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Volume 128 Issue 12 Thursday, September 11, 2014

Kansan.com | The student voice since 1904


THE UNIVERSITY DAILY
KANSAN
AARON GROENE/KANSAN
SENATE ELECTION
RESULTS:
SAID AND WAGNER RESUME POSITIONS
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KU CAMPUS HAS MOST
HISTORICALLY DIVERSE
POLICE FORCE
OFFICER
DIVERSITY:
PAGE 3A
MIDGET WRESTLING
THE MIGHTY MIKE HAWK,
CATWALK II & KING MIDGET
PAGE 5A
SAFERIDE
SLACKING
STUDENTS LIVING
NEAR SAFEBUS STOPS
DENIED RIDES HOME
PAGE 7A
PAGE 2A
ALLOWING STUDENTS
A FLEXIBLE WAY TO
ATTEND CLASS
HYBRID CLASSES:
PAGE 3A
RESEARCHING RETENTION:
STUDY FINDS THAT LEARNING A LANGUAGE
ISNT IN ONE EAR AND OUT THE OTHER
KANSAN.COM
CAMPUS
PUP
PAGE 7A
POWER OF
THE PAST
EVENT PROVIDES
UNIQUE LOOK
INTO HISTORY
PAGE 5A
Te University recommends
sexual assault sanctions case
by case, however, there are
currently no specifc sanc-
tions laid out for sexual mis-
conduct.
Te two pictures on Jane
McQueenys iPad showed a
dozen deep red and purple
bruises looped around the
neck and shoulders of a young
woman who had been re-
strained and sexually assault-
ed by a male student.
Te photos were evidence
in a May 2012 investigation
by McQueeny, the executive
director of the Ofce of Insti-
tutional Opportunity and Ac-
cess, who used the photos to
describe the type of case she
said would warrant an expul-
sion. However, unlike other
schools, the University doesnt
have written guidelines out-
lining specifc punishments
for perpetrators of sexual as-
sault.
Te cases that have war-
ranted expulsion have been
cases where there has been
some bruising, some stran-
gulation marks, McQueeny
said. So any kind of sexual
assault, were probably going
to recommend expulsion.
As a result of the case de-
scribed above, the male stu-
dent was banned from student
housing.
But because the case was
reported about a week before
graduation, McQueeny said
he had already graduated by
the time the investigation
completed. McQueeny said
she recommend that he be
banned from campus in the
future.
Well, it was too late, Mc-
Queeny said. He was gradu-
ating.
Some universities, as rec-
ommended by a White House
task force issued in April, have
adopted separate and compre-
hensive sexual misconduct
policies that outline specifc
sanctions.
At the University of Iowa,
for example, the sanctioning
guidelines for sexual assault
state that, Sanctions for
non-consensual sexual inter-
course will normally range
from multi-semester suspen-
sion to expulsion from the
university, with expulsion be-
ing the most likely sanction.
Aggravating factors such
as the use of force, intentional
incapacitation (using alcohol,
drugs, or by other means), or
intimidation will lead to
the most severe sanctions, ac-
cording to the policy.
Ohio Universitys policy re-
quires a minimum of one-se-
mester suspension for a sexual
misconduct violation, a min-
imum one-year suspension if
there was any physical con-
tact, and students can expect
expulsion if there was any
form of penetration.
At Mississippi State Univer-
sity, the sanctions for students
found guilty of sexual assault
range from a minimum of sus-
pension for one year to a max-
imum of permanent expul-
sion. Any student suspended
under this policy must, as a
condition of returning to the
university, submit to the Dean
of Students proof of successful
completion of counseling by
a licensed mental health pro-
fessional and the results of a
psychological evaluation.
At the University of Kansas,
however, there are currently
no specifc sanctions laid out
for sexual misconduct. Sexu-
al assault falls under a sexual
harassment policy. Sexual
assault cases follow the Dis-
crimination Complaint Reso-
lution Process, along with 16
other forms of discrimination
such as age, religion, and vet-
eran status.
For any type of discrimina-
tion, the process states, un-
der a heading labeled con-
sequences, that Members
of the University community
who are found to have vio-
lated the University Nondis-
crimination Policy are subject
to disciplinary actions appro-
priate to their status as faculty,
staf, or student employees or
as students.
Te University has been in
the spotlight this past week
involving two sexual assault
cases. In the case reported by
NEWS MANAGEMENT
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 PAGE 2A
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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY
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Showers with a 40 percent chance of
rain. Wind NNE at 15 mph.
Sunny with a 10 percent chance of
rain. Wind ENE at 7 mph.
Partly cloudy with a 0 percent chance
of rain. Wind SSE at 9 mph.
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THURSDAY
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Sunny with a 0 percent chance of
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weather.com
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What: Monarch Watch Open House
When: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Foley Hall
About: An open house to celebrate
the monarch butteries arriving
from the North.
What: Campus Movie Series: Neigh-
bors
When: 7:30-10 p.m.
Where: Woodruff Auditorium, Kansas
Union
About: Free movie showing.
What: Study Abroad Financial Aid Info
Session
When: 10 a.m.
Where: 501 Summereld Hall
About: Learn about scholarship and
nancial aid options for study abroad.
Calendar
Thursday, Sept. 10 Friday, Sept. 11 Saturday, Sept. 12 Sunday, Sept.13
What: SMA Art Cart: Clothing Clues
When: Noon to 4 p.m.
Where: Spencer Museum of Art
About: The Art Cart is a drop-in art
activity station where families and
groups can enjoy art projects.
Resolution condemns University policy
ROCHELLE VALVERDE
@chelleval
PAIGE STINGLEY
@paigestingley11
Student Senate unani-
mously passed a resolution
Wednesday that condemns
the University for its han-
dling of reported sexual
assaults. It was written and
presented by Emma Halling,
interim student body presi-
dent.
If you are a victim of rape
at this University, you are
treated like a liability and
not a human being, Halling
said.
In the middle of her speech
about the resolution, Hal-
ling, a senior from Elkhart,
Ind., held back tears as she
told senators and present ad-
ministrators of her own sex-
ual assault story.
She said she was sexually
assaulted in high school, but
coping as a survivor has been
difcult for her on campus.
For people who dont
think sexual assault and rape
are traumatizing, let me tell
you what it looks like, Hal-
ling said. It looks like walk-
ing down the boulevard and
thinking you see someone
who looks like your assail-
ant, and being immediately
transported back to that sit-
uation.
Halling has been vocal in
her condemnation of the
University since Te Huf-
ington Post article detailing
how the University handled
one sexual assault case was
published. On Wednesday
she was not only one of the
loudest critics of the Univer-
sity, but spoke as a survivor.
She said she wants people
to realize the breadth and
depth of the subject. Halling
said she knows it can really
impede a students ability to
succeed at the University,
and its something she can
speak to personally.
It is traumatic, Halling
said. It inhibits your ability
to pursue an education, and
we are not doing a damn
thing about it.
It was clear that those who
spoke about the sexual as-
sault situation were ready
for a change. Halling and
Angela Murphy, Student
Senate graduate afairs direc-
tor, have been serving on the
Title IX Roundtable since its
creation last fall.
Murphy, who is the treasur-
er and development director
for the roundtable, said she
hasnt felt like student poli-
cy change suggestions have
been taken seriously.
Halling, Murphy and In-
terim Student Body Vice
President Tyler Childress sat
down Friday afernoon with
the Chancellor and the pro-
vost.
Halling said she was in-
spired by the conversations
at the meeting. She said the
Chancellor was interested in
every detail of the process
and that the three students
were able to provide a lot of
input.
Murphy said she is opti-
mistic and believes that this
is the right climate for the
McQueeny: Sexual assault
sanctions differ by case
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Emma Halling, interim student body president, holds back tears as she
addresses Student Senate. On Wednesday, the Senate passed a resolution
condemning the University for its handling of sexual assault cases.
MIRANDA DAVIS
@MirandaDavisUDK
SEE SENATE PAGE 7A
SEE IOA PAGE 7A
Grow KU wins
re-election
Grow KU presidential can-
didate Morgan Said and vice
presidential candidate Mi-
randa Wagner won Tuesday
and Wednesdays re-election.
Tey will resume ofce afer
joint senate next Wednesday.
Te Elections Commission
released the results Wednes-
day night. Said, a senior from
Kansas City, Mo., and Wag-
ner, a senior from Shawnee,
received 552 votes. Crimson
and Trues Kevin Hundelt, a
senior from St. Louis, Mo.,
and Sara Anees, a senior
from Wichita, received 307
votes.
Te results will be certifed
by the Elections Commission
on Monday, which allows
joint senate, where the previ-
ous senate turns over power
to the new senate, to happen
next Wednesday before com-
mittees begin that night.
Said said she is ready to get
back in the ofce and contin-
ue work the administration
had already started. Said,
Wagner and their executive
staf had been in ofce since
May and were removed when
the Appeals Panel of the
University Judicial Board or-
dered a new election.
We are so ready to get back
to work, Said said.
Her main goal once back in
ofce is to continue the con-
versation about the Universi-
tys policies on sexual assault.
Tis sexual assault policy
change is absolutely some-
thing we will continue work-
ing on throughout the dura-
tion of the year, Said said.
She also said that before the
re-election was ordered, she
MIRANDA DAVIS
@MirandaDavisUDK
SEE ELECT PAGE 7A

This sexual assault


policy change is absolutely
something we will continue
working on...
MORGAN SAID
Student body president elect
In light of the racial divide
among ofcers and citizens in
Ferguson, Mo., the KU Public
Safety Ofce reported its fall
2014 staf is more diverse than
before.
Tere are four female of-
cers, as well as one Asian of-
fcer, two African-American
ofcers and two Hispanic of-
fcers.
Director of Public Safety and
Chief of Police Ralph Oliver
said he thinks this diversity
will improve relations among
students and ofcers.
Its important that any police
department refect its com-
munity, Oliver said. When
youre refecting your commu-
nity, that means that your of-
fcers are able to interact, and
theyre able to function well
within that demographic.
Oliver said his ofcers were
knowledgeable and sensitive
to this topic even before Fer-
guson occurred.
One thing that were doing,
and I hate to say since Fergu-
son, because weve been doing
this even before Ferguson, is to
make contact with our com-
munity and to get out more
and be available more so peo-
ple feel more comfortable with
us, Oliver said. Students are
our community. Were here
to support your educational
desires and the Universitys
initiatives to fll those desires.
Tats what we focus on.
Oliver said having four fe-
male ofcers in the depart-
ment is extremely rare, as
applicants are typically white
males. Female and minority
ofcers are usually recruited
to larger departments in more
diverse areas, such as Dallas or
New York.
Probably in the last 20 years,
we have only had four female
ofcers on the force, Oliver
said. We ended up hiring, in a
six-month period, four female
ofcers. Tats shocking.
Freshman Rachel Abercrom-
bie from Eden Prairie, Minn.,
likes the addition of the female
ofcers.
I feel more comfortable
talking to someone who is the
same gender and can relate
more in a sense, Abercrombie
said. Its just diferent when a
female is on the same level as
you and has a similar under-
standing and could potentially
have gone through a similar
situation.
While University statistics
for the fall of 2014 are not
yet published, the KU Ofce
of Institutional Research and
Planning reported 6,173 racial
minority students attending
classes on the Lawrence and
Edwards campuses during last
spring semester. Approximate-
ly half of all students were fe-
male.
Although the numbers say
there is a more diverse police
force to match the student
body, Mitchell Cota, a senior
from Overland Park, said he
still notices predominantly
white male ofcers.
I havent noticed the in-
crease in diversity personally,
but if this is true, they need to
make sure these PSOs [Public
Safety Ofcers] are visible to
students, Cota said.
Cota said the large student
minority population should
motivate the ofcers to inter-
act more frequently with stu-
dents.
Students feel comfortable
identifying with these diverse
public safety ofcials, Cota
said. Te PSOs need to keep
in mind there are students who
are diferent in racial composi-
tion from their ofcers.
Edited by Emily Brown
Friday is KUs 148th birthday!
The very rst classes began
on Sept 12, 1866.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 PAGE 3A THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
RockChalkLiving.com
BECAUSE THIS ISNT WHAT YOU HAD IN MIND WHEN
YOU SAID...
HARDWORKER ON YOUR RESUME
STUDENTS PREMIERE HOUSING SITE
@RockChalkLiving /RockChalkLiving
KU officer diversity at all-time high
ALANA FLINN
@ajf_1212
JOHN GRIFFIN/KANSAN
From left, KU Public Safety Ofcers Sam Olker, Jacob Hout and Jamie Johnson meet for roll call on Tuesday.
Hybrid, ipped courses allow students to learn from home
LAUREN METZLER
@MetzlerLauren
Many hybrid classes are
currently ofered through the
University in a variety of for-
mats and engagement levels.
Being uneasy with the idea of
non-traditional classes is un-
derstandable, but hybrid class-
es are far from intimidating.
Tis semester, Marlee
Slaughter, a junior from San
Mateo, Calif., is taking a hy-
brid fnance class. Her class is
set up so she has to watch on-
line video lectures, complete
online assessments three times
a week and attend a two-hour
lecture on Tursdays.
She said she spends a lot
more time on online materials
than she would if she only had
to go to a lecture twice a week.
Its nice because you can
listen and pause if you want
to take notes on something,
Slaughter said. You can go at
your own pace even if it takes
longer, which is a bummer.
In addition to the hybrid for-
mat, the University also ofers
fipped classes. In a fipped
class, homework is done in the
classroom with the help of a
professor and lecture material
is taught online outside of class
in their jammies at 2 a.m.
should they wish, said Chris
Haufer, Deans Project Lead-
er for Educational Innovation
and Course Redesign.
Haufer works closely with
alternative formats, as well as
working to bring them to the
classroom. Instructors have
complete freedom over how
their course is run, and Hau-
fer hopes that more instruc-
tors choose to take advantage
of the services.
One resource available to
instructors looking to revamp
their courses is the Center for
Teaching Excellence, located
in 135 Budig. Haufer has of-
fce hours there and is even
part of a group of instructors,
called C21, who meet to dis-
cuss successful and unsuccess-
ful strategies theyve tried in
the classroom.
Another aspect of course in-
novation are PhD consultants
who are hired to work with
diferent departments and
help instructors utilize tools
and strategies to make their
classrooms more engaging and
accessible. For seasoned in-
structors, like Haufer, this can
be easier said than done.
I was trained to give lec-
tures, so thats what Im com-
fortable with. When I go into
a classroom where students are
going to be working amongst
themselves, and Im supposed
to be helping them in this pro-
cess, its a new world, Haufer
said.
Although it took some ad-
justing, Haufer is an advocate
for alternative learning.
And yet, I recognize that its
the right thing to do, Haufer
said. It just means a lot of
time invested on my part to
change the way that Im ap-
proaching the work that I do
as a professor.
Hybrid courses have been
tested scientifcally in the
study, Improved Learning in
a Large-Enrollment Physics
Class by Louis Deslauriers,
Ellen Schelew and Carl Wie-
man. In this study, fostering
group work and critical think-
ing with active instructor in-
teraction resulted in higher
attendance, engagement and
increased learning.
Te message that we need to
send is the data is demonstrat-
ing that this is an enhanced
way of helping students
achieve what theyre supposed
to at an institution like KU,
Haufer said.
For more information on
hybrid classes ofered through
the University, go to classes.
ku.edu.
Edited by Emily Brown
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 PAGE 4
I once woke up early enough
to see the UDK being distributed.
It was magical.
We are starting a sign language
club and it will be AWESOME
We have had plenty of education
about alcohol...people just
choose to ignore the possible
consequences. But alcohol-fueled
rape is still rape.
I think my biggest motivation for
going to class every day is being
able to pick up a UDK
Protip: when you have to pack into
a full bus, hold your backpack at
your feet. You can even stand two
wide in the upper deck with all the
extra space.
I just want Ivory to know that
there is someone who does care,
and there are more. Im very sorry
about what happend to you.
I dont know why freshman feel
like they NEED to come into class
right at the 10 til mark... Were
still ending ours...Your class isnt
that exciting and you know it
The answer to if mens bathrooms
have consent explained
on the walls is no. Typically there
are drawings of dicks and
phone numbers labeled,
call for a good time.
Rape happens to people no matter
their sexual identity. EVERYONE
needs to be informed on what rape
is and what consent means
I wonder how many people were
actually saved from the people
yelling at everyone saying theyre
going to hell. Pretty sure zero.
Zenger: Who run Barter Town?
Bernadette Gray-Little: Sheahon
Zenger! Sheahon Zenger runs
Barter Town.
IOA and KU need to stop with all
this non-consensual sex bull.....
its called rape. And its whats
happening to your students and
youre just ignoring the problem
Still waiting for the UDK to
challenge me with a sudoku I
havent been able to master.
Running on 2 hours of sleep and
still feel more energized than I
would as if I was on 8
On the front page we have articles
condemning victim blaming, on
the 4th page we have a cartoon
blaming victims of sex crimes...
The key to re-folding your UDK in
the wind is to remain calm. It can
sense your anguish.
The kid next to me is eating an en-
tire thing of chips ahoy for lunch.
Now thats a meal of champions
Winter is coming.
Text your FFA
submissions to
(785) 289-8351 or
at kansan.com
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editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
What type(s) of gym
etiquette do you wish
people recognized at the
Rec Center?
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
Follow us on Twitter @KansanOpinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just
might publish them.
Emma LeGault, editor-in-chief
elegault@kansan.com
Madison Schultz, managing editor
mschultz@kansan.com
Hannah Barling, digital editor
hbarling@kansan.com
Cecilia Cho, opinion editor
ccho@kansan.com
Christina Carreria, advertising director
ccarreria@kansan.com
Tom Wittler, print sales manager
twittler@kansan.com
Scott Weidner, digital media manager
sweidneri@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board
are Emma Legault, Madison Schultz,
Cecilia Cho, Hannah Barling and Christina
Carreria.
FFA OF THE DAY

Halloween is on Friday this year. Someone better run


into Budig 120 yelling Troll in the dungeon!

@IVChioco
@KansanOpinion Not being all bro-ey.
N
o one understands
the importance
of a library more
than college students. So
many things factor into
a good library: location,
hours, noise and snacks.
The list is endless. Here at
the University of Kansas,
we are privileged enough
to have several libraries,
but two really stand out.
Both Watson Library and
Anschutz Library house
a countless amount of
books, contain remarkable
resource centers and offer
dead-silent study rooms.
However, every person
has their favorite spot,
and both offer completely
different things.
Watson is the place I go
when it is crunch time
and I need to get things
done. It is the place where
I can buckle down and
finish my work without
distractions. If spotted
in Watson, I am alone,
tucked in a corner with
my face buried in work.
Everyone is there for one
goal, and that is to work.
Because the library isnt
open twenty-four hours,
students can be there
until closing time in order
to finish procrastinated
assignments.
To me, Anschutz has a
more relaxed study feel,
specifically on the third
floor. It is where I can
hang out with my friends,
enjoy a latte and tinker
with homework here and
there. In Anschutz, Im not
scared of dropping a book
or letting out a sneeze. The
chairs are much more cozy,
and the large wooden tables
make the perfect place for a
group study session.
However, on the first and
second floors you will find
an environment similar to
Watsons. These floors are
meant for quiet study and
independent work. But if
I had to make a deadline,
I would rather head to
Watson because the third
floor of Anschutz is too
distracting.
No matter where you
study, KUs libraries are
filled with incredible
and knowledgeable staff
members who are ready to
help whenever its needed.
I cant count the number
of times I have chatted
with the librarians about
research questions or
advice on particular books.
They are the secret to any
great research project.
Dont wait until your first
midterm to check out our
libraries. Take some time
out of these first few weeks
of school to visit Watson
and Anschutz. Introduce
yourself to the librarians,
investigate the stacks and
figure out for yourself
which one you prefer.
Madeline Umali is a
sophomore from St. Louis
studying journalism
KU libraries provide services
suited to a variety of needs
By Madeline Umali
@madelineumali
A
s a college student,
I have one sacred
place where I can
work off all my stress and
anxiety: the Ambler Student
Recreation Fitness Center.
The rec is a place for me
to get rid of all the crap
that has put me in a bad
mood throughout the day.
However, the lack of gym
etiquette Ive seen during
my latest rec visits has left
me even more stressed and
angry. The rec is where
students go to get in shape
and relieve stress, but this
becomes difficult when
students lack common
courtesy for their peers.
When youre at the rec, try
to avoid taking social laps
at the gym. Running laps is
great, but dont just wander
around looking for people
to socialize with. You are
just taking space away from
those who actually came to
the gym to work out. If you
want to have a social hour,
go shopping, out to eat or
somewhere on Mass Street.
Throwing your weights on
the ground is another way
to disrespect those around
you. We get it: youre tough
and want everyone to know
it. But you shouldnt be
slamming your weights
to the ground. It is noisy
and distracting, and makes
it seem as if they are too
heavy for you.
Having your phone with
you is fine; everyone needs
a little break every now and
then. However, seeing you
take 15-minute breaks in
between workouts to check
Instagram, Twitter or other
social media makes me
wonder why you came to
the gym in the first place.
Your social life will still
be there after you get your
pump, I promise.
Last, but certainly not
least, is people who use
their water bottles to
mark their territory. It has
become popular to leave
your water bottle on a piece
of equipment that youre not
even using. Gym machines
are already limited, and its
a hassle for others who cant
use the equipment they
want because someones
water bottle is holding up
the line.
The rec center is a
student sanctuary for many
different reasons. For some,
its to get that revenge
body on an ex-girlfriend
or ex-boyfriend. For others,
its a place to relieve tension
and work through all the
unfair cards the day has
dealt. By considering these
etiquette tips, you can
maintain the gym as a place
where stress goes to die,
not an environment where
anxiety rises and grunts are
out of frustration instead of
exhaustion.
Anissa Fritz is a
sophomore from Dallas
studying journalism
and sociology
Gym etiquette important at Ambler
I
have never felt as
inspired by my fellow
students as I have over
the past two weeks. After
the articles about the
University mishandling
two different sexual assault
cases broke last week, I
wasnt sure what to expect.
I hoped for students to be
angry about it and to care,
but I was not prepared for
the absolute resolve that
many took in trying to get
KU to reform its sexual
assault case practices.
Through social media,
public forums and word of
mouth, we as students have
made a difference.
The thing is though, its
not enough. Not yet.
With the age of social
media, things tend to
go viral and then die
out quietly. People post
hashtags or sign petitions
and then move on with
their lives until the next
cause catches students
attention. There are
few times students put
themselves out there, not
as a Twitter handle, but as
their physical self.
Maybe thats why I was
so impressed by Columbia
University student Emma
Sulkowicz when I saw
her project in New York
Magazine.
During Sulkowiczs
sophomore year of college,
a classmate raped her in
her dorm room. When
she reported the rape,
Columbia dismissed the
case and she was left
without justice, forced to
continue attending classes
with her rapist.
For her senior thesis,
Sulkowicz decided to
carry her dorm mattress
everywhere she went until
she no longer attends the
same school as her rapist.
The idea of doing a project
like this was to bring her
mattress, an object that
usually is hidden in a
private space, out into the
public sphere. Much like
the mattress, sexual assault
is a topic often hidden
behind closed doors. It
is only recently that our
campus has opened up a
dialogue and really begun
to discuss the way KU
has mishandled sexual
assault cases. It is only until
recently that survivors
have told their stories and
that the student body has
paused to listen.
The dialogue has still
been behind closed doors,
metaphorically. Most of the
discussion has taken place
over social media, and
while people are technically
sharing their opinions
on the Internet, it isnt as
powerful as sharing an
opinion face to face with
another person. Sulkowiczs
project shows how much
power a physical and visual
representation can have for
sexual assault survivors. A
physical presence shows
a personal commitment
to the cause of reforming
sexual assault policies far
more than any tweet or
Facebook post ever can.
The public forum on
Tuesday at the Ecumenical
Campus Ministries was a
good start to approaching
this problem in a more
personal, present way. I
hope to see more events
like this that give students
a chance to step out from
behind social media
and really make this
cause visible on campus.
Hashtags and discussions
are great, but theyre not
enough, especially if they
stop now. This isnt another
viral video its the safety
of our campus. If we dont
show that we care, who
will?
Anna Wenner is a
senior from Topeka studying
English and history
Visual representation more effective for raising awareness
@rmschlesener
@KansanOpinion Dont sit and text at
machines between sets! Rotate with
people. I dont wanna stand and watch
you text while I need to lift!
@JimboSlice_32
@KansanOpinion Using the squat rack
for curls or shoulder presses. Cant
squat anywhere else, but you can press
and curl other places.
@_buh_lake_
@KansanOpinion not camping out
on the equipment to check 9 miles of
Twitter feed would be good
By Anna Wenner
@Anna_Wenner
By Anissa Fritz
@Anissa_Fritz
HAVE SOMETHING ON YOUR MIND?
SEND US A LETTER TO THE EDITOR
[ [
Send letters to opinion@kansan.com. Write LETTER TO THE EDITOR
in the email subject line. The submission should include the authors
name, grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the editor policy
online at kansan.com/letters.
Ike and Darlene Taylor have
been going to the Power of
Te Past Antique Engine &
Tractor Show in Ottawa for
about 10 years. Ike brings
tractors to showcase in a
tractor parade the festival
features. He has restored and
owns a few 1940s and 50s
tractors he keeps at their
home in Baldwin. Ikes oldest
tractor is a 1927.
It is [tradition] for us,
Darlene said. Darlenes family
started going with her father
to the show since hes always
been interested in antiques.
He was very involved in the
Ottawa show until he had his
stroke four years ago, Darlene
said.
Te city of Ottawa has
hosted Power of the Past
since around 1995. Tis year,
it will be held from Friday,
Sept. 12, to Sunday, Sept. 14,
at Forest Park in Ottawa. Te
events mission is to provide a
look into the past through its
diferent demonstrations.
Aside from tradition, Ike
goes because of his profession
while Darlene gravitates
more toward old trinkets that
vendors bring to sell. Ike said
its a good place to buy parts
and they have trailers full of
old tractor parts you can go
around and pick through to
get what you want.
I go just to see people
and mostly hen and chicken
things, antique stuf, Darlene
said. Tey have a fea market
there. I got an old creamer
there last year and its going to
be so cute whenever I just get
the time to paint it. Im going
to paint it bright red and its
got two bowls on it and have
fowers coming out of it.
Ike and Darlene are the
parents of Benton Taylor.
Benton has been going to the
festival on and of since he
was young.
[My grandpa] used to bring
a bicycle that was built for two
people and me and my buddy,
wed go and ride through the
park and stuf on his antique
bicycle, it was all rusted,
Benton said.
Bentons girlfriend, Becky
Ast, a sixth-year KU student
from Colwich, will attend
the festival for the frst time.
Although Ast did not grow
up in the same environment
as the Taylors, she said she
is looking forward to the
experience. She said growing
up, she didnt really know
anything about farming and
she is interested to learn about
all the diferent tractors and is
excited to see the parade.
As she begins in the tradition
of the Power of Te Past, Ast
also said she could see herself
going regularly with Benton,
who said he sees the festival as
a learning opportunity.
Teres a lot of displays
that a lot of the time you
have no idea whats going on.
If somethings running out
there, you go and you get to
learn and talk to people and
see if theyre shucking corn or
whats going on, Benton said.
Darlene said every year the
festival turns into a sort of
reunion for everyone who
comes, and has made it a
tradition just like the Taylors.
You get to the point that
your neighbors that are
beside you and stuf, you
start looking for them to be
back every year, Darlene
said. Its just really fun to see
them again, to see how theyre
doing and catching up. Prior
to going to the show, you
never knew them. Its great
to branch out and meet new
people.
Troughout the weekend,
guests can enjoy tractors,
antiques and food. Admission
is $3 per person on the frst
day, and children under 12
years old can attend free.
Edited by Casey Hutchins
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014
A
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
arts & features
HOROSCOPES
Because the stars
know things we dont.
PAGE 5A
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is an 8
Do what you love long enough,
and prot. Build a strong foun-
dation. Youre gaining respect.
Work on the details, and play by
the book. Focus on putting in the
work for the next two days.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is an 8
Self-discipline, plus your warm
heart, guarantee your success.
This experience could even be
enjoyable. Do the homework. Use
your creativity to nd solutions.
Family comes rst. Improve your
living conditions. Find balance
and harmony.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 7
Pinching pennies pays off. In-
dulge in a small luxury. Trust old
love and old information. Exercise
discipline, and strengthen sup-
port structures. An older female
provides answers. Stick close to
home for the next two days.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 7
Share a recent dream. You
love practicing your skills and
intellect today and tomorrow.
Practicality is a winner. True love
isnt after your loot. Explain your
thoughts, and share feelings. Do
what you promised. Create peace.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 7
Make peace with your past. Your
ideas are attracting attention.
Work today and tomorrow, and
play later. It benets your bottom
line. Sell things you no longer
want. Do more reading. Friends
offer good advice.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is an 8
Youve got the power today
and tomorrow. Let others know
what you need. A female joins
your group. Your work is well
respected. Friends can help you
set long-term goals. They want
to play.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is an 8
Rene your speech. Its getting
easier to stick to your budget.
The little touches make a big
difference. Keep communications
channels open. Your imagination
goes wild over the next two days.
Let it run. Take notes.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 9
You work well with others today
and tomorrow. An outing will
be good for you and your mate.
Make long-term plans. Pay back
a debt. Youre making a good
impression. Balance duty with
pleasure.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is an 8
Career matters are in the
forefront today and tomorrow.
Respect age and authority. Doing
the work increases your prots.
Spend carefully. Seek advice from
a colleague. Crazy dreams seem
possible. Work for your future.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is an 8
Love keeps you on the right path.
Watch for angels. Ask for what
you need. Do a good job. Provide
security. Take the high ground.
Study possibilities over the next
two days. You have untapped
resources.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7
Divergent ideas come together.
Get help building your dream. Pay
the bills today or tomorrow. Mon-
ey isnt everything. Balance your
checkbook and it goes farther.
Talk about the good old days.
Heed a loved ones advice.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 7
Self-discipline empowers
creativity. Learn from a strict
and experienced teacher. Youre
gaining skills and condence.
Get help from family to bring your
vision into practical reality. Put
your back into your dream. Make
a romantic connection.
Tractor tradition passes down generations
MARIA SANCHEZ
@MariaSanchezKU
BEN LIPOWTIZ/KANSAN
From left, Becky Ast, Ike Taylor, Darlene Taylor and Benton Taylor talk about their experiences with the Power of The Past Engine & Tractor Show. Ike
has been showcasing his tractors in the show every year for the past decade.

Its really fun to see them


again, to see how theyre
doing and catching up.
DARLENE TAYLOR
Bentons mother
Extreme Midget Wrestling returns to Lawrence
Tonight the Granada
Teater will host Extreme
Midget Wrestling
Federation.
Its extreme, its crazy;
they really beat the heck
out of each other and theres
a good storyline to the
show, said Jett Romain, the
road manager for EMWF.
Teyre the best wrestlers
in the industry. Without
them we wouldnt be doing
what were doing.
Romain said their
event started growing in
Oklahoma and soon gained
popularity throughout the
country and they have been
expanding to new areas.
Te event will feature about
six diferent wrestlers.
For the wrestling event in
Lawrence, there are several
notable wrestlers lined up to
enter the ring. Romain said
one wrestler to watch for is
Veteran Little Nasty Boy,
who has spent 32 years in
the wrestling business, has
been on Jerry Springer fve
times and was also a part
of the WWE Mini Royal
Rumble.
Another wrestler who will
be featured is Te Mighty
Mike Hawk, a 17-year
veteran who has appeared
in the movie Catwalk II.
King Midget will enter the
spotlight as well, a wrestler
Romain said is a rookie
from Oklahoma City and
an up and coming star.
Ryan Kass, a freshman
from Calabasas, Calif., said
he found out about EMWF
from the app Yik Yak and
became curious. Kass said,
I googled it, and I realized
they were coming to the
Granada and I got really
excited.
Kass said he plans to
attend the event, and it
should be a lot of fun.
Other students are more
skeptical of a wrestling
event coming to Lawrence.
Katie Clerke, a freshman
from St. Louis, said she
heard about the event from
her roommate. Clerke said
she isnt going to attend
because she doesnt like
fghting on any level.
I dont have anything
against wrestlers, its just a
personal preference, she
said.
Romain has released
previously unknown
information about the event
in Lawrence.
Were actually going to
have a triple-threat match,
he said.
Jett said the match will
be a USA vs. Canada
triple-threat match for the
EMWF heavyweight title
belt. Romain said this event
coincidentally happened to
land on the date they will be
in Lawrence.
Te event is open for
all ages. Tickets are $10
in advance and $20 for
ringside tickets. Tickets can
be purchased the day of for
$12. Doors open at 7 p.m.
and the show will start at 8
p.m.
Check back with Kansan.
com for a follow-up
interview with one of the
wrestlers afer the event.
Edited by Casey Hutchins
RYAN MILLER
@Ryanmiller_UDK
FILE PHOTO
Fans get rowdy at the Extreme Midget Wrestling Federation show at The Granada on Sept. 26, 2012. The show
will return to Lawrence tonight at 7 p.m.
FILE PHOTO
The Extreme Midget Wrestling Federation also came to The Granada on Sept. 26, 2012. The wrestlers will be
back tonight, and fans can expect more excitement than ever.
FILE PHOTO
According to Jett Romain, the Extreme Midget Wrestling Federation road manager, wrestler Nasty Boy, a 32-
year wrestling veteran, will make an appearance this year.
VISIT
KANSAN.COM
FOR COVERAGE ON
LAWRENCE RESTAURANT WEEK
In late November, students
searching for something to
do can head to the Lawrence
Public Library not to check
out a book but to ice skate.
Te Parks and Recreation
Department of Lawrence is
installing a 60 by 80 foot, ar-
tifcially surfaced ice skating
rink in the librarys plaza be-
fore the holiday season.
Its something that is just
very Lawrence, said Jimmy
Gibbs, the recreation opera-
tions manager of Lawrences
Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment. Its fun, and its some-
thing for the community.
Te librarys new plaza was
created as a venue for activi-
ties like the ice skating rink in
the winter, and a grass area in
the summer to accommodate
various functions. Gibbs said
the Library Plaza will hold
events like art shows, farmers
markets and even live music.
Te anticipated rink will be
surfaced with synthetic ice.
According to a report by the
Parks Department, synthetic
ice is a plastic-like surface that
is unafected by temperature
or weather changes. Gibbs
said the department chose
to use synthetic ice because
unpredictable Kansas winters
dont allow refrigerated ice
to be kept in an outdoor en-
vironment. Skaters will be al-
lowed to use their own skates
or rent skates at the facility,
according to the report.
I think it would be some-
thing fun to do besides go-
ing out to eat or to bars, said
Garrett Fugate, a graduate
student from St. Louis. It will
be something new to do on
Mass Street.
Kendra Weinstein, a junior
from Overland Park, said
she has skated several times
before, but never on synthet-
ic ice. She said if the ice rink
is big enough, she would be
interested in going there to
skate once it opens.
We see the University and
the students as a very large
component of our commu-
nity, Gibbs said. While the
students are here, this is their
home, and we hope that this
will be a draw for University
students.
Gibbs said the rink will be
open right before Tanks-
giving and will stay open for
an eight-week window from
Tanksgiving to the frst or
second week of January. Te
rink will be open evenings
and weekends, and may open
up during weekdays for les-
sons and special events. Te
rink will be open to all ages.
Edited by Alyssa Scott
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6A
SUDOKU
CRYPTOQUIP
CHECK OUT THE
ANSWERS AT
http://goo.gl/92MxMA
KANSAN PUZZLES
SPONSORED BY
Ice skating rink comes to Lawrence
CODY SCHMITZ
@Cody_Schmitz
CONTRIBUTED PHOTO
Construction for an ice rink has begun next to the Lawrence Public Library at 707 Vermont St.
MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE
LONDON Graham
Joyce, one of Britains best
known fantasy writers, has
died from complications of
lymphoma cancer, an illness
he had blogged about exten-
sively. He was 59.
Joyce died Tuesday afer-
noon in a hospital near his
home in Leicester, a city
north of London, said Simon
Spanton, associate publisher
of the science fction and fan-
tasy imprint of Orion Books.
Several of his novels re-
ceived the British Fantasy
Award, including Indigo,
Te Tooth Fairy and Some
Kind of Fairy Tale, which
won last year. He also won
an O. Henry Prize for short
fction and the World Fantasy
Award for Te Facts of Life.
Stephen King, who called
him a truly great novelist,
was among those mourning
him on Twitter.
Raised in the mining village
Keresley, Joyce remembered
himself as an uninspired stu-
dent who muddled through
school. But he loved writing
and storytelling and kept a
long-winded diary.
He even turned his own ill-
ness into an adventure. On
his blog, he imagined a myth-
ical journey in which a hero-
ine has been struck by light-
ning from the Gods and is on
a quest to regain her health,
a kind of Holy Grail, or a
Vessel of Plenty that was lost
and must be found again.
But in that world, and
standing in the way of her
quest object is a terrifying
enemy, he wrote.
Cancer is a ferocious, dark
force, a Darth Vader fgure
from Star Wars, or Sauron
from Lord Of Te Rings. Te
enemy pursues her. She is re-
quired to do ferce battle with
that enemy, and the outcome
is uncertain.
He is survived by his wife
Sue and his children, Ella and
Joe.
Writer Graham Joyce dies
from complications of cancer
Follow
@KansanNews
on Twitter

Cancer is a ferocious, dark


force... She is required to do
battle with that enemy, and
the outcome is uncertain.
GRAHAM JOYCE
Fantasy writer
K
A
N
S
A
N
.C
O
M
YO
U
R
G
O
TO
FO
R
TH
E
LATEST KU
N
EW
S
KANSAN.COM
Heirs seek settlement
with owners of $25
million Klimt painting
VIENNA The present Aus-
trian owners of a valuable
Gustav Klimt painting say they
plan to reach a fair settlement
with Jewish heirs of the family
who left the artwork behind as
they ed the Nazis.
The Bildnis Gertrud Loew
(Portrait of Gertrud Loew) is
valued at up to 19.3 million
euros ($25 million.) It was
abandoned by Gertrud Fel-
soevary and her family after
Austria was annexed by Hitlers
Germany in 1938 and is now
in the possession of the Klimt
Foundation.
Foundation members said
Wednesday that they want to
reach a fair and just solution
after a committee of experts
deemed that the picture fell
under Austrian restitution laws.
The foundation says it hopes
to buy the portrait but also has
left open its return to the heirs.
Associated Press
ASSOCIATED PRESS
The photo provided by Klimt-Foun-
dation on Wednesday shows Gus-
tav Klimts work Bildnis Getrud
Loew that he painted in 1902.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7A
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www.psych.ku.edu/
psychological_clinic/
COUNSELING SERVICES
FOR LAWRENCE & KU
Confidential
Students and
Non-Students
Welcome
the Hufngton Post, a male
student who admitted to
nonconsensual intercourse
was recommended by IOA
to perform community ser-
vice, be removed from cam-
pus housing, write a refective
essay and attend counseling.
Te article reported the of-
fce of Student Conduct and
Community Standards decid-
ed not to impose the commu-
nity service.
On Sept. 8, Te Kansan re-
ported another case in which
IOA recommend the perpe-
trator be put on probation
for six months, that he meet
with IOA to discuss alcohol
and consent and that he pay
restitution to the victim for
any out-of-pocket therapy ex-
pense related to the case. Ac-
cording to the complaintant,
those recommendations were
not imposed by the ofce of
Student Conduct and Com-
munity Standards, an ofce
under Student Afairs.
Tose cases have led to stu-
dent outrage and a student
group demanding that the
University change its poli-
cies. Te case reported by Te
Hufngton Post is under re-
view by the federal Ofce for
Civil Rights.
McQueeny said when sanc-
tion recommendations are
made, each case is looked at
individually, and the impact
on the victim and the com-
munity is considered.
Is this someone who we
think is going to be a risk
for our community? Mc-
Queeny said.
Not Alone, the frst report of
the White House Task Force
to protect students from sex-
ual assault, urged campuses
to develop separate and com-
prehensive sexual misconduct
policies.
Te task force report states
that universities should have
a separate sexual misconduct
policy in order to provide a
single, easily accessible and
user-friendly document for
students, employees, and oth-
ers afected by sexual miscon-
duct to fnd information re-
garding an institutions rules
and procedures, including the
rights of students and the ob-
ligations of the institution and
its employees.
As part of the task force re-
port, schools were provided
with a checklist for develop-
ing a policy for sexual mis-
conduct. In the checklist, it
states the policy should ex-
plain the possible results of
the adjudication process, in-
cluding sanctions.
When a student is found re-
sponsible for sexual assault,
McQueeny makes recom-
mendations for sanctions to
the Ofce of Student Conduct
and Community Standards,
which decides which recom-
mendations to implement.
According to its website,
Te Ofce of the Vice Pro-
vost for Student Afairs takes
an educational approach to all
conduct cases, not a punitive
one. When students are found
responsible for the allega-
tions, it is our opportunity to
educate the student/student
organization on the efects of
his/her/their behavior and to
efect a change in the students
behavior for the future.
Despite this educational,
non-punitive approach, sus-
pensions and expulsions do
happen. Of the 27 sexual as-
sault cases the IOA investi-
gated from Jan. 2013 through
July 2014, fve students were
expelled and four were sus-
pended, McQueeny said.
Emma Halling, a senior
from Elkhart, Ind., and in-
terim student body president,
said she believes that there
needs to be a change in the
current policy.
We need to have a more
transparent and consistent
process, especially in the sen-
tencing, Halling said.
Halling and other students
have called on the University
to reform policies. Te Kansas
Boards of Regents said it is
also reviewing KUs sexual as-
sault policies as well as those
at K-State and Washburn.
FROM IOA PAGE 2A

We need to have a more


transparent and consistent
process, especially in the
sentencing.
EMMA HALLING
Interim study body president
Student hit by car near
Allen Fieldhouse
recovering at KU
Hospital
Joshua Wepking, a senior from
Lansing who was struck by a ve-
hicle Saturday afternoon in front of
Allen Fieldhouse, said he is now in
stable condition at KU Hospital.
Im in stable condition and re-
covering. No more surgeries, now
its just physical therapy and a few
tests, Wepking said. I should be
able to go home on either Saturday
or Sunday and back to school in
probably a week after that.
Wepking said he remembered the
accident which occurred when he
was trying to cross Irving Hill Road
to get to work.
Wepking caught the headlight
with his leg, his left hand went
through the windshield and he did
a few summersaults before going
into the street, he said.
The accident resulted in a broken
left leg, road rash, a three-by-two
inch gash on his left hand, and a
right hand fracture. Wepking had
surgery on his left leg and right
hand.
According to Captain James
Anguiano of the KU Public Safety
Ofce, Wepking was in serious
condition.
He was airlifted to the KU Hospi-
tal after Public Safety Ofcers, an
ambulance, and refghters arrived
at the scene.
Sgt. John Dietz of the Public
Safety Ofce said University police
were dispatched at 2:47 p.m. to
the 1500 block of Irving Hill Road,
where the accident occurred.
According to Dietz, the case was
still under investigation on Mon-
day.
Alicia Garza
Organization brings
puppies to campus
Hawks Helping Hawks, an orga-
nization devoted to assisting stu-
dents in nancial need, is hosting
a Puppy Party to reach out to stu-
dents wanting more information.
Nobody can turn down a conver-
sation while you have a puppy to
pet, TJ Blake, a sophomore from
Hutchinson, said.
Puppies such as a black Lab,
German shepherd and pug will be
in front of Gamma Phi Beta next to
Chi Omega from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Hawks Helping Hawks can pro-
vide assistance in the case of a
medical event or car problem that
nancial aid doesnt always cover.
Amelia Arvesen
and Wagner were getting a lot
of traction on the of-campus
lighting project, which would
bring more lighting to neigh-
borhoods where students live
near campus.
Said will also begin flling
board and committee appoint-
ments and work to ensure that
there is adequate student rep-
resentation.
I am really proud of the way
that so many students have put
aside petty politics and under-
stood the real impact that this
issue and this election have on
the student body as a whole,
Said said.
Kevin Hundelt and Sara
Anees of Crimson and True
could not be reached by Te
Kansans deadline.
Edited by Kelsey Phillips
FROM ELECT PAGE 2A
University to set a standard
for sexual assault policies.
Tis is a great time for KU
to set a national standard
for how sexual assault is ad-
dressed at institutions of high-
er education, Murphy said. I
think we have the momen-
tum, we have the right people
in place, especially in the stu-
dent body and I do think we
have an administration who is
open to hearing these things.
Morgan Said, a senior from
Kansas City, Mo., and student
body president elect, said she
plans to continue working
with Halling and administra-
tion on Title IX initiatives.
Student Senate acted quick-
ly and very directly, some-
thing that I dont think we
can say about the University
administration at this point in
time, Said said.
Said said she and Natalie
Parker, a senior from Over-
land Park and vice chair of
Rights Committee, sat down
with Jane Tuttle, assistant vice
provost of Student Afairs, on
Tuesday to discuss concerns.
Te pair also urged Tuttle to
have someone from Student
Afairs attend the open forum
on sexual assault at the ECM
that night. No one from the
ofce attended, Halling said.
Tuttle, who was in atten-
dance at Wednesdays full
Senate meeting, declined to
comment.
Edited by Emily Brown
Follow
@KansanNews on
Twitter
VISIT KANSAN.COM FOR EXCLUSIVE
ONLINE CONTENT
FROM SENATE PAGE 2A
SafeRide denies car
service to two students
SafeRide, the system dedi-
cated to picking up students at
night and taking them to their
home, has not picked up every
student who has called for their
services.
SafeRide is a service available
to students who are out at night
and feel unsafe walking back to
their home. Students can call
Saferide and a vehicle will pick
them up at their location. But
for some students, the SafeRide
system hasnt worked that way.
Alex Anthony, a junior from
Olathe, is one of the students
who has been denied by this
system.
Anthony said it was Hallow-
een night when he went out
with friends, and his ride lef
him. He said he saw SafeRide
circling, and a few empty
SafeRide cars around him, so
he decided to call one. Afer
getting ahold of dispatch, they
said they werent going to pick
him up because he was near
a route for SafeBus and it was
supposed to arrive in a few
minutes no more than fve.
I waited about 45 minutes in
the cold, and I didnt get back
until at least like 3 or 4 in the
morning. I dont have a prob-
lem taking SafeBus, but I really
needed to get home and you
know, I live all the way out at
the Legends (Place), and there
was no way I was going to
walk, Anthony said.
Anthony isnt the only one
who has had problems with
system. Another student,
Codie Dean, a ffh-year senior
from Wichita, has also been
denied by SafeRide.
For the full story, visit
Kansan.com
Edited by Jennifer Salva
ALICIA GARZA
@AliciaoftheUDK
DAYDAY, MONTH ##, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE ##
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Volume 127 Issue 12 kansan.com Thursday, September 11, 2014
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
S
TENNIS OPENER
ROAD BLOCK
SOCCER
PREVIEW
PAGE 4B
FIRST BIG 12
FEMALE REF
OPENS DOORS
FOR OTHERS
ONLINE EXCLUSIVE:
KANSAN.COM
PAGE 2B
WINNING AT DUKE WOULD END
LONG LOSING STREAK ON THE ROAD
FOOTBALL PRESSER:
WHO WILL WIN THE KANSAS-
DUKE FOOTBALL GAME
ON SATURDAY?
DAILY DEBATE:
PAGE 8B
5
YEARS
COMING
DUKE CHRONICLE SPORTS EDITOR
DISCUSSES HIS THOUGHTS AND
PREDICTIONS FOR UPCOMING GAME
YOU CAN CALL HIM
SVI
17-YEAR-OLD UKRAINIAN
SVIATOSLAV MYKHAILIUK
ARRIVES ON CAMPUS
PAGE 5B
PAGE 4B
VOLLEYBALL
MATCH PREVIEW:
KANSAS VOLLEYBALL SETS
SIGHTS ON VILLANOVA
CLASSIC THIS WEEKEND
PAGE 6B
KANSAS WOMENS TEAM
BEGINS SEASON WITH
TOURNAMENTS IN
TEXAS AND ARKANSAS
PAGE 4B
KANSAS NUMBER ONE GOAL IS TO WIN IN DURHAM ON SATURDAY
PAGE 2B
G
A
M
E
D
A
Y
PAGE 7B
JAMES/HOYT/KANSAN
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 2B
Union.KU.edu
Big Changes For KU Dining!
Hawk Food Stops are
now Jay Breaks!
Whether youve returned to
campus or are a new freshman,
youll love the look of the new Jay
Breaks! Located in JRP, Murphy,
Strong, Art & Design and Spahr
Library, Jay Breaks offer any
Jayhawk a great place to refresh
with a cold beverage, hot brewed
coffee, Tempo Grab-n-Go items,
soup, sushi, hot dogs, pizza,
sweet and salty snack items or
awesome baked goods from Law-
rences own Formosa Bakery.
Theyve been offering awesome
grand re-opening specials this
weektake advantage of these
specials today and tomorrow:
Thu: Buy a large coffee and get
a Formosa Bakery item 50% off
Fri: 50% any Tempo food item
with the purchase of a bottled
beverage.
The Pulse is Now
Roasterie!
All Pulse Cafes are now Roaster
ies, featuring Kansas Citys own
local, direct-trade coffee, with
KU Dinings student baristas
serving it up your way! Hot
brewed coffees, espresso drinks,
frappes, iced drinks, Freshens
Smoothies and delicious food
items from the Tempo Line are
just some of the great selections.
Various locations offer different
combinations of offerings, with
the largest selections at the
Roasterie at the Kansas Union
and Studio Caf in Hashinger
Hall. You can also get your
ccee x at The Undergrcund at
Wescoe; Anschutz; and Mortar &
Pestle Express cn West Campus.
Brewed coffee is available at
all retail dining locations across
campus including Impromptu
Caf at the Kansas Union.
Enjoy grand reopening specials
all week September 15-19:
Mon: Buy any size Almond
Fieldhouse and get a 12 oz. free
Tue: Any pastry just $1.00 with
any coffee purchase
Wed: Purchase any large
smoothie for the price of a small
smoothie.
Thu: 16 oz. Beach Frappe for
just $3.50.
Fri: 50% off any specialty bever
age from 2-3pm.
News from the U
FIVE YEARS AND COUNTING
Jayhawks seek first win on the road since 2009
STELLA LIANG
@stelly_liang
Te season might still be
new, but one question remains
from years past. Kansas has
not won a road game in almost
fve years. Te pressure builds,
and it will continue to do so
as long as Kansas football
continues to lose on the road.
Te Jayhawks last won on the
road on Sept. 12, 2009, against
University of Texas-El Paso.
Tis was before Charlie Weis
was coach. Tis was before the
Turner Gill era. Te victory
was from Mark Manginos
fnal year.
Weis said his team has a good
chance to win when it visits
Duke on Saturday, Kansas
frst opportunity this season to
snap the streak.
I think that our players have
visual evidence on tape that
they have a legitimate chance
at winning, Weis said.
However, it is easy to say
Kansas has a chance to win on
the road. On paper in the last
few years, the Jayhawks have
had opportunities to do so on
the road.
Last year in week two,
Kansas traveled to Houston to
take on the Rice Owls. About
halfway through the fourth
quarter, the Jayhawks were
ahead 14-13. By the end of the
game, the Owls had scored 10
more points, including three
on a go-ahead 56-yard feld
goal, and won the game 23-14.
Kansas ofensive coordinator
John Reagan, who was the
ofensive coordinator at Rice
last year, said why winning on
the road is more difcult than
winning at home.
Really to win on the road,
you have to do the same things
you have to do at home, just
better, he said. You have
to execute, but you have to
execute a little bit higher.
Te change in scenery and
atmosphere usually means the
visiting team has less room to
make mistakes.
Te margin of error goes
down a little bit on the road,
Reagan said. You dont have
people behind you. You dont
have the comforts of what
youre used to.
Afer Saturdays victory
against Southeast Missouri
State, in which Kansas lead
24-0 afer the frst quarter and
fnished with a 34-28 victory,
Weis said the Jayhawks might
not be used to winning in
general.
Te Jayhawks have won
four games total the past two
seasons and Weis said success,
especially the quick start
against SEMO, might have
caught the Jayhawks of guard.
Not being used to winning
at all doesnt boast well for
winning on the road, but
visiting Duke early in the
season and coming out with a
victory could do a lot for the
team and its confdence.
[Ending the losing streak
is] one more thing to put
behind us and not worry about
anymore, Weis said. Te
season doesnt end with a win
or a loss, but this would be a
big win for our program.
Edited by Lyndsey Havens GEORGE MULLINIX/KANSAN
Coach Charlie Weis looks onto his players during the game against Southeast Missouri on Sept. 6. Kansas plays its rst away game this Saturday.

I think that our players


have visual evidence on tape
that they have a legitimate
chance at winning.
CHARLIE WEIS
Kansas coach
visit kansan.com
Kansas defense faces
tough matchup in Duke
SHANE JACKSON
@jacksonshane3
Duke has two of the best
wide receivers in the Atlantic
Coast Conference. Kansas has
an experienced secondary that
had three interceptions last
Saturday.
Something has to give on
Saturday as Kansas takes on
Duke at 2:30 p.m. at Wallace
Wade Stadium in Durham,
N.C. Tis will be the Jayhawks
frst road game of the season.
Te people most dynamic
on their team are the wide
receivers, coach Charlie Weis
said. Tat also happens to be
the position that we feel the
best about on our defense.
Te Blue Devils have
arguably the best receiver unit
Kansas will see all year. Tey
are led by the dynamic duo of
senior wide receivers Jamison
Crowder (5-foot-9, 175
pounds) and Issac Blakeney
(6-foot-6, 225 pounds).
Its a problem. You know,
this is a legitimate good group
of wide receivers, Weis said.
Its not like you say, well, lets
just take Crowder out of the
game and not worry about the
other ones because you just
cant do that.
Crowder caught 108
receptions in his junior
campaign and is of to a
fast start this year with 14
receptions for 163 yards and
a pair of scores. Blakeneys
size could provide matchup
problems for some of Kansas
smaller defensive backs.
Luckily for the Jayhawks,
the secondary is arguably
their biggest strength. Dexter
McDonald is the reigning
Big 12 defensive player of
the week afer recording two
interceptions against Southeast
Missouri. If Duke lines up
the way it has, McDonald (6-
foot-1, 200 pounds) will be on
Crowder and senior JaCorey
Shepherd (5-foot-11, 195) will
match up with Blakeney.
I wouldnt put out anything
in particular, we just need to
bring our A game like every
other game, senior safety
Cassius Sendish said. If we do
that like we know we can, we
will come out victorious.
Te matchup between
the traditional blue-blood
basketball programs also
includes a clash between
coaches who were called upon
to rebuild struggling football
programs.
Duke coach David Cutclife
enters his seventh year with
Duke (77-73) and is most
known for mentoring the likes
of Peyton Manning in his days
at Tennessee. Cutclife has
been able to build this football
program from the ground up.
For Weis, Cutclifes tenure
at Duke is the model of that
he wants to do at Kansas.
Cutclife turned the program
completely around but not
without some early struggles.
In his frst four years, he won
just 15 games before going to
bowl games in each of the last
two years.
I have a lot of respect for
the job theyve done, and
hopefully we cannot only
emulate that, but hopefully we
can speed up that timetable
just a tad, Weis said.
Te Blue Devils are coming
of their best year on the
gridiron. Last year the
Blue Devils had a school
record 10 wins including
the ACC Coastal Division
championship and an
appearance in the Chick-fl-A
Bowl. A large part of Dukes
emergence on the football feld
is due to its athletic director,
Kevin White, someone Weis
knows very well.
Kevin White, their AD,
whos also a vice president
there, hired me at Notre
Dame, Weis said. One of the
fnest men that Ive ever met in
my entire life. He taught me a
lot about college football.
Edited by Kelsey Phillips

ESPN President John Skipper called


one-and-done the single worst
violation of student-athlete relation-
ships.
Wall Street Journal
?
TRIVIA OF THE DAY
THE MORNING BREW
Q: How many Jayhawks are
currently in the NBA?
A:16 (Andrew Wiggins, Joel Embiid,
Cole Aldrich, Darrell Arthur, Mario
Chalmers, Nick Collison, Drew
Gooden, Xavier Henry, Kirk Hinrich,
Ben McLemore, Marcus Morris,
Markieff Morris, Paul Pierce,
Thomas Robinson, Brandon Rush
and Jeff Withey)
KU Sports
!
FACT OF THE DAY
There have been ve one-and-
dones from KU basketball.
KU Info
NBA needs to get rid of one-and-done rule
QUOTE OF THE DAY
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 PAGE 3B THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
By Kirsten Peterson
@KeepUpWithKP
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JOBS HOUSING
A
rticle X of the NBAs 2005
Collective Bargaining Agree-
ment made a statement that
required all potential NBA drafees
to be at least 19 years old and one year
removed from their high school grad-
uation. Tis rule has become known
as the one-and-done rule.
We have all been afected by this
rule, especially in the past year when
both Andrew Wiggins and Joel Embi-
id declared for the draf afer only one
year of playing for Kansas. Wiggins
coming to Kansas was great for our
athletic program, but was it as great
for him? He is a perfect example of a
talented athlete who is ready to play at
the professional level, but was forced
to go a year in college with the fear of
getting injured or performing worse,
leading to a lower draf pick.
Tere have been many none-and-
dones who have managed to have a
successful career in the NBA, includ-
ing LeBron James, Kobe Bryant and
Amare Stoudemire.
Te big question is: Is this rule
helping the athletes? Or is it just age
discrimination and delaying the play-
ers from making millions a year?
Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowls-
by told the Associated Press, I like
the baseball rule. I like draf em out
of high school or leave em go until
afer their junior year. He added, I
also think the NBA and NFL need to
have some legitimate developmental
program to allow people who dont
want to go to college to go develop
their skills. Te only current choice
in basketball is for players to forgo
college and play internationally.
A great idea for the NBA
would be to imitate other
leagues that require players
to be out of high school
for at least three years to
be eligible for the draf.
I think itd be benef-
cial for students to go to
school for at least a couple
years, if not three years,
like they do in baseball
and football, said Kyle
Brueggemann, a pitcher for the Rock-
ford Aviators.
Even Kentucky coach John Calipari
told the Associated Press he likes the
idea of athletes going to college for
a two-year period before they can
declare for the draf. In most cases,
the athletes arent mature enough to
handle the league at such a young age.
Tere have been multiple cases where
young athletes arent careful with their
fnances and make a fool of them-
selves in the limelight.
Joey Wagman, pitcher for the
Oakland Athlet-
ics, mentioned he
didnt think he was
ready to handle play-
ing in the league at a
high school age. Well,
I spent four years in
college, Wagman said.
Afer four full years I
had gone through enough
situations, met enough
people, dealt with enough
things and learned time
management. To be able to handle
something like that at a high school
level? No way.
A change is desperately needed for
the athletes. One-and-done players
may have to watch their families
struggle fnancially while they fulfll
their lone college year risking a ca-
reer-ending injury. If the NBA does
want to change the rules, Kansas fans
would be happy to welcome back
players like Wiggins and Embiid.
Edited by Lyndsey Havens
BOSTON When Wei-Yin
Chen saw right felder Nick
Markakis make a diving grab
in the ffh inning, sure, he
thought about a perfect game.
Chen didnt permit a runner
until the sixth, Adam Jones
helped provide an early cush-
ion and the Baltimore Orioles
beat the Boston Red Sox 10-6
Wednesday for a three-game
sweep.
Te Orioles took an 8-0 lead
in the ffh. Markakis robbed
Allen Craig with a catch in the
gap for the second out in the
bottom of the inning.
Of course it still crosses your
mind, a perfect game is still
very difcult to do, so I tried
to concentrate on each at-bat,
Chen said through a translator.
Dan Butler then doubled of
the Green Monster with one
out in the sixth, ending the
pitching drama.
Wei-Yin was tough, Orioles
manager Buck Showalter said.
I love the way he attacked with
the lead, pitched real well with
the lead. A lot of people nitpick
around. He had some depth on
his of-speed stuf again.
Caleb Joseph homered and
drove in three runs and Ryan
Flaherty got a career-high
four hits as Baltimore won for
the 11th time in 14 games and
maintained its double-digit
lead atop the AL East.
Chen (15-4) gave up one
run and three hits in seven in-
nings, striking out four with-
out a walk. Te lef-hander
felt throwing strikes early in
counts was important.
I was able to get ahead of
the hitters and they were more
aggressive than they should be,
thats why I was so efcient, he
said.
Te Red Sox scored fve
runs in the ninth, but it wasnt
nearly enough afer Chen shut
them down.
Stayed out of the middle of
the plate. Hes been a guy that
notoriously is efective against
us, Boston manager John
Farrell said. He pitches right-
handers in. Hes got multiple
secondary pitches that he can
go to, but I think more than
anything its the consistent lo-
cation that he shows.
Darren ODay got the last out
with two runners on for his
third save.
Brandon Workman (1-9)
lost his ninth straight decision
since winning at Baltimore on
June 10.
Jones two-run double high-
lighted a six-run third, and
Joseph hit a two-run drive in
the ffh. Jones and Joseph each
had three hits.
Chen improved to 12-2 in
his last 21 starts. Te only run
of the lef-hander scored on a
home run by Xander Bogaerts.
Carlos Rivero hit his frst ca-
reer homer, a three-run shot of
Joe Saunders, in the ninth.
Te Orioles combined six
hits two by Flaherty two
walks and Riveros throwing
error from third base for their
burst in the third. Alejandro
De Aza, Joseph and Flaherty
each had RBI singles and Steve
Pearce drew a bases-loaded
walk.
NOT SO FAST
With their magic number in
single digits for clinching the
AL East and a 10-game home-
stand coming up, the Orioles
can possibly clinch at home.
Showalter wasnt about to think
that far ahead. If that comes
to be the potential for that to
happen, thats so far away, if
were fortunate to have that day
happen, then we can talk about
it, he said. Weve got a lot of
roads to cross.
TRAINERS ROOM
Orioles: SS J.J. Hardy missed
his ffh straight game with
lower back spasms. Te hope is
hell be ready to play in Fridays
doubleheader against the Yan-
kees. Hes feeling good, Show-
alter said. Well have a better
idea (Tursday).
Red Sox: Farrell said afer the
game that 2B Dustin Pedroia is
done for the season was sched-
uled to have surgery Tursday
for soreness in his lef wrist
and hand. Hes going to have a
procedure done here tomorrow
by Dr. Leibman in Boston that
will address what hes dealing
with right now, Farrell said. I
dont know any more specifcs
than that, but there will be cer-
tainly a follow-up afer thats
completed tomorrow.... INF-
OF Brock Holt missed his ffh
straight because of illness, but
is expected to play in the up-
coming series in Kansas City.
UP NEXT
Orioles: Of Tursday before
opening a 10-game homestand
with a doubleheader against
the Yankees on Friday. RHP
Kevin Gausman (7-7, 3.83
ERA) and RHP Bud Norris
(12-8, 3.92) are slated to go for
Baltimore.
Red Sox: RHP Clay Buchholz
(7-8, 5.29) is scheduled to start
Tursday night in Kansas City
against RHP Liam Hendriks
(1-1, 4.81).
Chen perfect into 6th inning, Orioles sweep Red Sox
ASSOCIATED PRESS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
As the fth run of the inning by the Baltimore Orioles is posted on the Green Monster wall scoreboard, Boston Red Sox left elder Yoenis Cespedes
waits for the pitch during the third inning of a baseball game at Fenway Park in Boston on Sept. 10.
Two wins in Colorado last
weekend bumped the womens
soccer team to an undefeated
6-0 record, the best start to
the programs season in a de-
cade. Te Jayhawks enter the
weekend determined, focused
and looking to improve on
their early success with two
home games against Cal State
University Northridge and
UMKC.
We want to win, Liana Sala-
zar, a junior midfelder, said.
Nothing else, just win. Win-
ning is the most important
thing right now for us, and I
think we have a big responsi-
bility right now because we are
6-0, and we are playing here at
home next. We are excited. Te
mentality is to keep fghting
and keep winning.
Along with an undefeated
record and the longest win-
ning streak to date in the pro-
grams history, the team picked
up a No. 20 national ranking
this week. While the news
was very exciting, head coach
Mark Francis said it did not
phase his team.
Weve got a whole lot of
soccer lef to play and what it
really means is that whoever
we play, we are going to get
their best game, Francis said.
Whenever youre ranked, ev-
eryone brings all theyve got
against you. So it just means
we have to be that much more
focused.
Te team has tallied 16 goals,
averaged 12.7 shots a game,
and has yet to trail at any point
in six games. Salazar leads
both the ofense and the Big
12 with her six goals, 13 points
and 20 shots.
Te personal success comes
with the team success, Sala-
zar said. I think, without my
team, I wouldnt be able to
score or do many things. So
pretty much everything comes
from them.
Despite a difcult start
to their season, Cal-State
Northridge will hit the turf
at Jayhawk Soccer Complex
feeling the momentum of two
wins on their backs. Te Mata-
dors take over 14 shots a game,
and their defense has only al-
lowed four opponent goals.
Francis has told his team to
expect a physical game.
I watched them on tape,
Francis said. Very good, very
athletic, and probably the most
athletic weve seen yet. Itll be
hard, but were looking for-
ward to the challenge.
He said ofense has been re-
viewing what to do to coun-
teract the challenge and
maximize their chances to be
confdent in Fridays game.
Even with a hard game
ahead, Salazar said her team
is well-prepared to take on the
Matadors.
Te games will be very
physical, Salazar said. I imag-
ine its going to be hard. But
were prepared, we know how
to play and be strong. Its going
to be fun.

Edited by Amelia Arvesen
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 4B
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Volleyball sets sights on Villanova Classic
KYLE PAPPAS
@KylePap
Afer defeating UMKC in
four sets Tuesday night, the
No. 24 Kansas volleyball team
(6-1) will travel to Pennsyl-
vania where it will take part
in the Villanova Classic this
weekend. Te pre-conference
tournament boasts some of the
stifest competition in the na-
tion, and is considered one of
the most difcult tournaments
the Jayhawks have participated
in during the Ray Bechard era.
"We're going to tell the team,
forget what the uniform says,
we've gotta earn everybody's
respect when we go out there,"
Bechard said afer the UMKC
win. "If it's Villanova, Yale,
American or Penn State, it
doesn't matter. Just forget the
uniform. We have to play at
our standard."
Kansas kicks of the invita-
tional by taking on host Villa-
nova (4-3) on Friday at 11 a.m.
Te Wildcats have struggled
out of the gate, dropping all
three of their matches in last
weekend's SDSU-USD Chal-
lenge, winning only two sets
along the way. Te Wildcats
are led by junior outside hit-
ter Colleen Hickey, who has
recorded at least seven kills in
each of her last four games on
her way to leading the team in
that category.
Te Jayhawks then square of
against four-time Ivy League
defending champions, Yale
(1-2), later in the day. Te
Bulldogs have also got out to a
bit of a rocky start in 2014
they've lost their two matches
to Minnesota and Boston Col-
lege in straight sets. Tey're led
by junior setter Kelly Johnson,
a two-time All-Ivy First Team
selection who leads the Bull-
dogs in kills and ranks second
in assists this season.
It doesn't get any easier for
Kansas on Saturday when
they face American (4-2).
Te champions of the Patriot
league last season, the Eagles
fnished 2013 with an impres-
sive 34-3 record before being
bounced out of the NCAA
tournament in the Sweet 16
by Texas. Junior middle block-
er Kelly McCaddin should be
an impact performer she's
second on the team with 43
kills while maintaining an im-
pressive .386 kill percentage in
2014.
Lastly, the Jayhawks will pre-
sumably face their toughest
test of the weekend if they take
on defending NCAA champi-
on Penn State. Te Nittany Li-
ons (4-1) have started out the
year strong, picking up wins
against TCU and UCLA before
falling to Stanford last week-
end. Freshman outside hitter
Ali Frantti, 2013 Illinois Gato-
rade Player of the Year, is the
player to watch for Penn State
as her 67 kills and .479 kill per-
centage both lead the team.
For Kansas, its chances will
likely hinge on the play of se-
nior outside hitters Sara Mc-
Clinton and Chelsea Albers.
Te lone seniors on a fresh-
man-heavy squad, the two
have been relied upon heav-
ily thus far to come up with
big kills at key moments for
the Jayhawks. Freshman set-
ter Ainise Havili will also be
crucial, as her 287 assists this
season have created most of
McClinton's and Albers' op-
portunities.
Edited by Casey Hutchins
Undefeated soccer team returns home for two matches
LIZ KUHLMANN
@LizKuhlmannUDK
Young womens tennis team begins season on the road
SKYLAR ROLSTAD
@SkyRolSports
Te Kansas tennis team will
begin its season this weekend
with tournaments in Texas
and Arkansas. Saturday will
also mark the beginning of the
second year for the team under
coach Todd Chapman.
Kansas tennis will send four
players to Arkansas for the
CCLR Collegiate Invitational
in Little Rock, Ark., and sev-
en to Midland, Texas, for the
Midland Invitational. Chap-
man will coach the players
who travel to Arkansas and
his assistant, Aaron Fuller, will
coach in Texas.
Te team is almost brand
new in Chapmans second sea-
son in charge, with only two
returning players, senior Ma-
ria Luduena and junior Maria
Cordona.
My two returners are very
key because theyve been with
me for my whole frst year
so they know what I expect,
Chapman said. Tey know
what I demand each day.
For Chapman, it was import-
ant to establish a team with
players he recruited afer sev-
eral graduated in 2013.
Recruiting is the lifeblood
of a program, Chapman said.
It helps as youre recruiting
players that they know what
you expect from day one
Te mentality is already set,
youre not trying to reteach
something or create a diferent
culture.
Both tournaments will be
gauges for how well the team
will start this season. Chap-
man has diferent goals for
each group of players. For un-
derclassmen, the tournament
is a chance to get their feet wet
and face good competition.
Chapman said the rest of the
team will have the chance to
play ranked opponents and
possibly get in the national
rankings themselves.
Te Kansas tennis team has
not competed in the NCAA
tournament for 16 years.
We have high expectations,
Chapman said. Our goal is at
the end of the season to be in
contention and be in the con-
versation for having a chance
to go to the NCAA tourna-
ment.

Edited by Sarah Kramer
MICHAEL OBRIEN/KANSAN
Senior outside hitter Chelsea Albers goes for a kill during Tuesdays volleyball match against UMKC at the
Horejsi Family Athletic Center. The team will play at the Villanova Classic in Pennsylvania this weekend.
FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
Junior midelder Liana Salazar and her teammates celebrate after her goal against Wake Forest. Kansas soccer played against No. 24 Wake Forest on
Aug. 31, defeating the Deacons 4-1 at the Jayhawk Soccer Complex.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 5B
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with Dons Auto Center
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Mykhailiuk arrives on campus
BLAIR SHEADE
@RealBlairSheady
Te wait to see incoming
Ukrainian freshman guard
Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk has
come to an end as he met with
Kansas media this afernoon.
Mykhailiuk, or Svi as he
told the media to call him,
just landed in Kansas a couple
of days ago afer a full day of
traveling and an eight-hour
time diference from Ukraine.
Tis is my third time to
America, Mykhailiuk said.
I was sleeping a lot so I have
to work out my energy, a lot
of paperwork, thats what Ive
been doing for the past couple
days.
In Mykhailiuks home
country of Ukraine, theres a
war going on between Ukraine
and Russia. Mykhailiuk said
his city isnt afected by the
fghting, but he hears of
terrible stories near the Russia-
Ukraine border.
Tere is no efect on my
city, Mykhailiuk said. Cities
near the border are afected by
bombing and killing people, so
its horrible.
Before Mykhailiuk arrived,
there were rumors he wouldnt
show up to Kansas because
of the infuence to play
international professional
basketball. Tose rumors were
far from the truth.
I thought it would easier
for me to go to the NBA from
college than from Europe,
Mykhailiuk said. It was my
dream as a child to play in the
NBA, and my dream to play in
the NCAA.
Te delayed arrival
on campus was due to
Mykhailiuks participation
on the Ukrainian national
basketball team during
the FIBA World Cup. Te
Ukrainian team was knocked
out of the tournament afer
losing to the United States on
Sept. 4. Mykhailiuk played in
the game against the U.S., and
said it was great experience.
To play against players
like D-Rose, Kyrie Irving and
James Harden was pretty hard,
but pretty fun, Mykhailiuk
said. You need a lot of
experience to play with them.
Kansas was one of the three
schools to recruit Mykhailiuk.
He said the fnal two came
down to Virginia and Kansas.
I think Kansas is better than
Virginia, Mykhailiuk said.
[Kansas] has a lot to develop
my skills more than Virginia.
Here is great people and a
great team.
Mykhailiuk stands at 6-foot-
7, but said hes a guard even
though hes grown in the last
fve months.
Im good right now,
Mykhailiuk said about his
height.
Te 17-year-old said hes
excited to play with all the
players on the current roster
such as Wayne Selden Jr.,
Perry Ellis and Jamari Traylor.
We have a great recruiting
class and great sophomores,
Mykhailiuk said.
When asked about which
former basketball players
he watched, he named of
the Morris twins, Mario
Chalmers, Andrew Wiggins,
Joel Embiid and Paul Pierce.
Mykhailiuk said his favorite
players are Michael Jordan,
Derrick Rose, Isaiah Tomas
and Kyrie Irving.
I watch some games,
Mykhailiuk said.
Mykhailiuk speaks fuent
English and said he hasnt
enrolled into classes yet
because he has to take a
placement test. When
asked about what he would
study while enrolled in the
University, he said he didnt
know yet.
I will know today or
tomorrow my classes, Svi said.
Edited by Lyndsey Havens
FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
Freshman Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk answers questions during a press conference Wednesday in Allen Fieldhouse. The 6-foot-7 Ukrainian-born guard
recently arrived in Kansas after playing on the Ukrainian national basketball team during the FIBA World Cup.
MANHATTAN, Kan.
Bill Snyder has changed little
since his arrival at Kansas
State more than 20 years ago,
his focus always on in-house
preparation and consistency
across the board.
He also disdains mental
mistakes and penalties.
One little detail and hes
not going to let it slide,
quarterback Jake Waters ex-
plained. Hes so detailed ori-
ented, so knowing that with
one little mistake, you know
youre going to hear about it.
Tat should motivate you to
minimize those mistakes and
penalties.
Snyder was blunt in assess-
ment of No. 19 Kansas States
come-from-behind win over
Iowa State on Saturday, and
his feelings hadnt changed a
whole lot by midweek.
Tere were 10 penalties,
including fve illegal proce-
dures, a costly pass interfer-
ence call in the end zone and
a facemask penalty that all
conspired to put the Wildcats
in a big hole.
Just about the only thing
that didnt go wrong were
turnovers. Kansas State
didnt have any, while Iowa
State threw an interception
near midfeld that scuttled a
promising drive.
Despite the mistakes, Sny-
der was pleased with Kansas
States resiliency in battling
back.
Tere were some cer-
tain things that I didnt see
through the course of the
game that I did see on vid-
eo tape, Snyder said. Still,
I dont know how pleasantly
surprised I was, but on the
positive side of it, it does
have a meaningful impact on
the quality of the character of
the young people in our pro-
gram.
Kansas State was still trail-
ing 28-26 with 3:01 remain-
ing when it took over posses-
sion at its own 20-yard line.
Seven plays later, Waters was
barreling into the end zone
from 8 yards out for the go-
ahead touchdown the
eventual game-winner, as it
turned out.
I think it showed great
toughness, resiliency, Wild-
cats ofensive lineman Bos-
ton Stiverson said. We came
together as a team. Tat is a
team-efort win. It shows that
even if we are not playing
well and making mistakes,
we can fght through adversi-
ty and come out with a win.
Te Wildcats (2-0, 1-0 Big
12) are of this week before
welcoming ffh-ranked Au-
burn to town next Tursday
night. Tat gives Snyder time
to clean up the mistakes.
It will be here in a heart-
beat, he said. Tere is no
doubt about that. We have to
be awfully careful about not
putting things of. It is our
intent to treat this week like
it is game week as much as
possible. I am sure with our
players and my interest right
now is correcting mistakes
and making improvements
by each individual in the
program.
Tat includes Waters, his se-
nior quarterback, who called
the review of game flm from
Iowa State an eye-opening
experience for the team.
Just watching that flm, we
learned so much Xs and Os
wise and about ourselves as
a team, Waters said. Going
through what we go through
on the road in a hostile en-
vironment, being down and
showing how resilient we are
to come back and win. Tose
teaching moments, luckily
we had it in a win and were
going to grow from that, too.
Kansas State
cleaning up
before Auburn
ASSOCIATED PRESS

...it does have a meaning-


ful impact on the quality of
the character of the young
people in our program.
BILL SNYDER
Kansas State Coach

It was my dream as a child


to play in the NBA, and my
dream to play in the NCAA.
SVIATOSLAV MYKHAILIUK
Kansas freshman guard
DAN: Duke is coming of a
win against Troy in which they
started out slow, trailing 14-3.
Talk a bit about what youve
seen from the 2014 team.
NICK: I would say playing
against Elon and Troy, Troy
is stifer competition, but the
biggest thing Id say so far:
Duke hasnt had a turnover
this season. Tats going to be
huge for them to continue that
it wont hold up, but if they
can keep their turnovers to a
minimum theyll be great.
Anthony Boone is looking
a lot more comfortable in
the pocket, and not to men-
tion hes got Issac Blakeney,
who is 6-foot-6 and around
230 pounds. He ran on the
4x100-meter Duke track team
this spring. Hes really taking
things seriously this year and
has been saying that the NFL
is a goal for him, studying NFL
receivers. Hes got three touch-
downs through two games.
Competition is going to get
stifer. Teyve got Kansas, Tu-
lane and a trip to Miami.
Trough these frst two
games, Duke has looked ex-
actly how it has wanted to
look. Tey wanted a blowout
in front of a packed house
thats what it did.

DAN: Wide receiver Jamison
Crowder gets much of the at-
tention at the position, and
deservedly so, but could a case
be made that Issac Blakeney is
every bit as good, or is he ben-
efting from Crowder being
matched up against the defens-
es best?

NICK: Crowder was spectacu-
lar last season. A lot of people
question whether he could re-
place Connor Vernon and he
did that and more as a receiver
and as a punt returner. I think
you are looking at two guys,
Jamison is smaller but faster.
One of the biggest things that
separated the two was work
ethic set them apart prior to
this season. If you talk to the
ofensive coordinator Scottie
Montgomery, Jamison is one
of the hardest-working receiv-
ers he has ever worked with
and one of the most talented.
You can tell from the intensity
he brings on the feld and of
the feld. Isaac is a much more
mature player this year. Senior
year, the light-bulb went of.
Football is something he wants
to do past this year he has
potential to be a dominant
player. Te Coastal division is
not a strong division when it
comes to receiver talent; com-
pare him to Kelvin Benjamin
from FSU same body-type
and same speed. Its premature
to say he is as good as Jamison,
but its not a stretch to say that
he could be one of the top re-
ceivers in the conference.
DAN: Right or wrong, quarter-
back Anthony Boone is known
as a facilitator of the Duke of-
fense who doesnt turn the ball
over. Does his mobility and the
rushing attack as a whole get
overlooked? Both Josh Snead
and Shaquille Powell average
more than 4.5 yards per carry.
Is this a strength of the team?

NICK: Losing Jela Duncan,
who is now a Denver Bronco,
was tough for the rushing at-
tack, and Brandon Connette
as well, if it was third-and-4 or
less, you could nearly guaran-
tee that he was going to bully
his way past everyone because
he was a massive guy. Boone is
not as big, but if you watched
the Troy game this past week,
he scrambled for a 30-yard
touchdown, so the mobility is
there, in this system he should
be able to get 5 yards because
they spread the feld so well.
Powell and Snead, they are
both talented guys, and at
times they may get overlooked,
but its a strength that they
have and its something they
are going to continue to play
to, especially with a veteran of-
fensive line. Well see how that
plays out when the Blue Devils
go up against bigger, more ath-
letic defensive lines. Even last
year, it was pretty even-keel,
about 50-50 in play-calling for
run to pass.
DAN: Duke is allowing 148
yards per game on the ground,
and 214 yards per game
through the air. Is Duke a bet-
ter team defending the pass or
the rush?

NICK: Im a little more con-
fdent in protecting the pass,
just because the secondary has
an insane amount of potential
and depth. Tey are all soph-
omores, minus a few. All of
them played last season in big
games. Not to take anything
away from the front-six, but
some of the younger back-
ers are feeling out new posi-
tions. Tey are working their
way into new positions, and
new reads, and the front-four
are fne. Teyre going to be
strong. If I had to choose one
or the other, Id take the pass
defense.

DAN: How have the sea-
son-ending injuries to middle
linebacker Kelby Brown and
Braxton Deaver afected the
outlook of the season? Who
has flled in in their absence,
and how well, so far?

NICK: Obviously losing Kelby
Brown and Braxton Deaver in
the pre-season is a huge blow
for any team, but more so
Duke, because the defensive
unit so much relied on Brown
in the middle to make the calls,
and David Helton never really
played the inside linebacker
position before, so he is kind of
stepping in and feeling it out.
DAN: David Cutclife is in his
seventh year as the coach at
Duke. While he has brought
the program back to respect-
ability, his frst four seasons, he
went just 15-33 and won just
six conference games. Charlie
Weis has only won four games
in two years and has a big re-
build ahead of him. What are
the feelings around Durham
on Cutclife now, and how
were they a few years ago?

NICK: Id say in the past three
years, Cutclife has [gone]
from being the coach attached
to the Manning brothers, now
he is one of the more popular
coaches. He won the coach of
the year last year, really turned
the program around from be-
ing one of the worst in the
power fve conferences sever-
al years ago. Hes loved on the
feld and in the community.
When they had the Meet the
Blue Devils days, when they
lined up for autographs in the
shopping mall, Cutclifes line
was 90 yards long. A couple
years ago, it wasnt close to
that. People are excited about
him and he is defnitely in the
conversation when people talk
about the top coaches.
DAN: Charlie Weis said play-
ing second-fddle to the bas-
ketball team is not necessar-
ily a bad thing, and can help
motivate the football team
on the feld and in recruiting.
Can the same thing be said for
Duke? With the recent success,
how receptive has the Duke
fan-base been to the football
program. What kind of atten-
dance can we expect Saturday?

NICK: Cutclife talked about it
on Tuesday. A couple years ago
before the back-to-back bowl
games, it was a way to get your
foot in the door on the recruit-
ing trail in California because
when you knocked, people
knew Duke for basketball.
I think basketball gives them
name-recognition. Now, its
not needed as much. Last year
they played two Heisman tro-
phy winners and a bowl game
on New Years Eve. Football in-
terest has grown exponentially.
Weve only had one game to
take a look at it, but for the
Elon game, there were 31,000
people. I didnt cover the game,
but I walked to the stadium,
close to my dorm, and usually
you can go to the stadium late
and grab a seat up close right
before the game, but that was
not the case. It hasnt been like
that since the Carolina game
or Miami game; I had to stand
in the very back row of the stu-
dent section. People are com-
ing out, and I would expect a
pretty similar atmosphere. It
should be pretty packed.
DAN: Prediction?
NICK: I think the tough ques-
tion is that Kansas has only
played one game. Kansas is go-
ing to get its points, but Duke
is going to win. If I had to put
a score on it, Id go, maybe, 35-
17 would be my guess. I think
it would be similar to the Troy
game.
Edited by Lyndsey Havens
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6B
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OPPOSING SIDELINE
Kansan football beat writer speaks with Duke Chronicle sports editor Nick Martin
to get a closer look at Saturdays opponent
DAN HARMSEN
@udk_dan
ASSOCIATED PRESS
Duke Coach David Cutcliffe talks with quarterback Anthony Boone in the second half of an NCAA college football
game at Veterans Memorial Stadium last Saturday in Troy, Ala.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7B
KEY CONTRIBUTORS KEY CONTRIBUTORS
KANSAS AT DUKE
KANSAS
KICKOFF
DUKE
KICKOFF
FOOTBALL GAMEDAY
Kansas faces off against
Duke University on Saturday
Prediction: Duke 34, Kansas 27
BLAIR SHEADE
@realblairsheady
DAN HARMSEN
@udk_dan

KANSAS
(1-0)

DUKE
(2-0)
Montell Cozart, So.
Quarterback
The sophomore quarterback missed on a number of throws, but didnt throw an interception against
Southeast Missouri (SEMO). After being outscored 28-10 by SEMO in the second half, Cozart said he
needed to nish the game and not allow the other team to make a comeback.
Cory Avery, Fr.
Running back
The starting running back was unknown going into the season-opener against SEMO, and the popular
thought was junior DeAndre Mann would be the starter. But Avery was the rst running back on the
eld, and he nished with a team high of 19 carries and a touchdown. The freshman will be the
starter on Saturday.

Nick Harwell, Sr.


Wide receiver
Dexter McDonald, Sr.
Defensive back
The Big 12 Player of the Week led the Jayhawks with two interceptions last Saturday. Hell have a
tough test against Dukes Jamison Crowder and Isaac Blakeney, but McDonald said the coaches have
him prepared to face anyone, and hell be ready to take on both Duke receivers.
Ben Heeney, Sr.
Linebacker
After starting the rst half with nine tackles, Heeney only made two tackles in the second half. He said
the way to stay more involved is to stay focused on the task at hand. Kansas needs Heeney to bring the
rst half performance against SEMO to Durham in order for Kansas to take its rst road win in 2014.

Anthony Boone, Sr.


Quarterback
The senior gunslinger has completed 49 of his 74 attempts this year for 515 yards and ve touch-
downs. The key stat: zero interceptions. Also a threat to run, Boone scored twice against Troy in the
victory.
Josh Snead, Sr.
Running back
Often overlooked, the Duke ground-game is potent because the wide receivers stretch the eld. Snead
has averaged 4.8 yards per carry so far this season and is a threat to catch the ball out of the back-
eld.

Jamison Crowder, Sr.


Wide receiver
Arguably one of the toughest assignments of the season for the Kansas secondary, Crowder, at 5-foot-
9, runs crisp routes, is tough and has a knack for nding creases and the end zone.
DeVon Edwards, So.
Defensive back
The Duke secondary is youthful, but precocious, with a lot of big-game experience last year. Edwards
leads Duke with 21 tackles, two pass breakups and two forced fumbles.
David Helton, Sr.
Linebacker
Helton will be relied on to make the calls on defense in Kelby Browns absence. He was successful
last year on the outside, tallying 133 total tackles, but the move to middle linebacker makes for a
learning curve. Helton may have to clean up some of the mess that a talent-deprived Duke defensive
line gives him.

Harwell was the missing piece to offensive coordinator John Reagans spread offense. Harwell made
tough catches, and he scored twice, but in the second half, he only had one catch. For Kansas to win,
Harwell will have to be involved the whole game.

T
he Kansas Jay-
hawks are fresh of
a season-opening
victory, which saw the KU
ofense score an impressive
34 points. Quarterback
Montell Cozart connected
with wide receiver Nick
Harwell for two scores in
the frst quarter, and the
running back combination of
DeAndre Mann and Corey
Avery added 212 yards on
the ground and another frst
quarter score. Te Jayhawks
will need another strong per-
formance from the ofense
if they hope to be victorious
this Saturday against a Duke
Blue Devils team that has
averaged 43 points per game
in the frst two games of the
season. However, keep in
mind Dukes frst two victo-
ries came against the likes
of Elon and Troy, neither
of which is the caliber of
Kansas.
Despite only surrendering
30 points total through the
frst two weeks of the season,
Duke has struggled on
defense, ranking nationally
at No. 105 in total defense,
despite playing weak oppo-
nents. Much of this struggle
is because fve starting
defensive players from last
years Blue Devils squad
graduated. Te Duke defense
is relatively young, with only
fve seniors in the starting
lineup, three of whom are
new starters this season.
Tey have struggled to stop
the run efectively, ranking
at No. 72 in the nation for
rushing defense.
If the Jayhawks can protect
Cozart and efectively move
the ball against the Duke
defense, especially on frst
down, then Kansas has a
good chance at securing a
victory. An early score or
two will also help build the
momentum and confdence
of the Jayhawk ofense.
Another key to Kansas suc-
cess will be how well the de-
fense matches up with Dukes
passing game, which has
shown fashes of brilliance
thus far. Te Jayhawk defense
will have to fght hard not to
let the game slip away in the
second half, as they did last
week by surrendering 28 sec-
ond half points, 21 of which
came in the fourth quarter.
Te Jayhawks defnitely have
their work cut out for them
this week in Durham, where
Duke has won its past fve
home games and past eight
non-conference matchups.
Momentum will be the de-
ciding factor. Whoever can
get on the board frst and set
the tone will likely emerge as
the victor.

Edited by Alyssa Scott
I
n no way can Kansas fans
expect the Jayhawks to
come out of Durham,
N.C., with a win against Duke
on Saturday.
Te reigning Atlantic Coastal
Conference champions are
favored by 15.5 points in this
game, and it would likely be
much more if the Blue Devils
wouldnt have fallen to a 14-3
defcit against Troy in the frst
half of last weekends game
before coming back for a 34-17
victory.
Senior Anthony Boone is still
under center and leading the
way for the Blue Devils. Duke
is 11-2 the past two years in
games Boone has played in,
and hes totaled 515 yards and
fve touchdowns in two games
early in the season.
His top target is senior wide
receiver Jamison Crowder
a 5-foot-9 slot speedster
who set new school and ACC
records for receptions in 2013.
Coach Charlie Weis compared
Crowder to NFL veteran Steve
Smith earlier this week, and
called him one of the best
receivers Kansas will see this
year. Senior Isaac Blakeney
a 6-foot-6, 225 pound pro-
totype at wide receiver has
also emerged for the Blue Dev-
ils with three touchdowns in
two games, and may also cause
the Jayhawks some trouble.
Tough Kansas junior
cornerback Dexter McDonald
was so dominant in the frst
game with two interceptions,
two pass breakups and a Big 12
Defensive Player of the Week
award, it doesnt mean Kansas
secondary is ready for Dukes
passing attack, by any means.
Senior JaCorey Shepherd was
a liability for the Jayhawks in
their frst game and could see
plenty of targets go his way
in the teams second game as
the Blue Devils try to avoid
McDonald.
Weis expects Crowder to
lineup on the Jayhawks right
side with Blakeney on his
lef, which would match up
Crowder and McDonald,
though the Blue Devils will
likely move him around all
game.
If the Jayhawks cant shut
down the passing attack
especially Crowder it will
be tough for the team to
overcome. However, if the
same Jayhawks who were
showcased in the frst quarter
against SEMO show up, it will
be enough to keep Montell
Cozart and company in reach-
ing distance.
But afer three quarters of
disastrous Jayhawk football
against a much more mediocre
team than Duke, the type of
production the team brought
in the frst quarter shouldnt be
counted on by Kansas fans.
Edited by Casey Hutchins
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 8B
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Harvey, Nurski meet
for US Mid-Amateur title
BETHLEHEM, Pa. Scott Har-
vey and Brad Nurski advanced to
championship match in the U.S.
Mid-Amateur.
The winner Thursday in the 36-
hole nal will earn an automatic
spot in the Masters next year.
Harvey, a 36-year-old from
Greensboro, N.C., won his quarter-
nal match, 7 and 6, over Denver
Haddix of Lexington, Ky. Harvey had
a tougher time in the seminal. He
won ve straight holes for a 3-and-
2 win over 2005 Mid-Am champion
Kevin Marsh.
This is where (the champi-
onship) I have put myself in my
mind, said Harvey, a real estate
property manager. I am where I
want to be and feel like I should
be. Hopefully, I can take advantage
of it.
Nurski had a more stressful day
at Saucon Valleys Old Course.
The 35-year-old from St. Joseph,
Missouri, won on the 18th hole in
the quarternals over Todd White
of Spartanburg, S.C. In the semi-
nals, Nurski had to go 19 holes to
beat Tom Werkmeister of Kentwood,
Michigan.
Getting to the nal two is an un-
believable accomplishment, said
Nurski. We just have to come out
and play our game tomorrow, stay
aggressive and make some putts.
This will be the rst USGA cham-
pionship match for Harvey and
Nurski.
Associated Press