of the upgrade of the kitchen at the Adelaide
Remand Centre

Completed the access security upgrade at the Adelaide Remand Centre

Implemented enhancements to the supervision of offenders in the community

Progressed work to improve risk based decision making

Implemented the Abuse Prevention Program

Contributed to government policy and direction on criminal justice and
related matters

Continued the Shaping Corrections change management program

Implemented the new Standard Operating Procedure SOP 090
Management of Prisoners at Risk of Suicide or Self Harm



DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 8

INTRODUCTION

The Department for Correctional Services (DCS) is committed to assisting the South Australian
community in achieving good order through its efforts to enhance public safety and provide
for a continued reduction in the rate of re-offending.

As most prisoners in custody will be released back into the community (often still under the
supervision of the department), the provision of meaningful and targeted opportunities that
address offending behaviour is critical to an offenders reintegration. When these
opportunities are provided within a safety and security framework, positive outcomes are
achieved - not only for offenders, but also for the departments stakeholders.

The 2011-12 Annual Report, allows the department to outline the many accomplishments for
the year, as well as serve as a key document for the review of DCS operations and financial
performance, in accordance with relevant legislation, government policy, the State Strategic
Plan, and corporate planning documents including the departments 2011-12 Business Plan
and 2011-14 Strategic Plan.

The Department for Correctional Services employs approximately 1 722 staff located across
the state at nine prisons, 17 Community Correctional Centres and the departments Central
Office. The departments Vision, Mission, Values, Stakeholders and Outcomes are
fundamental to our success and are at the core of our business.

OUR VISION
A safer community by protecting the public and reducing re-offending

OUR MISSION
We contribute to public safety through the safe, secure and humane management of
offenders and the provision of opportunities for rehabilitation and reintegration.

CORPORATE VALUES
Integrity
Ethical and respectful behaviour
Social responsibility
Accountability and professionalism
Equity, diversity, and cultural inclusion
Workplace safety

STAKEHOLDERS
The community, South Australian Parliament and government,
the courts, the Parole Board and victims of crime.

OUTCOMES
Improved public protection
Secure, safe and humane environments
Reduced re-offending
Improved outcomes for Aboriginal people
Skilled, professional and valued workforce
Accountable and responsible leadership and administration

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 9
YEAR IN REVIEW


The 2011-12 financial year resulted in many important
achievements for the Department for Correctional Services.

This is my last Annual Report as Chief Executive of the
department and it is particularly pleasing to summarise some of
the successes of the 2011-12 financial year.

For the fourth year in a row, the Report on Government Services
showed that South Australia had the lowest return to prison rate
of any Australian jurisdiction. This low rate of recidivism is the
ultimate measure of the success of a corrections system.

During 2011-12, infrastructure improvements across the states
prisons continued. This included the construction of the new
Banksia Unit at Port Augusta Prison which is now scheduled to be
commissioned (ahead of schedule) in October 2012. The Banksia Unit is configured as two
wings around a central officers station and includes accommodation for disabled or high
needs prisoners.

The $42.6 million Northfield Prison precinct upgrade at Yatala Labour Prison has progressed
well, with works on a new gatehouse and kitchen underway. Also at the Northfield site, the
program of works at the Adelaide Womens Prison is progressing well with a new kitchen, a
high security perimeter fence and a 20 bed cell block divided into two 10 bed high security
units being constructed in the first phase.

At the Adelaide Remand Centre, the access control and reception upgrade was completed
in early 2012 and has provided the institution with some of the most advanced security
technology available in Australia.

Plans to further increase the bed capacity in South Australian Prisons continued throughout
2011-12. This included the decision to use the success of the modular accommodation trial at
Cadell Training Centre to build a 108 bed medium security cell block at Mount Gambier
Prison (also using a modular design). The use of the modular design provides for secure and
cost effective accommodation.

One of the most significant announcements made in 2011-12 is that a High Dependency Unit
will be built at Yatala Labour Prison. This Unit will provide special accommodation and support
services to prisoners with high level care needs, either due to mental health or age related
conditions.

During the year, the department developed a number of new programs to complement its
existing suite of interventions. A trial of a medium intensity program (co-facilitated by
Disability Services) for sex offenders with learning and or intellectual disabilities commenced
at Mount Gambier Prison. The program will run for 14 months with a thorough evaluation to
ensure its efficacy.

An intervention program for female prisoners with Borderline Personality Disorders (and other
mental health issues) has been approved for implementation in the coming financial year
and will be delivered at the Adelaide Womens Prison. The Program will focus on reducing
self harming behaviours and suicidal tendencies, reducing behaviours that impact on
delivering therapy.

Effective reintegration of prisoners back to the community remains a strong focus, and in
saying this, the department implemented in the 2011-12 year both the Prisoner Reintegration
Employment Opportunity Program (PREOP) and Sierra Program. Following successful trials,
these initiatives not only offer fantastic opportunities to engage in partnerships with private
enterprises such as BHP Billiton, but also give prisoners work skills and opportunities for
employment upon release.



DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 10
Another initiative that commenced in 2011-12 is the Abuse Prevention Intervention Program,
one component of a range of integrated services aimed at reducing the risk of on going
domestic violence. After early positive results, I am pleased that expansion of this Program is
now planned for 2012-13.

2011-12 saw further implementation of Enhanced Community Corrections for managing
offenders in the community. Focusing on a risk based approach, the initiative targets
resources towards those offenders who present the highest risk of re-offending. From 1 May
2012, offenders in the community are now supervised and monitored by Community
Corrections staff utilising a new web based information program, to assist with decision
making.

One final achievement was the work done to progress and finalise the amendments to the
Correctional Services Act 1982 that were introduced to Parliament in June 2011. Important
changes include strengthening the supervision of persons on parole, improving the sharing of
information with the South Australian Police, and allowing for more expeditious ways to deal
with offenders who have breached their Parole Order and are considered to present a high
risk to the community. The Bill was passed in both Houses of Parliament on 31 May 2012 and
will soon be operational. The department is pleased that the amendments will further
enhance public safety.

I would like to thank the staff and management of the Department for Correctional Services
for their outstanding contribution in 2011-12 and over the past nine years. It has been an
honour and a privilege to be part of this organisation, and to serve the people of South
Australia. I also thank all other public, private and not-for-profit organisations who assist us
with the delivery of our services on a daily basis.

Since I started as Chief Executive of the department in July 2003, there has been tremendous
innovation and improvement in a challenging environment.

I am proud of the successes of the department during my tenure as Chief Executive and I am
confident that the department will continue to improve in the future.


Peter Severin
OUTGOING CHIEF EXECUTIVE


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 11
STRATEGIC PLAN 2011-14



DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 12

ORGANISATION CHART
(As at 30 June 2012)







DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 13

OVERVIEW OF THE DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES


Office of the Chief Executive
The Office of the Chief Executive provides executive support to the Chief Executive of the
Department for Correctional Services and the Executive Director of Strategic Services.

The Office also includes the Intelligence and Investigations Unit, which conducts
investigations and manages strategic information relating to prisoners and offenders
throughout the correctional system.

Strategic Services
Strategic Services is responsible for strategic management and other key services to
stakeholders including the Minister for Correctional Services and the media.

The directorate develops and facilitates the implementation of corporate plans, policies,
processes and systems to enable the department to achieve government policy and the
objectives of the Justice Portfolio. Also measured by the unit, is corporate performance and
quality management.

Strategic Services is comprised of the Aboriginal Services Unit, Policy and Stakeholder
Services, Business and Performance Services, Knowledge and Information Systems, the
Vocational Training and Education Centre of South Australia, Executive Services and
Corporate Communications.

Offender Development
Offender Development oversees the development, management and evaluation of
professional services for prisoners and offenders. The directorate facilitates coordinated and
integrated assessments, sentence planning, psychological services and rehabilitation
programs (particularly in relation to high risk, serious offenders) with ongoing case
management.

Offender Development implements policies and procedures to ensure that intervention with
offenders occurs in a manner that is coordinated, targets criminogenic needs and promotes
community safety.

The directorate includes the Sentence Management Unit (incorporating Psychological
Services), the Rehabilitation Programs Branch, and the Program Services Unit.

Custodial Services
Custodial Services is responsible for the management and operation of the nine South
Australian prisons.

These prisons are the Adelaide Remand Centre, the Adelaide Womens Prison, the Adelaide
Pre-release Centre, Yatala Labour Prison, Port Lincoln Prison, Port Augusta Prison, Cadell
Training Centre and Mobilong Prison.

Custodial Services also controls the management of Mount Gambier Prison however, the
prison is operated (under contract) by a private company, G4S Custodial Services Pty Ltd.

Community Corrections
Community Corrections manages the supervision and monitoring of offenders in the
community who are placed on Probation, Parole, Home Detention, Intensive Bail Supervision
(Home Detention Bail), Bail, and Community Service Orders (Repay SA).

The directorate also provides information to the courts and the Parole Board to assist with
sentencing and/or the setting of the conditions of bonds and other orders.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 14
These services are provided through 17 Community Correctional Centres and other outreach
services located throughout the state within the Northern Metropolitan Region, Southern
Metropolitan Region, Northern Country Region and Southern Country Region.

Finance and Asset Services
Finance and Asset Services provide budgeting, finance, accounting, procurement, risk
management, insurance and civil claims management, and asset management services to
DCS.

The division also administers the departments capital investment program, and manages
and maintains the fixed asset portfolio comprising the departments prisons and Community
Correctional Centres.

Finance and Asset Services also assists the department to effectively allocate resources for
the delivery of services, programs and initiatives and monitors financial performance.

Human Resources
Human Resources provide a range of services to enable the department to recruit and
develop staff and implement plans to achieve safety in the workplace and manage industrial
relations.

The directorate provides a range of services within four key areas: Getting and keeping the
people we need, making sure people do their job well, keeping people safe and well at
work and Industrial Relations there for you. These services support the achievement of
corporate objectives to enable the department to achieve excellence in the Public Service.

Human Resources comprises Workforce Management, HR Policy and Projects and the
Workforce Planning and Development branches.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 15
1. DELIVERING OUR CRITICAL SERVICES



The Department for Correctional Services provides for a safer South Australian community
through the application of Integrated Offender Management which ensures a continued
emphasis on Safety and Security, and enhances Community Engagement.


In 2011-12, key strategies to deliver critical services included:

Improving the multi-disciplinary management of offenders with complex needs
Managing the effective transition and reintegration of offenders into the community
Providing appropriate risk-based information and reports to inform decision-making on
offenders
Providing targeted interventions and rehabilitation services
Improving the whole of sentence management of offenders
Responding to the decisions of the Courts and Parole Board
Ensuring the highest standards of safety, security and emergency management
Strengthening the engagement of offenders in meaningful structured activity
Enhancing Community Corrections to appropriately manage risk
Meeting responsibilities with respect to state protective security, and to counter-terrorism and
violent extremism
Contributing to public safety and confidence by targeting dangerous, serious and high risk
offenders
Effectively using intelligence to reduce the risk faced at a state and national level
Improving support and engagement of Victims of Crime
Increasing the engagement of Aboriginal people and people from diverse cultural and
linguistic backgrounds
Increasing community engagement and the understanding of Corrections
Expanding and enhance volunteerism
Strengthening strategic partnerships to effectively reintegrate offenders back into the
community

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 16



Key Performance Indicators

Offence focused programs (Making Changes Program, Sex Offender Treatment
Program and Violent Offender Treatment Program) - number of program hours
delivered and percentage of offenders/prisoners successfully completing programs;
Education/vocational programs - number of prisoners/offenders enrolled in
education/vocational programs, percentage of enrolments successfully completed;
On the job work skills programs average number and percentage of eligible prisoners
with duty assignments;
Daily average prisoner population, daily average remand in prison and percentage of
population on remand;
Annual escape rates from secure and open prisons, numbers of unnatural deaths in
custody (per 100 prisoners), assault rates in custody (per 100 prisoners, per quarter),
hours out of cell (more than ten hours per day);
Court ordered reports completed on time, number of reports completed for the courts,
Parole Board and Sentence Management Unit;
Community Based Orders supervised, commenced and successfully completed and
percentage of Aboriginal community based orders
Percentage of draft Individual Development Plans (IDPs) for eligible prisoners, prepared
within six weeks of reception;
Percentage of Case Management Plans completed within eight weeks (for non-control
offenders) and number of control offenders who have their assessment and Case Plan
completed within 28 days;
Rate of prisoner participation in structured activities;
Number of complaints registered;
Number of Community Services work hours undertaken;
Compliance with legislative requirements (with regard to Victims of Crime), number of
victims registered and number of out of hours responses to victims; and
Number of volunteers registered.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 17
1. DELIVERING OUR CRITICAL SERVICES

INTEGRATED OFFENDER MANAGEMENT

Internationally, the focus of corrections has shifted towards a greater emphasis being placed
on the strengthening of collaborative partnerships, in addition to providing offenders and
prisoners with targeted programs that specifically address criminogenic need. In recognising
this focus, the Department for Correctional Services has established an integrated and
individual case management approach to rehabilitation and reintegration, across both
Custodial Services and Community Corrections.

The departments concept of Integrated Offender Management is a cooperative and
coordinated approach that supports obtaining a goal of reduced rates of reoffending, whilst
ensuring that the safety, security, health and welfare needs of offenders are addressed in an
effective manner. This management style is in place from an offenders initial, to final
contact with the department.

Central to Integrated Offender Management is the provision of targeted case management
and specialised risk/needs assessment processes. This includes the delivery of appropriate,
offence specific rehabilitation programs for sexual and violent offending, alcohol and drug
use, general offending, and domestic violence. These programs include Making Changes,
the Violence Prevention Program and the Sexual Behaviours Clinic which are currently
delivered across a range of locations, both in prisons and Community Corrections.

In addition to rehabilitation programs, education (with a particular current focus on literacy
and numeracy), and vocational programs (including nationally accredited courses) provide
direct work skills and enhance employment opportunities for released offenders. There is a
clear expectation from government and the community that the department provides a
means for offenders to contribute to the community, to acknowledge the impact of their
crime on victims, and to provide their victims with the opportunity to be involved in the
sentencing and correctional process.

Community based support services that specifically address pre-release issues and assist with
an offenders re-integration are also fundamental in bringing about a reduction in the rate of
return to prison. DCS is committed to the enhancement of the critical partnerships it has, as
well as the many initiatives that aim to assist a prisoners re-integration into the community.
Support services and departmental relationships with community groups and other Justice
Portfolio agencies provide offenders with access to necessary information and assistance
required for a positive transition back into the community.

The departments Aboriginal Services Unit and Aboriginal Liaison Officers also play a critical
role in ensuring the connection between Aboriginal prisoners and offenders and their
community is encouraged whilst in custody or under the supervision of the department.

Offender Assessments
The Offender Risk Need Inventory-Revised (ORNI-R) is the departments primary assessment
tool for identifying offender risk and need. The ORNI-R (initially developed by Queensland
Corrective Services) is based on five principles of effective offender intervention - risk, need,
responsivity, professional discretion and program Integrity.

The information collected during the ORNI-R assessment provides a basis for the creation of
an Individual Development Plan, which assists with sentence and case planning (across both
Custodial Services and Community Corrections). The tool identifies responsivity factors,
enables for the provision of referrals to appropriate interventions and identifies reintegration
and social needs (such as accommodation, health and employment).

As the ORNI-R was not designed to assess the level of risk of re-offending within some specific
offender populations (sexual or violent offenders), additional assessment tools are necessary

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 18
to determine risk and needs within these groups. In recognising this, during 2009-10, the
department introduced the Risk of Re-Offending (RoR) screening tool with versions for prison,
probation and parole. This tool provides an initial service level response to determine risk,
and the necessity for the next level of assessment known as the Offender Needs Analysis, or
ONA. Both the RoR and the ONA have now been placed on the departments electronic
database.

In 2010, a restructure of the departments psychological resources resulted in the creation of
a dedicated Sentence Management Unit to conduct specialist psychological assessments,
including risk of sexual and violent re-offending, cognitive assessment, neuropsychological
screening, personality assessment and other complex assessments as required. In the 12
months from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012, 348 specialist assessments were conducted across
both Custodial Services and Community Corrections.

Offender Development Programs
Whilst offence focused programs based on the What Works literature have been proven to
be effective in reducing rates of re-offending, research and ongoing evaluation has also lead
to program modification and possible replacement to be inline with best practice
interventions.

During 2011-12, departmental staff have continued to plan for future rehabilitation programs.
The three phases of the Making Changes program (preparatory, substance use and general
offending), continued to be facilitated in Community Corrections and Custodial Services.

Reviews of the Violence Prevention Program and the Sexual Behaviours Clinic were also
undertaken and found that positive treatment target shifts were occurring amongst
offenders who had completed these programs.

In 2012-13, Offender Development staff will commence work on further developing the
Violence Prevention Program to include an Alcohol and Other Drug component and ensure
the program continues to address the treatment needs of moderate and high risk violent
offenders.

A new prison-based program that commenced in September 2011 was trialled for sexual
offenders with cognitive deficits at Mount Gambier Prison. This program, called SBC-me
(reflecting the Old Me, New Me concepts) provides rehabilitation to 8 prisoners, over a 14
month period. SBC-me aims to reduce re-offending amongst sexual offenders who have
been assessed as being of significant risk of re-offending, and who are unable to engage in
the Sexual Behaviours Clinic (due to inherited or acquired cognitive deficits).

Integrated Housing Exits Program
The Integrated Housing Exits Program (IHEP) commenced as an outcome of the 2003 Social
Inclusion Board Report, Everyones Responsibility: Reducing Homelessness in South Australia.
That report identified release from correctional facilities and remand as a high impact area
for crisis intervention. The report also highlighted the importance of an integrated cross-
government strategy to address housing issues for newly released offenders.

A partnership was formed between Housing SA and DCS to work with non-government
organisations to assist offenders on remand, or offenders with sentences less than 12 months
who are at risk of homelessness.

Within this program, accommodation is provided to participants through Housing SA on a
short-term lease. Additional tenancy support and case management services are also
provided to the offender to assist with finding alternative accommodation arrangements
(private rental or long term lease with Housing SA).

As at 30 June 2012, 51 people were actively involved in the program, and a total of 184 ex-
prisoners had been accommodated by IHEP. The Housing Outreach Program also visited 399
prisoners throughout the nine South Australian prisons in relation to identified accommodation
issues, during 2011-12.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 19

In early 2012, a subsidiary program to IHEP, known as the Integrated Housing Exits Alternative
Accommodation Service (IHEAAS) was established to assist prisoners who are assessed as
being suitable to participate in IHEP, however have no suitable properties available upon
their release. IHEAAS participants are instead provided with a case management service
through Offender Aid and Reintegration Services Community Transitions to find alternative
accommodation (either private rental, community housing or Housing SA properties). IHEAAS
participants are case managed for up to six months post release. There have been 16
referrals in 2011-12.

Housing SA and DCS will continue to work in partnership during 2012-13 to secure the
maximum number of properties allocated to this project (60 beds), and ensure that the
services continue to support the goal of reducing homelessness and reducing re-offending.

Rehabilitation Programs Branch
The Rehabilitation Programs Branch (RPB) was created as a state government initiative. The
branch employs a multidisciplinary team who provide group-based, cognitive-behavioural
programs for moderate to high risk sexual and violent offenders. Programs are delivered by
the RPB across Community Corrections and Custodial Services and are around six to nine
months in duration. The branch utilises programs that are developed internationally, and
based on the principles of best practice.

The Sexual Behaviours Clinic and Violence Prevention Program both aim to address factors
associated with risk of sexual or violent recidivism. These programs focus on increasing an
offenders capacity for self-management and positive living, by promoting positive
relationship skills, managing negative emotions or unhelpful thinking patterns, and increasing
awareness of the impact of offending

During 2011-12, the RPB delivered the Sexual Behaviours Clinic at Yatala Labour Prison and
Mount Gambier Prison, whilst one Violence Prevention Program was delivered at Port Lincoln
Prison and two programs at Mobilong Prison. An additional Violence Prevention Program also
commenced at Community Correctional Centres and a pilot program designed for sexual
offenders with lower intellectual ability was launched at Mount Gambier Prison.

Maintenance sessions that aim to strengthen and extend the skills developed (whilst
participating in the main program), were provided at the Adelaide Community Correctional
Centre. Support was also provided by the RBP to case managers in country regions.

Intervention Teams
During 2011-12, Community Corrections Intervention Teams facilitated a total of 32 Making
Changes phases, with 27 phases delivered in Custodial Services. Departmental social work
teams work closely together to ensure the implementation of nationally acknowledged best
practice standards.

As a result of working to an evidence-based rehabilitation model, further collaboration
between divisions, and increased involvement with rural intervention staff is anticipated
during the 2012-13 year.

Sentence Management Unit
The Sentence Management Unit (SMU) operates from Yatala Labour Prison in accordance
with Section 23(1) of the Correctional Services Act 1982. The unit has the responsibility for
providing assessments and developing individual plans for offenders with a sentence of six
months or greater. The SMU also makes decisions regarding the placement of prisoners. It is
largely divided into two streams, an assessment and sentence planning function, and an
administrative function.

The role of the Sentence Management Unit includes the:
creation of offender plans for all sex offenders and prisoners who have an effective
sentence of six months or greater;

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 20
provision of administrative support to the Serious Offender Committee and the Home
Detention Committee;
maintenance of records on prisoners with an effective sentence of 12 months or more;
provision of relevant information to the Parole Board;
interface between Youth Justice and the adult correctional system;
monitoring of prisoner security ratings and status, such as dual or remand;
audit of offender plans, case reviews, case note entries, assessments and case files;
implementation and quality control of case management as described in the relevant
Standard Operating Procedures; and
monitoring of bedspace issues for all institutions and the management of the movement
of prisoners between institutions.

In the 12 months from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012, the Serious Offender Committee reviewed
318 Individual Development Plans and provided oversight on 1 193 case reviews for serious
offenders. Also during this year, the Home Detention Committee reviewed 656 applications,
341 of which were approved for release on home detention.

Psychological Services
The Department for Correctional Services employs psychologists who provide specialist
assessment services across Custodial Services and Community Corrections, as well as
program delivery through the Rehabilitation Programs Branch.

DCS psychologists utilise empirically based, internationally recognised best practice principles
and work collaboratively with other service providers, such as the SA Prison Health Service
(SAPHS) and Forensic Mental Health Services. They provide intervention and specialised
assessments for offenders who are affected by substance abuse, personality and mental
health disorders, as well as playing a significant role in addressing criminogenic need.

DCS psychologists further assist with decision making regarding intervention for offenders by
providing information to the Sentence Management Unit, the Serious Offender Committee
and the Parole Board. Offenders are referred for psychological assessment and intervention
through the Sentence Management Unit (via the departmental case management system).
Specialised risk assessments then inform the nature and level of needs, as well as treatment
priorities.

SMU psychologists are involved in the High Risk Assessment Team (HRAT) meetings and
Behavioural Management Forums across the state. This is a multi-disciplinary approach with
SAPHS, prison intervention teams and custodial officers, providing a format for urgent referrals
for prisoners requiring immediate treatment, crisis intervention and specialised management
strategies. The role of the psychologist attached to the HRAT adds opportunity for specialist
assessment and advice to further guide behaviour modification and risk management
strategies.

From 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012, Sentence Management Unit psychologists delivered 1 871
sessions to prisoners, including risk or suicide and self harm assessments to inform HRAT teams.

Aboriginal Services Unit
The Aboriginal Services Unit was established to service the needs of the departments
Aboriginal stakeholders. In addition, the unit monitors DCS implementation of
recommendations from the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody (1991).

The unit works across the department (at both policy, and operational levels) to provide
advocacy for Aboriginal departmental staff and oversees the development of culturally
appropriate services and actively participates in the growth of partnerships and support for
Aboriginal community organisations, and other government departments, for the provision of
targeted services to Aboriginal offenders.

Key activities for the Aboriginal Services Unit in 2011-12 included:

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 21

contributed to strategies to encourage the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal staff
including the implementation of the departments Aboriginal Recruitment Program (in
conjunction with the Department of Further Education, Employment, Science and
Technology);
engaged Aboriginal community members as Visiting Inspectors and supported
Aboriginal Liaison Officers through quarterly information training forums;
coordinated of the annual Aboriginal Staff Conference to overview specific directions
and build awareness of stakeholders and their programs;
coordinated and implemented the National Indigenous Corrective Services
Administrators Council Working Group agenda for Australian and New Zealand
delegates;
audited progress on the recommendations of the Royal Commission Into Aboriginal
Deaths In Custody (RCIADIC) to assess compliance (20 years after implementation);
provided advanced cultural awareness training across the department as well as
development and training opportunities to Aboriginal staff members;
continued to enhance the departments partnership with Aboriginal stakeholders;
supported Centacare Reintegration Services to assist with the reintegration of Aboriginal
offenders;
provided resources to enable Aboriginal prisoners to participate in life skills building
programs including the Prisoner Re-Integration Employment Opportunity Program
(PREOP) and the Sierra Program at Port Augusta Prison;
contributed to the recruitment and retention of Aboriginal staff across the department;
modified and delivered Cultural Awareness programs to existing and trainee custodial
officers and other departmental staff;
supported the development and implementation of the Cross Border Aboriginal Family
Violence Program for women offenders across the Pitjantjatjara, Yankunytjatjara and
Ngaanyatjarra speaking communities of central Australia;
progressed and implemented training supporting the roll out of the Aboriginal Impact
Statement;
supported finding systemic solutions to the barriers faced by Aboriginal offenders; and
continued to coordinate the Prevention of Aboriginal Deaths in Custody Forum, giving
Aboriginal prisoners the opportunity to raise concerns directly with the Chief Executive.

During 2012-13, the Aboriginal Services Unit will lead the engagement of the Aboriginal
community within specific departmental institutions and programs by:

continuing the Aboriginal Elders Visiting Program;
exploration of opportunities for Aboriginal people wishing to reintegrate back to remote
communities;
continuing to engage with Aboriginal support programs that offer specific assistance to
female Aboriginal prisoners and offenders in the community;
exploring employment opportunities for Aboriginal prisoners leaving the correctional
system; and
focusing on the issue of Aboriginal over representation within the custodial
environment.

Alcohol and Other Drug Strategy
The departments Alcohol and Other Drug Strategy incorporates an integrated approach to
reduce the supply and demand of illicit drugs.

The department is focused on intercepting the introduction, and supply of illicit drugs into the
prison system through the use of information gathered by the departments Intelligence and
Investigations Unit, and the activities of the Operations Security Unit. The strategy also seeks to
identify and target the extent of prisoners drug problems, and provide appropriate programs
that assist with addiction recovery.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 22
Prisoner and community based offender urine testing continues to be undertaken extensively
to detect the use of illicit drugs. In addition, the Parole Board increasingly imposes conditions
that require parolees to undergo regular testing for drug and alcohol use. The courts have
also been including drug testing conditions on Bonds and Bail agreements.

The Alcohol and Other Drug Management Unit undertakes urinalysis and breath testing on
community based offenders. The unit is a mobile service, accredited under Australian
Standard 4308: Procedures for specimen collection and the detection and quantification of
drugs of abuse in urine.

During 2011-12, the unit undertook in excess of 500 tests per month. This amounted to over
6 000 urinalysis tests across Community Corrections and over 4 058 tests in prisons. In addition
to testing, the unit also trialled new on site urine and saliva testing devices and provided
training and advice on testing for both Community Corrections and prison based staff.

The department continues to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of this service,
including increased attendances at regional offices and out of business hours testing.

Prisoner and Offender Education
The Vocational Training and Education Centre of South Australia (VTEC-SA) is the
departments Registered Training Organisation. VTEC-SAs primary function is ensure the
qualifications on the Registered Training Organisations scope (covering staff, prisoners and
community based offenders) comply with the national standards and conditions for
Registered Training Organisations which are set by Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA).
VTEC-SA staff provide advice on planning and policy and offer direction for the education
and training programs which the department is registered to deliver.

During 2011-12, the department continued to focus on targeting prisoners who have very low
levels of literacy and numeracy, and who have a high risk of re-offending. Education
programs emphasise the development of basic language, literacy and numeracy skills.
Concentrating on the development of literacy, numeracy, learning skills and employability
capabilities improves opportunities for prisoners to access gainful employment on their
release from prison and, by so doing, assists to lessen the incidence of recidivism.

During 2011-12:

a total of 1 983 prisoners and offenders participated in education and vocational and
educational training programs (compared to 1 779 in 2010-11);
prisoners and offenders commenced 3 931 (3 032 in 2010-11) units of study covering
literacy/numeracy, vocational education, secondary school and tertiary studies. 3 083
(2 587 in 2010-11) of these units were in literacy and numeracy, computing and business
studies;
a total of 2 036 (1 554 in 2010-11) units of study were completed and were included in a
Statement of Attainment for prisoners and offenders successfully completing literacy
and numeracy, computing and business studies. The 2011-12 completion rate was 66%
(compared to 60.1% in 2010-11); and
departmental staff enrolled in 2 605 (2 369 in 2010-11) units of courses including
Certificate III and IV in Correctional Practice (Custodial), Diploma of Correctional
Administration, Certificate IV in Government, and Diploma of Government.

Prison Industry
Prison Industries have continued to experience moderate growth over the last year. Existing
customers are being serviced to meet their requirements whilst industry managers and
general managers continue to search for new opportunities. Prison Industries have
maintained quality accreditation to Australian Standard 9001:2008, as well as managing the
food safety requirements of prison catering operations in accordance with the food safety
standard code.

Prison Industries plays an important role in the structured day routine for prisoners where the
work/life balance is mirrored to reflect what is expected in the wider community. There are

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 23
approximately 392 prisoners engaged in prison industries daily across all sites. The specific
industries undertaken at each location are:

Yatala Labour Prison - engineering, carpentry and joinery, E-recycling, laundry, spray
painting and powder coating;
Mobilong Prison - engineering, component assembly, bakery, concrete product
manufacture and E-recycling;
Cadell Training Centre - dairy, citrus, olive growing;
Port Lincoln Prison - cropping, carpentry, vegetable production, engineering, assembly;
and
Port Augusta Prison - joinery, engineering, powder coating, vegetable growing and tree
propagation.

The SA Prison Health Service
The Department of Health and Ageing through the Central Adelaide Local Health Network,
Statewide Services, and SA Prison Health Service (SAPHS) is responsible for the provision of a
range of primary health care services to all prisoners in South Australia. SAPHS work
collaboratively with Mental Health Services and Drug and Alcohol Services to support and
manage patients with mental illness and significant substance abuse problems.

SAPHS provides patients with health services appropriate to their ongoing health needs in line
with that which they would receive in the general community. Additionally, allied health is
provided by external providers. Dental services are provided by the South Australian Dental
Service, and psychiatric clinics are provided by the South Australian Forensic Mental Health
Service.

Health Centres located at Yatala Labour Prison and the Adelaide Remand Centre provide
24 hour nursing services. All other prison Health Centres provide nursing during extended
business hours, often between 7am - 9pm. Male or female prisoners who require health
treatment or medical observation, within the scope of the service, may be transferred to
Yatala Labour Prisons 24 hour Health Centre.

The Department for Correctional Services and SAPHS have developed Joint System Protocols,
which describe the responsibilities of the two agencies in relation to prisoner health and
welfare and case management processes. The Joint System Protocols were reviewed and
updated in 2010 to include complex case management, and now includes South Australian
Forensic Mental Health and South Australian Dental Service as signatories.

SAPHS also partnered with DCS in the implementation of a joint procedure to manage
prisoners at risk of suicide or self harm. This procedure was implemented across all prisons in
the last financial year. SAPHS is now also undertaking a review of medication service delivery,
in conjunction with DCS, and SAPHS is considering alternative strategies for low risk
medications.

In 2011-12, the Department of Health commissioned PricewaterhouseCoopers to undertake a
review of all service delivery provided by SAPHS. As a result, a joint Governance Committee
was established to progress the twenty six recommendations. SAPHS will now work together
with the department, in consultation with staff, unions and prisoner support groups, to
strategically implement these recommendations in the future.

Also during 2011-12, the department and SAPHS joined together to hold various health
promotional activities. This included a full day Health and Wellbeing Expo (held in March
2012 at Cadell Training Centre) and activities for Mens Health Week held in mid 2011. In
addition, at Mobilong Prison in 2011-12, a series of health information sessions were
coordinated on topics including quitting smoking, arthritis, hepatitis C, cardiovascular health
and diabetes. These sessions were complemented by the continual provision of activities
such as tai chi, pilates, football and basketball.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 24
Chaplaincy Service
The Prison Chaplaincy Service within a custodial setting is integral to the religious and social
welfare needs of prisoners, and it is complementary to departmental objectives for a safe,
secure and humane prison environment.

The service is lead by the Principal Chaplain, who is supported by prison management and
other chaplains who are either specifically trained and/or qualified, or who are local
volunteer chaplains. Pastoral care is provided to prisoners and opportunities are given for
worship, personal and spiritual growth along with religious education.

The department continues its commitment to supporting members of the Christian
Prison Ministries Forum and their provision of various programs including, Kairos, Alpha, Prison
Fellowship and other faith based initiatives that promote faith, cooperation, wellbeing and
human dignity.

Kairos has run two, three day introductions to Christianity at Mobilong Prison with 24 prisoners
completing the course to date. Kairos now plans to expand the program to Port Augusta
Prison in 2012-13.

Prison Fellowship provides practical support to many prisoners via a visiting program where
volunteers offer banking and property services as well as extensive mentoring. Support is also
provided to families of prisoners including through the provision of camping trips for children
of prisoners, the arrangement of Christmas presents for prisoners and their children (who are
under 15 years of age). In 2011-12, the fellowship also commenced a pilot of Christian
free-to-air television at Cadell Training Centre.

In 2011-12 the Department continued its 17 year partnership with Edge Church including the
Life Skills Program at the Adelaide Womens Prison. This program provides prisoners with
access to a range of services and activities including hair cuts, chocolate and card making
workshops, job interview preparation and presentation workshops and a range of art classes.

Edge Church also worked with the Department throughout 2011-12 to commence an
infrastructure partnership at Adelaide Womens Prison. This partnership involved the
refurbishment of three accommodation units which included upgrades to kitchen, bathroom
and garden areas.

The providers of faith based services and their communities are acknowledged and thanked
by the department for their efforts in 2011-12 as well as their ongoing support.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 25
1. DELIVERING OUR CRITICAL SERVICES

SAFETY AND SECURITY

Custodial based services

There are nine prisons located throughout South Australia, four of which are in the Adelaide
metropolitan area, with the remaining situated across the State in country areas including
Mobilong (Murray Bridge), Port Augusta, Port Lincoln, Cadell and Mount Gambier. Each
prison plays a specific role and function within the South Australian correctional system.

The key prisoner categories include male and female, remand, sentenced, high security,
medium security, low security and protection. The South Australian prison system is designed
to enable prisoners to progress from high security to medium and then to low security prisons.
A prisoners ability to progress through the system is managed through an individualised case
management system which is informed on their assessed level of risk to the community,
institutional risk and their level of behavioural compliance in accordance with the various
prison regimes. Placement also considers the availability of offender services and programs to
address individual needs.

The department remains committed to addressing the needs of Aboriginal people in the
criminal justice system. In accordance with that commitment, the department provides a
range of support services in the custodial environment to Aboriginal prisoners. This includes
the use of Aboriginal Liaison Officers, Aboriginal specific accommodation, the provision of
Grieving Shelters and participation in relevant forums such as the Prevention into Aboriginal
Deaths in Custody forum.

The departmental focus on appropriate management and support of prisoners with complex
needs (such as mental illness, intellectual disability and aged and infirm prisoners) continued
in 2011-12. Upon admission, all prisoners are assessed by correctional staff in conjunction with
SA Prison Health Service. Assessments continue throughout a prisoners sentence and form
the basis of each prisoners offender plan.

In 2011-12, the amendments to Correctional Services Act 1982 (SA) enhanced the security
and safety of the prison system. Key changes include increased powers relevant to prisoner
visits, as well as new provisions in relation to the use of passive alert detection dogs and
weapons by correctional staff.

Yatala Labour Prison
Yatala Labour Prison (YLP) is South Australias largest prison and can accommodate up to 500
male high, medium and low security prisoners, including those in protective custody. YLP also
accommodates a high proportion of remand only prisoners.

A range of programs and services are delivered to prisoners at YLP, including education and
vocational training, numeracy and literacy programs, and the Sexual Behaviours Clinic. The
prison is also the host of the training school for new correctional officers as well as the
departments Sentence Management Unit.

Yatala Labour Prison provides for an extensive prison industry program, delivering work and
vocational opportunities in metal work and metal fabrication, joinery work in the
manufacturing of a variety of timber products including furniture and sofa frames, a paint
and powder coating workshop, E-Waste recycling of electronic components, a commercial
laundry service and a commercial standard institutional kitchen that produces over a 1 000
meals a day.

The institution has embarked upon a significant infrastructure upgrade with the
commencement of construction on a new gatehouse facility, Health Centre and the

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 26
complete refurbishment of the kitchen. In addition, in 2011-12 the prison expanded its
capacity by 32 beds.

YLP has implemented major roles and function changes which are designed to improve
operational efficiency, as well as to better support the management of prisoners in protective
custody and to improve their access to programs and support services.

Other highlights at YLP in 2011-12 included:

the introduction of a new front line supervisory model for the leadership of custodial
staff and a new rosters system which expanded the variety of work opportunities for
correctional staff and exposure to personal development and promotional
opportunities; and
the departments commitment in 2011-12 to establish a High Dependency Unit at YLP
which will accommodate prisoners who require specialised accommodation and
support services due to their mental or physical health or impairment, disability, age
and others who require more intensive supervision. It is anticipated that construction
on this unit will commence in the next financial year.
The Northern Metropolitan Correctional Business Centre is located at Yatala Labour Prison
and services the prison, the Adelaide Pre-release Centre, the Adelaide Womens Prison and
the Northern Metropolitan Community Correctional Region. This includes the provision of
human resources, finance, occupational health and safety and procurement functions.

Adelaide Remand Centre
The Adelaide Remand Centre (ARC) is a high security remand facility which was
commissioned in 1986. Its inner city location was originally intended as the sole
accommodation for remand prisoners given its close proximity to the courts. The prison now
manages a video conferencing facility, which allows offenders to appear before the court
without the need to leave the prison.

Prisoners accommodated at the ARC have access to exercise yards, a gymnasium, a squash
court and recreational areas, which help to form the basis of a constructive day. The centre
also operates an education program which focuses on literacy and numeracy to assist
prisoners in preparing for their return to the community. The ARC has its own fully equipped
Health Centre where nursing staff and doctors from the SA Prison Health Service, manage the
health needs of prisoners.

Up to 267 prisoners can be accommodated in the prison including both mainstream and
protective custody. Approximately 160 staff are employed at the ARC comprising of
management, custodial, administrative support and professional services staff.

Other highlights at the ARC in 2011-12 included:

the completion of an access control and a reception upgrade which utilises new
technology in an effort to reduce the risk of contraband or unauthorised persons
entering the prison. This includes Biometric Verification (using an iris or fingerprint scan),
a Rototurn metal detector, X-ray scanning of approved personal items, an explosive
and narcotics trace detector and speed stile entry and exit gates.

Mobilong Prison
Mobilong Prison is an open, campus-style prison located near Murray Bridge. It has the
capacity to accommodate 327 medium and low security male prisoners. 50 of these
prisoners live in cottage-style units which each hold up to five prisoners.

Mobilong Prison aims to maximise prisoner participation in a range of programs and services
that are designed to develop skills and reduce the risk of re-offending. Prisoners can access
designated areas in the prison without being escorted which requires them to demonstrate
personal responsibility.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 27
Aboriginal relations are a focus at the prison with two full time Aboriginal Liaison Officers
appointed in addition to the facilitation of the Nunga Healing Circle and the arrangement of
monthly visits from guest speakers and Elders from the Aboriginal community. The prison also
held a number of events recognising Naidoc week, including a football match and family
day.

Programs delivered at the prison are Making Changes, Alcoholics Anonymous and Violence
Prevention Program. Mobilong also runs a number of Mens Health clinics throughout the year
that cover diabetes, prostate cancer and hepatitis C awareness as well as parenting skills.

Further services offered at Mobilong Prison include prisoner education, grounds maintenance,
fitness and wellbeing training, ceramics classes, Dreamtime Aboriginal art classes, emu egg
engraving and other recreational activities.

Prison Industries provided at Mobilong Prison include an electronic waste recycling project,
assembly work, paver production, metal engineering workshop, kitchen and bakery. A
number of bakery products are used widely throughout the prison system.

Other highlights at Mobilong Prison in 2011- 12 included:

the arrangement of an inter-prison football tournament between Mobilong Prison and
Cadell Training Centre which was sponsored by past and current AFL players, the
Aboriginal Services Unit and the DCS Executive;
the hosting of 160 guests to celebrate the completion of the Kairos short course; and
14 submissions in the Flinders University Art by Prisoners competition. 12 contributors
won awards with proceeds from some artwork sales donated to Victims of Crime.

The Southern Country Correctional Business Centre is located at Mobilong Prison. The Business
Centre services Mobilong Prison, Cadell Training Centre, Berri, Murray Bridge and Mount
Gambier Community Correctional Centres. Customer Services provided include human
resources, finance, occupational health and safety and procurement functions.

Port Augusta Prison
Port Augusta Prison (PAP) is a multi-purpose facility providing accommodation for up to 392
high, medium and low security prisoners. PAP is South Australias largest regional prison
catering for remand, reception and sentenced prisoners both male and female. Port Augusta
Prison has a high proportion of Aboriginal prisoners from communities across the north of the
state.

Programs and services delivered at PAP for 2011-12 include crisis intervention and support
services, prisoner assessment and sentence planning, case management services, education
and vocational training, and core programs, such as the Making Changes program and the
Violence Prevention Program.

PAP provides prisoners with opportunities for work and training in the kitchen, laundry, garden,
nursery and other trade workshops. The prison industry program includes seed propagation,
seasonal vegetable production, timber furniture production and metal products fabrication.

The prison includes the Pakani Arangka unit, which means a good growing place. The unit is
a 12 person dual occupancy unit which is dedicated to Aboriginal prisoners. Pakani Arangka
is located within a large garden and aims to provide culturally specific programs and allow
cultural interaction amongst prisoners. A range of programs support Pakani Arangka in
addition to culturally specific training, such as mens leadership and enhanced cultural
awareness training. Pakani Arangka requires that prisoners agree to demonstrate a high level
of institutional conduct and display a sound work ethic in order to contribute to a stable
communal living environment.

In 2011-2012, PAP completed the second instalment of the Sierra Program which targets
young offenders aged between 18 and 23 years. The cognitive based program is based on
relevant literature on the characteristics and needs of young persons involved in criminal

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 28
behaviour. It aims to assist participants to build essential skills that support an offence-free
lifestyle after release from prison.

PAP also facilitates the BHP Prisoner Reintegration Employment Opportunity Program (PREOP).
This program involves groups of 12 low security prisoners undergoing three months of training
at PAP, and on site at Roxby Downs. Prisoners gain certificates in elevated work platforms,
forklifts, front end loaders, and complete mining and safety inductions, as well as gain skills in
interviewing and resum writing. The PREOP program is a practical example of overcoming
the cycle of crime and providing prisoners with tangible opportunities to improve their and
their familys, lives. To date, 45 offenders have completed the program with 27 having gained
paid employment upon release. PREOP is the most successful program of its kind in Australia.

PAP also has an agreement with the Port Augusta City Council for community service
projects. These projects are undertaken by a work gang that operates from the low security
cottages, and includes undertaking graffiti removal, park construction and maintenance,
and general clean up activities of the foreshore area. This community service has also been
extended to include submissions from other community organisations. For the 2011-12
financial year, the community benefit was estimated at approximately $94 749.

Other highlights at PAP In 2011-12 included:

the continuation of infrastructure projects, including construction works on the new
Banksia unit which is due to be completed in late 2012. The Banksia Unit has been
designed to hold 90 prisoners of medium and high security classifications.
the prison awarded the departments Community Partnership Award to BHP Billiton,
Xceptional Recruitment and Olympic Dam Transport Australis for their contributions to
the Departments PREOP Program; and
players from the North Adelaide Football Club attended the prison to observe and
support a prison football match and to provide a training session for prisoners.

The Northern Country Correctional Business Centre is located at Port Augusta Prison. The
Business Centre provides human resources, finance, occupational health and safety and
procurement function services for Port Augusta Prison, Port Lincoln Prison and Northern
Country Community Corrections.

Cadell Training Centre
Cadell Training Centre (CTC) provides accommodation for up to 161 low security male
prisoners in a rural environment covering approximately 1600 hectares. Prisoners at CTC are
also able to undertake employment focused education programs including literacy and
numeracy, backhoe, truck, vehicle, boat and forklift licences, and nationally recognised
qualifications in horticulture and dairy. During 2011-12, 234 prisoners successfully gained
licences and permits to assist with employment opportunities upon release.

During 2011-2012 all three Phases of the Making Changes program were delivered at CTC.
Prisoners at Cadell Training Centre also have access to work pursuits including olive groves, a
nursery, irrigation unit, garage and workshop area. CTC also operates a registered Holstein-
Friesian stud, and processes and packages the milk produced for use in the prison system as
well as the Royal Adelaide Hospital.

The Cadell Country Fire Service (CFS) which is staffed by seven custodial staff, nine members
of the public and 13 prisoners maintained their level one and two qualifications during
2011-12. This also included a number of other accreditations during the year such as
Compressed Air Breathing Apparatus, Suppress Wild Fire, Government Radio Network Usage,
Burn Over Drills and Off Road Driving. The Cadell CFS managed approximately 112 hours of
internal training and also conducted training sessions at the Cadell Brigade for other CFS
Brigades.

During 2011-12, the Cadell CFS attended numerous callouts for a variety of purposes such as
road accidents, traffic control, creating landing zones for emergency helicopters,
commercial fires and storm damage.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 29

Other highlights at CTC in 2011-12 included:

the updating of the prisons citrus orchards which will now require less water and will
allow for more trees per hectare; and
the expansion of the CTC Community Work Program which included projects such as
cleaning up tasks at the Cadell Bowling Club, restoration work on the Canally Paddle
steamer, paving and painting for schools and other non profit organisations, clean up
work in national parks and assistance at community sporting events.

Port Lincoln Prison
Port Lincoln Prison (PLP) is located 650 kilometres (by road) west of Adelaide on the lower Eyre
Peninsula, and can provide accommodation for up to 126 medium to low security prisoners.
In June 2011, the new low security unit, called Bluefin, was opened which provided another
36 beds at the site. Bluefin includes accommodation specifically designed for prisoners who
are aged, or who have mobility issues.

Port Lincoln Prison, is considered a farm property and consists of approximately 200
hectares, which is currently used for barley, canola and livestock production. The commercial
garden produces a wide range of vegetables, which are used within the institution and sold
to the local community through contracts with vegetable retail outlets, hotels and
restaurants. The workshop has recently become involved in the oyster industry and is currently
manufacturing five different style oyster bags. The prison has also developed an engineering
business unit which constructs items for the oyster and pilchard industries.

PLP delivers the Violence Prevention Program and approximately 40 percent of the prisoner
population is involved in educational and vocational programs such as Senior First Aid and
White Card training. Some prisoners are also trained to become Peer Supporters who
support other prisoners with various issues associated with being incarcerated. Peer
Supporters work closely with case management staff to ensure positive outcomes.

Other highlights at PLP in 2011-12 included:

a small group of prisoners spent up to ten days working to set up and dismantle the
infrastructure for the annual Tunarama Festival as part of a community initiative;
the prison commencing a review of its library system including new material sourced
and bar-coded to complement the planned new borrowing system which will
commence next financial year.
significant infrastructure works at the prison took place including the relocation of the
main store and prisoner property, and the refurbishment of the existing control room.

Adelaide Womens Prison
Adelaide Womens Prison (AWP) is the only dedicated womens prison in the state. It has the
capacity to accommodate up to 148 female prisoners and caters for both remand and
sentenced prisoners with high, medium and low security ratings, including pre-release needs.
Remand and sentenced prisoners are accommodated together, within a range of
accommodation types determined by incentive-based regimes and risk assessment.

The AWP employs a multi-disciplinary approach to the management needs of female
prisoners. Programs and services delivered at the prison include crisis intervention and support
services, case management, education and vocational training and coordination of external
support service providers. The Making Changes program is also delivered to identified
prisoners.

Employment opportunities include a textiles workshop, grounds and maintenance work,
kitchen, laundry and cleaning. The textiles workshop has a number of commercial contracts
with external customers as well as making the states prisoner clothing and undertaking
community service projects.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 30
There is a continued focus on integrated offender management, with the increased aim of
involving family members and community support workers to assist in the transition process
from prison back into the community.

Other highlights at the prison in 2011-12 included:

continuation of the development of the Master Plan for improvement works at the
AWP and Adelaide Pre-release Centre to upgrade (or construct) a new kitchen, a
new cell block and install a new perimeter fence at the Prison;
the prisons workshop submitted entries for the Royal Adelaide Show (following
successful outcomes in 2010-11). The workshop also featured in a television current
affairs segment which highlighted prisoners work and achievements; and
an important infrastructure improvement program was initiated at the Prison in
2011-12 which included the commencement of a partnership with Edge Church to
undertake a renovation project as part of the Living Skills Unit.

Adelaide Pre-release Centre
The Adelaide Pre-release Centre (APC) is the main pre-release facility in the state for male
prisoners. It has the capacity to accommodate 60 low security prisoners in cottage
accommodation.

The APC was established to provide male prisoners with programs to facilitate their gradual
release into the community. Prisoners at the APC are generally in the last 12 to 18 months of
their sentence and participate in accompanied and unaccompanied family leave,
education, work release and community work programs, as well as a range of on centre
employment programs and service delivery opportunities.

In 2011-12, 149 prisoners from the APC performed various important community service roles
including work for the Metropolitan Parks Program, the Salvation Army the Northgate Life
Centre, church organisations and other government programs. During the year, more a total
of $157 760 worth of value and benefit was provided to the community as a result of this
prison-based community service.

The APC continues to provide re-socialisation programs to prisoners, based on the principles
of case management and incentive-based regimes, enabling prisoners to access a wide
choice of programs based on individual assessment of need and progress through each
regime. Programs delivered include accommodation services, basic budgeting, gambling
assistance, mens health as well as information sessions relating to Parole and Home
Detention. External service providers, as well as departmental resources, are used to assist in
preparing prisoners to re-enter the community.

The APC garden provides employment opportunities for prisoners accommodated on site.
The garden is a commercial enterprise supplying fresh seasonal vegetables to the states
prison kitchens. The garden has also been a long-standing supporter of FOODBANK SA, and
regularly donates substantial quantities of fresh produce for community distribution by state
charities and churches.

Meaningful education is also given a high priority at the APC. Prisoners attend courses in
community learning facilities to address identified literacy and numeracy deficiencies,
obtaining vocational education qualifications and skills to assist in gaining employment.

Other highlights at the APC in 2012 included:

the enhancement of an award winning partnership arrangement with the
Department for Water, Environment and Natural Resources which enables a team of
selected low security prisoners to work in the metropolitan National Parks; and
the establishment of a new partnership as part of the departments REPAY SA,
program where male prisoners engage in community service work.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 31
Mount Gambier Prison
Mount Gambier Prison is the only privately managed prison in South Australia. It is currently
managed and operated by G4S Custodial Services Pty Ltd, and the contract is closely
monitored by the department. The prison can accommodate 172 male sentenced and
remand prisoners, and caters primarily for medium and low security prisoners. The prison can
also accommodate short-term high security male and female prisoners.

G4S is responsible for the day to day operation of the prison, although these operations are
overseen by a departmental General Manager and two onsite operational coordinators, as
required by legislation.

Performance of the prison and its operations are monitored by a range of mechanisms, such
as:

monthly reports against the Key Performance and Service Level Indicators;
monthly meetings of the Contract Management Group to consider any key issues and
performance;
monthly reports from the G4S Prison Director who manages the prison on a day-to-day
basis; and
a contract compliance framework and full time contract compliance officer to
ensure compliance with the contract specifications.

This monitoring is conducted to ensure the prison remains operationally effective, provides
value for money, and that G4S complies with its contractual obligations.

The public tender process for the operation of Mount Gambier Prison concluded in June 2011
with Cabinet approving G4S as the successful tenderer. The new five-year contract
commenced on 1 December 2011.

Security Classifications
Prisoners who enter the prison system are assessed to determine an appropriate security
classification. This classification is reviewed on an ongoing basis through the case
management process, with endorsement by the general manager and/or the Serious
Offender Committee, as required.

In addition to standard security considerations, prisoners must demonstrate positive behaviour
and a commitment to addressing their offending behaviour to achieve a reduction in their
security classification.

As at 30 June 2012, 23.11% of prisoners were classified as high security, 54.94% were classified
medium and 21.04% of prisoners were classified as low security. There were approximately
0.91% of prisoners yet to be classified.

Incentive Based Regime
Prisoners in South Australia are managed in accordance with incentive based regimes. The
regime management system seeks to enhance case management processes by ensuring
prisoners are provided with opportunities to address offending behaviours and develop skills
that will assist in leading a law-abiding lifestyle upon release back into the community.

Prison regimes are designed to encourage prisoners to accept responsibility for their own
actions and behaviours. Upon entry into a prison, prisoners are placed
on an induction regime and can progress through basic, standard and enhanced
regimes. As prisoners progress through the regimes they are able to have increased access to
privileges if their behaviour and security rating permits. The regime system also allows for
prisoners to be regressed through the regimes in instances where their behaviour is non
complaint to governing rules and regulations (noting that upon review date if there are
noted behavioural improvements the prisoner will then recommence working through the
regimes with increased incentives).


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 32
In circumstances where the prisoner has unique needs, such as mental health, the prisoner
may be placed on an intensive case management regime which provides flexibility and
scope for the prisoner to achieve positive outcomes in a manner which is in line with their
capabilities, with governing rules and regulations.

Nominated Visitors
Prisoners are entitled to receive visits from nominated visitors. Visits from relatives and friends
enable prisoners to maintain community ties and are essential for the present and future
wellbeing of prisoners and their families. During 2011-12, there were 48 645 visit sessions across
the prison system. The total visitor number was 72 208.

Unfortunately, some visitors abuse their visit privilege and seek to introduce contraband into
the prison system or do not meet accepted behavioural standards. When there is sufficient
evidence to suggest that a visitor may be attempting to introduce contraband, they may be
banned from visiting prisons. During 2011-12, a total of 96 visitors were banned.

Pursuant to Section 34 of the Correctional Services Act 1982, during 2011-12:

60 visitors were detained and searched; and
25 visitors were found to be in possession of a prohibited or restricted item and
detained for South Australian Police (SAPol) attendance. The average duration of
these detentions was approximate 15 minutes.

Visiting Inspectors
Visiting Inspectors monitor the operation of prisons in accordance with the Correctional
Services Act 1982. Visiting Inspectors provide an independent regular inspection service
across South Australian prisons.

Visiting Inspectors speak directly with prisoners to make certain that they are treated fairly
and that their accommodation is clean and safe. They also ensure that prisoners have access
to adequate food and suitable clothing, and may be called upon to investigate any
complaints that could affect the health and welfare of prisoners.

South Australia currently has 25 active Visiting Inspectors. One Visiting Inspector was
appointed in 2011-12, one retired from the position and one Visiting Inspector resigned. There
was one active Aboriginal Inspector in 2011-12.

Visiting Tribunals
Visiting Tribunals are appointed by the Governor of South Australia to provide an
independent adjudication service for serious breaches of prison rules and regulations.
Appeals that originate from General Managers penalties may also be attended to by Visiting
Tribunals. They are also involved in the witnessing and destruction of contraband seized within
the prison system.

In 2011-12, there were six active Visiting Tribunals, with no new appointments or revocations.

Complaints Management
The complaints management service provides a step by step prisoner and offender
grievance process aimed at achieving a satisfactory resolution at the first point of contact.
This service includes the prisoner complaint telephone line which provides advice,
information, and appropriate referral services for prisoners.

In 2011-12, there were 1 248 registered calls to the Prisoner Complaint Line, comprising 691
valid calls and 557 invalid calls (such as wrong number dialled or hang ups). This compares to
a total of 977 calls, comprising of 498 valid and 479 invalid for 2010-2011.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 33
Prisoner Population
The average prison population continued to increase during 2011-12, while the number of
prisoners held in custody on remand was steady there was an increase in those serving a
custodial prison sentence.

The average prisoner population for 2011-12 was 2078, this compares with 1987 in 2010-11 and
1963 in 2009-10. The following graph shows the annual average numbers of prisoners over the
last five years.

1855
1935 1963
1987
2078
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
2000
P
r
i
s
o
n
e
r


P
o
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12
Average Prisoner Population - 2007-08 - 2011-12


Gender
Males made up 93.55% of the prison population as at 30 June 2012.

Age
The average age for a person in custody at 30 June 2012 was 37.0 years. On 30 June 2011,
the average age was also 37.0 years, and was 36.4 as at 30 June 2010. During 2011-12,
19.82% of all intakes into custody were from the 25-29 year age group.

Aboriginal Status
The number of Aboriginal prisoners decreased slightly from the previous year. As at
30 June 2012, 22.39% of prisoners were Aboriginal, this compares with 23.79% on 30 June 2011.

Remand
As at 30 June 2012, 31.15% of prisoners were unsentenced. This compares with 31% on
30 June 2011 and 35.25% as at 30 June 2010.

Sentence Length
The average expected time to serve in prison for sentenced prisoners as at 30 June 2012 was
70.6 months compared with 69 months on 30 June 2011 and 70.2 months on 30 June 2010.

66.4
69.3
70.2
69.0
70.6
0
20
40
60
80
M
o
n
t
h
s
07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11 11-12
Expected Time to Serve in Custody - 2007-08 - 2011-12



DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 34
Most Serious Offence
As at 30 June 2012 the most common serious offence for male sentenced prisoners were Acts
Likely to Cause Injury at 23.5%. The most common serious offence for the previous two years
has also been Acts Likely to Cause Injury, on 30 June 2011 at 23.8% and 30 June 2010 at 20.7%

As at 30 June 2012 the most common serious offence for sentenced female prisoners was
Homicide at 24.7%. Homicide was also the most common offence, at 22.6%, on 30 June 2011,
and also in 2010 at 23.1%.

Most Serious Offence for Sentenced Males 2010-2012
0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%
Homicide
Sex Offences
Other Theft
Acts Likely to cause injury
Robbery, extortion and related offences
Unlawful entry with intent
Deception and related offences
Offences against Justice Procedures
Drug offences
Driving/Licence/Traffic Offences
Other Offences
Unknown
Percentage (%)
2010 2011 2012


Most Serious Offence for Sentenced Females 2010-2012

0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25%
Homicide
Sex Offences
Other Theft
Acts Likely to cause injury
Robbery, extortion and related offences
Unlawful entry with intent
Deception and related offences
Offences against Justice Procedures
Drug offences
Driving/Licence/Traffic Offences
Other Offences
Unknown
Percentage (%)
2010 2011 2012

Robbery, extortion and related offences

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 35
Prison Incidents

Escapes
In 2011-12, no prisoner escaped from secure or open custody, this is a direct result of the
Departments strengthened security measures for all prisoners, particularly for those in low
security open custody and on escort or hospital watch.

Strengthened measures have included amendments to prisoner placements, additional
security checks of the environment of individual hospital rooms, and implementing other strict
guidelines to reinforce procedures.

The following graph illustrates the escape rates since 2007-08 (escape rate is calculated as
100 x prisoners escaping divided by the daily average prison population). It must be noted
that a single incident impacts greatly on the overall rate due to the very low number of
incidents.

Escape rates from 2007-08 to 2011-12

0.32
0.36
0.15 0.20
0.00
0
0.2
0.4
0.6
0.8
1
P
r
i
s
o
n
e
r

p
o
p
u
l
a
t
i
o
n
07/08 08/09 09/10 10/11 11/12
Escape Rates between 2007-08 and 2011-12


Assaults
Prisoner assault rates are calculated as 100 x prisoners involved in assaults divided by the daily
average prisoner population. The Department has further improved the reporting of assault
incidents during the year to ensure the safe and secure management of the prison system.

Assault rates between from 2009-10 to 2011-12
Prisoner on Officer 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Physical Assaults 0.61% 0.80% 0.77%
Abusive Threatening Behaviour 4.94% 3.17% 5.05%
Prisoner on Prisoner
Assault 8.40% 8.70% 8.33%

Deaths in Custody
Four deaths in custody occurred during 2011-12. Three of these recorded deaths were of
apparent natural causes.

Whilst any unnatural death in custody is unacceptable, the department continues to ensure
that appropriate measures are undertaken to identify those offenders most at risk of self harm
and, wherever possible, prevent deaths in custody. No Aboriginal prisoners died in custody in
2011-12.



DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 36
Illicit Drugs
During 2011-12, there were 216 recorded drug detection incidents in prison.

The Department for Correctional Services proactively seeks to stop the supply and trafficking
in illicit drugs. The trafficking of drugs to prisoners is an issue for every correctional jurisdiction.
The department has deployed a range of measures to reduce trafficking by targeting and
minimising supply and demand.

A number of targeted whole of institutional searches took place during the year. The
searches were undertaken by members of the departments Emergency Response Group,
Operations Security Unit, staff at each site, the departments Intelligence and Investigations
Unit, South Australian Police and the Australian Customs Service. These searches were
supplemented with a rigorous and regular local search program to assist in slowing the use of
illicit drugs in the prison system.

A number of Operation Dedicates, in partnership with South Australia Police were undertaken
in 2011-12. These operations targeted visitors to correctional institutions and involved the
searching of visitors and their vehicles. SAPOL resources provided, which greatly assisted the
department, included officers from a range of specialised units in addition to their drug
detection dogs.

Search of Prisoners
Pursuant to Section 37 of the Correctional Services Act 1982 (the Act) the manager of a
correctional institution may cause a prisoners belongings to be searched for the purpose of
detecting prohibited items.

In this regard, prison general managers have reported that over 55 000 searches were
conducted on prisoner areas and their cells and property throughout the states prisons
during 2011-12. As a result of these searches, a large number of prohibited items were found
and confiscated.

Search of prisoners between 2011-12
TYPES OF CONTRABAND
PRISON
NUMBER OF
SEARCHES 1 2 3 4 5 6
ARC 4890 9 5 0 1 0 2
APC 787 12 0 6 0 0 18
AWP 4051 48 0 4 0 0 41
CTC 4584 38 1 1 2 1 18
MOB 5232 43 10 10 8 9 37
MTG 3892 12 0 0 1 1 5
PAP 21629 55 12 1 1 1 58
PLP 1685 13 7 0 2 1 325
YLP 10307 69 16 0 0 2 160
TOTALS 57057 299 51 22 15 15 664
LEGEND: 1 Drugs/drug paraphernalia 4 Homebrews
2 Homemade weapons 5 Tattooing equipment
3 Mobile phones, and related items (SIM cards and chargers) 6 Other prohibited items

Intelligence and Investigations Unit

The departments Intelligence and Investigations Unit works collaboratively with the South
Australian Police (SAPol), monitoring the activities of prisoners and their visitors to intercept
and reduce the flow of contraband into the prison system.

Visitors who are reported, or charged by SAPol as a direct result of the units activities, can be
banned from visiting any of the States prisons. This can occur after either being detected
with contraband, endeavouring to gain entry using a false identification or for being
suspected of introducing contraband into the prison system.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 37

1. DELIVERING OUR CRITICAL SERVICES

SAFETY AND SECURITY

The role of Community Corrections
The courts can sentence offenders to undertake community based sanctions including
Probation (Bonds), Community Service (Repay SA), Supervised Bail or Intensive Bail Supervision
(court ordered Home Detention).

During the period of their community based sentence, offenders are supervised by the
Department for Correctional Services, and are often ordered to undertake programs to
address their offending behaviour. Offenders with community based orders are required to
comply with all conditions of the order with any failure to comply resulting in possible further
sanction from the courts. In addition to supervising offenders on court orders, the department
also provides community based supervision for offenders on Parole and Home Detention.

Community Corrections continues to provide targeted, risk based offender management,
known as Enhanced Community Corrections (ECC). Improving public safety and managing
offenders based on their level of risk, are the key principles behind the ECC. Resources are
focused on offenders that represent the greatest risk to the community - the higher the risk,
the more intensive supervision, monitoring, programs and case management provided.
Community Corrections strengthens the departments capacity to effectively and rigorously
manage adult offenders in the community with a focus on public safety, public confidence,
offender responsibility, and the rights of victims.

In 2011-12, the Department for Correctional Services continued to provide services to
communities and offenders in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) and
Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (NPY) Aboriginal lands of central Australia. This
included the continuation of partnerships with the Commonwealth and other state
jurisdictions to provide offender family violence rehabilitation programs. One such program is
the Cross Borders Indigenous Family Violence Program which delivers culturally and
linguistically appropriate programs that address issues of family violence (as it occurs in
remote Aboriginal communities) with the aim to decrease the incidence of physical and
psychological harm. Cross Borders Indigenous Family Violence Program is aimed at helping
break the cycle of violence across generations of male indigenous offenders. In 2012-13, the
Department aims to also launch a female specific program.

Another APY Lands initiative is the Cross Border Justice Project and the cross-border protocols
for the transfer and supervision of prisoners and offenders. In accordance with legislation,
Community Corrections provided assessment, monitoring and supervision of offenders in the
APY region, with particular emphasis on collaboration to ensure community safety and victim
protection.

In 2011-12, Community Corrections provided services at 17 Community Correctional Centres
and other outreach services situated throughout the state, which are divided into four
separate regions: the Southern Metropolitan Region, the Northern Metropolitan Regions, the
Southern Country Region and the Northern Country Region.

Southern Metropolitan Region
The Southern Metropolitan Region (SMR) supervises offenders at three major locations:
Adelaide Community Correctional Centre, Edwardstown Community Correctional Centre,
and Noarlunga Community Correctional Centre. Community Corrections also provides an
outreach service in Victor Harbor and Mount Barker. Also located at the SMR is the:

Courts Unit which facilitates offender reports for the courts;
Home Detention Administration Centre which is responsible for the electronic
monitoring supervision of prisoners (subject to Home Detention, Parole and offenders
on Intensive Bail Supervision); and

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 38
Business Centre (located at the Edwardstown Community Correctional Centre) which
provides an effective service delivery to SMR and the Adelaide Remand Centre.

As at 30 June 2012, the SMR was responsible for the supervision of offenders on:

Bail 178
Community Service Orders 228
Financial Penalty Expiated through CS 217
Home Detention Orders 45
Home Detention Bond Orders 1
Intensive Bail Supervision 309
Interstate Orders 6
Other Orders 100
Parole Orders 278
Probation Orders 767
Individuals with multiple orders counted once in each particular category

Northern Metropolitan Region
The Northern Metropolitan Region (NMR) supervises offenders at four major locations: the
North East Community Correctional Centre at Holden Hill, Elizabeth Community Correctional
Centre, Gawler Community Correctional Centre and Port Adelaide Community Correctional
Centre. The region services Adelaides northern suburbs, the Barossa Valley, mid north and
the Yorke Peninsula.

Also based at the NMR is the departments Volunteer Unit which supports prisoners and
offenders in the community through a wide range of services provided by volunteers across
the state.

As at 30 June 2012, the NMR was responsible for the supervision of offenders on:

Bail 263
Community Service Orders 379
Financial Penalty Expiated through CS 344
Intensive Bail Supervision 3
Other Orders 126
Parole Orders 435
Probation Orders 1062
Individuals with multiple orders counted once in each particular category

Southern Country Region
The Southern Country Region (SCR) supervises offenders at three main centres: Murray Bridge
Community Correctional Centre, Berri Community Correctional Centre, and Mount Gambier
Community Correctional Centre. Community Corrections also provides an outreach service in
Mount Barker and Bordertown, with the region covering the Riverland and south eastern parts
of the state, with many offenders living a significant distance from the correctional centres.

As at 30 June 2012, the SCR was responsible for the supervision of offenders on:

Bail 43
Community Service Orders 133
Financial Penalty Expiated through CS 63
Home Detention Orders 4
Intensive Bail Supervision 19
Interstate Orders 1
Other Orders 28
Parole Orders 88
Probation Orders 256

Individuals with multiple orders counted once in each particular category


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 39
Northern Country Region
The Northern Country Region supervised offenders at seven locations: Port Pirie, Port Augusta,
Whyalla, Port Lincoln, Ceduna, Coober Pedy and Marla. Many offenders live a significant
distance from these centres. This requires staff to operate regular outreach services, including
in the APY Lands. Approximately one-third of offenders supervised by regional staff are of
Aboriginal descent, some living in remote traditional communities.

As at 30 June 2012, the Northern Country Region was responsible for the supervision of
offenders on:
Bail 91
Community Service Orders 162
Financial Penalty Expiated through CS 63
Home Detention Orders 5
Intensive Bail Supervision 23
Other Orders 29
Parole Orders 88
Probation Orders 342
Individuals with multiple orders counted once in each particular category

Offender Reports
Reports are prepared for the courts, the Parole Board and the Sentence Management Unit to
assist them in the sentencing and/or setting conditions for a range of orders.

Reports prepared for the courts include Bail, Home Detention (Intensive Bail Supervision), and
Pre-Sentence. Parole Reports are prepared for the Parole Board. Home Detention Reports are
prepared for the Sentence Management Unit.

These reports are prepared for a variety of purposes and contain a range of information. This
information can relate to:

the offenders risk of re-offending;
the offenders background and current situation;
offending history;
programs that are available to assist offenders address their offending behaviour;
an offenders likelihood of complying with the conditions of a community based order;
and
any victim(s) of their offending.

Reports aim to provide accurate and objective information to inform the relevant decision
making authority. The information contained in reports comes from a variety of sources
including the offender, SAPol and court files, and where appropriate, from other sources
including the offenders family, government agencies, non-government organisations,
professionals and other persons.

In 2011-12, the number of Offender Reports (completed for the Courts, Parole Board and
Sentence Management Unit) were:

Pre-sentence 1 142
Bail Enquiry 1 265
Intensive Bail Supervision 1 985
Parole 645

Offender Programs
Community based offenders are supervised under the following major programs: Community
Service (Repay SA), Probation, Intensive Probation Supervision, Parole, Home Detention,
Intensive Bail (Home Detention Bail), Bail and Drug Court Curfew.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 40
Community Service (Repay SA)
Community Service (Repay SA) is the departments offender Community Service Program.
Offenders repay their debt to society through supervised community work projects. Repay SA
ensures offenders face the consequences of their crime, learn new skills and make a positive
contribution to the community. The focus of Repay SA projects is on providing meaningful
work for offenders. The projects enable offenders to acquire skills and experience that will
assist them in obtaining employment. For many offenders, Repay SA is their first experience at
making a positive contribution to their community.

Repay SA projects generally comprise of work groups involving four - eight offenders that are
managed by supervisors, which are funded by the department. These work groups undertake
a range of projects throughout the community. Projects involve partnerships with local and
state government organisations and community agencies who contribute to the cost of work
groups and supervisors. These partnerships often incorporate vocational training in painting
and horticulture.

A number of Repay SA offenders have special needs, including physical, psychological, and
alcohol and other drug problems. These problems may preclude them from working on
mainstream projects, and the department provides alternative work for these offenders who
often require high levels of support and supervision to enable them to complete their hours.

Offenders that have been assessed as suitable to undertake Repay SA may be placed at
organisations or community agencies and work with agency workers and volunteers. In these
instances, the department has criteria to ensure that the project does not secure a pecuniary
profit for its members, provides aid to the disadvantaged or is a project of a government
department or instrumentality, or local government authority.

The department also manages a graffiti removal program named, detag. The objective of
detag is for offenders, some of whom have committed graffiti related offences, to repay their
debt to society. It is run in conjunction with local and state government organisations and
provides a responsive, cost efficient and sustainable program to remove graffiti throughout
the community.

The South Australian Government is committed to constructive programs for addressing
graffiti vandalism at a local level. Graffiti removal costs the community millions of dollars each
year, and detag is just one way to minimise the impact of this cost.

During 2011-12, 1 817 orders to perform Community Service were referred to the Department.
This compares with 2 217 in 2010-11 and 2 154 in 2009-10. In 2011-12, offenders carried out
146 759 hours of Community Service. This compares with 141 119 in 2010-11 and 138 921 in
2009-10.

Probation
A court may release an offender on a bond to be of good behaviour (Probation). A bond
may require an offender to meet a number of conditions such as, being under the supervision
of a community corrections officer, undertaking assessment and intervention (including
attending programs relating to their offending behaviour), residing or not residing at certain
places or undertaking or refraining from undertaking specified employment as directed.

When offenders are placed under supervision, a community corrections officer assesses their
risk of re-offending and criminogenic needs. The assessment of criminogenic needs identifies
those factors that may contribute to offending behaviour, for example, alcohol and other
drug use, poor anger management, dysfunctional thinking and reasoning skills. Based on the
results of risk and needs assessments, a case plan is developed.

During the period of the bond, ongoing reviews of the offender and their case plan are
undertaken. Depending on the progress of the offender and the implementation of the case
plan, they may be reassessed as lower risk and their level of supervision reduced where
appropriate. Other issues such as mental health problems may be addressed by referral to
appropriate community services.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 41
Unless offenders breach their orders and fail to report, or an administrative discharge is
authorised, they are supervised for the entire period of their order.

In 2011-12, 1 944 Probation Orders were registered with the Department. In comparison, 2 228
were registered in 2010-11 and 2 583 in 2009-10.

Intensive Probation Supervision
Since 1999, the courts have been empowered to order home curfews with Intensive
Probation Supervision for offenders who, but for ill health, disability or frailty would otherwise
have been sentenced to imprisonment. A full case management service is provided,
including psychological and other services. This program relieves the community of the cost
of imprisonment, and allows offenders to have access to the services they require to manage
their special needs.

Intensive Probation Supervision also involves offenders being subject to Home Detention
conditions with electronic monitoring (in most cases).

Parole
Offenders with prison sentences of 12 months or longer are required to have a non-parole
period set by the court (unless the court declines to set one).

Offenders serving a sentence of five or less years, other than those convicted of a sexual
offence, personal violence offence or arson, are automatically eligible for release on Parole
at the expiration of their non-parole period if they agree to comply with the conditions of
release set by the Parole Board.

Prisoners serving a period of imprisonment for a sexual offence, personal violence offence or
arson are precluded from being automatically eligible for release on Parole. They must apply
for release on Parole, which is considered by the Parole Board.

In addition, those prisoners serving a term of five years or more are also required to apply for
release, and the Parole Board makes the decision whether or not to release the prisoner, and
provides the conditions of release. For those prisoners serving a life sentence, the Governor in
Executive Council must approve the Parole Boards recommendation for release.

The Parole Board is assisted in making its decisions by a Parole Report, completed by a
community corrections officer. The report contains comprehensive information regarding
background, offending history, an assessment of the prisoners risk and criminogenic needs,
behavioural patterns in prison, recommendations for programs to be undertaken, and
release plans. The report also makes recommendations regarding the conditions of Parole.

During 2011-12, 565 new Parole Orders were registered with the Department. This compares
with 584 in 2010-11, 645 in 2009-10, 695 in 2008-09, 602 in 2007-08 and 564 during 2006-07.

Home Detention
Home Detention provides an option for certain prisoners to complete their prison sentence at
home. The program, which has been operating in South Australia since 1986, is one of the
departments most intensive and successful community based programs.

Prisoners who have completed half of their non-parole period, and are in the last 12 months
of their sentence, or who have satisfied half of their sentence (if sentenced to 12 months or
less), are able to apply for Home Detention. The Sentence Management Unit assesses all such
applications against the eligibility criteria. Sex offenders and murderers cannot apply for
Home Detention.

Release conditions are strict and may require prisoners to be subject to electronic monitoring.
Breaches of any condition may result in immediate revocation of the release order and
subsequent return to prison.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 42
Community service work can be ordered by the Sentence Management Unit if an offender
on Home Detention has no employment or study, which gives an offender the opportunity to
make restitution and gain vocational skills that may lead to employment.

During 2011-12, 193 offenders were released to Home Detention. This is in comparison to 160
in 2010-11 and 218 in 2009-10. In 2011-12, 163 offenders successfully completed Home
Detention Orders. This is compared with 168 in 2010-11 and 224 in 2009-10.

Intensive Bail Supervision (Home Detention Bail)
Courts have been empowered, since 1987, to release a defendant on Bail with conditions of
home curfew and Intensive Bail Supervision. This program is managed similarly to Home
Detention, although with an increased surveillance component. Almost all (95%) Intensive Bail
Supervision Orders include electronic monitoring conditions.

Courts are first required to consider a departmental report on the suitability of the proposed
residence, and may seek further advice regarding other factors that may affect the
successful completion of the order.

During 2011-12, 1 182 new Intensive Bail Supervision Orders were registered with the
Department. In 2010-11, 946 new Intensive Bail Supervision Orders were registered and 856 in
2009-10.

Bail
A defendant may be granted a Bail Order, with a condition to be under the supervision of a
community corrections officer. Conditions may be imposed covering areas such as where
defendants can reside and with whom they can associate, assessment and/or treatment
they are required to undertake, or programs they must attend.

The main purpose of Bail with supervision is to ensure that defendants comply with the
conditions of their Bail Order and attend court as required. However, the period during which
a person is on Bail can be a time when intervention to address the issues underlying their
alleged offending behaviour can be very effective. Therefore, where a court has imposed
appropriate conditions, or where the defendant is willing to do so, he or she can engage in
counselling and programs whilst on Bail.

Offenders on Bail are required to have regular contact with their community corrections
officer and breaches of Bail conditions, such as failure to report, are reported back to the
courts.

During 2011-12, 1 195 new Bail Orders were registered with the Department. In 2010-11, 1 276
new Bail Orders were registered and 1 507 in 2009-10.

Drug Court Curfew
The South Australian Drug Court can also impose Home Curfew Orders that may have an
electronic monitoring component, in accordance with the Bail Act 1986. Home detention
supervisors support the Drug Court through an after-hours monitoring service for all Drug Court
participants subject to Home Detention conditions.

The Alcohol and Other Drug Management Unit undertakes urinalysis and breath testing on
community based offenders, and any non-compliance identified is reported to Drug Court
staff for determination by the court.

Gender
On 30 June 2012, males made up 82.44% of all individuals with community based orders. The
figure, as at 30 June 2011, was 82.06%, and at 30 June 2010 was 81.43%.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 43
Aboriginal Status
On 30 June 2012, 17.17% of individuals were of Aboriginal descent. This is compared with
17.12% on 30 June 2011 and 18.49% on 30 June 2010.

Age
The average age for an individual offender under the departments supervision in the
community on 30 June 2012 was 36.90 years. This is compared with 37.29 years on 30 June
2011 and 37.19 years on 30 June 2010.

Number of Orders
As at 30 June 2012, 6 454 orders were supervised by Community Corrections, a decrease from
6 808 as at 30 June 2011. The following chart shows the placement of all offenders under the
supervision of the department as at 30 June 2012.

Placement of Offenders as at 30 June 2012
Home Detention Bond
0.01%
Other Orders
3.37%
Interstate Orders
0.14%
Probation
29.57%
Prison
24.24%
Parole
10.50%
FPE Thru CS
8.18%
IBS
4.47%
Home Detention
0.63%
CSO
11.29%
Bail
7.59%

Number of Individuals
As at 30 June 2012, there were a total of 6 162 individuals under supervision with one or more
order. This is an increase of 219 offenders from the previous year.

The following graph shows the distribution of both orders and individual by region.

Orders by individual and region as at 30 June 2012

0
500
1000
1500
2000
2500
3000
N
u
m
b
e
r
NCR NMR SCR SMR
Orders Individuals

NCR = Northern Country Region SCR = Southern Country Region
NMR = Northern Metropolitan Region SMR = Southern Metropolitan Region



DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 44
Bail Support Program
During 2011-12, the department commenced the Bail Support Program (BSP) Project. The BSP
aims to provide bail accommodation to suitable offenders as an alternative to being
remanded.

Alleged offenders likely to benefit from the BSP are those who either do not have any
accommodation (or suitable accommodation), or who are awaiting the completion of a bail
report. This program provides Magistrates with a meaningful alternative to remand.

The BSP aims to capture offenders who are often remanded for a short period of time and will
specifically assist disadvantaged groups including those who are homeless and Aboriginal
offenders. As the program allows offenders to stay in the community (whilst under the
supervision of the department) offenders in the BSP are able to better maintain links to
education and employment and their families.

In 2011-12, key milestones achieved included the completion of a viability report, extensive
stakeholder engagement (with Commonwealth and State government departments) and
liaison with the Chief Magistrate. Additionally, the department has developed partnerships
with relevant non-government organisations, explored potential funding models and
reflected these in a comprehensive business case.

The government has confirmed funding for a BSP Project Manager in 2012-13.

It is anticipated that significant progress will be made over the next year in achieving
commencement of the BSP in 2012-13.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 45

1. DELIVERING OUR CRITICAL SERVICES

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Victim Services
The departments Victim Services Unit consults with government and non-government victim
support agencies and departmental stakeholders, to ensure that the rights of victims are
upheld. The unit manages the Victims Register which promotes the rights and needs of victims
of crime and demonstrates the departments commitment to restorative justice.

During 2011-12, the department consulted broadly with Registered Victims and stakeholder
groups on the development of a draft Victim Service Charter. Finalisation of the Charter is
expected by late 2012.

The growth in registered victims has been consistent over the last few years and is expected
to continue as the communitys awareness of victims rights increase. As at 30 June 2012,
there were 721 registered victims compared with 645 at 30 June 2011. This equates to an
increase of 12% in victim registrations for the 2011-12 financial year. Over the past three
financial years (1 July 2009 30 June 2012) there has been an increase of 32% in the number
of registered victims.

As at 30 June 2012, the large majority of victims were registered as a result of a major
indictable offence. Homicide, Child and Adult Sex Offences and Domestic Violence
Offences equated to 77.5% of all victim registrations.

Number of Registered Victims - July 2006 June 2012























NOTES: In 2011-12, a total of 149 new registrations were received. The most common source of victim referrals
include; the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP), DPP Witness Assistance Program, SAPol
and Victim Support Services.

Volunteer Support
Departmental volunteers provide a meaningful and worthwhile support service to prisoners,
offenders and DCS staff with the Volunteer Unit providing a vital link between the department
and the community. In 2011-12 there were more than 100 registered departmental

Victims Offenders
580
545
468
445
401
721
564
492
545
645
0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800
2011-2012
2010-2011
2009-2010
2008-2009
2007-2008

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 46
volunteers, who provided support to offenders in prison and the community through a wide
range of services.

During 2011-12, DCS volunteers undertook 3 997 tasks (which is an increase from
3 441 in 2010-11) and gave over 18 187 hours of support to offenders (which is an increase
from 9 000 hours last year). Each task averaged 4.55 hours which equates to just under
$426 000 worth of volunteer support (in line with Australian Bureau of Statistics Counting Rules).

The range of support provided by volunteers in 2011-12 included the following programs:

Transport - Volunteers provided a transport service to assist prisoners with pre-release
needs. This service (which is the busiest area of the Volunteer Unit) also provides for
the movement of offenders in the community to attend appointments and
departmental programs;
Prisoner Family Visits - Volunteers support prisoner family members to maintain contact
with prisoners through the provision of transport for the families of offenders to prisons,
including escorting unattended children for visits and supporting family members from
interstate;
Prisoner Release Program - Volunteers provided practical support for prisoners
attending court, or those who are newly released from prison, to assist with the
transition to supervision in the community;
Community Mentor Program - Volunteers visited socially isolated offenders to provide
pro-social supports in prison and in the community. The support provided is adapted
to meet the individual needs of each offender;
Library Support - The Prison Library Review continued to be supported by the
Volunteer Unit. A new computer systems has been implemented and tasks
undertaken to ensure resources are catalogued and managed appropriately.
Additional volunteers were recruited to support the new libraries with further
volunteers to be appointed in 2012-13; and
Education and Prisoner Visiting Programs: Volunteers who assist with the delivery of
education at metropolitan prisons and prison visits in some prisons. The use of further
volunteers is hoped to be increased for use in these areas in the next financial year.

Changes to the Volunteer Induction Program were implemented in 2011-12 following an
internal review. Further monitoring and amendments may be made to meet operational
needs and to the department provides a consistently high level of support in line with
National Standards.

The impending publication of Volunteer Services Guidelines and a Volunteer Handbook will
enable staff to utilise departmental volunteers more effectively (within the scope of the
volunteer programs currently available).

Involvement in the Reintegration Program (currently being piloted by department) is
anticipated to provide opportunities for offenders to receive a higher level of support from
volunteers than previously provided, in areas such as health & wellbeing, identification, and
relationship support through increased family visits whilst also enabling the community to
continue to be part of the rehabilitative process.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 47
2. BUILDING OUR CAPACITY AND CAPABILITY


The Department for Correctional Services aims to be a work place that meets both its current
demands, and those resulting from future growth and operational change.

By Building our Capacity and Capability and continually reviewing the management and
allocation of resources, the department can work to ensure that provides for optimum
conditions for staff, as well as achieve the best standards with infrastructure.


In 2011-12, key strategies aimed at Building our Capacity and Capability included:

Upgrading and expanding our infrastructure to facilitate service delivery requirements
Planning and managing our resources to meet service objectives
Identifying our workforce requirements and target recruitment efforts
Managing the risk in everything we do
Effectively worked with our strategic partners to improve service outcomes
Investing in staff through, targeted training, performance development and Embracing
Diversity
Enhancing and supporting gender equity
Enhancing safety and well-being in the workplace
Improving how we use information and technology in decision making and service delivery

Key Performance Indicators

Real recurrent expenditure per prisoner/offender per day; net cost of services budget
unfavourable variance of <$500K;
Workers Compensation: reduction in new claims, early notification and investigation of
accidents/incidents within 48 hours; early intervention within five days;
Availability of critical information technology systems and research proposals approved;
Contracts performance (within specifications);
Gender equity percentage of females in promotional positions, on training programs,
on committees and working groups as well as in all work areas;
Sick leave and family carers leave figures, long service and annual leave liability,
number of staff with Performance Management Agreements, number of notified
disputes;
Self-Insurer Management System (SIMS) Hazards and Incidents Reported within
24 hours and corrected within 30 days; and
Increased Home Detention capacity: Electronic monitoring units available and in use.



DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 48
2. BUILDING OUR CAPACITY AND CAPABILITY

CAPACITY

Asset and Risk Services
The departments Asset and Risk Services Branch assists the department to manage its fixed
asset portfolio, currently valued at $411 million. This includes the states prisons, community
correctional centres, farm machinery, manufacturing plant, equipment and motor vehicles.

Prisons, in particular, are complex assets comprising of accommodation and associated
buildings, advanced electronic security systems, perimeter walls and fences, electrical
services, fire detection systems, air treatment systems, and, water and waste water treatment
systems. Community Correctional Centres comprise office premises for staff involved in the
community based supervision of offenders.

Effective asset and facilities management is vital to the departments ability to provide a safe
environment for staff, prisoners and offenders, to maintain effective security and public
confidence in the correctional system, and to reliably deliver services.

The following major projects were commissioned, commenced or completed in 2011-12:

commenced upgrading the kitchen at Yatala Labour Prison;
commenced construction of the new gatehouse at Yatala Labour Prison;
continued the upgrade of infrastructure at the Northfield precinct;
continued with the construction of a new cell block at Port Augusta Prison;
completed the upgrade of access control and screening systems at the Adelaide
Remand Centre;
completed the upgrade of the sewer treatment plant at Cadell Training Centre;
upgraded the security management systems and duress system at Mobilong Prison;
continued planning for the additional prisoner accommodation at Mount Gambier
Prison;
upgraded the hot water system at the Adelaide Remand Centre;
completed the upgrade of the sewer treatment plant for the Port Augusta Prison;
completed the upgrade of the energised fences at Port Augusta Prison and Mount
Gambier Prison;
upgraded three low security units at the Adelaide Womens Prison (in partnership with
the Edge Church);
installed CCTV coverage in various Community Correction Centres;
upgraded perimeter detection at Mount Gambier, Port Augusta and Mobilong Prisons
and the Adelaide Remand Centre; and
Developed a Master Plan for improvement works at the Adelaide Womens Prison and
Adelaide Pre-release Centre.

Risk Management
The department has adopted AS/NZ ISO 31000:2009 as its risk management standard and has
implemented operational compliance frameworks to manage and mitigate risks. The
department established an Internal Audit and Risk Management Branch in October 2011.

The Branch oversees the reporting of risk registers, including undertaking regular risk reviews
and continuous reporting of operational compliance performance. This process is maturing
and will be further enhanced during the 2012-13 financial year.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 49
Contract and Business Management
The Business and Performance Service unit is responsible for the provision of effective
management of key strategic contracts. The department has a number of major contracts,
which are critical to effective services delivery. They include contracts with:

G4S Custodial Services Pty Ltd (G4S) for the operation of Mount Gambier Prison;
G4S for Prisoner Movement and In-Court Management Services (administered by DCS
on behalf of participating agencies); and
G4S for the hire of the Electronic Monitoring System.

The Prisoner Movement and In-Court Management Services five year contract with G4S
commenced in August 2009 and expires in 2014. The Electronic Monitoring System contract
with G4S commenced in February 2010 and expires January 2013.

The public tender process for the operation of Mount Gambier Prison concluded in June 2011
with Cabinet approving G4S as the successful tenderer. The new five-year contract
commenced on 1 December 2011.

Workforce Planning and Development

The Workforce Planning and Development Branch is responsible for a range of projects
including the development and delivery of training and assessment programs, workforce
planning, leadership and management development, operational training, safety training,
study assistance and performance and organisational development programs.

Throughout 2011-12, the branch continued with the development and implementation of
high performance, leadership succession planning programs to provide for future leaders of
the department. Measures undertaken included:

training new correctional officers in Certificate III in Correctional Practice and
experienced officers in Certificate IV in Correctional Practice;
training managers in the Diploma of Government (in 2011-12, 56% of participants were
staff from the departments prisons)
trial of a non-accredited leadership development program known as Tomorrows Senior
Managers which links placements to participants development areas;
training of Community Corrections Case Managers, senior managers and operational
supervisors;
reviewing, upgrading and delivering the Community Corrections case management
program;
maintaining a focus on safe work environments; and
commencing alternative training delivery methodology.

The departments Ethical and Professional Behaviour in the Workplace training includes
sessions on Ethical Conduct and Anti-bullying, Code of Ethics for the South Australian Public
Sector, DCS Employee Conduct Policy and ethical decision making. Programs are rolled out
to each of the departments division and locations, as well as through individual training
programs.

As at 30

June 2012, 81.6% of DCS staff had undertaken ethics training and 34% of staff had
undertaken Anti-bullying programs.

Other highlights for the branch in 2011-12 included:

the delivery of a second Professional Supervision Training Program (nationally
accredited) for 12 Community Corrections Case Managers and other senior managers,
with a majority of the participants successful in obtaining acting positions; and
the facilitation of two separate leadership courses during October and November of
2011 for the Timor Leste Leadership group. 12 senior managers and Timor Leste
Leadership advisors undertook projects on subjects including prisoner reintegration and

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 50
prison industries and returned to their country with a new skill set and valuable
experience.

A credit to the efforts of the branch is that after submitting an application for the 2012
South Australian Training Awards in the Employer of the Year section, the department was
placed as a finalist. The winner will be announced in September 2012.

Tomorrows Senior Managers Program
In August 2011, the department launched the Tomorrows Senior Managers Program (TSM), a
succession planning initiative aimed at building the departments leadership and
management capability.

The 12 month program, which commenced in December 2011, assigned successful
participants to one of six designated senior positions at either a prison, within a Community
Corrections Centre or at Central Office (for a period of up to four months at a time). Each
participant would therefore experience three different professional development
placements.

Over 60 staff from across the department expressed their interest in being considered for the
TSM. The program was offered to six employees in the first instance (at Band 1) with a further
six employees offered Band 2 placements. Following the first year of the program, four of
the six Band 1 participants secured promotional positions (with three of the four being
awarded non-traditional roles). 50% of the TSM participants who obtained higher level
positions were female.

Running parallel to the work placements were a range of professional development activities
including workshops, coaching and mentoring sessions, attendance at some senior level
meetings and monthly discussion meetings with mentors. The Band 1 participants also met
with the Chief Executive for a professional development session once a quarter.

Performance Development
The department implemented a corporate approach to performance development in
December 2007 to ensure consistency. To support this, the Performance Development Guide
is used in all leadership and management training programs. The Guide is scheduled to be
reviewed in the 2012-13 financial year.

In December 2011, the Workforce Planning and Development branch introduced the
Performance Development Plan Electronic System through the Corporate Reporting System
(CHRIS Training and Development Database). This electronic model replaced the previous
paper based template for Performance Development Plans (PDPs).

The 2010-11 Annual Report reflected that 51.5% of departmental staff had undertaken PDPs
with their line manager (using the paper based system). As a result of the system change, the
final number of completed PDPs in 2011-12 cannot be reported.

It is anticipated that with the introduction and implementation of the DCS Training and
Development Policy, and changes to the Correctional Officer structure (by the start of 2013),
the corporate target of >80% by 2014 will be met.

Workforce Planning
Workforce planning analysis continues to provide the department with the opportunity to
continue to focus on the:
recruitment of new correctional officers to replace those leaving through natural
attrition; and
recruitment and development strategies aimed at increasing the number of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander employees.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 51
2. BUILDING OUR CAPACITY AND CAPABILITY

CAPABILITY

Human Resources Policy and Projects
The Human Resources Policy and Projects Branch is responsible for providing specialised
advice and consultancy on general human resources matters, undertaking related projects
and, policy development and review. During 2011-12, the Human Resources Policy and
Projects Branch has contributed to a number of projects, including the:

coordination of research and responses on HR matters for the Legislative Council Select
Committee on the Department for Correctional Services
implementation of a Functional Model at Custodial Services sites;
selection and recruitment of Supervisor Operations across all Custodial Services sites;
review of Correctional Business Centres;
development of the Bona fide and Leave Return Policy;
implementation of Public Sector Act 2009 employment contracts across the
department;
provision of advice and contract management for development placements;
management of the recruitment and selection of Trainee Correctional Officers;
provision of redeployment management for DCS excess employees;
management of the Allied Health Professional Peer Assessment process; and
continued management of the vacancy management process.

Workforce Management
The Workforce Management Branch is responsible for a broad range of human resources
functions, including industrial relations, misconduct and disciplinary matters, Employee
Assistance Program, redeployment, specialised recruitment, management of executive
contracts and injury management.

Key Workforce Management achievements include Trainee Correctional Officer Recruitment,
Employee Assistance Program, Employee Relations, Employee Transfers/ Relocations,
Occupational Health Safety and Injury Management,

Trainee Correctional Officer Recruitment

During 2011-12, 827 Trainee Correctional Officer applications were processed, with 101
positions offered (in courses 165 to 170 inclusive).

DCS recognises the need to increase the focus of achieving gender equity, particularly in the
custodial environment, as well as focusing on ethical and professional behaviour in the
workplace. The departments Strategic and Business Plans, as well as within the Shaping
Corrections framework support this focus. A positive result from 2011-12 was that 29% of
correctional officers recruited were female.

Employment Opportunity Programs
In mid 2011, the Human Resources Directorate engaged with the departments Aboriginal
Services Unit and T.A.F.E. Aboriginal Access Centre to deliver a pre-employment training
program for Aboriginal persons who were interested in a career as a Correctional Officer.

The 10 week program focussed on improving literacy, numeracy and writing skills whilst also
introducing participants to structures and training processes used in the formal training of
Trainee Correctional Officers (TCOs). The pilot course of three participants concluded in mid
2012, with two Aboriginal participants successfully gaining employment as a TCO.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 52
The department is currently working with T.A.F.E. Aboriginal Access Centre in promoting this
course via information sessions at various locations, in order to generate interest within the
Aboriginal community to attract participants for future courses.

The target intake of TCOs in both regional and metropolitan areas for up 100 trainees per
financial year (this may equate to four - six intakes per year), provides employment
opportunities for many of the states targeted groups: women, Aboriginal/Torres Strait
Islanders; mature age and retrenched workers.

A 12 month training program is provided to new recruits, with a balance of on and off the job
training, resulting in a nationally accredited qualification of a Certificate III in Correctional
Practice (Custodial).

Employee Assistance Program
The departmental Employee Assistance Program (EAP) has continued to provide a structured
and comprehensive staff support process and provides critical incident services. The program
also identifies opportunities to improve workplace psychological health management
through program reviews.

During 2011-12, the EAP received over 309 referrals including 21 critical incident referrals. This
was compared to 250 referrals in 2010-11, which was an increase of approximately 24%.
Approximately 17% of all EAP referrals were work related for workplace conflict. Custodial
Services continued to be the largest user of the service representing 63% of the total EAP
referrals.

Critical incident referrals have remained reasonably steady for this financial year at 21,
compared with 23 for the last financial year.

Employee Relations
The Employee Relations Branch is responsible for providing specialised advice on discipline
matters disputes and industrial relations.

During 2011-12, the Employee Relations Branch:
delivered training on the SOP 60 Employee Complaints Resolution Process as part of the
anti-bullying training;
consulted with the Public Service Association regarding a number of industrial issues;
established work arrangements for employees engaged on the Prisoner Reintegration
Employment Opportunities Program (PREOP);
undertook Yatala Labour Prison Improvement Projects;
provided advice regarding the rostering systems in prisons;
negotiated staffing arrangements for the new Banksia unit at PAP;
contributed to a replacement enterprise agreement for the whole of government South
Australian Government Wages Parity (Salaried) Enterprise Bargaining Agreement 2010
(EB Agreement); and
resolved identified underpayments relating to higher duty and Mobile Outback Work
Camps.

Throughout 2011-12, there were 75 recorded incidents that resulted in the investigation of
potential misconduct, with five internal and no external reviews lodged. This is in line with the
new provision introduced in the Public Sector Act 2009 (refer to Appendix 6, Table 12).

Employee Transfers/Relocations
The Human Resources directorate coordinates the transfer of correctional officers. In total, 33
applications were processed for consideration (five officers from metropolitan to regional
prisons, 13 regional officers to metropolitan prisons, 13 metropolitan officers to other
metropolitan prisons and two regional officers to other regional prisons).


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 53
The directorate also coordinates all government accommodation and relocation allowance
applications. A total of 24 accommodation applications were processed, and a total of 22
employees received re-location assistance.

Also undertaken this year was the management of six successful career transitions of excess
employees. There were four employees that were paid targeted voluntary separation
packages (TVSPS) in the 2011-12 financial year.

Occupational Health, Safety and Injury Management
The Department for Correctional Services has continued the governments commitment to
the zero harm vision for the South Australian Public Service, and strives to ensure that
managers are accountable for providing effective health, safety and injury management
practices in their respective workplaces.

In 2011-12, positive Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare (OHSW) outcomes that have
been achieved include:

the continuous monitoring and evaluation of the strategic measurement and reporting
framework and the development and testing of an OHSW risk assessment tool;
a reduction in workplace injuries;
the establishment of Risk Management and Compliance Programs;
the ongoing development and implementation of OHSW & Injury Management (IM)
System;
greater focus on a close out of corrective actions across all programs; and
the strengthening of OHSW and IM Internal Audit program and a strong level of
compliance in injury management procedures.

OHSW training for managers and supervisors remains a high priority for the department,
especially given the specialised nature of work undertaken by staff. OHSW is an important
inclusion in a range of DCS training and induction programs including nationally accredited
training which is provided to operational staff and managers. An OHSW training program
officer works with DCS senior management to ensure that training programs reflect priority
training needs and include any emerging issues.

Subject areas include Senior First Aid, Emergency Warden Training, Compressed Breathing
Apparatus Training, Chemical Management, Workplace Inspection, Internal Audit, Manual
Task, Manual Task Risk Assessment, Communicable Diseases, Health and Safety
Representative, OHS Committee Training and Plant Management.

Review of Accident, Incident Data and Applicable Remedial Action
The department significantly reduced its number of workplace injuries from 147 in
2010-11 to 122 claims in 2011-12. This reflects a reduction of 17%. The department has also
continued to achieve positive outcomes in workers compensation claim costs.

Workers compensation costs are indicative of improved injury management and prevention
practices. Injured workers are returning to work earlier and workplace programs have
minimised workplace risks. Despite the economic increases in the cost of medical and
rehabilitation services as well as general salary increases, the department recorded a
reduction of 11.90% in total claim costs in comparison to the previous financial year. In 2012
there was an increase of $0.2m in workers compensation liabilities (refer to Appendix 6
Table 3).

There were 157 hazard reports and 302 incident reports submitted during the 2011-12 financial
year. Approximately 88% of reports are forwarded within 24 hours, and investigation and
follow up outcomes continue to improve. The most common types of injury in 2011-12
continue to be sprains and strains, slips and trips and manual tasks. The departments
program based approach to managing risk focuses on minimising risks, which has contributed
to the overall reduction of workplace injuries.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 54
Other outcomes in 2011-12 include:

the Psychological Injury Frequency Rate decreased from 9.33% to 7.24% as at 30 June
2012 (a record low). Workers compensation reports indicated that work pressure and
harassment/bullying as the main causes of work related stress. The EAP has assisted in
addressing these issues, along with the ongoing implementation of training in Ethical
Behaviour and Anti-bullying;
manual tasks and risk assessment training continues to be provided and monitored for
compliance and improvement opportunities;
ChemAlert Training and usage of the system for the management of all chemicals has
been implemented;
custodial staff continue to receive training in restraint techniques and restraint aids to
minimise the potential for injury;
injuries resulting from restraining prisoners have reduced by 72% (over the past five
years); and
the influenza vaccine program continued to have a very good participation rate with
over 600 employees receiving the vaccine during this financial year.

Compensable Disabilities/Rehabilitation Initiatives
The Department for Correctional Services continues to demonstrate a strong commitment to
early intervention and the rehabilitation of work injured employees. DCS is reported to be a
leader in the Public Sector Safety Targets in assessing claims for rehabilitation within two days
of notification, as well as in its ability to determine claims for Provisional Liability within seven
days (55.56% in 2010-11 and 97.18%).

The departments rehabilitation process is a collaboration between the injured worker, the
rehabilitation provider, the worksite manager or supervisor and the treating medical
providers. The process has been enhanced through the use of the departments
Rehabilitation Provider Panel, which allows for services and skills to be targeted based on
individual circumstances associated with the claim..

This year, the department continued to engage the services of an occupational physician to
advise on best practice medical management of work related injuries. Advice on diagnosis
and treatment strategies has assisted claims management staff to better manage the return
to work of injured employees. Claims management staff also continued to work with a
designated legal representative from the Crown Solicitors Office to ensure that claims
management decisions are made in an appropriate and timely manner. This has led to the
successful finalisation of a number of complex claims and a reduction in future workers
compensation liability.

The 2012, OHSW&IM survey results showed that 87% of respondents were satisfied that
processes were in place to consult with management on safety issues.

An Internal Audit of the Injury Management system in March 2012 demonstrated a strong
level of compliance with internal procedures and no legislative non conformances were
identified. Continuous improvement in return to work outcomes and better early intervention
strategies have assisted in the continued reduction in claims costs and reduced liability.

WorkCover Evaluation
The department underwent a full OHSW&IM system evaluation in July 2010, with five non-
conformances confirmed. WorkCover SA conducted a mid-term review of the departments
OHSW&IM System in November 2011 (this was delayed due to the lengthily review process),
three of the five outstanding non-conformances were closed out. Work continued to address
the two remaining non-conformances which related to hazard management and system
review.

The department will undergo a full OHSW&IM System evaluation by WorkCover SA during
August 2012 and the department will continue to work closely with the WorkCover

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 55
Performance Evaluator to ensure that safety management performances continue to
improve.

Disability Action Plan
On 1 July 2010, a Memorandum of Administrative Arrangement (MAA) commenced between
Department for Families and Communities Disability SA and Department for Correctional
Services regarding the facilitation and improvement of the day-to-day management and
standard of life experiences amongst prisoners and offenders with disability including clients
of the Exceptional Needs Unit. The MAA is valid to 30 June 2013 when it will be reviewed with
work on the 2013-2016 DAP due to commence at the end of 2012.

The Departments Disability Action Plan 2010-2013 (DAP) is a working document that will
integrate the principles and strategies of the whole of government framework for South
Australians with a disability.

The DAP is based on the following five key outcomes:

portfolios and their agencies ensure accessibility to their services to people with
disabilities;
portfolios and their agencies ensure information about their services and programs is
inclusive of people with disabilities;
portfolios and their agencies deliver advice or services to people with disabilities with
awareness and understanding of issues affecting people with disabilities;
portfolios and their agencies provide opportunities for consultation with people with
disabilities in decision making processes regarding service delivery and in the
implementation of complaints and grievance mechanisms; and
each portfolio Chief Executive will ensure that their portfolio has met the requirements of
the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the Equal Opportunity Act 1984.

Each directorate within the department has a responsibility in ensuring these outcomes (and
the strategies underpinning the outcomes), are adhered to in relation to prisoners and
offenders, as well as DCS employees with a disability.

Carers Recognition
The Department for Correctional Services recognises and is supportive of the role of carers
employed within the department. All managers and employees are informed of the
departments commitment through its Corporate Induction Program. Flexible working
arrangements are available to assist carers to meet their obligations.

Flexible Working Arrangements
The Department for Correctional Services recognises and is supportive of the need to provide
flexible working arrangements to its employees. All managers and employees are informed of
the departments commitment through its Corporate Induction Program and discussed
during staff performance development reviews.

In 2011-12 the department supported 207 employees to utilise flexible working arrangements
such as compressed working weeks, purchased leave, working from home, job share
arrangements and/or working part time. An additional 528 utilise government flexi-time
arrangements.

Whistleblower Qualification
The Department for Correctional Services has identified and trained four responsible officers
for the purposes of the Whistleblowers Protection Act 1993. The identified officers are:
Director, Business and Performance Services; Regional Director, Northern Metropolitan
Region; General Manager, Adelaide Womens Prison/Adelaide Pre-release Centre; and
Director, Workforce Planning and Development.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 56
In 2011-12, the number of occasions on which public interest information has been disclosed
to a responsible officer was nil.

Gender Reporting

DCS is committed to achieving gender equity throughout the department. As reflected in the
following tables, during 2011-12, 52% of participants in departmental leadership and
management programs were women and 31% of the DCS SAES Executives were women.

33% of women in DCS were working in promotional positions^ and 18% of women in DCS
custodial institutions were in promotional positions.

Leadership and Management Programs in 2011-12
Program Male Female Total
Supervision in Prison (SIP) 12 2 14
Managing in Corrections 12 14
26
Diploma of Correctional Administration 2 10 12
Transitions to Management 7 8 15
Australian Correctional Leadership Program 0 0 0
Public Sector Management Program 1 1 2
Total number 30 33 63
Total % 48% 52% 100%
[Data source: Leadership & Management records database as at 30 June 2012]

Technical Development Programs (excluding Trainee Correctional Officer Course) in 2011-12
Male Female Total
Advanced Skills Training Program 11 8 19
Training and Assessment 3 7 10
[Data as at 30 June 2012]


Number of Departmental Executives in 2011-12
Male Female Total
Number 9 4 13
Total % 69% 31% 100%
[Data as at 30 June 2012]

Women in promotional positions in 2011-12
Female Male Total
Number in promotional positions 227 394 671
Total number of employees 688 1030 1718
% in promotional positions 33% 38% 39%
[Data as at 30 June 2012]

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 57

Classification Streams ASO6 and Above
Classification Streams Male Female Total
AS06 25 22 47
AS07 11 8 19
AS08 2 0 2
Exec 9 4 13
MAS 1 0 1 1
MAS 2 5 2 7
MAS 3 12 6 18
OPS5 4 1 5
OPS 6 25 3 28
OPS 7 4 0 4
AHP3 13 25 38
AHP4 2 5 7
AHP5 1 2 3
Total 113 79 192
Total % 59% 41% ** 100%
[Data source: Gender Analysis as at 30 June 2012]

Information Analysis
The proper analysis of information is essential in the decision making process. The accuracy of
the analysis of information impacts markedly on the decisions made by the department, and
on the local and Australian correctional industry as a whole.

Information on prisoner and offender numbers, offender profiles and crime trends form the
basis on which to develop policy, plan, and manage human resources, facilities and
strategies to meet demand. The information also underpins planning for future projected
needs and possible construction of correctional facilities.

Information analysis, which helps to determine offender trends, also has significant
implications for sentencing options and the development of diversionary strategies to better
achieve criminal justice outcomes. The analysis of national statistics provides benchmarks by
which individual correctional jurisdictions may be compared.

Information Technology Management
The department remains committed to improving how we use Information Technology (IT) in
decision making and service delivery.

Notable achievements for 2011-12, include:

the implementation of an application to support Enhanced Community Corrections, on
the Justice Information System (JIS) web-based platform, including:
o establishing Service Standards based on risk profile;
o assigning Community Corrections clients to Service Standards based on risk
assessment;
o scheduling of Service Standard activities and actions taken;
o reporting on non-compliance against Service Standards; and
o reporting on clients who have been imprisoned/released from prison.
the expansion of functionality of the JIS web-based platform for general enquiries and
the implementation of functionality to support TV access for prisoners;
integration of the Office of the Minister for Correctional Services into the departments IT
infrastructure and support environment (as part of the machinery of government
changes);

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 58
the provision of a private Virtual Network for SA Prison Health Services within DCS
institutions (in conjunction with the Department for Health), to improve the accessibility
of information to health workers within prisons;
completion of significant IT infrastructure upgrades for end-of-life equipment in the DCS
Network; and
planning for the migration of the departments desktop and laptop fleet to the current
releases of Microsoft Windows and Office.

Data Warehouse
The department continues to share the Justice Data Warehouse platform with other justice
agencies including, SAPol and the Courts Administration Authority. The data for the
department is held within its own secure partition within the Justice Data Warehouse.

The department continues to use the Justice Data Warehouse for statistical analysis,
legislative reporting obligations and management reports to support improved decision
making.

Intranet
The departmental Intranet site (InSite'), continues to be the central repository and
communication hub for corporate documents and information including policies and
procedures and other documentation.

Use of InSite during 2011-12 increased over the previous year, with an average of 379
departmental staff accessing the Intranet each week day. A total of 2791 items were
published, or updated, by the departments business units during 2011-12. Staff from other
agencies across government also accessed 575 items on InSite during the year.

Public Web Site
The departments new public web site was successfully launched in October 2011. The new
web site employs a content management system in order to allow business units within the
department to dynamically update information available to the public, including current job
vacancies.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 59
3. LEADING AND MANAGING OUR ORGANISATION


The Department for Correctional Services is dedicated to achieving excellence in
management and leadership.


The following Key Strategies in Leading and Managing Our Organisation were undertaken in
2011-12:

Enhancing leadership and target management development and cultural competence
Ensuring we exhibit the highest standards of ethics and behaviours and that we
communicate effectively with our stakeholders and strategic partners
Engaging and consult effectively with our staff
Strengthening our ability to promote and manage diversity
Informing and respond to government strategy, policy and legislation
Ensuring effective governance, planning and reporting to achieve the highest level of
performance
Defining and driving corporate change and continuous improvement
Implementing the Shaping Corrections Program
Developing and implementing the departments research agenda
Effectively managing our budgets and meet our savings targets
Ensuring the services we deliver are efficient, effective and accountable

Key Performance Indicators

Percentage of staff undertaking ethics training, number of staff undertaking Corporate
Training including Induction, Ethics and Managing in Corrections;
Percentage of freedom of information requests processed within defined guidelines;
and
Shaping Corrections Program: percentage of progress reports reported to Executive,
number of monthly reports to Executive and rates of attendance at Regional Working
Groups.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 60
3. LEADING AND MANAGING OUR ORGANISATION

Strategic Management
The department for Correctional Services Strategic Management Framework (SMF)
integrates planning, budgeting and reporting and defines the principles and management
cycle of events and processes required for effective management. The SMF is a key initiative
towards meeting the departments objectives of effective management and accountability.

The SMF provides for effective performance management, by supporting the alignment of
plans and budgets throughout the department. Corporate plans define strategies, measures
and targets to achieve corporate objectives and are primarily managed through project
planning mechanisms.

During 2011-12, the department developed the Corporate Business Plan for 2012-13 in line
with its SMF. The Framework aligns the departments strategic priorities with the government
priority areas, including the South Australian Strategic plan. The departments vision, mission,
goals, priorities and outcomes are articulated clearly in the Strategic and Business plans,
communicated through the various mediums such as the Shaping Corrections Regional
Working Groups, the Senior Managers Forums as well as other existing mediums.

In parallel with the development of the Strategic Plan, the department commenced the
development of the mandated High Performance Framework (HPF) during 2011-12. The HPF is
a systemic approach to organisational performance management and continuous
improvement and has been designed to assist public sector agencies achieve higher
performance. The HPF is a practical tool to improve performance and promote
collaboration across the public sector.

The HPF builds on the South Australian Strategic Plan (SASP) serving as an enabler for the
SASP, by instilling a culture of results-focus and continuous improvement within agencies, and
whole-of-government collaborative responses to achieve SASP targets and outcomes.

The DCS executive endorsed the implementation of the HPF in December 2011. The
implementation required the department to undertake a self-assessment review process
which assessed the departments performance against set criteria, gathering evidence to
demonstrate performance and scoring performance against the HPF characteristics and
building blocks.

The Implementation of the HPF in DCS followed a four step review process:
Step one - identification of priorities and accountabilities;
Step two - identification of enterprise results;
Step three - identification of enterprise management; and
Step four - provision of Performance and Accountability Statement (PAS), the final
report identifying areas of strength as well as opportunities for improvement. It is
expected that the PAS will be forwarded to the Chief Executive in early 2012-13 for his
consideration.

Shaping Corrections
2011-12 saw the departments service improvement framework, Shaping Corrections, enter its
third year. This followed a highly successful second year, during which six projects were
completed. The remaining two projects are continuing in their progressive stages. Critical to
the success of this change management initiative is the achievement of a high level of
engagement. This has included:

regular communication and information forwarded from the CE to all employees;
a monthly discussion with the executive team;
bi-monthly meetings of the five regional working groups supported by briefing
documents and extensive minutes; and

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 61
the provision of project information sheets and monthly progress updates available to
all employees.

The regional working groups are comprised of front line employees, managers, supervisors
and employee job representatives, who engage in discussions about Shaping Corrections
projects, including the design and implementation as well as a range of other initiatives and
policy.

Significant Shaping Corrections initiatives include:
the development of a program for female prisoners with complex needs;
progression of a reintegration program for sentenced prisoners; and
commissioning of new access control at the Adelaide Remand Centre and
strengthening access control procedures across all South Australian Prisons.

The focus on improving service delivery during the previous two years of the Shaping
Corrections Program has provided a sound foundation. This will support the future focus of
broadening the program with the inclusion of new initiatives aimed at creating a professional,
gender and culturally inclusive working environment

Effective Corporate Performance
The South Australian Strategic Plan, was first released in 2004, was updated in 2007 and again
in 2011. Over 10,000 South Australians were consulted as part of the development of the 2011
South Australian Strategic Plan and one of the important messages coming from this process
was the communitys desire for safer communities.

Accordingly, DCS key strategic priorities derive from, and are aligned to the primary areas of
focus of the governments forward agenda, in particular priority 2: Maintaining our safe
communities and healthy neighbourhoods, as well as the South Australian Strategic Plan
vision: We are safe in our homes, community and at work.

In relation to the SASP Targets, DCS is the lead agency for SASP Target 19: Repeat offending -
South Australia has the lowest Australian rate of repeat offenders over the period to 2020
(baseline: 2007 - 2008). The target requires departmental staff to lead and coordinate a
whole of government response and hence DCS works closely with agencies that contribute
to SASP Target 19.

DCS has a robust framework of measures, Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) and targets
which have been developed and are regularly reviewed and reported in the Quarterly
Performance Report (QPR). The Quarterly Performance Report (QPR) is aligned to reflect the
objectives of DCS Strategic and Business Plans. The QPR is divided into the two main business
functions (key projects and KPIs) that are undertaken by the department in order to achieve
both the governments and the departments strategic priorities.

The key projects and their associated KPIs are commonalities that run through the DCS
Business plans and budgets. These linkages enable appropriate strategic management,
public accountability and the forward planning process to be linked with resource allocations
and the budgeting mechanisms of government. DCS reports against a total of 99 KPIs on a
quarterly basis through the QPR, 27 of which are Strategic KPIs which appear in the Agency
Statement and the Enterprise Scorecard. The remainder 72 operational indicators are
monitored and reported by the respective operational directorates in the department and
are also collectively reported to the Executive through the QPR.

The Executive group considers the QPR on a quarterly basis and discusses performance
against targets and progress against projects. A traffic light reporting approach is used in the
QPR to consider KPIs. Results are green (the KPI is on track to meet target); amber (the KPI is
on track to meet target and should be monitored) and red (the result is not on track to meet
target and requires action). Furthermore, DCS Executive monitors and takes corrective
action on those indicators which are not met (red).


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 62
Over the past year (July 11 June 12) 81% of DCS strategic indicators achieved target (22 out
of a total of 27), with 19% (5 indicators) not achieving target. Accordingly, DCS has a solid
record of achieving targets and performing well against set KPIs.

Civil Claims
Civil claims can be lodged against the department for alleged breaches of process and duty
of care. The department insures against claims of this nature through the South Australian
Captive Insurance Corporation.

The departments contingent liability in respect of claims is limited to the excess payable in
the event claims are successful. The contingent liability of the department as at 30 June 2012
is disclosed in the Notes to the Financial Statements.
Freedom of Information
The Freedom of Information and Stakeholder Support Section is responsible for the provision of
information under the Freedom of Information Act 1991 and the Correctional Services Act
1982. During 2011-12, the department processed 328 applications under Freedom of
Information.

The following table demonstrates an increase of 14.7% for applications received by the
department in 2011-12 as compared with 2010-11. The volume and level of complexity of
applications continues, as applicants are becoming aware of the various types of information
retained by the agency and their rights to seek access to this information.

177
328
197
112
286
0
50
100
150
200
250
300
350
2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12
FOI Applications Received by DCS - July 2007 - June 2012
N
u
m
b
e
r
s


Policy Development
Departmental policy is influenced by various factors, including the South Australian Strategic
Plan, the Minister (through government priorities), the Justice Portfolio (through the Justice
Portfolio Leadership Group), and by the department and its stakeholders. The Strategic
Services division, in conjunction with other directorates, coordinate the facilitation and
development of departmental policy.

As part of its policy process, the department has in place a policy and procedure framework.
Business units are responsible for service delivery, and the policy and procedure framework
expresses business unit requirements through a structure that delegates responsibility for
achievement to appropriate operational levels. This is accomplished by making explicit the
expectations of results to business units and employees by corporate strategic planning,
standard setting and performance monitoring.

Policies, standards and procedures are developed to reflect the philosophies of the wider
criminal justice system, the views of the government and the community, best practice, the
operational needs of the department, and available resources both financial and physical.
Relevant stakeholders are also consulted in the development and review of policies.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 63

The department provides advice on policy issues to various stakeholders, including:

victims, who request information about prisoners and departmental policies;
community members, who request information about the departments policies and
procedures;
prisoners, and friends and relatives of prisoners on operational matters; and
community members and prisoners seeking information pursuant to provisions of the
Freedom of Information Act 1991.

During the course of 2011-12, departmental staff worked on a number of initiatives, such as:

monitored compliance and worked collaboratively to improve service delivery by Non
government agencies for Pre/Post Release and Community Based Reintegration
Services;
assisted with the implementation of the Abuse Prevention Program (Integrated
Domestic Violence Program) as a result of the introduction of the Intervention Orders
Act 2009;
contributed to the roll out of the Family Safety Framework, which is an initiative of the
Womens Safety Strategy;
contributed to Information Sharing Guidelines for the promotion of safety and wellbeing
of children, young people and their families, including delivery of training to DCS
personnel through Corporate Induction and Trainee Correctional Officer programs. This
is a cross government initiative;
continued to progress the Offender Management Plan in partnership with SAPOL for
example the ongoing identification and case management of serious offenders who
present the most harm to the community). A pilot program was undertaken in Western
Adelaide and is being expanded in 2012;
reviewed and enhanced the departmental research agenda through greater
collaboration with relevant external stakeholders; and
implemented changes arising from amendments to the Correctional Services Act.

Management of Prisoners at Risk of Suicide or Self Harm

During 2011-12, the department incrementally implemented a Standard Operating
Procedure (SOP) for the consistent and effective approach to management of prisoners at
risk of suicide or self harm. This SOP will be next reviewed in June 2014.

SOP 090 Management of Prisoners at Risk of Suicide or Self Harm is a standardised process
for the identification of prisoners at risk of suicide or self harm. This is undertaken through
raising a Notification of Concern Form (NOC) and the then development of an Initial
Response Plan in conjunction with SA Prison Health (SAPHS) for a prisoners initial care,
management and placement. All prisoners with a NOC are then referred to the High Risk
Assessment Team (HRAT) for a formal risk assessment using the Suicide Assessment Manual for
Inmates (SAMI) (undertaken by prison social workers or psychology staff).

Prisoners placed on the HRAT are discussed at weekly HRAT forums. These forums include
representatives from SAPHS, the departments custodial services branch, social workers,
psychologists and (at some prisons), Forensic Mental Health Services (FMHS).

All departmental prison social work, and psychology staff members have been provided with
training in the use of SAMI. Whilst only DCS Social Workers and Psychologists can formally
administer the SAMI, the department has also provided training to Aboriginal Liaison Officers
and Clinical Nurse Consultants (from SAPHS).

In 2011-12, 88 staff members have been trained in both SAMI and Suicide Awareness. A
further 167 staff members across the prison system were also provided with training in Suicide
Awareness during 2011-12.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 64
Stakeholder Support
The department has a number of stakeholders who require services and advice from the
department. Others provide pre/post release services to offenders and prisoners.
Stakeholders are individuals and groups throughout the community who affect, or who are
affected by, the operations of the department.

The departments key stakeholders include:

the Minister for Correctional Services;
Members of Parliament;
Justice Portfolio agencies;
Courts Administration Authority;
South Australia Police;
Parole Board of South Australia;
South Australian Ombudsman;
Correctional Services Advisory Council;
Victims Support Groups;
members of the public;
various Aboriginal groups;
various prisoner welfare agencies; and
other government and non-government agencies.

Support and services to stakeholders are provided by key senior staff through representation
on working parties and at the Justice Portfolio Leadership Group.

To ensure culturally appropriate services for the large number of Aboriginal prisoners, many of
the departments stakeholders are directly focused on services for Aboriginal offenders. Major
stakeholders in this arena include:

Aboriginal Services Division Department of Health;
Aboriginal Legal Rights Movement;
Aboriginal Prisoner and Offender Support Services(APOSS);
Offenders Aid and Rehabilitation Services of South Australia (OARS);
Prison Fellowship;
Aboriginal Catholic Ministry;
Commonwealth Department of Employment and Workplace Relations;
Nunkuwarrin Yunti;
Aboriginal Education Unit of TAFE and Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council.

Legislation
The Correctional Services Act was enacted in 1982. Since that time, it has been regularly
amended to reflect changes in government policy, changes to correctional practice and to
address community concerns.

To ensure that the Department for Correctional Services continues to enhance public safety
and provide the highest level of prisoner and offender management, amendments to the
Correctional Services Act 1982 and Correctional Services Regulations 2001 were proposed.
Subsequently, the Correctional Services (Miscellaneous) Amendment Bill 2011 was introduced
to Parliament on 8 June 2011. The changes to the Act and Regulations proposed in this Bill
were wide ranging including the strengthening of the supervision of persons on parole in the
community, the improvement of information sharing of information with SApol, more
expeditious dealings with offenders who have breached their parole order and considered to
present a high risk to the community, and improved pre-release arrangements for prisoners
serving life sentences.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 65
Other changes strengthen existing provisions along with adding new provisions into the
Correctional Services Act 1982 that relate to the security of the prison system. Such changes
include tightening the visit procedure to prisoners, in particular for those convicted of child
sex offences, extending search provisions to further restrict contraband entering the prison
system, and increasing penalties for those caught attempting to introduce drugs into the
prisons. A new section was added to regulate the issue and use of weapons by correctional
services officers, and a new section to regulate the use of correctional services dogs.

On 31 May 2012, the Correctional Services (Miscellaneous) Amendment Bill 2012 was passed
by both Houses of Parliament and on 12 June 2012, received Royal Assent.

In preparation for the commencement of the changes to the Correctional Services Act 1982,
the department has worked to ensure all Policies, Procedures and Guidelines have been
amended to ensure compliance with the new changes to legislation as contained within the
Correctional Services Act 1982 and that these changes have been communicated to the
departments staff and relevant stakeholders.

Energy Management
The Department for Correctional Services pursues its energy reduction targets through the
installation of more energy efficient equipment, security and building management systems,
lighting, air treatment systems, computers, plant and machinery.

In 2011-12, the department consumed 77 721 Gigajoules (Gj) of energy. Energy savings have
been achieved through the scheduled replacement of existing equipment, security systems,
lighting, air treatment systems and computers with new, more energy efficient technology.
However, the continued increasing demand on the department, in terms of growing prisoner
and offender numbers, has led to an increase in buildings and prison capacity. In addition,
there has been ongoing requirement to increase services to improve facility amenities within
existing infrastructure, which in conjunction with the inherit difficulties of retrofitting within old
and secure facilities, makes meeting energy reduction targets challenging for the
department.

As at 30 June 2012, the departments vehicle fleet was comprised of LPG, dual fuel, diesel,
unleaded (ULP) and hybrid vehicles.

Media Liaison and Corporate Communications
The department takes a positive and proactive approach to dealing with the media and
community organisations. The involvement of prisoners and offenders in reparation projects
continues to attract media interest.

During 2011-12, internal communications through the departments bi-monthly electronic
newsletter was maintained and the new DCS public information web site,
www.corrections.sa.gov.au, was launched.

The departmental Corporate Communications Strategy was reviewed and updated, with a
range of new communication initiatives being implemented with a focus on internal
communications, staff engagement and positive media stories.

Research Management
The department encourages research in a wide range of areas of interest, and manages
research applications made through the departments Research Management Committee.
The role of external research should be one of enhancing the departments ability to achieve
its corporate objectives, and utilising knowledge and evidence gained in the process.

The objectives of the departments Research Management Charter are to:

promote the conduct of sound and ethical research, which contributes to the pursuit of
world class correctional performance, whilst ensuring the safety and security of prisoners
and offenders under the departments supervision;

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 66
establish a broad research agenda, which endeavours to develop or inform existing
departmental policy and support the cost-effective achievement of corporate
objectives; and
establish a procedure framework for the assessment, approval and ongoing monitoring
of research.

The department continues to develop and implement its research agenda inline with the
Strategic Plan 2011-2014.

Recent developments have led to the planning of a research forum being held to bring
together a more collaborative approach by stakeholders in identifying and pursuing
appropriate research areas to further enhance evidence based practice including policy
and procedure development

Corporate Finance
The Department for Correctional Services operates within a complex accounting
environment. In addition to general operating revenues and expenses, the department
accounts for a significant fixed asset portfolio, manufacturing operations (prison industries),
agriculture and horticulture production (prison farms), food processing (prison kitchens), retail
operations (prison canteens), prisoner trust moneys, stores and inventories.

The departments Corporate Finance Branch has continued to consolidate and enhance
accounting operations using the Masterpiece suite of accounting applications. The Branchs
highly integrated accounting systems enable it to effectively manage its diverse accounting
requirements (with a team of skilled staff).

Shared Services SA is now responsible for the processing of account payments for the
department. 46 022 account payments were processed in 2011-12 with over 95% of accounts
being paid by the due date.

Corporate Finance assists the departments Executive and Senior Managers with the annual
budgeting process and the efficient allocation of resources to programs and business units.
The branch also monitors the financial performance of the department through regular
monthly reporting, and identifies financial management issues and trends for the attention of
the departmental executive and Senior Managers.

The departments budget is allocated to business units using funding models developed by
the branch, in conjunction with Directors and Senior Managers. These funding models enable
the department to accurately benchmark the financial performance of business units and
identify opportunities for improved efficiency.

The departments responsibility centre approach to financial management requires Senior
Managers to report monthly to their respective executive directors concerning major budget
variances and plans for corrective action. Monthly financial reports are published on the
departments Intranet, allowing Senior Managers across the state to access the information
within a few days of the end of each month. Executive Directors, in turn, report monthly to the
Chief Executive concerning the overall financial performance of their division and major
budget pressures. This ensures a regular focus on financial management throughout the year.

The Corporate Finance Branch provided financial analysis to business units in the
development of a number of business cases and funding submissions. The branch also
provided financial analysis for the departments submissions to the annual state budget
process and prepared financial briefings for the Parliamentary Estimates, and Budget and
Finance Committees.

Summary of Financial Results
The departments statutory financial statements and supporting notes are contained in
Appendix 1 of this report however, the following table provides a summary and explanation
of the departments financial results for 2011-12.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 67
Summary Income Statement
The departments revised budget for 2011-12 (incorporating approved adjustments) provided
for a budgeted (allowable) net result of $15.9m deficit. In 2011-12, the department produced
a net result of $20.5m, an unfavourable variance of $4.6m against its budget.

Operating expenses were higher than provided for in the revised budget. This mainly reflects
the transfer of the revaluation of annual and long service leave ($3.7m), and the revaluation
of workers compensation expense ($0.4m).

Summary Income 2011-12 (compared to 2010-11)

2011-12 Result
($000)
2011-12 Budget*
($000)
2010-11 Result
($000)
Operating Expenses 222 439 217 530 207 282
Operating Revenues 9 728 9 381 9 798
Net Cost of Services 212 711 208 149 197 484
Revenues from SA government/
Payments to SA government
192 242 192 242 197 761
Net Result (Deficit) (20 469) (15 907) 277

* Budget figures incorporate all budget adjustments approved up until the 2012-13 Budget
Expenditure Profile 2011-12
Supplies & Services,
$60,765,000 , 27%
Employee
Expenses,
$135,371,000 , 61%
Accommodation
and Lease Costs,
$8,330,000 , 4%
Other, $1,173,000 ,
1%
Depreciation,
$14,321,000 , 6%
Payments made to
Prisoners,
$2,479,000 , 1%

Employee expenses accounted for 61% of total expenditure in 2011-12. This includes salaries
and wages, superannuation and payroll tax, and accruing leave entitlements. Supplies and
services expenses accounted for 27% of total expenses. This includes payments to
G4S Custodial Services Pty Ltd for Prisoner Movement and In-Court Management Services,
management of the Mount Gambier Prison and provision of the Home Detention Electronic
Monitoring System SA (EMSSA).

Operating Expenditure by Program
The Department for Correctional Services administers three key programs:

Custodial Services;
Community Based Services; and
Rehabilitation and Reparation.

The Custodial Services Program accounted for 71% of total operating expenditure in 2011-12.
Under this program, the department provides secure containment and supervision for adults
on remand and those sentenced by the courts to a custodial sentence. Program expenditure
includes the cost of operating the states prison system, the provision of prisoners basic needs
and the secure movement of prisoners.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 68

The Community Based Services Program accounted for 13% of total operating expenditure.
Under this program, the department case manages and supervises offenders in the
community on Probation, Parole or under Home Detention and offenders on supervised Bail.
This program includes the cost of operating the departments state-wide network of
community correctional centres.

The Rehabilitation and Reparation Services Program accounted for 16% of total operating
expenditure. Under this program, the department provides a range of educational,
vocational and rehabilitation programs to assist offenders to address their offending
behaviour, and provide them with opportunities to lead law abiding and productive lives. This
program includes the cost of prisoner education and rehabilitation programs, provision of
work and vocational training in prison industries, and community service programs.



Community Based
Serv ices,
$29,481,000, 13%
Rehabilitation and
Repatriation
Serv ices,
$36,618,000, 16%
Custodial Serv ices,
$156,340,000 71%
Expenditure Profile 2011-12

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 69
KEY TARGETS IN 2012-13


Develop and implement a pilot reintegration program for prisoners serving
greater than 12 months
Develop options for a Domestic Violence Offence Focussed Program for
prisoners and offenders
Enhance Offence Focused Programs for Aboriginal prisoners
Enhance the delivery of education services to prisoners
Establish a Mothers and Babies Program at the Adelaide Womens Prison
Enhance family engagement for Mothers in Prison at the
Adelaide Womens Prison
Commence the transition to a smoke free environment in all prisons
Commission the Port Augusta Prison new cell block
Construct additional prisoner accommodation at Mount Gambier Prison
Finalise the upgrades to the Gatehouse and Kitchen at Yatala Labour Prison
Strengthen access control standards across all prisons
Complete the upgrade of the kitchen at the Adelaide Remand Centre
Complete the upgrade of the perimeter fence, construction of the new
kitchen and commence the construction of the new cell block at the
Adelaide Womens Prison
Implement evidence based practice to improve the supervision of offenders
Review information provided to the Courts
Enhance the management of high risk offenders through the expansion of the
Offender Management Plan
Implement a program in the APY Lands for female offenders focussing on their
violent offending
Implement enhancements to the drug testing of offenders

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 70

INDEX
A
Aboriginal Services Unit, 13, 17, 20, 27, 51
Adelaide Pre-release Centre, 30
Adelaide Remand Centre, 26, 104
Adelaide Womens Prison, 29, 104
Alcohol and Other Drug Strategy, 21
APY Lands, 37
Assaults, 35
B
Bail, 13, 37, 38, 39, 42, 68, 121
Business and Performance Services, 13
C
Cadell Training Centre, 28, 104
Chaplaincy Service, 24
Community Corrections, 13, 17, 19, 22, 37, 38,
41, 42, 43, 108
Community Service, 13, 37, 38, 39, 40
Complaints Management, 32
Contract and Business Management, 49
Corporate Finance, 66
Custodial Services, 13, 17, 49, 67
D
Data Warehouse, 58
Deaths in Custody, 35
detag, 40
Drug Court Curfew, 42
E
Education, 22, 64
Employee Relations, 52, 121
Energy Management, 65
Escapes, 35, 105
ESCAPES, 105
F
Freedom of Information, 62, 63, 119, 121
H
Health, 20, 23, 64, 121
Highlights, 7
Home Detention, 13, 30, 37, 38, 39, 41, 42, 67, 68
Homelessness, 18
Human Resources, 14
I
Illicit Drugs, 36
Incentive Based Regime, 31
Information Analysis, 57
Information Technology Management, 57
Integrated Housing Exits Program, 18
Intensive Bail Supervision, 13, 38, 39, 42




Intensive Probation Supervision, 41
Intranet, 58, 66
Introduction, 8
K
Knowledge and Information Systems, 13
L
Legislation, 64
LEGISLATION, 121
M
Media Liaison, Corporate Communication, 65
Mobilong Prison, 26, 104
Most Serious Offence, 34
Mount Gambier Prison, 19, 31, 49, 67
N
Nominated Visitors, 32
Northern Country Region, 39
Northern Metropolitan Region, 38
O
Offender Development, 13, 18
Offender Development Programs, 18
Offender Reports, 39
Office of the Chief Executive, 13
Operating Expenditure by Program, 67
P
Parole, 8, 13, 18, 20, 22, 30, 37, 38, 39, 41, 64, 68,
121
Policy Development, 62
Port Augusta Prison, 27
Port Lincoln Prison, 29
Prison, 18, 20, 22, 29, 35, 104
Prisoner Assessment, 39, 41, 42
Prisoner Assessment Unit, 13, 39
Prisoner Population, 33
Probation, 13, 18, 37, 38, 39, 40, 68
Psychological Services, 20
R
Rehabilitation, 13, 19, 64, 67, 68, 121
Rehabilitation Programs Branch, 13, 19
Remand, 33
Research Management, 65
Risk Management, 48

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 71


S
Security Classifications, 31
Sentence Length, 33
Sentenced Females, 34
Sentenced Males, 34
Southern Country Region, 38
Southern Metropolitan Region, 37
Stakeholder Support, 62, 64, 119














Strategic Management, 60
Strategic Plan, 8, 11, 61, 62
Strategic Services, 13, 62
V
Victim Services, 45
Victims, 45, 64, 121
Visiting Inspectors, 32
Visiting Tribunals, 32
Y
Yatala Labour Prison, 19, 25, 104

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 72
























APPENDICES 1 9

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 73

APPENDIX 1 - AUDITOR GENERALS REPORT AND FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 2011-12


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APPENDIX 2 - ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 2011-12

Accounts Payable in 2011-12
Particulars
Number of
Accounts
Paid
% of Accounts
Paid
Value in $A of
Accounts Paid
% of
Accounts
Paid
Paid by due date 44 022 95.65% $86 415.327 87.24%
Paid < 30 days from due date 1 275 2.77% $11 156 999 11.26%
Paid > 30 days from due date 725 1.58% $1 483 275 1.50%
Total 46 022 100% $99 055 601 100%


APPENDIX 3 - ENERGY USAGE 2011-12
Energy savings are achieved through the scheduled replacement of existing equipment,
security systems, lighting, air treatment systems and computers with new more energy
efficient technology. The figures in the table below reflect gas and electricity consumed
in/around buildings only.



NOTES: (a) Base line information represents structure as at 2000-01.
(b) Due to billing cycles and information available for the different sites, consumption at some sites has
been estimated using previous years consumption.
(c) Business measure used is the number of prisoners and offender orders being managed.


Energy Usage in 2011-12
Departmental Total / Measure / Target Energy Use (GJ) GHG
Emissions
Business
Measure
Base Year 2000- 01: Departmental Total 77 096 13 102 8 163
Base Year 2000-01: Departmental Total 9 444 Mj/per offender/prisoner
Year Being Reported: 2011-12 Departmental Total 77 721 10 047 8 532
Departmental Business Measure (for year being
reported)
9 109 Mj/per offender/prisoner
Final Departmental Target (for 2014) 7 083 Mj/per offender/prisoner

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 104
APPENDIX 4 - CUSTODIAL SERVICES STATISTICAL INFORMATION 2011-12

TABLE 1 - INTAKES BY RACIAL IDENTITY AND GENDER 2011-12
Intakes by Racial Identity and Gender 2011-12
Non-Aboriginal Aboriginal Unknown

M F Total M F U Total M F Total Total
Unsentenced 2 051 218 2 269 853 176 1 1 030 298 56 354 3 653
Fine Default 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Sentenced 372 31 403 62 12 0 74 49 5 54 531
Unknown 107 3 110 25 1 0 26 24 1 25 161
Total 2 530 252 2 782 940 189 1 1 130 371 62 433 4 345

TABLE 2 - PRISONERS IN CUSTODY AND AVERAGE PRISON POPULATION IN 2011-12

NOTES: ARC - Adelaide Remand Centre, YLP - Yatala Labour Prison, MOB - Mobilong Prison, APC - Adelaide Pre-Release
Centre, AWP - Adelaide Womens Prison, JNH - James Nash House, CTC - Cadell Training Centre, PTA - Port Augusta
Prison, PTL - Port Lincoln Prison, MTG - Mount Gambier Prison
TABLE 3 - PRISON CAPACITIES AND AVERAGE DAILY POPULATION 2011-12
60
148
172
327
161
258
56
123
378
172
324
161
499
126
392
267
124
472
0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500
Adel aide Remand Centre
Yatal a Labour Prison
Adel aide Pre-release Centre
Adelaide Women's Prison
Pt Augusta Prison
Pt Lincoln Prison
Mt Gambier Prison
Mobi long Prison
Cadel l Trai ning Centre
Capacity Average Dai ly Pri son Population

NOTES: Additional beds are utilised in cases of emergency including City Watch House.
Prisoners admitted to James Nash House are not included.

Prisoners in Custody and Average Prison Population in 2011-12
ARC YLP MOB APC AWP JNH CTC PTA PTL MTG Total

M M F M M F M F M M F M M F M F Total
In Custody
30/6/11
245 455 0 326 59 114 7 0 164 356 6 122 171 1 1 905 121 2 026
In Custody
30/6/12
240 499 1 319 57 127 3 3 156 371 4 126 172 0 1 943 135 2 078
Daily
average
in prison
258 471 1 324 56 123 9 1 161 372 6 124 172 0 1 947 131 2 078
Daily
average
remand
228 225 0 60 0 48 7 1 0 70 4 5 6 0 601 53 654
Daily
average
sentenced
30 246 1 264 56 75 2 0 161 302 2 119 166 0 1 346 78 1 424

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2011-12 105
TABLE 4 - ESCAPES FROM DCS CUSTODY 2011-12
Escapes from DCS Custody in 2011-12
ARC YLP APC AWP JNH CTC MOB PTA PTL MTG ESCORT
Escapes 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o 0 0 0
Incidents 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Daily Average Prison
Population
258 472 56 123 10 161 324 378 124 172 0
Escape Rate 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 N/A
NOTES: Escape rate is calculated as 100 x prisoners escaping divided by the daily average prison population.

TABLE 5 - ESCAPES FROM DCS FROM 2007-12
Escapes from DCS for years ending 30 June 2008-12
2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
Prisoners Escaping 6
1
7
2
3
3
4 0
Incidents of Escape 5 7 3 3
4
0
Daily Average Prison Population

1 855 1 935 1 963 1 987 2 078
Escape Rate 0.32 0.36 0.15 0.20 0.00

NOTES: Escape rate is calculated as 100 x prisoners escaping divided by the daily average prison population.
1
Includes an escape from James Nash House
2
Includes Escapes from MowCamp
3
Includes 2 escapes from G4S escort
4
Includes 1 escape from G4S escort

TABLE 6 - INCIDENTS IN PRISON 2011-12
Incidents in Prison in 2011-2012
ARC CTC MOB MTG APC AWP PTA PTL YLP Total
Drugs 14 32 12 5 2 21 18 1 111 216
Alcohol 1 0 8 1 1 0 1 2 0 14
Escape 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0*
Critical Self Harm 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 3
Death Unnatural 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Death Natural Causes 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 3
Prisoner/Prisoner Assault 41 5 19 9 0 8 44 7 40 173
Fire (Appliance Called) 0 0 28 1 0 0 1 1 6 37
Fire (Handled Internally) 0 1 20 0 0 1 5 0 2 29

TABLE 7 - PRISONER/STAFF INCIDENTS 2011-12

Prisoner/Staff Incidents 2011-12
ARC CTC MOB MTG APC AWP PTA PTL YLP Total
Physical Assaults
Number of incidents 3 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 9 16
Staff assaulted 3 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 9 16
Abusive/Threatening Behaviour
Number of incidents 40 2 1 2 0 4 27 5 24 105
Total Incidents
Number of incidents 43 2 1 2 0 8 27 5 33 121
Staff assaulted 3 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 9 16
NOTES: Incidents reported on the Departmental Incident Reporting System

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 106
TABLE 8 - SENTENCED DISCHARGES BY TIME SERVED AND MAJOR OFFENCE - 2011-12

Sentenced discharges by time served and major offence in 2011-12
Offence Group
< 1
month
1-3
months
3-6
months
6-12
months
1-2
years
2-5
years
5-10
years
> 10
years
Total
Homicide 0 0 1 0 1 5 3 4 14
Assaults 10 25 44 50 24 16 3 0 172
Sexual Assaults 1 2 4 4 13 17 10 1 52
Other Offences Against The Person 1 0 1 3 3 4 2 0 14
Robbery 0 0 2 9 7 21 4 3 46
Extortion 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1
Break and Enter 2 6 13 35 37 18 9 3 123
Fraud 23 24 22 17 11 4 3 0 104
Receiving 2 4 1 3 1 1 0 0 12
Other Theft 3 7 7 10 6 2 1 0 36
Property Damage 6 4 3 0 2 0 0 0 15
Offences Against Justice Procedures 185 225 132 40 34 20 2 0 638
Unlawful Possession of Weapons 1 1 2 4 2 1 0 0 11
Deal or Traffic Drugs 1 3 3 12 19 13 1 0 52
Manufacture or Grow Drugs 0 1 1 0 2 2 0 0 6
Driving Offences 5 5 4 7 2 0 0 0 23
Licence or Registration Offences 48 57 33 12 3 0 0 0 153
Other Offences Against Good Order 71 21 9 15 11 0 0 0 127
Other Offences 0 1 3 3 0 0 0 0 7
Unknown 7 7 8 31 18 3 0 0 74
Total 366 393 293 255 196 128 38 11 1 680

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 107
TABLE 9 - FORMS OF DISCHARGE BY INSTITUTION - 2011-12
Forms of Discharge by Institution in 2011-12
APC ARC AWP CTC JNH MOB MTG PLP PTA YLP TOTAL 2011-2012 2010 - 2011
M M F M M F M M F M F M F M F M F Total % Total %
Sentence Served 8 84 70 174 2 0 216 29 2 22 1 202 14 245 0 982 87 1 069 23.95 956 21.98
Release to Home Detention 67 1 15 62 0 0 9 2 0 6 0 15 0 5 0 167 15 182 4.08 156 3.59
Release to Parole 88 5 52 103 0 0 94 18 0 33 0 80 0 83 0 504 52 556 12.46 570 13.11
Release to Licence 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 4 0 4 0.08 1 0.02
Released to Probation 3 1 4 8 0 0 8 1 0 0 0 4 0 9 0 34 4 38 0.85 37 0.85
Total Custodial Sentence 166 92 141 347 2 0 328 50 2 62 1 301 14 343 0 1 691 158 1 849 41.42 1 720 39.55
Default Period Served 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 3 0.07
Suspended Further Time to Pay 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 10 0 10 0.23 3 0.07
Fine Paid/Part Paid 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 2 0.05
Total Monetary Warrant 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 5 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 10 0 10 0.23 8 0.18
Release to Bail 0 381 64 0 7 2 9 23 3 22 1 34 4 200 0 676 74 750 16.80 428 9.84
Bail Appeal Pending 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 2 0.05 11 0.25
Release from Court 0 617 210 0 16 0 58 12 2 12 0 315 58 493 1 1 523 271 1 794 40.20 2 127 49.01
Appeal Upheld 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 5 0 5 0.12 7 0.16
Total Remand in Custody 0 998 274 0 23 2 68 36 5 34 1 349 62 698 1 2 206 345 2 551 57.17 2 573 59.16
Deceased 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 4 0 4 0.08 4 0.09
Deported 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 0.02 0 0.00
Extradition 0 7 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 9 1 10 0.23 6 0.14
Escaped 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 4 0.09
Transfer to Other Agency 0 3 0 0 12 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 19 1 35 3 38 0.85 33 0.76
Wrongfully Imprisoned 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.00 1 0.02
Total Other Discharges 1 10 0 0 12 2 0 1 0 0 1 1 0 24 1 49 4 53 1.18 48 1.10
Total 201112 167 1 100 415 348 37 4 396 92 7 98 3 652 76 1 066 2 3 956 507 4 463 100%
Total 2010-11 197 927 406 304 26 6 466 120 7 68 2 582 58 1 178 2 4349 100%


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 108
APPENDIX 5 - COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS STATISTICAL INFORMATION 2011-12

TABLE 1 - COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS ORDERS AND INDIVIDUALS - 2011-12
Community Corrections Orders and Individuals Current as at 30 June 2012
Male Female Unknown
ORDER TYPE
Orders Individuals Orders Individuals Orders Individuals
Bail
538 467 106 102 1 1
Community Service
775 728 186 175 0 0
Financial Penalty Expiated Thru CS
514 505 183 182 0 0
Home Detention
51 51 3 3 0 0
Home Detention Bond
1 1 0 0 0 0
Intensive Bail Supervision
343 315 39 36 0 0
Interstate Orders
10 9 1 1 0 0
Other Orders
266 266 17 17 0 0
Parole
824 814 73 73 0 0
Probation
2 021 1 934 502 482 0 0
Total
5 343 5 090 1 110 1 071 1 1

TABLE 2 - AGE AND SEX OF INDIVIDUALS WHO COMMENCED ORDERS - 2011-12

Age and Sex of Community Corrections Individuals who Commenced Orders in 2011-12
Male % Female % Unknown % Total %
17 1 0.1 % 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 1 0.1%
18 154 2.2 % 31 2.3% 0 0.0% 185 2.2%
19 213 3.1 % 40 3.0 % 0 0.0% 253 3.1%
20 252 3.7 % 57 4.3 % 0 0.0% 309 3.7%
21 - 24 1 002 14.5 % 150 11.2% 3 12.0 % 1 155 14.0%
25 - 29 1 316 19.1 % 254 19.0 % 14 56.0 % 1 584 19.2%
30 - 34 1 131 16.4 % 225 16.8 % 3 12.0 % 1 359 16.4%
35 - 39 798 11.6 % 188 14.1 % 3 12.0 % 989 12.0%
40 - 49 1 172 17.0 % 252 18.8 % 1 4.0 % 1 425 17.2%
50 - 59 353 5.1 % 69 5.2 % 0 0.0% 422 5.1%
60 and over 106 1.5 % 18 1.3 % 1 4.0 % 125 1.5%
Unknown 396 5.7 % 54 4.0 % 0 0.0% 450 5.5%
Total 6 894 100.0% 1 338 100.0% 25 100.0% 8 257 100.0%

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 109

TABLE 3 - COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS ORDERS COMMENCED - 2011-12

Community Corrections Orders Commenced in 2011-12
Male Female Unknown Total
Bail Supervision - Bail 999 186 10 1195
Total Bail Orders Commenced 999 186 10 1 195
Crimes Act - Cs Orders 3 2 0 5
Parole Cs 32 2 0 34
Bond Community Service (No Supervision - No Suspended
Sentence)
66 10 0 76
Bond Community Service (No Supervision Suspended
Sentence)
31 2 0 33
Bond Supervision and Community Service (No Suspended
Sentence)
23 5 0 28
Bond Supervision and Community Service (Suspended Sentence) 61 7 0 68
Community Service Order 1257 306 2 1565
Community Service Order With Supervision 5 1 0 6
Shop Theft Diversion 1 1 0 2
Total Community Service Orders Commenced 1 479 336 2 1 817
Community Service Order (Fines Enforcement) 549 159 1 709
Total Financial Penalty Expiated Through Community Service
Orders Commenced
549 159 1 709
Home Detention Supervision 168 14 0 182
Parole and Home Detention 11 0 0 11
Total Home Detention Orders Commenced 179 14 0 193
Bond With Supervision and Home Detention (Suspended
Sentence)
2 1 0 3
Total Home Detention Bond Orders Commenced 2 1 0 3
Intensive Bail Supervision Orders 1027 148 7 1182
Total Intensive Bail Supervision Orders Commenced 1 027 148 7 1 182
Interstate Parole 5 0 0 5
Interstate Probation 5 5 0 10
Total Interstate Orders Commenced 10 5 0 15
Criminal Law Consolidation Act 1 0 0 1
Pre-Bond Supervision (Home Detention) 4 1 0 5
Pre-Parole Supervision (Home Detention) 124 8 0 132
Supervision In Prison 451 42 0 493
Voluntary Supervision 2 1 0 3
Total Other Orders Commenced 582 52 0 634
Parole Under Licence 0 1 0 1
Parole & Home Detention 11 0 0 11
Parole 507 46 0 553
Total Parole Orders Commenced 518 47 0 565
Mental Impairment Supervision 89 29 1 119
Crimes Act Bond With Supervision 14 11 0 25
Bond Supervision and Community Service (No Suspended
Sentence)
23 5 0 28
Bond Supervisor and Community Service (Suspended Sentence) 61 7 0 68
Bond Supervision and Home Detention (Suspended Sentence) 2 1 0 3
Bond With Supervision 423 152 2 577
Bond With Supervision (Suspended Sentence) 932 184 2 1118
Community Service Order With Supervision 5 1 0 6
Total Probation Orders Commenced 1 549 390 5 1 944
Total Orders Commenced 6 894 1 338 25 8 257

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 110

TABLE 4 - COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS ORDERS CLOSED - 2011-12

Community Corrections Orders Closed During 2011-12
Male Female Unknown Total
Expired / Paid / Hours Completed
3 811 741 8 4 560
Estreated / Cancelled
405 65 6 476
Expired in Breach
1 177 308 1 1 486
Administration Discharge
15 9 0 24
Variation
426 133 3 562
Interstate Transfer
6 0 0 6
Deceased
29 4 0 33
Offender Requests
1 0 0 1
Deported
0 0 0 0
Total Orders Closed 5 870 1 260 18 7 148


TABLE 5 - HOME DETENTION - 2011-12

Home Detention in 2011-12
Commencements Discharges Revocations
Current as at 30 June
2012

Post-
Prison
Bail Bond
Post-
Prison
Bail Bond
Post-
Prison
Bail Bond
Post-
Prison
Bail
Bon
d
Male 179 1 039 2 162 992 0 10 190 0 51 343 1
Female 14 143 1 17 140 1 1 32 0 3 39 0
Total 193 1 182 3 179 1 132 1 11 222 0 54 382 1


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 111
TABLE 6 - COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS REPORTS COMPLETED - 2011-12

Community Corrections Reports Completed in 2011-12

Pre-
Sentence
Parole
Community
Service
Bail
Home
Detention
Bail
Home
Detention
Home
Detention
Bond
Total
Northern Metropolitan Region
Elizabeth 99 86 124 2 0 0 0 311
Gawler 48 23 5 1 0 0 0 77
North East 76 64 7 1 0 0 0 148
Pt Adelaide 95 71 251 2 0 0 0 419
NMR Total 318 244 387 6 0 0 0 955
Southern Metropolitan Region
Adelaide 75 48 49 0 0 0 0 172
Courts Unit 327 0 3 1028 0 0 0 1 359
Edwardstown 56 55 2 0 0 0 0 113
HD Admin 0 0 0 1 1722 297 0 2 020
Noarlunga 94 63 16 0 0 0 0 173
SMR Total 552 166 70 1 029 1 722 297 0 3 837
Northern Country Region
Ceduna 10 0 0 12 3 1 0 26
Coober Pedy 11 1 0 22 3 1 0 38
Marla 43 0 0 59 0 1 0 103
Pt Augusta 66 99 1 111 55 12 0 344
Pt Lincoln 14 12 0 8 23 9 0 66
Pt Pirie 22 6 2 29 23 8 0 90
Whyalla 42 6 0 53 28 6 0 135
NCR Total 208 124 3 294 135 38 0 802
Southern Country Region
Berri 36 12 3 4 44 11 0 110
Mt Gambier 10 22 6 21 38 18 0 115
Murray Bridge 53 81 4 5 39 7 0 189
SCR Total 99 115 13 30 121 36 0 414
Total 1 177 649 473 1 359 1 979 371 0 6 008

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 112
APPENDIX 6 - HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT STATISTICAL INFORMATION - 2011-12
TABLE 1 - DCS EMPLOYEES BY CLASSIFICATION STREAM, DIVISION AND GENDER - 2011-12
Central Office Community Corrections Custodial Services Correctional Business
Centre
Workers Comp Pool Total
Stream
Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total
Administrative
Services

Trainees 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
ASO1 2 2 4 0 5 5 3 17 20 5 7 12 0 0 0 10 31 41
ASO2 4 12 16 5 30 35 4 16 20 3 21 24 0 0 0 16 79 95
ASO3 0 15 15 0 10 10 12 8 20 4 17 21 0 0 0 16 50 66
ASO4 7 16 23 1 2 3 4 4 8 4 7 11 0 0 0 16 29 45
ASO5 9 19 28 5 2 7 0 1 1 1 0 1 0 0 0 15 22 37
ASO6 25 14 39 3 3 6 1 1 2 0 4 4 0 0 0 29 22 51
ASO7 11 12 23 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 12 25
ASO8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Manager
Administrative
Services

MAS1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
MAS2 0 2 2 1 1 2 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 5
MAS3 8 4 12 3 1 4 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 15 5 20
Total
Administrative
Services
66 96 162 20 55 75 28 48 76 17 56 73 0 0 0 131 255 386

Operational
Services

Trainees 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
OPS1 12 3 15 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 4 16
OPS2 0 0 0 35 2 37 509 153 656 0 0 0 3 4 7 541 159 700
OPS3 1 0 1 38 47 85 146 24 170 0 0 0 0 0 0 185 71 256
OPS4 2 0 2 4 4 8 40 11 51 2 0 2 0 0 0 48 15 63
OPS5 1 1 2 4 2 6 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3 9
OPS6 3 0 3 0 0 0 9 0 9 0 1 1 0 0 0 12 1 13
OPS7 1 0 1 0 0 0 10 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 0 11
Total Operational
Services
20 4 24 81 55 136 709 189 898 2 1 3 3 4 7 815 253 1 068

Allied Health
Professionals

AHP1 0 0 0 5 21 26 0 3 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 24 29
AHP2 0 7 7 17 53 70 4 17 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 77 98
AHP3 9 17 26 5 8 13 2 5 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 16 30 46
AHP4 2 5 7 0 1 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 7 9
AHP5 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Total Allied Health
Professionals
11 30 41 27 83 110 6 26 32 0 0 0 0 0 0 44 139 183

Professional
Officers

PO1 0 0 0 1 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 4 5
PO2 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2
PO3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
PO4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
PO5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total Professional
Officers
1 1 2 1 4 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 5 7

Executives
SAES1 3 2 5 1 0 1 4 2 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 4 12
SAES2 (CEO) 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Total Executives 4 2 6 1 0 1 4 2 6 9 4 13

Others
Ministerial
Special Ministerial
Classifications
3 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 4
Total Ministerial 3 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 1 4

Government
Services

GSE1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
GSE2 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 10 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 10 15
GSE3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
GSE5 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2
Total Government
Services
0 0 0 0 0 0 7 10 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 10 17

Government Stores
WSE3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 0 3 0 3
WSE4 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 8 2 10 0 0 0 9 3 12
WSE5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 2
WSE6 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1
Total Government
Stores
0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 12 4 15 0 0 0 13 5 18

Government
Transport Freight

MF11 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
MFD7 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 2
MFD9 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1
Total Government
Transport
0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 4

Hourly Paid
Instructors

HPICAS 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 17 22 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 17 22
Total Hourly Paid
Instructors
0 0 0 0 0 0 5 17 22 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 17 22
Total All Streams 105 134 239 130 197 327 764 293 1 057 31 61 91 3 4 7 1 033 689 1 722
NOTES: Central Office represents all work groups that are not defined as Custodial Services or Community Corrections. This
includes staff from the Ministers Office. Some Custodial and Community Corrections staff are however located in
Central Office.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 113
TABLE 2 - NUMBERS - GENDER STATUS - 2011-12

Numbers - Gender Status in 2011-12
Persons 1 718
FTE's 1 640.95
Gender % Persons % FTE
Male 59.95 61.15
Female 40.05 38.85
Number of Persons Separated from the agency during the last 12 months 210
Number of Persons Recruited to the agency during the 11/12 financial year 294
Number of Persons Recruited to the agency during the 11/12 financial year AND who
were active/paid at June 2012 236
Number of Persons on Leave without Pay at 30 June 2012 23

NOTES: Does not include the Minister, Ministerial Advisors or Chief of Staff.

TABLE 3 - NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES BY SALARY BRACKET - 2011-12
Number of Employees by Salary Bracket in 2011-12
Salary Bracket Male Female Total
$0 - $51 599 607 304 911
$51 600 - $65 699 271 195 466
$65 700 - $84 099 105 142 247
$84 100 - $106 199 38 42 80
$106 200+ 9 5 14
Total 1 030 688 1 718

NOTES: Does not include the Minister, Ministerial Advisors or Chief of Staff.

TABLE 4 - STATUS OF EMPLOYEES IN CURRENT POSITION - 2011-12
Status of Employees in Current Position in 2011-12
FTE's
Gender Ongoing Short-term contract Long-term contract Casual Total
Male 890.95 94.9 11 6.53 1 003.38
Female 515.8 107.7 7 7.07 637.57
Total 1 406.75 202.6 18 13.6 1 640.95
Persons
Gender Ongoing Short-term contract Long-term contract Casual Total
Male 901 98 11 20 1030
Female 546 113 7 22 688
Total
1 447 211 18 42 1 718

NOTES: Does not include the Minister, Ministerial Advisors or Chief of Staff.

TABLE 5 - NUMBER OF EXECUTIVES IN CURRENT POSITION, GENDER AND CLASSIFICATION - 2011-12

Number of Executives by Status in Current Position, Gender and Classification in 2011-2012
Ongoing Term Tenured Term Untenured Total
Classification M F M F M F M F
Total
SAES1 1 0 0 0 7 4 8 4 12
SAES2 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1
Total 1 0 0 0 8 4 9 4 13

NOTES: Does not include the Minister, Ministerial Advisors or Chief of Staff.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 114

TABLE 6 - AVERAGE DAYS LEAVE PER FTE EMPLOYMENT - 2011-12

Average Days Leave Per FTE Employment in 2011-12
Leave Type 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12
Sick Leave 10.04 8.75 9.53 9.62
Family Carers Leave 1.22 1.46 1.55 1.48
Miscellaneous Special Leave n/a 0.81 0.89 0.95

NOTES: Does not include the Minister, Ministerial Advisors or Chief of Staff.

TABLE 7 - NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES BY AGE BRACKET BY GENDER - 2011-12

Number of Employees by Age Bracket by Gender in 2011-12
Age Bracket Male Female Total % of Total
Workforce
Benchmark % *
15 - 19 0 2 2 0.12 6.4
20 - 24 33 21 54 3.14 10.4
25 - 29 60 54 114 6.64 11.0
30 - 34 84 64 148 8.61 10.1
35 - 39 106 70 176 10.24 10.3
40 - 44 125 98 223 12.98 11.0
45 - 49 148 104 252 14.67 11.5
50 - 54 187 112 299 17.4 11.4
55 - 59 151 96 247 14.38 9.4
60 - 64 110 54 164 9.55 5.5
65+ 26 13 39 2.27 3.0
Total
1 030 688 1 718 100 100

NOTES: Does not include the Minister, Ministerial Advisors or Chief of Staff. *Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian
Demographic Statistics, 6291.0.55.001 Labour Force Status (ST LM8) by sex, age, state, marital status employed
total from February 78 Supertable, South Australia at May 2010

TABLE 8 - NUMBER OF ABORIGINAL AND/OR TORRES STRAIT ISLANDER EMPLOYEES - 2011-12

Number of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Employees in 2011-12
Salary Bracket Aboriginal Staff Total Staff % Aboriginal Target
$0 - $51,599 32 911 3.51 2%
$51,600 - $65,699 18 466 3.86 2%
$65,700 - $84,099 8 247 3.24 2%
$84,100 - $106,199 1 80 1.25 2%
$106,200+ 0 14 0 2%
Total 59 1 718 3.43 2%

NOTES: Does not include the Minister, Ministerial Advisors or Chief of Staff.

TABLE 9 - CULTURAL AND LINGUISTIC DIVERSITY - 2011-12
Cultural and Linguistic Diversity in 2011-12
Male Female Total % of Agency SA Community*
Number of employees born overseas 180 89 269 15.66 20.30%
Number of employees who speak
language(s) other than English at home
41 20 61 3.55 16.60%

NOTES: Does not include the Minister, Ministerial Advisors or Chief of Staff.
*Benchmarks from ABS Publication Basic Community Profile (SA) Cat No. 2001.0, 2006 census



DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 115
TABLE 10 - NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES WITH DISABILITIES REQUIRING WORKPLACE ADAPTATION - 2011-12

Number of Employees with Disabilities Requiring Workplace Adaptation 2011-12
Male Female Total % of Agency
17 7 24 1.4

NOTES: It is recognised that many employees do not wish to declare they have a disability. Further, departmental
employee data collection regarding disabilities is based on self disclosure only. Therefore, specific information
regarding the types of disabilities (physical, intellectual sensory physiological / psychiatric or other) may not be
captured.

TABLE 11 - NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES USING VOLUNTARY FLEXIBLE WORKING ARRANGEMENTS - 2011-12

Number of Employees Using Voluntary Flexible Working Arrangements 2011-12
Leave Type Male Female Total
Purchased Leave 2 9 11
Flexitime 173 355 528
Compressed Weeks 0 1 1
Part-time 55 128 183
Job Share 1 11 12

TABLE 12 - NUMBER OF INVESTIGATIONS INTO BREACHES OF THE CODE OF ETHICS - 2011-12

Number of Investigations into Breaches of the Code of Ethics 2011-12
Breach Found 6
Penalties for breach found
Reprimand 5
Reprimand and loss of remuneration 1
Reprimand and loss of leave 0
Loss of remuneration 0
No breach found 20
Employee resigned prior to completion 1
Awaiting completion 48
Total number of investigations 75


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 116

TABLE 13 - ACCREDITED TRAINING PACKAGES BY CLASSIFICATION - 2011-12

Accredited Training Packages by Classification in 2011-12
Classification Number of Accredited Training Packages
AHP1 4
AHP2 13
AHP3 4
ASO1 5
ASO2 16
ASO3 5
ASO4 4
ASO5 4
ASO6 8
ASO7 6
GSE5 1
HPIC 1
MAS3 3
MF11 1
OPS2 6
OPS3 7
OPS4 2
OPS5 1
OPS6 3
OPS7 1
OPX2 137
OPX3 47
OPX4 12
OPX5 3
PO1 2

TABLE 14 - LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT TRAINING EXPENDITURE - 2011-12

Leadership and Management Training Expenditure in 2011-12
Training and Development Total Cost
% of Total Salary
Expenditure
Total training and development expenditure $3.1m 2.36%
Total leadership and management development $0.67m 0.51%

NOTES: DCS salary budget provides for the payment of employees working in prisons on a 24/7 roster and therefore
includes payment of shift allowances and call backs. In addition, due to system limitations, many salary costs
of employees participating in training (and any call back charges) are not factored into the total training
investment this is also the case for any training directly charged against program and project codes.

TABLE 15 - OHS NOTICES AND CORRECTIVE ACTION TAKEN - 2011-12

OHS Notices and Corrective Action Taken 2011-12
Number of notifiable occurrences pursuant to OHS&W Regulations. Division 6.6 4
Number of notifiable injuries pursuant to OHS&W Regulations, Division 6.6 9
Number of notices served pursuant to OHS&W Act, s35, s39 and s40 (default, improvement
and prohibition notices)
4

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 117

TABLE 16 - AGENCY WORKERS COMPENSATION EXPENDITURE - 2011-12 (COMPARED WITH 2010-11)

Agency Gross Workers Compensation Expenditure for 2011-12 Compared with 2010-11

Expenditure
2011-12
($m)
2010-11
($m)
Variation
($m)+(-)
% Change
=+(-)
Hospital $0.098m $0.106m -$ -7.49%
Income Maintenance $1 718m $1 928m -$ -10.92%
Investigation $0.020m $0.075m -$ -73.21%
Legal Expenses $0.144m $0.146m -$ -1.12%
Lump Sum $1.255m $1.263m -$ -0.62%
Other $0.148m $0.394m -$ -62.36%
Registered Medical $0.706m $0.699m +$ 1.10%
Rehabilitation $0.327m $0.408m -$ -19.81%
Travel $0.058m $0.061m -$ -4.97
Total Claims Expenditure $4.47m $5.08m -$0.61m -11.90%

TABLE 17 - MEETING SAFETY PERFORMANCE TARGETS - 2011-12

Safety Performance Targets in 2011-12
Base:
2009-10
Performance 12 months
as at 30 June 2012*
Numbers
or %
Actual
Notional
Target**
Variation
1. Workplace fatalities 0 0 0 0
2. New workplace injury claims 149 122 134 -12
3. New workplace injury claims
frequency rate***
57.08 46.21 51.37 -5.16
4. Lost time injuries frequency rate*** 30.65 30.30 27.58 2.72
5. New psychological injury frequency rate*** 9.33 7.24 8.40 - 1.16
6. Rehabilitation and return to work:
6a. Early assessment within 2 days 66.44% 84.43% 80.00% 4.43
6b. Early intervention within 5 days 97.22% 86.36% 90.00% -3.64
6c. Days lost <=10 days 42.22% 42.68% 60.00% -17.32
7. Claim determination
7a. Claims to be determined for provisional in
7 calendar days
26.32% 97.18% 100.00% - 2.82
7b. Claims determined in 10 business days 68.92% 44.72% 75.00% -30.28
7c. Claims still to be determined after 3 months 7.43% 13.01% 3.00% 10.01
8. Income maintenance payments for recent Injuries
2009-10 injuries (at 21 months development) $1 071 216.48 $827 130.90 $244 085.59
2010-11 injuries (at 9 months development) $537 030.22 $642 468.01 $105 437.79

NOTES: * Except for target 5, all data is at year to date
** Based on cumulative reduction from base at a constant quarterly figure
*** Frequency rates are calculated for benchmarking and are used by the WorkCover Corporation.
Frequency rates calculated as follows: Number of new / lost time / psychological injuries for year x 1 000 000
(number of hours worked in year).


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 118
TABLE 18 - WORKERS COMPENSATION STATISTICS - 2011-12



Workers Compensation Statistics in 2011-12

PSWR actuarial
valuation of workers
compensation
liabilities
(rounded)
PSWR valuation of
workers
compensation
liabilities
(actual)
Workers
compensation
provisions
(notes to and forming
part of financial
statements)
Number of
new workers
compensation
claims by
financial year
30 June 2012 $18m $18 232 081 $18 232 122
30 June 2011 $18m $18 001 763 $17 079 147
30 June 2010 $20m $20 032 359 $18 824 149
30 June 2009 $21.1m $21 105 996 $20 311 141
30 June 2008 $24.9m $24 932 778 $23 983 182
30 June 2007 $28.3m $28 332 183 $27 005 167

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 119
APPENDIX 7 - FREEDOM OF INFORMATION - INFORMATION STATEMENT

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 9 of the Freedom of Information Act 1991(the FOI Act) the
following details are provided as part of the Information Statement.

Structures and functions of DCS
The structures and functions of DCS are shown in the front of this report. The report also includes an
overview of the reporting lines of responsibility.

Functions of DCS affecting the public
The departments work directly impacts on the public by securely and humanely managing
people ordered by the courts to serve a community based or prison sanction and to provide them
with opportunities to lead law abiding lives. DCS also contributes to a safer community by working
in partnership with other criminal justice organisations and the community to prevent crime and
reduce repeat offending.

Public participation in policy development
There are no formal arrangements which enable members of the public to participate in the
formulation of the departments policies and the exercises of the agencys functions. Public
consultation is undertaken when it is deemed appropriate to engage the public in the formulation
of specific policy.

Description of the kinds of documents held by DCS
Documents retained by DCS fall broadly into the categories of corporate files containing
correspondence, minutes and memoranda; policies, procedures, instructions and guidelines
prescribing the way various activities are to be performed; personnel files relating to departmental
employees; strategic and business plans, reports, contracts and agreements; accounting and
financial records; and prisoner and offender records.

The listing of these categories does not necessarily imply that all documents falling into the
categories are accessible in full or in part under the FOI Act. Information regarding policy
documents may be viewed on the departments website www.corrections.sa.gov.au

Arrangements and procedures for seeking access to records
Applications for access to, or amendment of, DCS documents should be addressed to:

Freedom of Information Officer
Freedom of Information and Stakeholder Support Branch

2
nd
Floor, 400 King William Street
Adelaide SA 5000

or

GPO Box 1747
Adelaide SA 5001

Telephone: 8226 9124 or 8226 9027 or 8226 4138

Applications made under the FOI Act for access to documents must be in writing and be
accompanied by the application fee of $30.50 A reduction on the fee payable may be
applicable in certain circumstances.

DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 120

APPENDIX 8 - OVERSEAS TRAVEL - 2011-12

Overseas Travel by Departmental Employees in 2011-12

Number of
Employees

Destination/s Reasons for Travel
Total Cost to
Agency
3 Singapore
Attendance at the International Corrections
and Prisons Association Conference
$11 410
1 Austria
Attendance at the United Nations Office on
Drugs and Crime Expert Group Meeting
(partially funded by the United Nations)
$8 751
1 Japan
Attendance at the Asian and Pacific
Conference of Correctional Administrators
$5 230
1 Wales
Attendance and presentation at the Division of
Forensic Psychology Annual Conference
$3 246
1 Malaysia
Attendance at the Malaysian Institute of
Accountants Conference
$ 853

NOTES: The following expenditure incurred in 2011-12 has not been included:

$3 274 for one employee to attend the International Corrections and Prisons Association Annual
Conference in Mexico as the conference is to be held in October 2012. Reimbursement to come from
the New South Wales government in 2012-13.
$2 300 for one employee to attend the Pacific Islands Fire Service Association Conference in Tonga as
the trip was cancelled. A credit for this has been received in 2012-13.


DEPARTMENT FOR CORRECTIONAL SERVICES ANNUAL REPORT 2010-11 121

APPENDIX 9 - LEGISLATION THAT GOVERNS THE OPERATION OF THE DEPARTMENT

The activities of the Department for Correctional Services are governed by various forms of
legislation, and include but are not limited to the:

Correctional Services Act 1982
Bail Act 1985
Criminal Law (Sentencing) Act 1988
Mental Health Act 1993
Prisoner (Interstate Transfer) Act 1982
Parole Orders (Transfer) Act 1983
International Transfer of Prisoners Act 1997
Victims of Crime Act 2001
Industrial and Employee Relations Act 1994
Industrial Law Reform (Fair Work) Act 2005
State Records Act 1997
Freedom of Information Act 1991
Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Act 1986
Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1986
Carers Recognition Act 2005
Equal Opportunity Act 1984
Public Sector Management Act 1995
Public Sector Act 2009
Public Finance and Audit Act 1987

















South Australian
Department for Correctional Services
Level 2, 400 King William Street
ADELAIDE SA 5000




Telephone: 08 8226 9000
Facsimile: 08 8226 9226




Internet: www.corrections.sa.gov.au
Email: dcs@sa.gov.au




ABN: 44736536754
ISSN: 18340415




As at 30 June 2012