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Instructions: Please fill up the gaps below with appropriate options listed

Finnish holidays are similar to the Western Christian calendar and Protestant traditions. Holidays
and traditions are a blend __________ the thousand-year old Christian presence and vestiges
__________ old Finnish pagan traditions.

Notable __________ these is the Finnish Midsummer. A majority __________ Finns retreat to
summer cottages __________ any one __________ Finland's numerous lakes. Depending __________
the region, a bonfire __________ midnight celebrates the summer solstice, and __________ the
land Islands, the Swedish-originated tradition __________ dancing __________ the Maypole is
observed. The midsummer traditions also include different versions __________ pairing magic and
folklore __________ the festivities.

The Finnish Christmas, follows traditions __________ Christmas trees and the Advent calendars.
Holidays start __________ the 23rd __________ December. Gift giving occurs __________ Christmas
Eve __________ a visit __________ Santa Claus. Traditional meals are typically only eaten __________
Christmas followed __________ sauna. Christmas Day is reserved __________ a "quiet day" and the
holidays end __________ the 26th, St. Stephen's Day.

Easter is a combination __________ Christian and Pagan customs. Either __________ Palm Sunday or
the Holy Saturday, children dress up __________ witches and go __________ door to door, giving
away daffodil adorned branches __________ willow __________ exchange __________ sweets. This is
similar to the celebration __________ Halloween __________ some countries. Burning Easter
bonfires is a Pagan custom meant to keep witches __________ bay.

Vappu, or May Day is a national holiday, an event __________ Finns to emphatically welcome spring
__________ several months __________ little daylight. It can be compared to Mardi Gras __________
parades and parties. Traditionally, the event begins __________ the eve __________ Vappu
__________ former and current students putting __________ their student graduation caps.

Finnish Independence Day is the 6th __________ December and a national holiday.

Sauna is a steam bath practiced widely __________ Finland. The word is __________ Proto-Finnish
Festivities and traditions in Finland
Grammar Gap Fill Exercise
with | atop | for | before | at | about | as | by | from | in | around | after | of | among | if | on | along
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origin. The sauna's purpose is to bathe, and the heat -either dry or steam- opens pores __________
the skin and thoroughly cleanses the body. Cedar or birch branches can be tapped __________ the
body to stimulate blood circulation. The sauna soothes sore and aching muscles. The Finns often
use and have used the sauna to recover __________ hard physical labor. Sauna culture dictates
subdued speech and time __________ thought to soothe the mind. Sauna is not to be rushed
__________ it is essential to spiritual living. The structure __________ the sauna began __________ a
small log building partially buried __________ the earth. A "smoke sauna" was used to cure meats
__________ pre-industrial years as well as, to bathe or a sterile environment __________ childbirth,
but this tradition has declined __________ favor __________ a modern invention, the continuously
heated sauna, which is hotter, cleaner and faster to heat up. __________ Finnish saunas,
temperature is set to __________ 60100 C, and small amounts __________ water thrown __________
rocks __________ the stove emit steam, which produces a heat sensation. Some Finns prefer the
"dry sauna" using very little steam, __________ any. Traditional sauna includes the process
__________ perspiring and cooling several times. A part __________ the cooling process may be a
swim __________ the lake __________ returning to the sauna __________ an additional sweat.

Similar steam baths have been part __________ European tradition elsewhere __________ well, but
the sauna has survived best __________ Finland, __________ addition to Sweden, Estonia, Russia,
Norway, and parts __________ the United States and Canada. Moreover, nearly all Finnish houses
have either their own sauna, or __________ multistory apartment houses, a timeshared sauna.
Public saunas were previously common, but the tradition has declined when saunas have been
built nearly everywhere... __________ private homes, municipal swimming halls, hotels, corporate
headquarters, gyms, etc.

Finland has a great amount __________ summer festivals, the biggest being music festivals.
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Finnish holidays are similar to the Western Christian calendar and Protestant traditions. Holidays
and traditions are a blend of the thousand-year old Christian presence and vestiges of old
Finnish pagan traditions.

Notable among these is the Finnish Midsummer. A majority of Finns retreat to summer
cottages on any one of Finland's numerous lakes. Depending on the region, a bonfire at
midnight celebrates the summer solstice, and in the land Islands, the Swedish-originated
tradition of dancing around the Maypole is observed. The midsummer traditions also include
different versions of pairing magic and folklore in the festivities.

The Finnish Christmas, follows traditions of Christmas trees and the Advent calendars. Holidays
start on the 23rd of December. Gift giving occurs on Christmas Eve with a visit from
Santa Claus. Traditional meals are typically only eaten on Christmas followed by sauna.
Christmas Day is reserved for a "quiet day" and the holidays end after the 26th, St. Stephen's
Day.

Easter is a combination of Christian and Pagan customs. Either on Palm Sunday or the Holy
Saturday, children dress up as witches and go from door to door, giving away daffodil
adorned branches of willow in exchange for sweets. This is similar to the celebration of
Halloween in some countries. Burning Easter bonfires is a Pagan custom meant to keep witches
at bay.

Vappu, or May Day is a national holiday, an event for Finns to emphatically welcome spring
after several months of little daylight. It can be compared to Mardi Gras with parades and
parties. Traditionally, the event begins on the eve of Vappu by former and current
students putting on their student graduation caps.

Finnish Independence Day is the 6th of December and a national holiday.

Sauna is a steam bath practiced widely in Finland. The word is of Proto-Finnish origin. The
sauna's purpose is to bathe, and the heat -either dry or steam- opens pores in the skin and
thoroughly cleanses the body. Cedar or birch branches can be tapped along the body to
stimulate blood circulation. The sauna soothes sore and aching muscles. The Finns often use and
have used the sauna to recover from hard physical labor. Sauna culture dictates subdued
speech and time for thought to soothe the mind. Sauna is not to be rushed as it is essential
to spiritual living. The structure of the sauna began as a small log building partially buried
in the earth. A "smoke sauna" was used to cure meats in pre-industrial years as well as, to
bathe or a sterile environment for childbirth, but this tradition has declined in favor of a
modern invention, the continuously heated sauna, which is hotter, cleaner and faster to heat up.
in Finnish saunas, temperature is set to about 60100 C, and small amounts of water
thrown on rocks atop the stove emit steam, which produces a heat sensation. Some Finns
prefer the "dry sauna" using very little steam, if any. Traditional sauna includes the process of
Answers
Grammar Gap Fill Exercise
Created By : Veronica-TLM
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perspiring and cooling several times. A part of the cooling process may be a swim in the lake
before returning to the sauna for an additional sweat.

Similar steam baths have been part of European tradition elsewhere as well, but the sauna
has survived best in Finland, in addition to Sweden, Estonia, Russia, Norway, and parts of
the United States and Canada. Moreover, nearly all Finnish houses have either their own sauna, or
in multistory apartment houses, a timeshared sauna. Public saunas were previously common,
but the tradition has declined when saunas have been built nearly everywhere... in private
homes, municipal swimming halls, hotels, corporate headquarters, gyms, etc.

Finland has a great amount of summer festivals, the biggest being music festivals.
Created By : Veronica-TLM
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