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UCLES 2008.

This material may be photocopied (without alteration) and distributed for classroom use provided no charge is made. It may not
otherwise be altered, photocopied, reproduced, distributed, published, recorded, made available on another website, or otherwise transmitted by
any means without the prior written permission of University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations.

CPE Listening Paper Part 4 teachers notes www.cambridgeesol.org/teach
Page 1 of 7
CPE Listening Paper Part 4 teachers notes

Description
The first activity familiarises students with Listening Part 4. Students then do an activity
which trains them to listen out for certain opinions in a dialogue. Finally, students decide if
the speakers agree or disagree with the opinions expressed.

Time required: 30 Minutes
Materials
required:
sample recording
students worksheet
tapescript
Aims:
to familiarise students with Listening Part 4

to help students identify opinions when expressed in a dialogue
and to decide whether speakers agree or disagree with the
opinions expressed

Procedure
1. Give out copies of the students worksheet. Check that students know what they
have to do in Part 4 by asking them to do Exercise , question 1.
2. Students feed back what they have underlined in the information about Part 4. Of
course, all of the information is important so accept any well-argued suggestions.
The key information is:
Students listen to a text with interacting speakers
There are 6 statements/opinions on the question paper and students have to
match each statement to either of the two speakers, or to both when they
express agreement.
3. Explain to students that they are going to listen to a discussion about formality in the
workplace. Read through the instructions for the class. Check that they understand
the context. Ask:
Who is speaking? (two friends Dominic and Sue)
What are they speaking about? (formality at work)
What do students have to do in this task? (read the 6 statements and match
the statements to either of the two speakers or to both when they express
agreement.)


UCLES 2008. This material may be photocopied (without alteration) and distributed for classroom use provided no charge is made. It may not
otherwise be altered, photocopied, reproduced, distributed, published, recorded, made available on another website, or otherwise transmitted by
any means without the prior written permission of University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations.

CPE Listening Paper Part 4 teachers notes www.cambridgeesol.org/teach
Page 2 of 7
4. Tell the class they are now going to listen to the conversation (Exercise 1 question
2). If you dont have access to a recording, you can make your own with a colleague
using the tapescript, or read the dialogue out to the class. Divide the class into two
groups. One group will focus on the woman speaking and note whether she
expresses the opinion in the six statements. The other group should concentrate on
the man speaking and note whether he expresses the opinion in the six statements.
5. Play the recording.
6. Ask for feedback from both groups. Use the Key to sample task and the highlighted
tapescript below to check the answers. Where a speaker gives his/her opinion, the
text is highlighted.
7. Hand out copies of the tapescript. Play the recording again. This time, tell students
that when they hear and read either of the people express the opinion in the six
statements, they should tell you to stop the recording. When you stop it, students
work in pairs to identify how opinions and agreement/disagreement are expressed,
marking these on the tapescript. At this level, simple phrases such as Thats right etc
are not used. Students usually need to listen to a whole sentence or sentences and
to understand the speakers opinion.

Additional information
Students need exposure to a range of texts containing the type of language used
between peers when discussing everyday topics of common interest.
In addition to what is directly stated, candidates should have practice in recognising
the role of stress and intonation in supporting meaning.
Analysing spoken text to recognise how people agree and disagree will help students
decide on Both answers. People do not always say something as obvious as Yes,
thats right.
Activities which encourage students to express their opinions, and agree and
disagree with others, such as debates, are very useful practice.
As candidates can write their answers on the question paper before transferring their
answers to the mark sheet at the end of the test, it is good practice to write the letter
of each speaker, as he or she expresses the opinion stated, on the question paper
because it makes it easy to confirm whether both speakers agree or not.
Remind students to listen carefully to check whether the speakers agree, as this will
give a Both answer.

UCLES 2008. This material may be photocopied (without alteration) and distributed for classroom use provided no charge is made. It may not
otherwise be altered, photocopied, reproduced, distributed, published, recorded, made available on another website, or otherwise transmitted by
any means without the prior written permission of University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations.

CPE Listening Paper Part 4 answer keys www.cambridgeesol.org/teach
Page 3 of 7
CPE Listening Paper Part 4 answer keys
Key to Students Worksheet Exercise 1
1. Suggested answer
PART 4 THREE-WAY MULTIPLE MATCHING
This part tests candidates ability to listen for stated and non-stated opinion, agreement
and disagreement.

Each correct answer in Part 4 receives 1 mark.

The six questions in this part relate to one text which is usually in the form of an informal
discussion in which opinions about a topic are exchanged and agreement and
disagreement are expressed. There are two main speakers, one male and one female to
facilitate identification, although some texts may also feature a presenters introduction
and/or questions. A series of six statements summarises the main points raised in the
text and forms the basis of a three-way matching task. Candidates are asked to match
each statement to the speaker who expresses that view, or to indicate where speakers
are in agreement.

Key to Students Worksheet Exercise 1
(Question 2 answers highlighted, question 3 answers underlined)
DOMINIC: You know, Sue, I was speaking to someone yesterday about informality at work
and he thought that open-plan offices really improve the working environment and
encourage people to talk about the job and about problems among themselves, and to the
boss, whos sitting there too.
SUE: I wouldnt be able to concentrate, so it would definitely be detrimental to my work
output.
DOMINIC: Well, it depends to some extent on the individual, I suppose, but it works for me,
though previously I was skeptical.
SUE: These days with e-mail and all these other ways of communicating, I cant see any
advantage in having open plan offices. (1 S)
DOMINIC: Thats hardly an argument against them. Everyone wants a more informal
atmosphere these days.
SUE: Another aspect of being less formal is calling your colleagues by their first names.
Where I work the owners most definitely want to be called Mr and Mrs, but the rest of us all
call each other by our first names. Does your company have any convention on that? (2 B)
DOMINIC: Were trained to go for polite informality. I answer the phone and introduce myself
as Dominic Greenfield, not Mr Greenfield, so everyone calls me Dominic and were off on a
good footing.
SUE: Im sure thats right, because youre immediately breaking down the barrier. You can
get on with the business more smoothly than if you sound starchy.
DOMINIC: What about dressing down at work into casual wear? My boss has changed his
mind, in fact, and now he thinks its acceptable. What do you think about that?

UCLES 2008. This material may be photocopied (without alteration) and distributed for classroom use provided no charge is made. It may not
otherwise be altered, photocopied, reproduced, distributed, published, recorded, made available on another website, or otherwise transmitted by
any means without the prior written permission of University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations.

CPE Listening Paper Part 4 answer keys www.cambridgeesol.org/teach
Page 4 of 7
SUE: Im for it in the right environment. Maybe you are in a very young environment, not an
old-fashioned workplace like mine and its probably very acceptable if people frankly, if
they work better because they feel more comfortable. But as long as it doesnt get too
sloppy, because I think if you go to work with no idea of formal dress, if there isnt any code
at all then it just tends to encourage people to be lazy. (3B)
DOMINIC: I understand what youre saying, and maybe wearing a nice shirt and tie and a
nice pair of cufflinks you know, is important to impress your clients. But when youve got a
day at work when youre not having any meetings or representing the firm at all, and youre
probably in an airless, overheated office, I think it helps to have easy, casual clothes.
SUE: I think modern offices are usually quite congenial and conducive to work.
DOMINIC: Anyway, it shouldnt be like school.
SUE: But I think some of the reasons children wear school uniform can be applied to adults
in the workplace. Ive always been in favour of school uniform because it equalises people in
a place where they need to concentrate on work, not on what everybody else looks like.
(4S)
DOMINIC: And there are certainly those who need to be protected from their own dress-
sense, and itd be better for all of us if they were told. (5D)
SUE: What difference does that make to your performance at work?
DOMINIC: Dont you think that dressing down may create an unspoken hierarchy that
doesnt really exist? So people at work whore, maybe, on the same level if one of them
dresses on a higher budget, in designer labels, even if its casual clothes, that person will
automatically be seen as more prestigious. (6B)
SUE: I dont say its all-important, but I think it could disadvantage certain people. I like the
idea of being comfortable and wearing casual clothes and it all being easier and less formal,
but I always feel right in a suit at work.
DOMINIC: I think theres two sides to the argument.
SUE: Anyway, I like to come home

Key to Sample Task (and Students worksheet Exercise 1 question 2)
23. S
24. B
25. B
26. S
27. D
28. B


UCLES 2008. This material may be photocopied (without alteration) and distributed for classroom use provided no charge is made. It may not
otherwise be altered, photocopied, reproduced, distributed, published, recorded, made available on another website, or otherwise transmitted by
any means without the prior written permission of University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations.

CPE Listening Paper Part 4 Students worksheet www.cambridgeesol.org/teach
Page 5 of 7
CPE Listening Paper Part 4 Students worksheet
Exercise 1
1. Read the information about Part 4 and underline the key words the words
which carry the most important information. When you have finished, compare
the words you have underlined with those of another student.

PART 4 THREE-WAY MULTIPLE MATCHING
This part tests candidates ability to listen for stated and non-stated opinion, agreement and
disagreement.
Each correct answer in Part 4 receives 1 mark.
The six questions in this part relate to one text which is usually in the form of an informal
discussion in which opinions about a topic are exchanged and agreement and disagreement
are expressed. There are two main speakers, one male and one female to facilitate
identification, although some texts may also feature a presenters introduction and/or
questions. A series of six statements summarises the main points raised in the text and
forms the basis of a three-way matching task. Candidates are asked to match each
statement to the speaker who expresses that view, or to indicate where speakers are in
agreement.

2. Look at this sample Part 4 task below. One half of the class should listen to the
woman speaking and note whether she expresses the opinions in the six
statements. The other half of the class should listen to the man speaking and
note whether he expresses the opinions in the six statements.
You will hear two friends, Dominic and Sue, talking about formality in the workplace. For
questions 23 28, decide whether the opinions are expressed by only one of the
speakers, or whether the speakers agree.
Write S for Sue
D for Dominic
or B for Both, where they agree.

23 Todays technology removes the need for open-plan offices.
24 Company policy determines the level of formality required when dealing with others.
25 Dressing casually for work is not always appropriate.
26 There are similarities in attitude towards dress between school and the workplace.
27 Some people need guidance as to what to wear.
28 Clothes can create artificial differences between work colleagues.


UCLES 2008. This material may be photocopied (without alteration) and distributed for classroom use provided no charge is made. It may not
otherwise be altered, photocopied, reproduced, distributed, published, recorded, made available on another website, or otherwise transmitted by
any means without the prior written permission of University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations.

CPE Listening Paper Part 4 Tapescript www.cambridgeesol.org/teach
Page 6 of 7
CPE Listening Paper Part 4 Tapescript
3. You will hear the recording again. This time, when you hear either of the people
express the opinion in the six statements, raise your hand to stop the
recording. Then, with a partner, identify what language the speaker uses to
show their opinion. Underline the language that is used.
DOMINIC: You know, Sue, I was speaking to someone yesterday about informality at work
and he thought that open-plan offices really improve the working environment and
encourage people to talk about the job and about problems among themselves, and to the
boss, whos sitting there too.
SUE: I wouldnt be able to concentrate, so it would definitely be detrimental to my work
output.
DOMINIC: Well, it depends to some extent on the individual, I suppose, but it works for me,
though previously I was skeptical.
SUE: These days with e-mail and all these other ways of communicating, I cant see any
advantage in having open plan offices.
DOMINIC: Thats hardly an argument against them. Everyone wants a more informal
atmosphere these days.
SUE: Another aspect of being less formal is calling your colleagues by their first names.
Where I work the owners most definitely want to be called Mr and Mrs, but the rest of us all
call each other by our first names. Does your company have any convention on that?
DOMINIC: Were trained to go for polite informality. I answer the phone and introduce myself
as Dominic Greenfield, not Mr Greenfield, so everyone calls me Dominic and were off on a
good footing.
SUE: Im sure thats right, because youre immediately breaking down the barrier. You can
get on with the business more smoothly than if you sound starchy.
DOMINIC: What about dressing down at work into casual wear? My boss has changed his
mind, in fact, and now he thinks its acceptable. What do you think about that?
SUE: Im for it in the right environment. Maybe you are in a very young environment, not an
old-fashioned workplace like mine and its probably very acceptable if people frankly, if
they work better because they feel more comfortable. But as long as it doesnt get too
sloppy, because I think if you go to work with no idea of formal dress, if there isnt any code
at all then it just tends to encourage people to be lazy.
DOMINIC: I understand what youre saying, and maybe wearing a nice shirt and tie and a
nice pair of cufflinks you know, is important to impress your clients. But when youve got a
day at work when youre not having any meetings or representing the firm at all, and youre
probably in an airless, overheated office, I think it helps to have easy, casual clothes.
SUE: I think modern offices are usually quite congenial and conducive to work.
DOMINIC: Anyway, it shouldnt be like school.

UCLES 2008. This material may be photocopied (without alteration) and distributed for classroom use provided no charge is made. It may not
otherwise be altered, photocopied, reproduced, distributed, published, recorded, made available on another website, or otherwise transmitted by
any means without the prior written permission of University of Cambridge ESOL Examinations.

CPE Listening Paper Part 4 Tapescript www.cambridgeesol.org/teach
Page 7 of 7
SUE: But I think some of the reasons children wear school uniform can be applied to adults
in the workplace. Ive always been in favour of school uniform because it equalises people in
a place where they need to concentrate on work, not on what everybody else looks like.
DOMINIC: And there are certainly those who need to be protected from their own dress-
sense, and itd be better for all of us if they were told.
SUE: What difference does that make to your performance at work?
DOMINIC: Dont you think that dressing down may create an unspoken hierarchy that
doesnt really exist? So people at work whore, maybe, on the same level if one of them
dresses on a higher budget, in designer labels, even if its casual clothes, that person will
automatically be seen as more prestigious.
SUE: I dont say its all-important, but I think it could disadvantage certain people. I like the
idea of being comfortable and wearing casual clothes and it all being easier and less formal,
but I always feel right in a suit at work.
DOMINIC: I think theres two sides to the argument.
SUE: Anyway, I like to come home