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Vol. 6 No. 9 www.mtolivenews.

com September 2014


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L o c a l
P o s t a l C u s t o m e r
Proverbs 3:5
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N
ever miss an opportunity- it can lead to many
things.
Molly Conway, a 12-year old girl from Flanders, recent-
ly learned this lesson when she competed as a State Finalist
in National American Miss (NAM) New Jersey Pageant,
Pre-Teen Division. The event was held Sat. Aug. 23 to Sun.
Aug. 24 at the Hyatt Regency in New Brunswick.
Molly placed third runner up in the talent competition
and in the top 25 out of 158 contestants in the pre-teen divi-
sion for NJ, ages 10 through 12. Her achievement has
earned her an invite to compete in the National American
Miss Pageant to be held in Anaheim, CA, at Disneyland
during Thanksgiving week.
Overwhelmed by all the requirements and fund-raising
to participate, and all the rehearsing to compete, Molly did
not know what to expect. But after meeting new people,
performing and public speaking in front of hundreds, and
completing one-on-one interviews with judges, Molly is
grateful for the experience and proud of her accomplish-
ment.
When they called her name as third runner up for the tal-
ent competition, "I felt so proud of myself; I was shocked,"
says Molly. "There were some really great talents; the con-
tortionist was really good. I was proud and surprised that I
placed that high because there were some really good tal-
ents."
For the talent competition, Molly entered in two differ-
ent acts. She choreographed and performed her own hip hop
dance routine in her first act; and then sang a solo for the
first time on stage. Although the seventh grader at Mt. Olive
Middle School has been dancing since she was three years
old at Dream Dance Studios in Ledgewood, this was the
first dance routine that she choreographed and performed
solo for competition.
"For hip hop, when I was on stage, it was really fun,"
says Molly. "I was really nervous. Singing was really fun
Local 12-Year Old Dances Her Way
To Top In State Pageant
too. It was just me, up there by myself, and I got to sing in
front of my family and my friends."
For the past 32 years, NAM has been hosting pageants
around the country for girls ages four to 18, in five separate
age divisions. Contestants compete in four categories
including Formal Wear Modeling, Personal Introduction,
Interview and Community Service Project, as well as
optional contests such as talent, actress and top model
search.
The largest pageant system in the nation, NAM offers
thousands in scholarships and prizes to recognize and
develop young ladies nationwide and create future leaders
continued on page 6
Page 2, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
JOAN SIRKIS LAVERY, ESQ.
IN PRACTICE FOR OVER 25 YEARS
B A N K R U P T C Y
We are a Debt Relief Agency and can help you file for Bankruptcy Relief under the Federal Bankruptcy Act
Mention This Ad & Receive A $25.00 Discount
FREE CONSULTATION
699 WASHINGTON STREET SUITE 103 HACKETTSTOWN
N RELIEF FROM CREDITORS
N Chapter 7 - Liquidations N Chapter 13 - Wage Earner Plans
Evening Hours Available Call 908.850.6161
M
t. Olive Bagels located on 135 Rt
46 in Budd Lake would like to
thank al those who helped in the
capture of the person who stole the tip box
from our counter as well as other business-
es. By you posting and sharing the video on
your Facebook pages you helped in the
arrest of this person.
Thank you..
John Owner Mt Olive Bagels
M
ount Olive Township is offering a
Female Cancer Screening at the
Medical Clinic in the Health
Department on Monday, October 6th from
5-7pm. The Municipal Building Health
Department is located at 204 Flanders-
Drakestown Road, Budd Lake, NJ 07828.
The screening includes Thin-Prep Pap
test, cervical and pelvic exam, manual
breast exam and referral for a discounted
mammogram. The cost is $45.00 to cover
the lab fee. All female residents of Mount
Olive, Netcong and Mount Arlington are
welcome. Please call Helen Giles, RN for
an appointment. 973-691-0900 ext. 7353.
M
ount Olive Township is offering a
free male cancer screening for
Adult Men. A licensed Urologist
will be screening in the medical examina-
tion room at Mount Olive Health
Department at 204 Flanders Drakestown
Road, Budd Lake NJ. Registration is rec-
ommended.
For a more complete assessment, you
may register for a Prostate Specific Antigen
blood test. This test is offered at Mount
Olive Township at our SMAC blood screen-
ing on 10/10/14 for a fee.
This screening is open to all male residents
of Mount Olive, Netcong, Mount Arlington,
Wharton and Dover. For an appointment,
call Helen Giles, RN, Public Health Nurse
at 973-691-0900 ext 7353.
Female Cancer Screening
at Mount Olive Health Dept.
Free Male Cancer Screening
at Mount Olive Health Department
Thank You!
T
he Mount Olive Public Library will
host a workshop titled Master the
Art of Scarf Tying on Monday,
October 6th, 2014 at 7:00 pm.
In this free and fun program, join Library
Director Lyn Gebhard as she demonstrates
how you can wear a scarf for every season
and mix up your look just about every day!
Bring your favorite scarves for hands on
learning.
For further information, visit
www.mopl.org or call the library at 973-
691-8686.
Master the Art of Scarf Tying
Next Issue Date October 21, 2014
Deadline October 8
Call Joe for info. 973-809-4784
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 3
"Members of Cub Scout Pack 47 of Flanders and Cub Scout Pack 249 of Budd Lake attended a New
York Red Bulls soccer game at Red Bull Arena in Harrison, NJ on Saturday September 6 and had the
opportunity to meet 3 Red Bull players for autographs before the game. The scouts cheered the Red
Bulls to a 2-1 win over the Kansas City Sporting while enjoying hot dogs, french fries, popcorn and
gatorade. For info joining Cub Scouts go to www.beascout.org"
B
azaar to be held on Saturday,
October 25, from 9am to 3 pm in the
Presbyterian Chapel of
Hackettstown, 291 Main St (across from
our sanctuary.) Tea time 9 to 11, lunch
11:30 to 1:30. Holiday sundries, handmade
items, white elephant table, and baked
goods. Enjoy our church's website at
fpchackettstown.org.
Presbyterian Chapel Hosts Bazaar
R
EELERS Square Dance Club is
hosting a free Introduction to
Square Dancing event on Tuesday,
October 7, 2014 from 7:30pm to 9:30pm at
Ironia School, 303 Dover-Chester Road,
Randolph.
Learn a few square dance moves and
dance the night away! Have fun, improve
your cardio fitness, and make new friends!
The event is open to singles and couples.
Casual dress. Refreshments will be avail-
able.
Happiness is right around your corner!
Dance in a square and youll make a cir-
cle of friends!
Square dancing: Friendship Set to
Music!
For more information, call 848-219-
4152 or email bikerdi@yahoo.com
Learn Square Dancing on October 7
Page 4, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
By Ejvind Boccolini
S
ometimes the symptoms of depression
are very difficult to see, and a Mount
Olive parent is hoping that a memorial
event for her son will help others more open-
ly discuss depression and suicide prevention.
Jenny Heeman, said in a recent phone
interview, when speaking about her son
Lukes suicide in 2012, that we often know
the symptoms of strep throat or chicken pox,
but we do not easily know the symptoms of
depression.
Some of the basic things are difficult to
know, but there are certain things that could
maybe tip us off and let us know that an indi-
vidual is experiencing deep depression.
With the Luke Heeman Memorial
Tournament, she hopes to open up an avenue
so that parents can talk to children about
depression - and so that kids can talk
amongst kids about it.
The basketball tournament event was cre-
ated for these reasons - and to keep Luke's
memory alive. She said hopefully the event,
which was held Aug. 28, 29, and 30, helped
to raise some awareness about suicide pre-
vention.
We were very happy, with the memori-
al event this year, said Jenny.
Her son Zack was able to come back from
Rutgers University to attend the event as
well, and There were teams from three differ-
ent age groups participating in the tourna-
ment: high school-age individuals; college-
age; and a team for men over 26.
Jenny said that on Saturday, Aug. 30, par-
ticipants played all day from 9am to 7 pm,
and there were about 85 players and 15 dif-
ferent teams.
Jenny thanked all of these individuals and
the businesses, which either donated to the
fund or helped with special pricing for the
event. They are: her husband Mark; Rashan
Spencer (who was on the high school basket-
ball team with Lukes brother Zack, and now
attends Centenary College. Spencer brought
his basketball teammates from Centenary to
be a part of the event); Colin Ormrod, of
Instant Imprints; Enzos Pizza, of Budd
Lake; Lori Vega; Keith Jefferson; Irving and
Tanya Fisher; Budd Lake Bagels; and Joe
from MCM of Morristown.
Jenny also was grateful that the weather
was good for the event. They sold T-shirts for
$15, and all of the players wore them. These
T-shirts are still available for sale.
This was the first year of the event, and
possibly the event will be switched to June in
coming years, instead of being held in
August, Jenny said. A lot of people go on
vacation during August, she said, and so it
may be better if held in June.
The event will help preserve the memory
of Luke. Luke was born on April 16, 1993 in
Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and lived in
Pewaukee, Wisconsin before moving to Mt
Olive in 2002. He was a graduate of Mt.
Olive High School in 2011 and he attended
Memorial Event Created To Preserve The Memory of Caring Man, & To Raise Awareness
the University of Illinois.
While at Mt Olive High School he had
been a member of the National Business
Honor Society, Future Business Leaders of
America, Co-Captain of the Varsity
Basketball Team, and played in the Lakeland
League for the Mt Olive Travel Basketball
team as well. Luke coached and played
recreation volleyball as well as basketball.
He was a Sunday School Teacher at Zion
Lutheran and an Eagle Scout. He loved hik-
ing the Appalachian Trail and was a camp
counselor at Camp Wheeler, and worked for
the Mt. Olive Board of Education and Amish
Mike's.
Luke was a die-hard Packer fan, and was
a friend to all and cared tremendously about
his friends, family, and community. He was a
big believer in helping others and giving
back. He died on Sept, 25, 2012.
Donations can be sent to: the Luke
Heeman Memorial Scholarship Trust Fund
c/o PNC Bank, Attn: Almira Halilovic, 3
Naughright Rd., Hackettstown, NJ 07840.
Contact Lori Vega on 973-234-7836,
Jenny Heeman 973-876-2896 or email
mountoliveboystravelbball@gmail.com for
questions, and please support this event in
future years as well.
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 5
By Ejvind Boccolini
G
aining self-confidence, greater ath-
leticism, and learning cognitive and
social skills are all benefits of
becoming involved in gymnastics.
Cheryl Moorman, Director of CS
Gymnastics, of Flanders, is celebrating 30
years of success and knows her students
have been succeeding right along with her.
Moormann said she is pleased with the
longevity of CS Gymnastics, and notes that
she has taught students who, years later,
grown with families of their own choose to
bring their kids to CS Gymnastics for class-
es.
Helping generation after generation of
individuals become involved and skillful in
the sport of gymnastics is an admirable
thing, and Moormann notes that there are
indeed physical benefits as well as non-
physical advantages.
Our goal is to promote all of them, she
said.
In general, physical benefits include
gaining muscle strength, healthy bones, and
flexibility, while non-physical benefits
include healthy brain functions, improved
academic achievements, social skills, and
reduced risky behavior.
Whether you view gymnastics as a com-
petitive sport or as recreational fitness,
Moormann said it has grown to become a
respected industry over the years. CS
Gymnastics is, in fact, an official club mem-
ber of USA Gymnastics, a national govern-
ing body of the sport based in Indianapolis.
On the CS Gymnastics website,
www.csgymnasticsinc.com, it notes that it is
the friendly, fun place of positive begin-
nings. It is dedicated to the total develop-
ment of each gymnast.
Some students work hard to greatly
improve their athletic skills by way of gym-
nastics, and some make it their goal to com-
pete.
Several of Moormanns students have
gone on to compete in college and she said
she is happy that her staff and facility can
provide a great stepping stone for such
students.
She said that as the industry grew over
the years, owners of gymnastics instruction-
al centers sometimes would each take on a
different focus and provide services
accordingly. Some owners will focus on the
success in fitness and life skills instructional
classes offer, others will strive to develop
potential Olympic athletes, and still other
owners will provide services and classes that
fall somewhere in between these scenarios.
Moormann also works hard to make her
courses quite effective and practical. On
their website, there are many courses offered
and each have their specific focus and style,
as well as age and skill level, of course. And
Moormann also takes into account that fam-
ilies may have multiple siblings, hectic
schedules, and that each child may prefer
different activities. One can see there is a
great deal of thought and integrity that goes
into the design and objectives of each of the
classes.
Their brochure easily explains courses
specific to various ages, activity and skill
levels. There are monthly payment plans and
discounts available when several siblings
attend the school, and students can choose to
attend two classes per week as part of an
accelerated learning program.
Karate, Cheer, and Art are also offered at
the school, which has 12 instructors and
about 12,000 square feet of space. There is a
viewing balcony which offers parents and
spectators an exciting and complete view
of the entire gymnastics training area.
When entering the gym area one is taken
with the colorful and clean surroundings
amid the great selection of pre-school to
competitive level equipment. This welcom-
ing environment allows us to host invitation-
al competitions as well as special class per-
formances during the school year. In addi-
tion to offering a thrilling event to view, we
hope to provide an inspiration of dreams for
young athletes to pursue, the website reads.
Moormann said there are perhaps 90
clubs in New Jersey, but only about a dozen
have lasted as long as CS Gymnastics. This
is certainly an excellent track record and
everyone involved at CS Gymnastics should
be very proud of this.
Currently Moormann said she has the
goal of pushing to improve and upgrade to
make our customer service top notch.
Moormann and her husband are continu-
ally looking for areas to serve the families of
their community. CS Gymnastics is known
to offer courses that work with individuals
of all age levels and abilities, and they even
have two instructors that work with special
needs children. These courses have resulted
in positive therapy and a great learning envi-
ronment for kids.
Moormann said she has a passion to see
all students succeed and grow as individuals,
and enjoys seeing when a childs face lights
up after learning something brand new
perhaps a certain gymnastics skill or making
it to the top of the climbing rope.
On Sunday, Sept. 28, from 2 to 5 pm,
there is an open house to celebrate their 30th
anniversary, and many activities being
offered. There will be activities to try from
all their programs including an inflatable
slide, obstacle course, balloons, prizes, and,
of course cake. Phone number for CS
Gymnastics is 973-347-2771.
CS Gymnastics Celebrates 30 Years; Dedicated To Total Development Of Each Gymnast
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by practicing real world skills. Emphasis is
placed on inner beauty, poise and presenta-
tion as well as the importance of gaining
self-confidence and learning new skills
such as public speaking, interview skills,
competing against others and achieving per-
sonal goals.
At the pre-teen age, contestants had to
comply with a no make-up rule to portray
natural and inner beauty.
By participating, "I got to gain more con-
fidence in myself and not pay attention to
how I look," says Molly. "It was more about
personality. I liked the no make-up rule.
You got to show people your real beauty."
Molly found out about the NAM pageant
in the spring of 2014 when she received an
invite in the mail to attend a workshop and
personal interview. From the interview, girls
were selected as state finalists to attend a
training workshop. Molly knew right away
that she wanted to give it a try.
"I wanted this to build my confidence,"
says Molly, who also plays travel soccer. "I
wanted to get more comfortable performing
on stage. I wanted this to be a first step to
my career as a model, actress, dancer or
singer. It was a great opportunity to take. If
you get an opportunity you got to take it."
Besides practicing her hip hop dance
routine and singing in a microphone, Molly
spent months perfecting her posture, proper
model stance, walking inheels, smiling and
interview skills. Contestants were judged 30
percent on formal wear, 30 percent on per-
sonal introduction, 30 percent on personal
interviews and 10 percent on a community
service project. Wearing a beautiful gown
on stage was probably her favorite category.
"When you are walking up there and
smiling and you are in your dress, you feel
so much like a beauty queen," describes
Molly. "It was so much fun and I was up
there with my dad" who had to escort her on
stage.
The most challenging part was the inter-
view, she says.
"It sounds easy to talk to people about
yourself, but it was really hard because you
were timed and you felt rushed and you did-
n't know what they were going to ask you,"
she says.
In the pageant finale, girls wore their for-
mal gowns on stage and were called up to
receive awards. Like a real beauty pageant,
girls were announced from fourth runner up
to first place with all the competitions, and
for the main overall event they were nar-
rowed down from the top 25 to the top five
finalists. Molly was thrilled when her name
was called up in the top 25 and she was
allowed to remain on the stage.
"When I was picked in the top 25, I was
Top In State Pageant...
shocked, very excited and I was thinking
'pick me, pick me.' I really wanted to win
but at that point it didn't matter; I had fun
and I did good in the talent competition. I
would have liked to have been Miss NJ Pre-
teen because I would've loved to represent
the state I was born and raised in. Ever since
I was little I
wanted to be an actress, dancer, model,
singer. Competing in the pageant is my way
of going after my dreams.
"I wanted to show girls you can be con-
fident in yourself and go after your dreams
instead of sitting around and doing noth-
ing," continues Molly. "If they want to do
something when they get older, they have to
work hard for it."
Molly thanks all of her supporters,
whether financially or in spirit by cheering
her on, so she could participate.
"I wouldn't have been able to compete in
the pageant without the support from all of
my family, friends, teachers, dance studio
and even private donations from township
officials," she says.
California here I come? Just maybe.
continued from front page
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 7
Back To School Time!
First day of school for the Rivera kids from Flanders. Jessica enters Kindergarten and her older
brother Tyler is in the 4th grade. They are both excited for their new school year.
Page 8, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
By Cheryl Conway
M
ore kids are smiling in Mt. Olive,
some with ice-cream covered faces,
with a new homemade gourmet ice-
cream shop in Budd Lake.
Das Creamery, at the Village Green
Shopping Center on Route 46 west in Budd
Lake, is the newest place to go for the finest and
freshest selection of super-premium homemade
ice-cream.
Opened since June 16, the shop offers 32 fla-
vors of hard ice-cream, as well as soft vanilla.
Other homemade ice-cream shops may be as
far as Ledgewood or Chester, but with Das
Creamery, local residents can stay closer to
home for a delicious treat.
Weve always been very passionate about
our ice-cream, says Pankaj Das of Washington
Twp., co-owner of Das Creamery along with
his daughter Komal. Weve traveled the dis-
tance to go to a good ice-cream shop to get good
ice-cream.
When Das learned about the vacant 1,300 sq.
ft., former ice-cream shop, Das decided to occu-
py the space to open a fun business with his
daughter.
After dad retired last year, we talked about
ideas of what we could do, says Komal. We
wanted it to be fun once he retired, he didnt
want to just sit around.
After working for 25 years as the Director of
Social Services for a NJ state psychiatric hospi-
Unique Flavors Mixing In New Local Ice-Cream Shop
tal, Pankaj decided to retire in Sept. 2013 to do
something different, he says. Life is too short.
We need to experience it to the fullest as possi-
ble, he says, deciding to share his next venture
as a father/daughter team. His wife, Neeta
Das loves ice-cream too but works as a social
worker; and their son, Janak lives in Indiana and
works as a mechanical engineer.
So we decided to open a gourmet ice-cream
shop to sell good quality ice-cream, to try new
flavors, to create new flavors of ice-cream,
says Komal. We put this thing together in one
year with a lot of research and participation in
technology ice-cream resource courses.
Although she earned her degree in classic
culinary art in 2012 from the French Culinary
Institute in Manhattan, NY, Komal took that
extra step to learn about ice-cream by taking a
Technology Ice-Cream Course at Penn State.
To gain two different schools of thought
on creating ice-cream, Pankaj took his one week
intensive course in Dec. 2013 at the University
of Guelph in Ontario, Canada. I did a lot of
reading when I retired, he says. I read about
ice-cream technology, the factors, how to make
it good and what could go wrong.
Before going into business with her dad,
Komal worked as a chef cooking fine dining
market to table American cuisine for a Michelin
starred restaurant in Manhattan, and then lived
in Atlanta, Ga., to experience different things,
see different cuisines and lifestyles.
She says, We were thinking of a caf to
utilize her culinary experience, but decided that
ice-cream is the happiest business we could be
in together.
Out of the 32 flavors they offer at a time,
only two are not homemade, the Superman fla-
vor and no sugar added flavor. All of their other
flavors are their own creations.
The Pomegranate flavor is so unexpected
as customers expect more of a sherbet or yogurt
texture, but are pleasantly surprised when it
really is ice-cream, says Komal.
The peaches used to make the Peach flavor
are fresh fruit from RH Farms in Budd Lake.
They are planning on creating a new flavor with
basil and lavender, adds Pankaj, with ingredi-
ents also to be purchased from RH farms.
Basil is interesting to me, its a versatile fla-
vor that can be used in all kinds of drinks and
cooking, says Pankaj. Lavender is also unusu-
al and available for only a short time.
We want to work with unusual things and
challenge our guests when they buy ice-cream,
says Pankaj.
Some unusual flavors include Maple Brittle
with Sage; Cinnamon Almond Tipsy Raisin
dipped in rum; Lemon ice-cream with home-
made granola; Village Fig which is giving hom-
age to their location at the Village Green; and
Ghost Chocolate, which is smooth rich choco-
late ice-cream infused with chili.
Everyones palate is different, says Komal,
but with the ghost chocolate flavor, sweet, spicy
and a little bit of smoke at the end is her descrip-
tion. Its unusual and expected but its deli-
cious.
Customers say Wow, what great ice-cream
when they try The Dark Knight Rises flavor,
says Komal. Dark Knight Rises is a black
licorice flavor ice-cream but were always
adding things. The second time they made it,
continued on next page
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 9
they added marshmallow swirls and white-
chocolate curls; and the third recipe consists of
black licorice with chocolate-covered espresso
beans.
They are open to new flavor suggestions.
Sometimes we get our ideas from our cus-
tomers when talking with them, says Pankaj.
All of the ice-cream is super premium with
whole milk, made three to four times per week
on one little machine that Komal calls their
work horse. Its as fresh as can be using all
fresh fruit.
They serve one flavor of sorbet called
Sorberry, which is 100 percent dairy free and
naturally fat free that includes flavors such as
strawberries, blueberries, blackberries and rasp-
berries.
Some other new flavors they hope to try
include Grapefruit with Paragon in Nov. or
Dec.; and Pumpkin, Apple, Chai flavor.
Theres always something new when you
come back, says Komal; Something new to
try.
To accompany the many flavors are top-
pings galore with more than 30 toppings such
as Cinnamon Toast Crunch Cereal, dirty potato
chips, pretzels, chocolate rocks, sprinkles and
candies. Customers can order fresh dipped
sugar and waffle cones dipped in top quality
Belgian chocolate, or cups in four sizes from
kiddie to large, as well as pints, quarts and even
gallons packed fresh on the spot, .
Three day pre-order is required on gallons as
well as ice-cream cakes made by a cake decora-
tor which include super premium chocolate ice-
cream and vanilla ice-cream separated by a
layer of fudge and chocolate crunchies, then
decorated with designs and colors that are fun
and bright. Cakes can also be fully customized
with two flavors per cake, various fillings such
as caramel, candy, almonds or peanuts, in sizes
from seven-inch round, ten inch round and 9x13
half sheet cake.
Flying saucer ice-cream sandwiches; mix-
ins; three specialty sodas such as the Red Eye
Express made with coffee ice-cream and
Espresso Coffee Soda; and milkshakes are also
available.
Our chocolate is so rich and creamy it
makes a fantastic milkshake, says Komal,
adding that there are a minimum of five differ-
ent chocolate flavors offered at any given time.
Products are gluten free and allergy free with
no-nuts to go through the machinery.
Hours are 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. seven days a
week. Call 862-258-3593 for more information.
I like that people come in and they are
excited we are here, says Komal. We have
customers that come in three times a week.
Everyone is happy to be here. We are happy to
be here.
We care about what we are serving, con-
tinues Komal. We want all your ice-cream
dreams realized when you come here. We are
committed to quality and professionalism. We
count on our guests, they are our motivation.
Its all the chocolate-covered faces that
walk out from nose to chin all the way up to
their elbows in chocolate, she laughs.
continued from previous page
Unique Flavors Mixing...
Page 10, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
A
ll Gods Children is a non-denomi-
national Christian church service
designed for all school-aged chil-
dren, with a special welcome for families
dealing with autism, ADHD, Aspergers,
Downs and other developmental disabili-
ties. The eighth year inaugural service kicks
off on September 21st, initiating a series of
twice-monthly worship services at Christ
Church Budd Lake, to be held every first
and third Sunday at 9AM.
Catering to short attention spans, the All
Gods Children service is a lively combina-
tion of music, prayer, Bible stories, move-
ment and communion. The essential mes-
sage of Gods love and joy for all of His
children is presented in a simplified, mean-
ingful way. This service brings together
children with disabilities AND children
without disabilities to learn together, and
from each other, in an atmosphere of under-
standing and acceptance. Following the
half-hour service, parents share refresh-
ments and ideas while the children enjoy
snacks with adult supervision.
This unique service has been profiled in
Christ Church Budd Lake Worship Service for Special Needs Families Begins Eighth Year
several media outlets as a provider of a wel-
coming worship space for families with
exceptionally active and/or vocal children,
who often are diagnosed with Aspergers,
ADD, autism, or a host of other conditions.
Each child participates to the best of their
individual abilities along with their fami-
lies. In addition, several churches across NJ
have instituted their own special needs serv-
ices using this program as their model.
The number of participants continues to
grow, along with a growing sense of the
importance of sharing the Christian faith
with ALL of Gods extraordinary young
people. Come and pray for healing,
strength, progress, and enlightenment as we
share our spiritual journeys!
Christ Church is located at the corner of
Smithtown and Sandshore Road by Budd
Lake in Mount Olive, NJ, just up from
Route 46. For more information please call
the church at 973-347-1866 or email
rbonker@post.harvard.edu or visit
www.ChristChurchBuddLake.org for sam-
ple services and video clips.
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 11
I
t is hard for me to believe
that the summer is over
and another school year is
upon us. With that in mind, I
urge all of you to drive care-
fully. We have many school
aged children in town and
dont want to see any of them
get hurt. We often get com-
plaints regarding speeding
through the residential neigh-
borhoods and have found
most offenders to be resi-
dents in those neighbor-
hoods. Please slow down,
for all of us.
Please look out for the
numerous recreation events
which will be upcoming this
Fall, including the Tour de
Mount Olive and 5 mile fam-
ily bike ride September 28,
2014 and Monster Dash 3K
Run to be held in October to
name a few. I will be partic-
ipating in both and hope to
see you there.
Many people have asked
me about purchasing person-
alized pickets for our fantas-
tic Mt. Playmore
Playground. That can be
accomplished by calling the
recreation department . Also,
for those adults interested in
basketball, the Mount Olive
over 40 basketball league
plays on Monday and
Thursday nights. Contwct
recreation for more informa-
tion.
Our Adopt a Spot pro-
gram has grown into other
towns like Chester Boro
which have copied our idea.
The Givaudan Trails are
expanding with phase 2 &3
this coming year. We have
moved forward with our
Single Stream Recycling
Program. Keeping Mount
Olive Township a cleaner
and Eco friendly community.
The 911 Mount Olive
Memorial has been complet-
ed so that we have a place to
reflect and honor those who
have given and continue to
give of themselves. Our
Police Department hosted a
Corn Hole at Vasa Park to
fundraise for the Unity Tour.
I would like to recognize
the Mount Olive U14
Baseball Team and U12
Softball Team for their amaz-
ing achievements, both of
which had amazing runs in
the Babe Ruth World Series..
We continue to have our
Farmers Market at Town
Hall on Saturdays from 9-1
.Visit our many vendors and
local farmers for fresh fruits,
vegetables and much more.
The dedication and wet
down of the new Budd Lake
Fire aerial ladder 58 and
refurbished engine 53 was
held on Saturday September
6, 2014 at the Trade Zone
North.
We will continue to offer
many family events that pro-
mote community pride as
well as showcase our local
businesses.
Rob Greenbaum
Mayor,
Mt. Olive Twp.
From the Mayors Desk
Page 12, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
Local Expert Shows NJ Parents
How To Get The Most Money For
Their Childrens College Education
N
ew Jersey parents suffering with
finding ways to pay for their chil-
drens college education can final-
ly get the solutions to their college funding
problems.
Most families who earn $75,000 or more
and own a home assume they are not eligi-
ble for financial aid. However, most fami-
lies with income over $100,000 are actual-
ly eligible for some types of need based
financial aid. They simply need to know
how to get their fair share.
According to Newell, there are several
easy things parents can do to substantially
increase the amount of money they get
from colleges. For example, There are
several schools that historically give better
financial aid packages than others, says
Newell. If families do proper income and
asset planning before filling out the forms,
they can increase eligibility by thousands of
dollars.
Newell offers a few simple tips to par-
ents with college funding problems. If a
parent has only half an hour to end their
college funding problems, I would suggest
the following:
1. Make sure they do not over-value
their home on the financial aid forms
2. Try not to save money in the childs
name as it weighs more heavily than the
parents savings
3. Dont be afraid to negotiate with a
college for a better financial aid package.
Newell offers New Jersey parents with
college funding problems a free booklet
that explains the 9 most common college
funding problems and solutions. Free
copies will be distributed at the seminar
listed below.
Mr. Newell will be conducting a free
one-hour seminar for parents of college
bound high school juniors and seniors at the
following location: The Mt. Olive Public
Library on Thursday, October 23, 2014 at
7:00 p.m.
Reservation only! Seating is limited.
Reserve your seat today by calling toll free
1-800-928-8464.
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 13
Gelsamina Malanga
Gelsa
Broker/Sales Associate
Office: 908-879-4900 Ext. 150
Cell/Text: 908-217-7131
www.gelsa.com
Coldwell Banker
191 Main Street, Chester, NJ 07930
I am a Full Service Seller/Buyer Agent with 28 years of experience
Go to www.gelsa.com for Listing Information and Lots of Photos of this Home!
Want to See what your Home is Worth in Todays Market?
Go to www.gelsa.com and Click on Market Snapshot
VALUE PRICE IN BROOK HOLLOW
HACKETTSTOWN $339,900
Visit and Like my Facebook Real Estate Page for Timely Real Estate Information:
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Well Maintained, Updated Home includes
Granite Kitchen with Stainless Steel Appli-
ances, Updated Baths and Recently In-
stalled Furnace, A/C and Hot Water Heater.
Formal Living Room and Dining Room. Fam-
ily Room with Fireplace. Fabulous 2-tier
Deck with Pool and Hot Tub. Full, Finished
Basement with Media/Rec Room and Office.
Lots of Storage Space. Nicely Landscaped
Property.
15 Rolling Rapids Court
WHETHER BUYING or SELLING
NOW IS THE TIME!
Interest Rates are Low....Great Time to Buy!!
GreenChill Award For Weis
in Flanders
Weis Supermarkets of Flanders was awarded the GreenChill Award from the
Environmental Protection Agency for using green refrigertaion technology.
Pictured are (left to right) Tai Truong, Pharmacist; Manny Brito, District Manager; Dave
Dellecker, Store Manager; Gary Rogers Refrigeration Service, Manager and Chad Cramer,
Store Service Supervisor along with Weis employees.
Page 14, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
By Cheryl Conway
T
here is a new bagel place in town and
its so much more than fabulous
bagels.
Mt. Olive Bagels on Route 46 East in the
Paramount Plaza in Budd Lake, recently
opened up its doors offering customers not
only an assortment of bagels but a wide vari-
ety breakfast/lunch menu. Whether eat in or
take out, customers can enjoy breakfast sand-
wiches or platters, pancakes, French toast, a
variety of cheese spreads, homemade soups,
appetizers, salads, deli or hot sandwiches,
Paninis, cheesesteaks, burgers, wraps,
smoothies, a bakery and even catering.
As a Mt. Olive resident for 25 years, the
owner wanted to own a restaurant in town and
knew the vacant store would be an ideal loca-
tion for a fantastic bagel shop.
I really like the bagel business, says
John Kalavriziotis, of Flanders, owner of Mt.
Olive Bagels. An experienced restaurant
owner, Kalavriziotis has owned Piscataway
Pizza for the past five years and formerly
owned New Orleans Restaurant in North
Branch for 16 years before selling it five
years ago.
This was a great location, he says. I
always traveled far, to the other restaurant in
Piscataway. I wanted a store in town.
At Mt. Olive Bagels, customers can
choose from 12 to 15 varieties of bagels at
any given time, with one specialty every day
like the French toast bagel. The bagels are
hand-rolled and kettle-boiled, fantastic,
excellent, large, soft, hot and fresh, served
with various homemade cream cheese
spreads, or salads such as whitefish, chicken,
tuna or egg.
For breakfast, customers can start their
day with farm fresh egg omelettes, egg plat-
ters, breakfast sandwiches, pancakes and
even French toast, home fries, bacon, sausage
and even Taylor ham.
Some bakery items include muffins, crois-
sants, crumb cakes and pastries.
For lunch, there are bagels of course, or
seven different salads such as garden, chef,
Caesar, grilled Portobello or Mandarin
Grilled Chicken which includes spring mix,
grilled chicken, dried cranberries, almonds,
mandarin oranges with orange citrus vinai-
grette dressing.
The sandwich menu offers a great variety
of Boars Head Premium Deli choices such as
turkey, roast beef, pastrami and corned beef
on different breads with optional toppings; as
well as salad sandwiches; sloppy Joes; five
different Paninis such as the Tuscany with
ham, salami, roasted peppers, provolone and
pesto mayo; and hot specialty sandwiches
such as Grilled Chicken or Veggie Focaccia,
or Bacon Chicken Ranch Ciabatta, Grilled
Ruben, Eggplant Parm Sub; and even beef or
chicken gyros.
Lunch menu items continue and include a
variety of burgers, wraps, cheesesteaks and
triple decker club sandwiches.
More Than Just Bagels At Mt. Olive Bagels
Homemade soups are offered along with
appetizers such as buffalo wings, chicken ten-
ders and mozzarella sticks.
For parties or occasions, Mt. Olive Bagels
offers a catering menu for breakfast, salads,
sandwich platters and giant foot heroes.
For beverages, hot drinks such as coffee
and tea are sold, along with a wide variety of
cold drinks and homemade low-fat vanilla
yogurt fruit smoothies such as strawberry
banana, chocolate banana oreo, peach para-
dise or create-your-own.
The shop is open for breakfast and lunch
seven days a week: Mon.-Fri., from 5 a.m. to
4 p.m.; Sat., 6 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sun., 6 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
Kalavriziotis earned his skills and experi-
ence as a hands-on-operator by working in
the restaurant business since graduating high
school. He worked at his brother-in-laws
restaurant, The Travelers Diner in Dover,
from 1984-1992 in all areas from bus-boy to
chef.
His vision with Mt. Olive Bagels since
opening its doors June 11 is to provide a
great place for bagels, with great food,
great service, dining experience, great bagels,
great things.
For free delivery for orders more than $15
or more information, call862-254-2100; or go
to mtolivebagels.com.
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 15
Page 16, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
I
n an effort to help bring Trenton a little
bit closer to the Mount Olive area, the
Mount Olive Chamber of Commerce
will be hosting its annual Legislative
Leadership Summit on Tuesday evening
Sept. 23.
The dinner event, which is open all busi-
ness people in the Mount Olive region,
takes place from 6-9 p.m. at the Holiday
Inn of Budd Lake (in the International Trade
Center).
A host of representatives from the 24th
and 23rd Districts are expected to attend.
Among those confirmed thus far are NJ
State Senator Steve Oroho, State
Assemblywoman Allison McHose, and
State Assemblymen John DiMaio and
Parker Space. Various other area officials,
including Morris County Sheriff Ed
Rochford, Morris County Freeholder
Director Tom Masterangelo, Mount Olive
Township Mayor Rob Greenbaum, and
Betty Schultheis, representing the Warren
County Economic Development Advisory
Mount Olive Area Chamber Hosts Legislative Leadership Summit Sept. 23
Counsel, are also confirmed.
The focus of the Summit is not political;
rather it is an opportunity for legislators
statewide and locally, to offer their insight
into the current business climate and to
highlight programs of interest to business
people. There will also be time for questions
from the audience.
Cost is $40 for prepay and $50 at the
door. To register or for further information
about the chamber and other events, visit
http://mountolivechambernj.com/.
Meanwhile, Marketing in the Morning, a
complimentary benefit to members of the
Chamber, in association with the
Hackettstown Business Improvement
District, takes place the 3rd Wednesday
morning of every month from 7:15 to 9 a.m.
The Chamber also provides a monthly pro-
gram for the area Young Professionals to
meet and network which meets the 2nd
Thursday each month at a variety of loca-
tions. You can register for these programs
at MEET UP (http://www.meetup.com/
Marketing-in-the-Morning-Mt-Olive-Area.
S
t Judes Parish Center, 40 Maxim
Drive, Hopatcong, is hosting a
Christmas Craft Fair on Saturday,
November 15, 2014 from 9:00am to
4:00pm.
Vendors wanted $25 per table 3 Tables
for $70.
Something for everyone.
For Information CALL JIMMY 973-
945-7522
Free coffee for venders until 9:00am.
Early set up allowed.
Christmas Craft Fair
Secretay Needed
Busy phones, scheduling appointments, and typing.
Able to work independently and multi task. Send
resume to: HR, P.O. Box 6244, Parsippany, NJ 07054
or fax to (973) 442-2705 after 6 pm.
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 17
M
ount Olive Public Library has many fun and free
programs for children planned for September.
Preschool Play, Mother Goose, Storytime, & Library Fun
begin the week of September 14th
& end the week of October 5th. Dates and times are sub-
ject to change as needed.
Preschool Play: 2 through 6 years old
Tuesdays @ 10:00am. No registration required
Mother Goose: Infants 6-23 months
Tuesdays @ 11:15am. No registration required
Storytime: 2 through 6 years old
Wednesdays @ 10:00am. No registration required
Library Fun: 2 through 6 years old
Thursdays @ 10:00am
No registration required
Rubber Band Loom: Bring your loom & share your
designs with your friends! Grades K-5th
Tuesday, September 16th @ 7:00pm. No registration
required
Puzzle Mania: Heres your challenge - Can we finish a
puzzle in a week-end? All ages
Saturday, September 27th & Sunday, September 28th
(During Library Hours)
No registration required
FallFest: Save the Date!
Saturday, October 11th - 11:00am to 3:00pm
Raindate: Sunday, October 12th - 11:00am to 3:00pm
For further information call the Youth Services Department
at 973-691-8686.
Mount Olive Public Library
Upcoming Programs
C
hrist Church Budd Lake will be hosting a multi-fam-
ily yard sale and bake sale on Saturday, September
13th from9-4PM at 369 Sandshore Road in Mount
Olive. All of the proceeds from the sale will benefit chil-
dren in need. Tables are available for $20. For more infor-
mation call Paula Ackley at 973-347-5457. The Church is
located at the corner of Sandshore and Smithtown Roads.
The Yard Sale will be held rain or shine.
Christ Church Budd Lake
to Host Seventh Annual
Multi-Family Yard Sale
Next Issue Date October 21, 2014
Deadline October 8
Call Joe for info. 973-809-4784
amount.
In paperback only, and
210 pages, Conversations: A
Collection of Short Stories,
is currently available
through pre-orders or a
donation. Pre-orders for a
draft is $10; eBooks early
draft is $15; book pre-orders
are $40; and $100 for all
drafts, pre-orders, extra
copies and newsletter.
All monies go toward
publication costs. Once pub-
lished, Inshares gets 30 per-
cent of the royalties, and
authors get 70 percent,
which is more than what
most traditional publishers
give, she says.
For more information on
Conversations: A Collection
of Short Stories go to:
https://www.inkshares.com/
projects/conversations-a-
collection-of-short-stories ;
or visit Veronas website at
Emilyruthverona.com.
Page 18, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
By Cheryl Conway
W
ith a passion for
reading and writ-
ing just oozing
out of her, Emily Ruth
Verona of Budd Lake
recently completed her col-
lection of short stories and is
now seeking funds to get
published.
The young aspiring
author wrote through a pub-
lishing platform called
Inshares, which allows writ-
ers to raise funds for a book
project and if their goal is
achieved, the publisher
agrees to edit, design, pub-
lish and distribute the work
to local and national book-
stores. If Verona raises
enough money, she hopes
that her collection hits the
shelves early 2015.
Verona, 24, a 2008 Mt.
Olive High School graduate,
wrote six fictional short sto-
ries for adults called:
Conversations: A Collection
of Short Stories. Finishing
her stories in early August,
Verona began her project as
early as 2011, as some ideas
came from her senior thesis
required for her BA degree
in Creative Writing and
Cinema Studies that she
earned in 2012 from State
University of New York in
Purchase.
I love the idea of creat-
ing a story with compelling
rich characters and explor-
ing the ways people interact
with one another, says
Verona, a freelance enter-
tainment writer for EnStars
News, a global news enter-
tainment publication. I love
writing and I enjoy sharing
it with people.
Verona says her love for
writing began for as long as
I can remember. She
remembers when she was
eight years old, she would
go to the Barnes & Noble in
Ledgewood and read every-
thing until she ran out of sto-
ries.
I went through the
Childrens Classic
Collection; I loved to read
but I was so particular, she
says. I realized if they are
not here, Ill create them.
A Little Princess was her
first and favorite chapter
book, she says,. Its still my
favorite. I think thats how I
fell in love with books, also
the fact that her mother
always used to read to her.
I love horror stories and
when people find out I love
the Little Princess, they
laugh at me, admits
Verona, who hopes to some-
day write and publish nov-
els. She has one currently
being reviewed by an agent
that she describes as a con-
temporary literary novel
with a dark edge.
Although her favorite
genre has been historical,
Verona switched to writing
more contemporary fiction
pieces. She has been
inspired by author Jane
Austen and the movie, Fight
Club.
I have a strange fascina-
tion with classic literature
and contemporary gritty
film, says Verona.
Other than her short sto-
ries collection, she has two
works being published:
Care, which is a short
story being published in a
fiction journal called The
Pinch; and Forgotten
Things, a story being pub-
lished in a theology in 2015,
a finalist in the 2014 Jane
Austen Short Story Award.
In her current collection
of six short stories, Verona
structures her fiction based
on movies that she has
admired. She uses one set-
ting and a handful of charac-
ters with conversation that
serves as the action and
drives the stories, she
explains.
They are all stand-alone
stories, 25 pages each, but
carry the same theme or
story telling through conver-
sation.
Her favorite is her short
story Try- which is a
about a reporter in
Philadelphia who returns to
his suburban town after his
best friend is involved in a
fatal robbery.
Interviews become per-
sonal. He goes there to
interview the sister of his
childhood best friend who
committed the crime. They
have all this history together
and you start to wonder why
hes there in the first place.
Verona spent an average
of about two weeks per
story, followed by about six
weeks for each story to edit.
She says her best time for
writing is from 8 p.m. to 2
a.m.
I was always a morning
writer but somewhere along
the lines I became an
evening writer, she says.
Through her knowledge
and research, Verona learned
how difficult and expensive
it is to sell fiction collec-
tions.
I knew I didnt want to
self- publish, says Verona.
Short fiction is a small
market. As a result, she
decided to raise funds
based on reader approved
content.
Through Inshares,
Verona created a targeted
goal to gain interest on her
collection of stories through
fundraising on the website.
She set a 98 day limit to
raise $7,590 set by Inshares
to publish her work. All pro-
ceeds go toward publishing
her collection.
By getting others to
donate or pre-order, Verona
can raise enough money for
Inshares to move forward in
the publication process.
After you raise the
money they do take you on,
Verona says about the pub-
lishing company. They do
the design, they do the edit-
ing.
I checked out the web-
site and became really inter-
ested in it, says Verona.
They have to approve the
project. You send in a pro-
posal and then they have to
approve it before you put it
on their website. All dona-
tions and pre-orders are
made through the website.
If I dont meet that goal,
all that money is refunded,
says Verona.
Verona had 11 supporters
in just one week, reaching
eight percent. She has until
Nov. 26 to raise the required
Aspiring Local Writer Seeks Funds For Publication
Emily Ruth Verona
2
014 Holiday Shopping Bazaar will be
held on November 1st, 2014 from
9:00am 3:00pm, Set-up:7:30am (no
earlier) at the Budd Lake Fire House, 378
Route 46,Budd Lake, NJ 07828.
Fee: Each Space: $35.00. Each Electrical
and Wall Space: $40.00. (Registration fees
are non-refundable)
Space Size: Approximately 6 ft x 10 ft
includes 3 ft x 8 ft table w/2 chairs (If you do
not need table please indicate on application)
Contact: Lisa Kennedy 973-229-9112 or
e-mail at Lisa.Kennedy@buddlakefire.org
with any questions regarding this
event. (NO Flea Market/Garage Sales
Vendors for this show)
Registration: Complete the enclosed form
and mail back with the
fee. Make all checks payable to
LABLFD.
Mail To: LABLFD HSB, Budd Lake,
NJ 07828. NOTE: Electrical and wall spaces
are limited. This space will be provided on a
first come, first served basis. All registration
forms must be received no later than October
20, 2014.
Check us out on Facebook: Budd Lake
Fire Dept Ladies Auxiliary
Vendors Needed
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 19
Bagels Muffins Pastries Sandwiches
Grillers Wraps Pitas
FULL BOARS HEAD DELI
Catering Available! FREE Delivery $15 Min.
14 Bagels
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Page 20, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
By Cheryl Conway
F
or the past year, members of the St.
Jude Rosary Altar Society at the St.
Jude Thaddeus RC Church in Budd
Lake have been performing random acts of
kindness to mark its 50th anniversary.
Ironic how their kind gestures are a
reflection on how the Rosarians have sup-
ported its church and community for the
past half century. Hundred members strong,
including 50 who are still active, the women
plan to celebrate its 50 years since the
Rosary was founded next month with a spe-
cial mass at the church and dinner.
The Mass is scheduled for Sun., Oct. 26,
at noon, at the St. Jude Thaddeus RC
Church; followed by dinner at 2 p.m. at La
Strada in Randolph. Rosarians, past and
present, plan to attend.
All of the women are very excited,
says Melvilin Mel Kaufhold of Randolph,
current president of the St. Jude Rosary
Altar Society. We have one charter mem-
ber thats still involved (AnnaMarie
Andershonis), and quite a few that have
been Rosarians for 20 or 25 years; very
faithful Rosarians.
The St. Jude Rosary Altar Society of St.
Jude was formed Oct. 26, 1964. At that
time, St. Jude was a mission church or satel-
lite church of St. Michaels. It was more of
a summer weekend church, says Kaufhold,
as Father John Hewettson of St. Michaels
Church would come lead St. Judes on the
weekends.
It was Hewettson who approached the
ladies of St. Judes 50 years ago and sug-
gested that they form a rosary to help sup-
port the church. The St. Judes Rosary Altar
Society started out with six charter mem-
bers and its primary purpose is to praise
and honor the Blessed Mother and support
the parish and the community, says
Kaufhold, an active Rosarian for the past
eight years.
The six charter members were
AnnaMarie Andershonis; Eleanor Baker,
vice president; Helen Brodie, secretary; Ida
Flanagan; Ethel Kuzma, president; and
Elizabeth Puco, treasurer.
Over the years, the Rosarians have sup-
ported the church through fundraisers to
purchase needed items like necessities for
the altar or painting St. Jude Church, which
ultimately became a Parish in June 1967
with its first Pastor, Father Leo P Carey.
Father came to us and said he needed to
paint the church so we gave him money,
says Kaufhold. With help from the
Rosarians, the church was painted in spring
Rosary Society Celebrates Fifty Years of Church Support
2013, she says. We help maintain the
church like wash the curtains so it looks
nice.
The Rosarains also help to support its
church members like cooking meals when a
family member faces tragedy or a death, or
provide transportation to a doctor, appoint-
ments and even the grocery store for elder
members or families in need.
Some of the ways the Rosarians have
helped its parish and community have
included maintenance of the altar, its cloth
and vestments; held a baby shower for resi-
dents of Birth Haven in Newton; washed
and rehung the curtains in the Parish Center;
hosted farewell receptions as well as instal-
lation receptions; supported the Youth
Group's Habitat for Humanity Blitz Build
weekend with baked goodies; supported the
continued on next page
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Parish's First Annual Landscaping clean-up by being part of
the work crew and baking goodies; created a giving tree of
gift cards that totaled $1000, to be passed out by the Father
at the Rectory to those in need over the holidays; and
assisted Youth Group in their events with baked goods.
Members are currently part of the Tricky Tray commit-
tee and volunteer for baking and working at the Tricky Tray
in October. Some Rosarians also teach CCD, sing in the
choirs, and are part of the Wednesday Night Prayer Group.
In other words, wherever there is a need you will see
one or more Rosarians helping out, says Kaufhold.
The generosity and support provided by the Rosarians
over the years have been greatly appreciated.
Father Antonio Gaviria, current Pastor of St. Jude
Church, says The St. Jude Rosary Altar Society is a vital
and valuable parish organization. From my point of view
the Rosary Altar Society is a sign of hope to all
Parishioners. When I see the Rosary Altar Society mem-
bers they always seem so happy and excited to work togeth-
er to help the parish and all parishioners.
I would personally like to recognize Mel Kaufholds
tremendous leadership as President of this much appreciat-
ed organization, says Gaviria. As the Pastor, I am so
happy with the Rosary Altar Society members because they
support me and the Parish in many ways here at St. Jude.
May God bless all the members of the St Jude Rosary Altar
Society as they celebrate their 50th Anniversary.
To become a member of the Rosary Altar Society,
women must be atleast 18 years old and members of the
parish. Annual dues are collected to support the society and
its expenses.
To kick off their milestone anniversary, the Rosarians
attended a day retreat last October at the Blue Army Shrine
in Washington. They plan to return Oct. 4 this year.
It was such an enjoyable day that many Rosarians sug-
gested that we repeat the day again this October as we begin
the month of the 50th Anniversary of the Rosary Altar
Society, says Kaufhold. The idea of the retreat is to spend
some time thinking about Mary, the Rosary, attending
Mass, praying and working on the growth and development
of our own personal relationship with Mary in a beautiful,
peaceful and spiritual location.
The women also took it upon themselves to complete 50
random acts of kindness from Oct. 2013 to Oct. 2014.
Its been very fun, says Kaulfhold. Some people have
been very innovative.
It was agreed There would be no tracking each
Rosarian would be her own accountant, says Kaufhold.
Kindness Acts could be written on a paper and put in the
gift box to be presented to Mary at the 50th anniversary
Mass.
Some of the acts of kindness included: Doing something
kind for someone; Picking up something that was dropped;
holding the door for someone; offering to help carry pack-
ages; letting someone cut in front of them at the checkout
line; buying a cup of coffee for a homeless person; giving a
bottle of water to a construction worker or a postman on a
really hot day; cleaning out a closet and dropping the
clothes in the Catholic Charities container; buying a case of
water or a package of t-shirts to be distributed by Operation
Chill Out to homeless Veterans.
To support its society, the Rosarians hold annual
fundraisers. To support the parish, they help out as individ-
uals, members of the church as well as Rosarians such as
the upcoming St. Jude Parish Tricky Tray to benefit the
needs of the parish. The tricky tray is set for Sat., Oct. 11,
at the Budd Lake Firehouse. Doors will open at 6 p.m. and
drawings will begin at 7:30 p.m.
A Rosarian Fundraiser, the Annual Holiday Pie Sale, for
Thanksgiving is set to run from Nov. 1 through Nov. 17.
Orders can be placed with the Rosarians after all Masses on
Nov. 1 and 2, Nov. 8 and 9, and Nov. 15 and 16. The pies
will be from Adams Restaurant and Bakery in Budd Lake.
The 10 inch, restaurant quality, frozen pies can be picked up
at Adams Restaurant and Bakery Nov. 22 from 2 p.m.-4
p.m. Choices include: Apple, Dutch Apple, Cherry, Pecan,
Coconut Custard and Pumpkin.
In March, the ladies schedule its annual Irish Soda Bread
Sale.
Looking forward, Kaufhold says we want to continue to
support the Rosarians, the community and the parish. It is
our hope we will not only get closer to Mary, but help the
parish as a group. Its a very faithful group. Weve done a
lot of good things for the church.
For more information on news and upcoming events, go
to www.StJudeParish.org.
Rosary Society Celebrates...
continued from previous page
Page 22, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
By Cheryl Conway
Playing on their field of dreams became a
reality for 13 Mt. Olive teenage boys this
summer when they competed in the 2014
Babe Ruth World Series.
The Marauders 14U Baseball Team is the
first team on record in Mt. Olive to qualify
for the top stage for baseball. The games
were played at the Ocala Rotary Sportsplex
in Ocala, Fl., from Aug. 13 to Aug. 23.
The 14-year olds, most who have been play-
ing baseball together since they were eight,
played a total of six games at the World
Series tournament before losing 6-2 in the
semi-finals against the host team of Ocala.
Win or lose, the accomplishment and expe-
rience was great.
It was a ride of a lifetime, says Michael
Mancini, manager of the 14-U Mt. Olive
Baseball team and vice president of the Mt.
Olive Baseball and Softball Association, to
not only watch your kid play at this caliber
but to coach these boys. It was a once in
lifetime opportunity. There were thousands
and thousands of 14 year olds that would
die to have this opportunity to play in the
greatest event possible for baseball.
A dream as a coach to see his team do so
well and know that all the hard work was
worth it, Mancini writes to players parents
and team supporters. A dream as a father
and as a parent, to see your child reach a
pinnacle in their young lives that was never
truly in sight. As a group, as parents, and as
a team, the tears of joy have been plentiful
and everyone is truly blessed to have the
opportunity, never mind seize these amaz-
ing moments.
The Mt. Olive baseball team was one of ten
regional champions throughout the United
States competing for the World
Championship at the 14-U level. In order to
qualify, a team had to become regional
champions. Mt. Olive 14-U boys earned its
regional championship title for the Mid-
Atlantic Region on Aug. 8, by vying against
ten other teams in their region and then
beating number one seed Williamsport 10-5
at the regional finals in Williamsport, Pa.
Not only was the MO 14-U team the first to
compete at the World Series, but it was the
first team for MOBSA to ever win a state
title and compete at regionals, according to
Mancini. In order to qualify for regionals, a
team has to win states. MO 14-U boys won
states on July 26 beating Long Valley 2-1 at
Russ Nagle Field in Flanders.
We were tired of being Cinderella making
it to the dance and never getting through,
says Mancini. As district champions in
2008, 2009 and 2010, Mancinis team lost
in the states those years. This season they
were motivated and on a mission.
We set one goal to try to win the state
championship, says Mancini. Everything
was geared to winning a state champi-
onship. Weve been so close for so long; it
was time to get over that hump and give
them something to shoot for.
Mancini had t-shirts made up for every
player to wear under their jersey for every
game. The shirts read one team, one goal,
one mission. It was just a reminder that we
had only one mission this year and that was
to win a state championship.
At the World Series, MO played six games
in the National Division until losing in the
semi-finals against Ocala, the same team
they played earlier during one of their four
playoff games beating them 4 to 1. During
MO Baseball Team Wins Race As First Team to Vie In World Series
the semifinal game the score was 2 to 2 in
the sixth inning, but Ocala scored four runs
after that, describes Mancini.
They were very resilient; they never gave
up, Mancini says about his 35-5 winning
season.
In hopes that his players will come back
next year, even though most may be going
out for the Mt. Olive High School baseball
team as freshmen, Mancinis goal is to try
to defend our regional title and go back to
the series next year.
This season, they had a lot of heart; it was
within, says Mancini. They didnt want to
lose. They knew there was a goal; they were
more mature; they found a way to win. The
desire was greater. Their fire was greater.
They were tired of losing, being the
Cinderella and coming so close. They
wouldnt accept that anymore.
T
oday, Sams Club will award 20
teachers from [Sand Shore
Elementary] with $50 reward cards
to purchase classroom supplies that will
help students start the school year off right
as part of the companys Teacher Rewards
program. For the fifth year, Walmart will
donate up to $4.5 million to provide 90,000
teachers across the United States with
reward cards to help offset the cost of class-
room expenses at the beginning of the
school year. These funds come at a critical
time, as many teachers will spend an esti-
mated $500 of their own money to ensure
their students have the supplies they need to
learn throughout the school year.
[Nicole Musarro; Principal Sand Shore
Elementary]
More than 4,600 U.S. Walmartstores,
Distribution Centers and Sams Club loca-
tions are eligible to select one local public
school, grades K-8, and provide reward
cards to 20 teachers from each selected
school. Winning teachers can use the funds
to purchase essential items for their class-
rooms such as paper, folders, binders, pen-
cils, crayons and markers.
We are proud to honor our communitys
teachers, who give time and often their own
money to ensure our students have every-
thing they need to be successful throughout
the school year, [Cheryl Kane]. At Sams
Club, we are dedicated to supporting our
nations teachers by providing the support
and resources needed to continue educating
the future leaders of our community.
The Teacher Rewards program is an
extension of Walmarts ongoing support of
local education initiatives that help students
better prepare for their future. In 2012,
Walmart and its Foundation donated more
than $59 million to fund education pro-
grams across the country.
Local Teachers Benefit from
Walmart Teacher Rewards Program
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By Ejvind Boccolini
T
he Vets Summer Fest 2014 had a
great turnout said producer Sandy
Mitchell in a recent phone interview,
and the military dedication ceremony was
an emotionally powerful moment, as atten-
dees honored veterans at the Aug. 9 event
held at Vasa Park in Budd Lake.
Mitchell said about 1,000 people attend-
ed the event throughout the day, and added
that she thanks everyone who participat-
ed.
This included Picatinny Arsenal, Senator
Steve Oroho, the Knights of Columbus,
vendors, sponsors, Eastern Propane, Harley
Davidson, the musical groups, and more.
Ray Chimileski, Operation Chillout,
Executive Director, said This is Operation
Chillout's (OCOs) 4th annual fundraiser for
our homeless veteran outreach. Proceeds
from the event will enable us to provide
new season-appropriate clothing, emer-
gency temporary shelter assistance, summer
supplies and survival gear. A special fund
has also been set up to acquire an all-terrain
Rapid Response Vehicle to reach homeless
vets in all locations in all weather condi-
tions.
Those who purchased a ticket to the
event helped to support the survival of our
homeless vets.
Operation Chillout website notes that
there are up to 7,500 Homeless Veterans liv-
ing on the streets of New Jersey. Many face
acute Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and
chronic illnesses of body, mind and spirit.
Operation Chillout is counting on help from
the public to enable them to move forward
with their year-round outreach work.
In the winter, Operation Chillout pre-
pares a backpack for a veteranman or
woman filled with NEW warm clothing,
toiletries, survival gear, sleeping bags and
information about local resources; delivered
free of charge at locations where homeless
people gatherlike food pantries, soup
kitchens, temporary shelters, abandoned
buildings, parks and alleyways.
In the hot summer, we collect and deliv-
er cases of bottled water, T-shirts and base-
ball caps. Operation Chillout's Rapid
Response Outreach Team is active 24/7-
365 days a year providing emergency serv-
ices to our homeless veterans.
This years event featured many great
regional bands, good food, cold beer, mer-
chandise vendors, a vintage car and motor-
cycle show, military displays and great fam-
ily fun. Gates opened at 10:30, and atten-
dees brought blankets and in certain cases, a
small chair to relax and enjoy the festivities.
Children had access to a play ground,
games and other fun activites.
Please send additional donations to Spirit
of the Arts, 55 Bank Street, Sussex, NJ
07461. You can call Sandy at 973-875-2068
or email her at sandy@mitchellclan.com.
Operation Chillout notes that We are
vets serving vets and they provide a Rapid
Response Outreach Team; Emergency
Transportation for Medical Care; Winter &
Summer Survival Gear; Advocacy &
Referral; and Monthly Home Cooked Meals
for PTSD Unit at Lyons, NJ VA hospital.
Mitchell called the Vets Day event a
major fundraiser for Operation Chillout that
people really enjoyed.
She said, for instance, that homeless vets
need help to empower themselves and inte-
grate back into society. Without attention,
before you know it they become amongst
the forgotten.
To provide permanent housing for the
homeless vets, for instance, it takes money
to do that, said Mitchell.
Thats all part of what they (Operation
Chillout) do, she added.
Their website is http://operationchill-
out.org/.
Vets Summer Fest Helping Operation Chillout Provide For Vets In Need
Page 24, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
By Elsie Walker
N
ormally, getting doused with a bucket of ice water
doesnt sound like something anyone would wel-
come, much less volunteer to do. However, the lat-
ter is just what Mt. Olive Township Council Vice President
Joe Nicastro did. He took the ALS ice bucket challenge.
Nicastro and Rev. Rick Oppelt, of Flanders United
Presbyterian Church, are just two area people who have
stepped up to be drenched.
The idea of the challenge is to have a person get him-
self/herself videotaped pouring ice water over himself/her-
self, or having a bucket of ice water poured over his/her
head. Either the person takes the challenge or makes a
donation to the ALS association (or both). Also by posting
the video on social media, like Facebook, the person taking
the challenge brings about awareness of ALS and encour-
ages other to donate to the cause.
What is ALS? According the ALS Association,
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), often referred to as
Lou Gehrig's Disease, is a progressive neurodegenerative
disease that affects nerve cells in the brain and the spinal
cord. Motor neurons reach from the brain to the spinal cord
and from the spinal cord to the muscles throughout the
body. The progressive degeneration of the motor neurons in
ALS eventually leads to their death. When the motor neu-
rons die, the ability of the brain to initiate and control mus-
cle movement is lost. With voluntary muscle action pro-
gressively affected, patients in the later stages of the disease
may become totally paralyzed.
The ice bucket challenge was started in July by some
ALS patients and the challenge is spreading worldwide.
In his case, Nicastro decided to take beat others to the
punch and take the challenge in his backyard before being
asked.
I took the challenge and made a donation as I think it
was important, not only to raise awareness, but also make a
donation to help in the fight, he said.
Once hed done it, he was in the challenging seat.
I challenged fellow Council people from Mt Olive,
John Ferrante, Alex Roman and Ray Perkins [to do it],
Nicastro shared.
While many taking the challenge may have not been
touched by ALS, for some, the challenge and the awareness
that it brings strike a personal cord.
Oppelt was challenged by his sister-in-law, Nicolette.
I lost my dad to ALS back in 2001 and since then have
been aware of what a devastating illness ALS is for individ-
uals and their families. We were fortunate my dad did not
linger long with the illness; I have known several who con-
tracted ALS in their younger years who suffered horribly
for a long time. I have been amazed at how this thing [Ice
bucket challenge] has taken off and the amount of money
that has been raised in the past several months, Oppelt
shared.
Oppelt noted that one of the highlights of his summer
was watching someone else take the challenge. Following
his annual summer talent show, NJ 101.5 radio personality
Big Joe Henry took the challenge at Jenkinson's at Point
Pleasant Beach,
ALS is also known as Lou Gehrigs disease because the
Getting Doused with Ice for a Good Cause
famed baseball player was the first well- known figure to
have it. Coincidently, this year is the 75th anniversary of
Gehrig announcing that he was leaving baseball because of
ALS. What a fitting year to start the challenge.
For more information on ALS or to donate to the ALS
Association, visit http://alsa.pub30.convio.net
Joe Nicastro
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 25
Womens Wash,
Cut & Style
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One coupon per customer.
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with any other offer.
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offer. Expires 11/20/14
$15.00
Come In For Your
Pink Extensions for fhe Cure!
100% of the profits from The Pink Extention For The Cure
go to The Susan G. Komen of North Jersey.
O
ctober is Breast Cancer Awareness month and
throughout October 31st, Alfonso's Salon for the-
fourth year in a row is joining the fight to defeat
breast cancer, the second leading cancer killer of
women.The salon is offering pink hair extensions to com-
memorate the cause. The extensions are available in a shade
of brightpink for $12 each and in order to eliminate.Cash is
required to eliminate any bank fees. There is also a limited
supply of pink feathers available. 100% of donations and
profits for this fundraiser will benifit the Susan G. Komen
for the Cure."We are proud to help where we can to raise
funds to assist research, increase awareness and promote
screenings," says,Alfonso Merola, owner/stylist of Alfonso's
Salon at Sutton Plaza.
"Breast Cancer affects so many families. I have seen it touch
the lives of many of my clients, and happily count many as
successful survivors of this disease, because of early detec-
tion.".The Salon has received two awards for their efforts to
help defeat breast cancer.The non-permanent extensions are
a simple process and it only takes minutes to apply, Alfonso
reports. "We compress the pink extension into the hair with-
out causing anyharm to the client's own hair. They look great
on women of all ages, from kids to seniors, with some cus-
tomers getting two or three at a time. They can be easily cut
to any length the client wants and will stay in as long as
maintained properly,client should come in with clean
hair,without any conditioning at the root area,a moisturizing
shampoo and or conditioner is not used on the root area so
that extension will not slip out.
Alfonso is particularly excited about working with
groups for this worthy fundraiser. Last year he was invited
to Morristown Medical Center to apply extensions for staff
during the shift change outside the caffeteria, and we are in
the process of setting up a schedule to do it again on 2 mon-
days in Oct.
Check our facebook page for the days and hours.High
school Cheerleader and sportgroups from the local area have
also come in as a team to show their support.It's a fundrais-
er and a team building excerise all in one.
The salon will gladly eccept any donation even if cus-
tomers dont want to take advantage of the hair extension
services. A jar will be available at the front desk to anyone
wishing to help the fight for a cure. Donation jars can also
be found at Valentino's Pizzeria, Verizon Wireless
store,Wine Rack, Flanders Cleaners, Flanders Bagels, and
Mandrin Village, all located in the mall.
In business for 30 years,Alfonso's Salon is a full service
salon,specializing in complete hair services such as hair
extensions,color,highlights,cuts, styling, and specialized
smoothing systems such as Keratin Straightening and
Keratin Express as well as perms and conditioning treat-
ments. Manicures, pedicures, and waxing services are also
provided.
Hair extensions come in many varied colors and are done
all year round. Throughout his career,Alfonso has devoted
his time to the betterment of the hair industry.
He has done classes and demonstrations at shows
throughout New Jersey,N.Y. City,Boston, Atlantic City etc.
He was also, past director ofthe N.J. Hair Fashion
Committee and past chairman of the Warren County
October is Breast Cancer Awareness
Hairdressers Assosiation, show artist for Scruples, Framesi,
Bain DeTerre. Studied and/or assited some of the great
names in the industry Paul Mitchell (the man himself),
Irvine Rusk, Gary Brey (past coach for the U.S Hairdressing
Olympic Team), and many others. His passion is educating
and training new, upcoming stylist.
Page 26, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
By Ejvind Boccolini
S
candinavian heritage was well-repre-
sented at the 30th annual
Scandinavian Fest held at Vasa Park
on Aug. 31, even after a fierce downpour
put it on hold for a short while.
Attendees gathered under tents, or just
indifferently walked slowly around the
grounds after becoming soaked so quickly
that it was useless to fret over it.
Instead, all enjoyed the festivities. Many
were dressed in traditional clothing, as
demonstrations and displays of all sorts
helped to convey the arts, history, culture,
language, music, dance and food of
Scandinavia.
Hilde Lindstrom, Membership
Chairman, of the Leif Ericson Viking Ship,
Inc., was at the event with her group as they
have been in past years. They had historians
on hand, such as Steven Clarke and Karl
Spalin, and, of course, their Viking ship was
proudly on display. They can be found on
Facebook under Leif Ericson Viking Ship,
Inc.
Jyri Erik Kork, a member of Pillerkaar,
the Estonian Folk Dancers of Washington
DC, said he loves the pancakes, at the
Scandinavian Fest, just before he was get-
ting ready to perform.
Vasa Parks Scandinavian Fest Always Rich With Food, Culture & Crafts
Pillerkaar has more than 30 years of
experience performing Estonian folk dances
at both U.S. and international venues with
hundreds of performances. The group has
choreographed excellent programs and,
most importantly, passed on Estonian cul-
ture and tradition. Pillerkaar is a folk dance
ensemble initiated by Anu Oinas in 1971
comprised of Estonians, people of Estonian
descent, people who are married to
Estonians, and friends of Estonians.
Kevin DeFeo, Treasurer of Vasa Park,
said we do enjoy having the event here. It
was the 30th year of the Scandinavian Fest.
Erik Christenson, a Lake Hiawatha resi-
dent and member of Vasa Park, was dressed
in traditional garb and said he enjoys the
historical as well as modern aspects of the
festival.
Al Baumann, of the Swedish Jazz and
Saxophone Duo, which performed at
Scandinavian Fest, said we were here 4
years ago and were glad to be back.
He called the festival so colorful, with
crafts, music, and many wonderful things
all coming together in one place.
Terry Neill and Janet DAgostino-Neill
had a reproduction of a Viking ship on dis-
play and were on hand to speak about
Viking history. Terry said the Scandinavian
Fest at Vasa Park is always filled with very
knowledgeable Scandinavians, who ask
interesting questions - and challenging
ones.
She said they are genuinely interested in
their heritage.
Theyre proud of it and they spend time
cultivating it, she said.
Neill said the organizers of the festival
really put a lot of care and thought into
Scandinavian Fest, and consider what peo-
ple would enjoy, in addition to eating and
buying things.
Henry Montferrante (stage name is Sir
Manfred Von Halstern) was in period armor
and clothing and demonstrated medieval
fighting re-enactments at the festival.
It lets people see what the armor and
everything looked like, he said, adding that
attendees could now see what tournament
combat wouldve looked like.
Scandinavian Fest is a not-for-profit
event to celebrate and promote the cultures,
histories and current life of the Nordic area
countries. It is staffed entirely by volun-
teers. The annual festival held in rustic Vasa
Park is an all-day celebration of
Scandinavia where attendees can discover
its customs and history. The six Nordic
nations are represented: Denmark, Estonia,
Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden.
T
he Knights of Columbus Council
5410 is sponsoring Italian Night
Charity Dinner Dance on Saturday
October 4, 2014 at St Lawrence Parish Hall,
Chester, NJ from 6:30pm TO 11:00pm
The Knights of Columbus, Council 5410
Chester, NJ is sponsoring a gourmet Italian
Night Charity Dinner Dance on Saturday
October 4, 2014. The event will be held at
the St Lawrence Parish Hall in Chester, NJ.
The event begins at 6:30-11:00PM. A gour-
met dinner, catered by Charlottes Web of
Dover, will be featured and music by Rikki
Starr Entertainment. Beer, Wine, Soda is
included in the ticket price. FOR TICKETS
OR OTHER INFORMATION CON-
TACT973-584-2083. Tickets are $40.00 per
person. A 50-50 Raffle will be held during
the evening to benefit area charities. Come
and enjoy the festivities and an excellent
meal. You wont be disappointed. Buon
Appetite!
KofC Hosts Italian Night Charity
Dinner Dance
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 27
by Elsie Walker
A
pple will be the word of the day
on September 27th. A variety of
mouthwatering apple items, plus
entertainment, family fun, auctions, sales
and much more will fill the grounds of the
Flanders United Presbyterian Church ( 58
Drakesdale Road in Flanders) as it holds
its 12th annual Apple Festival from 10am
4pm (rain date October 4th). The event also
includes a blood drive which hopes to meet
a special goal. Church members Kathy
Hinds Banfe and Karen Brand are co-chairs
of the festival.
We will be serving such things as apple
pies and breads and apple cider donuts.
There will also be an apple press for fresh-
pressed apple cider. We are also putting
together a cookbook of the items for sale,
said Rev. Rick Oppelt, pastor of the church.
Banfe shared that activities sure to bring
big smiles to kids will be a hayride, games
including a bouncy house, and arts and
crafts.
For those looking for things to buy, the
event offers a variety of things. RH Farms
will host a Farmer's Market; and for those
looking for a special little something at a
bargain price, theres.a $2 Buck Table. The
event also includes a silent auction of small
items and a live auction of larger ones.
Music, and even dancing, will grace the
area. The band, "The Middle Ages" will
play classic rock and new wave from the
70's and 80's. Dancers from the DeNogla
School of Irish Dance will also be on hand
to entertain.
Oppelt explained that the funds raised by
the event support church special projects
like youth activities, mission endeavors,
music programs and emergency situations.
The event also supplies a day of fellowship.
Our annual Apple Festival provides our
church an opportunity to come together to
provide a fun, safe and delicious day of
activities for the neighborhoods we serve. It
enables us to continue to be a lively
Presbyterian presence in our community, as
we have been for more than 50 years.
explained Oppelt.
Also, that day, the Red Cross will be
there for the 2nd annual Fred Swinson
Memorial Blood Drive. Oppelt explained
that Swinson was a long time active mem-
ber of the church who died in 2013. For
many years, Swinson spear-headed the
blood drive held at the Apple Festival.
Last year, it made sense to christen it
the Fred Swinson Memorial Blood Drive.
Last year, we had 32 donations, more than
Flanders Church Holds 12th Annual Apple Festival - Sept. 27th
we've ever had before and this year we are
shooting for a goal of over 50. One of our
high school seniors is helping to organize it
in an effort to earn a college scholarship
from the Red Cross, shared Oppelt.
September 27th is the date and the word
is apple. The Flanders United
Presbyterian Church apple festival is an
event not to be missed!

Attention Schools, Churches, Organizations Send


Your Press Releases to mary.lalama@gmail.com
By Ejvind Boccolini
T
he Vets Summer Fest 2014 had a
great turnout said producer Sandy
Mitchell in a recent phone interview,
and the military dedication ceremony was
an emotionally powerful moment, as atten-
dees honored veterans at the Aug. 9 event
held at Vasa Park in Budd Lake.
Mitchell said about 1,000 people attend-
ed the event throughout the day, and added
that she thanks everyone who participat-
ed.
This included Picatinny Arsenal, Senator
Steve Oroho, the Knights of Columbus,
vendors, sponsors, Eastern Propane, Harley
Davidson, the musical groups, and more.
Ray Chimileski, Operation Chillout,
Executive Director, said This is Operation
Chillout's (OCOs) 4th annual fundraiser for
our homeless veteran outreach. Proceeds
from the event will enable us to provide
new season-appropriate clothing, emer-
gency temporary shelter assistance, summer
supplies and survival gear. A special fund
has also been set up to acquire an all-terrain
Rapid Response Vehicle to reach homeless
vets in all locations in all weather condi-
tions.
Those who purchased a ticket to the
event helped to support the survival of our
homeless vets.
Operation Chillout website notes that
there are up to 7,500 Homeless Veterans liv-
ing on the streets of New Jersey. Many face
acute Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and
chronic illnesses of body, mind and spirit.
Operation Chillout is counting on help from
the public to enable them to move forward
with their year-round outreach work.
In the winter, Operation Chillout pre-
pares a backpack for a veteranman or
woman filled with NEW warm clothing,
toiletries, survival gear, sleeping bags and
information about local resources; delivered
free of charge at locations where homeless
people gatherlike food pantries, soup
kitchens, temporary shelters, abandoned
buildings, parks and alleyways.
In the hot summer, we collect and deliv-
er cases of bottled water, T-shirts and base-
ball caps. Operation Chillout's Rapid
Response Outreach Team is active 24/7-
365 days a year providing emergency serv-
ices to our homeless veterans.
This years event featured many great
regional bands, good food, cold beer, mer-
chandise vendors, a vintage car and motor-
cycle show, military displays and great fam-
ily fun. Gates opened at 10:30, and atten-
dees brought blankets and in certain cases, a
small chair to relax and enjoy the festivities.
Children had access to a play ground,
games and other fun activites.
Please send additional donations to Spirit
of the Arts, 55 Bank Street, Sussex, NJ
07461. You can call Sandy at 973-875-2068
or email her at sandy@mitchellclan.com.
Operation Chillout notes that We are
vets serving vets and they provide a Rapid
Response Outreach Team; Emergency
Transportation for Medical Care; Winter &
Summer Survival Gear; Advocacy &
Referral; and Monthly Home Cooked Meals
for PTSD Unit at Lyons, NJ VA hospital.
Mitchell called the Vets Day event a
major fundraiser for Operation Chillout that
people really enjoyed.
She said, for instance, that homeless vets
need help to empower themselves and inte-
grate back into society. Without attention,
before you know it they become amongst
the forgotten.
To provide permanent housing for the
homeless vets, for instance, it takes money
to do that, said Mitchell.
Thats all part of what they (Operation
Chillout) do, she added.
Their website is http://operationchill-
out.org/.
Vets Summer Fest Helping Operation Chillout
Provide For Vets In Need
Page 28, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
By Cheryl Conway
T
wo local sisters who lost their father
to lung cancer two years ago are
stepping up awareness of the silent
killer by chairing and walking in the fifth
annual Northern New Jersey Free to
Breathe Walk later this month.
The event is set for Sunday, Sept. 21, at
Horseshoe Lake in Succasunna, with regis-
tration at 10 a.m., rally at 11 a.m. and the
5K walk beginning at 11:30 a.m. The walk
is being hosted by Free to Breathe, a nation-
al non-profit organization founded in 2001
to support lung cancer survival through
research, fundraising and public awareness.
Keri Rutkowski, 32, of Morris Plains,
and Kellie Smith, 35, of Morristown have
so far raised about $23,000 since getting
involved in Free To Breathe in 2011, after
their father was diagnosed with lung cancer.
Their goal for this years walk is to reach
$25,000, and to continue to raise awareness
of the disease; reduce the stigma that lung
cancer is a smokers disease; and encourage
others to get involved in the organization.
I couldnt save my dads life but we are
trying to save other peoples lives, says
Rutkowski. My dad did not have an easy
way out. The pain level he had to endure, no
one deserves that.
Their father, Mike Smith, of Morris
Plains was diagnosed with Stage 4 lung can-
cer in Feb. 2011 after worsening back pain
led to blood tests and a cat-scan. Rutkowski
recalls him complaining of back pain as
early as Dec. 2010, the same time the bliz-
zards came, she says. We figured he was
getting older. He was the type of guy who
shoveled everyones driveways.
But when the back pain got progres-
sively worse, Mike Smith went for addi-
tional tests which first showed an infection
in the lower back and then a weekend trip to
the emergency room for a biopsy of the
infection. After a cat-scan and bone scan,
they learned on Wednesday, that it was
Stage 4 Lung Cancer- Skima Cell
Carcinoma, with a tumor on his left lung
that had spread around his windpipe and
down parts of his spine.
After radiation treatments to shrink the
tumors on his spine, followed by
chemotherapy, Mike Smith- who was a
retired supervisor of a local water company,
volunteer firefighter and president of the
Mt. Kemble Fire Co.- fought the cancer for
14 months. He died on May 4, 2012 at the
age of 61, leaving behind his wife Peggy
Smith of Morris Twp.; son Matt Smith of
Manville; and two daughters-Keri and
Kellie.
While blindsided with the sudden
Step Up To Lung Cancer Awareness In Upcoming Walk
news when he was diagnosed, Rutkowski
and her family tried to stay positive
throughout the battle of fighting the disease
and she says this attitude helped in the end.
My father and I and all of us are very
positive people, says Rutkowski. We said
these are just statistics but we are going to
kick its butt. He fought for 14 months. I
really think the positive outlook helped
him.
As part of their positive mindset, Kellie
Smith found the local cancer walk- Free to
Breathe in 2011 for spirits and cheering
him on, and organized a team of about 30
walkers to participate. That was the only
year their father attended the walk, but the
ladies have been advocates ever since as
committee members last year and co-chairs
this year requiring greater involvement,
more planning and sponsorships.
New this year is a Kids Dash that invites
youngsters to complete a 100 yard dash.
In their fourth year participating, the two
sisters had 15 signed up on their team as of
press time, with hopes to have 25.
Deadline to register online is Sept. 17 for
$20; mail-in registration is Sept. 16 for $23;
and on-site registration for $25.
Besides raising money to support the
continued on next page
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Free to Breathe Organization, the two sis-
ters have three goals as part of their mission
in fighting the disease.
When looking at statistics, they learned
that lung cancer is the silent killer, with
symptoms that exist but are often ignored as
something of a lesser degree.
Who thought back pain would be stage
four cancer? asks Rutkowski, regarding
her fathers diagnosis. It put a pit in my
stomach. A former smoker, Mike Smith
quit smoking 17 years prior to his diagnosis
because he wanted to live longer, says
Rutkowski.
If people had known what the symp-
toms are, situations if you are not feeling
right, if there was more knowledge or more
tests that could have been done? she ques-
tions. There are tests for prostate cancer or
breast cancer; why is there nothing being
used that is preventative?
One of the symptoms of lung cancer is
common stuff like a cough, but then the
diagnosis is often a cold or allergies. If its
persistent, they really need to get checked.
People call it allergies.
While attending an Action Summit for
Free to Breathe in Sept. 2011, Rutkowski
learned her roommates story of how she
was an advocate for her own health when
she took it upon herself to fight for a cat-
scan and they found she had early stages of
lung cancer. After having a lobectomy, the
woman from Ohio survived. She was an
advocate for her own body; she fought for
what she needed and won.
Rutkowski recalls her dad always had a
little cough ever since she was little. Even
with a regular check-up they said he was
fine. He needed a cat-scan or the blood
results.
Besides encouraging others to become
advocates for their own health, the two sis-
ters would like to reduce the stigma with
lung cancer. While smoking is the leading
cause for lung cancer, exposure to radon is
the second leading cause to the disease.
If you have lungs you can get lung can-
cer, says Rutkowski.
New cases of lung cancer shows that 10
percent to 15 percent of lung cancer victims
never smoked, totaling 20,000 to 30,000
non-smokers diagnosed every year. Other
risk factors include second-hand smoke,
radiation, asbestos, air pollution and some
organic chemicals.
For homeowners, Rutkowski recom-
mends checking radon levels every two
years to make sure that remediation is not
required. Every year Im checking it and
making sure its under zero, she says.
When we learned about lung cancer we
learned how much funding they werent
getting, says Kellie Smith about the scary
statistics. She says, People turn their
head because of the relationship to smok-
ing and how its self-inflicting. But You
dont have to smoke to get lung cancer.
People dont realize you just need lungs to
get lung cancer.
According to statistics, lung cancer takes
the lives of around 160,000 Americans each
year more than the total deaths from
breast, prostate and colon cancers com-
bined. Although lung cancer is the leading
cancer killer, it is still the least-funded of
all major cancers.
Their third goal is to market Free to
Breathe and encourage others to get
involved in the community.
We found that being with people was
very healing, it helped us cope, says
Rutkowski. People are very quiet about
lung cancer; its hard to talk about. Its nice
to know there are people who share that
experience and are trying to raise money
and awareness.
In addition to the annual walk, Free to
Breathe encourages other community
fundraisers. Rutkowski and Smith hosted a
pasta dinner last year raising $3,000; and a
charity garage sale this year that raised
$1,500.
Free to Breathe is a wonderful commu-
nity, concludes Smith. Its goal is to double
the survival rate by 2022, not an easy task
since lung cancers five-year survival rate
of 16 percent has not changed in more than
40 years, making the need for research
funding more critical than ever. In compari-
son, the five-year survival rate for breast
cancer has advanced to 98.6 percent and
prostate cancer to 99.2 percent, according to
statistics.
To donate to Rutkowski and Smiths
team fundraising page, go to: http://partici-
pate.freetobreathe.org/goto/forthelove-
ofmike2014; or visit
www.freetobreathe.org/northernnj to create
a team or make a general donation. Checks
can be written to Free to Breathe and mailed
to: Free to Breathe, 1 Point Place, Suite 200,
Madison, WI, 53719
Step Up To Lung Cancer...
continued from previous page
Page 30, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
E
lements Massage in Chester has
reopened under new ownership and
management. Located at 170 Route
206 South in the Streets of Chester
Shopping Mall, Elements Massage is now
serving the communities of West Morris
County.
What sets Elements apart is our ability
to consistently provide a highly cus-
tomized massage to meet the unique needs
of each client, whether it is to provide
relief from pain or stress or to simply help
them relax, said Studio Manager,
Samantha Mazura. We are thrilled to have
this opportunity to become a part of the
West Morris business community and
make a positive impact in our clients
lives.
Once viewed as an expensive splurge,
Elements is making therapeutic massage
increasingly affordable and available to
time-starved consumers who recognize the
value of massage in maintaining their over-
all health and wellness. Those who receive
Elements Massage Now open In Chester
regular massages benefit from lower levels
of stress hormones, a heightened immune
system, increase in circulation, and many
other benefits.
At Elements, we spend the time with you
to understand your bodys problem areas,
learn about your wellness goals and expect-
ed outcomes. We then match you to one of
our skilled professional therapists for a cus-
tom massage experience. Our Therapists
will check in with you during and after your
massage to verify that you are comfortable
and your needs and expectations are being
met. Based upon your needs, your massage
may include the following modalities, Deep
Tissue, Trigger Point, Sports and Stretch,
Hot Stone and Swedish. We also offer
Prenatal and other specialty techniques.
The Elements commitment is to focus on
providing a true therapeutic experience. Of
the thousands of massages we provide each
tear, we always treat your massage as our
most important. Whether you need relief
from pain, release of tension, stress reduc-
tion or simply to relax and feel your best,
Elements Therapeutic Massage of Chester
is committed to promoting your well-being.
The Chester studio is open seven days a
week, welcomes walk-ins and offers a
membership program that allows clients to
receive regular, discounted massage therapy
services. Our Wellness Program is month-
to-month, with no long term contract. You
can cancel at any time with a 30 day notice.
You may also share your session with an
associate member at no additional cost. For
more information or to book an appoint-
ment or purchase a gift card, please call
(908) 888 2071, or visit our website at
www.elementsmassage.com/chester
G
et the Facts. Recognize the Signs.
Each year, approximately 22,240
women will be diagnosed with
ovarian cancer. In 2013, approximately
14,230 women will die in the United States
from ovarian cancer. Many women don't
seek help until the disease has begun to
spread, but if detected at its earliest stage,
the five-year survival rate is more than
93%. The symptoms of ovarian cancer are
often subtle and easily confused with other
ailments.
Visit http://www.ovariancanceraware-
ness.org for more information.
Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 31
A
new year is upon us. One year chases another, one
decade follows the next. Our lives unfold, our circum-
stances evolve, but how about us? Do we grow as
well or are we stinted in our spiritual and emotional growth?
It is a probing question and one we ought to ask of no one,
but ourselves. As the old year rolls to a close and a New Year
opens up we ask ourselves how to move forward. What are
the concrete steps that take us from childhood to maturity?
When we were younger we all had toys. Most of us had
favorite toys and our entire world revolved around them.
When we had them in hand we were content, but if anyone
took them from us, we grew miserable and did our best to
make everyone around us miserable too.
Most of us dont know what became of that favorite teddy
bear or blankie that we loved as a child. If someone asked us
what happened to our red toy fire-truck or beautiful little doll,
we likely wouldnt know. But somehow we also wouldnt
care. We have moved on and are no longer consumed with the
things that worried us in our youth.
We have moved on, but have we matured? The definition
of maturity is to be other focused rather than self-focused.
Have we matured? Today, more than ever, grown men and
women take pride in their little gadgets and toys. We no longer
worry about little dolls and fire trucks, but we have our
Androids and I-pods with their favorite little apps. Should we
lose them, we grow miserable. Should Facebook go down for
several hours as it did on August 2nd, social media would be
abuzz, as it was that day, with contempt for Facebook.
Can we live without our toys or are we mired in the imma-
turity of our youth?
Being able to let go of our favorite pastimes, to live with-
out them and remain content when we cant have them, is the
definition of maturity. Life is more than the accumulation of
possessions, homes and enjoyable moments. It is greater than
the opportunity to have fun and be stimulated. Life is a plat-
form on which we rise above ourselves.
When we willingly surrender our own comforts to share
with another, we catch a glimpse of lifes treasures. When we
are left without our usual crutches and retain our equilibrium,
pitting ourselves against the world and placing our faith in G-
d, we experience lifes meaning. When we recognize that life
is more about what we are needed for than what we need, we
have found lifes purpose.
Living with purpose isnt just a meaningful way to live, its
also enjoyable. There is more joy to be gained from giving
than taking. There is more happiness to be gleaned from
bestowing than acquiring. Depriving ourselves from some-
thing we perceive as important and learning that we are big-
ger than it, larger than we gave ourselves credit for, and capa-
ble of living without it, brings us face to face with our true
selves.
It is how we discover the measure of our potential and
learn the extent of our promise. It is the litmus test of maturi-
ty. It proves that we are greater than the self we thought we
were.
This cant be achieved in a day. Not even in a month, a
year, a decade or a lifetime. It is a journey of small steps with
no end goal. There is no way to tell precisely how selfless and
how deep we will be on our last day. The only rule is this.
Ensure that each day is deeper than the last and shallower than
the next. Keep growing and never let up. In life there will
always be ebbs and flows, but the general trajectory should be
forward not backward, upward not downward.
To do this we need a plan. As Rosh Hashanah approaches
we need to sit down and take inventory. What are the things
or areas in my life that take up a disproportionate amount of
my time? To what am I assigning more meaning and allocat-
ing more energy that it warrants? If I scale back on this area,
how will I fill that time and with what will I replace that vice?
It is good to draw up a list and then form a plan. By Rosh
Hashanah I want to prove that I can live without this. By
Pesach I want to prove that I can adopt this or that new prac-
tice. By next year Rosh Hashanah, I want allocate this much
of my income to charity. Establish short term goals and
embark on the process of inner growth.
Line up a long term goal that represents a serious sacrifice,
but is also a deeply meaningful achievement. For example,
decide if you want to adopt a child in need or travel to a third
world country to help people in need. Decide how much of
your time you can volunteer to the local soup kitchen or how
many days of your week you can devote to Torah study. Most
important, choose the parts of your day that you will sacrifice
to make that happen.
In the beginning you will miss what you gave up. With
time you will miss your old habits less and appreciate your
new customs more. In the fullness of time you will wonder
what attracted you to those old behaviors in the first place.
Slowly you will grow and mature. You will never stop grow-
ing. You will never reach a final benchmark. But the goal is
not to stop, the goal is simply to start.
With a New Year around the corner, now is as good a time
as ever.
Shanah Tova,
Rabbi Yaacov Shusterman
Rabbi Shusterman is the director of the Chabad Jewish
Center in Flanders. To join Rabbi Shusterman for the High
Holidays or for more information about the Center , please
visit www.mychabadcenter.com The High Holiday services
are free and open to the public. No membership or tickets are
necessary.
By Cheryl Conway
W
hile most recyclables will be co-mingled with the
new single stream recycling method in Mt. Olive,
residents do not have to invest in one large recy-
cling can or change their method.
Whether they use one large can or continue to use two to three
to separate plastic from glass or paper, the items will all be
collected and mixed together into one enclosed packer truck.
Single Stream Recycling will simplify the recycling process
by combining plastic, paper and bottles as a means to simpli-
fy recycling to residents and save money in sanitation costs.
With the new method getting ready to launch as of press
time, some questions and concerns are lingering. The follow-
ing article may clear up some of those concerns.
You can use your current can, says Tim Quinn, Mt. Olive
Twp. Public Works director. Its going to take time to get
with the program. If they dont single stream off the bat, it
doesnt matter.
Quinn says some residents have been calling in asking if
they need to purchase a new can. With the New One Arm
Bandit system for garbage pick-up, new cans were given to all
homeowners. But for recycling, items will be picked up man-
ually but with closed packer trucks rather than the current
open can truck.
The closed packer trucks will be neater and cleaner, says
Quinn.
So residents should continue to use their recycling cans for
recycling pick up. The main thing that is changing is that most
items can be all mixed into one recycling can.
Its easy, says Quinn. The easier we are going to make
it, the more they are going to do when it comes to recycling.
With New Jersey being a mandatory recycling state since
the 1980s, township officials agree that the Single Stream
Recycling method helps with the Ease of recycling. Most
people want to do the right thing, recycling is mandatory and
a NJ State Law, in addition everyone complains about public
tax dollars, here is a way the public can directly affect how
their money is spent, says Township Business Administrator
Sean Canning.
While there is no limit on the amount of garbage townships
can dump, Mt. Olive has to pay an MUA fee of $93.92 per ton
on garbage dumped at the Municipal Utilities Transfer
Station. So the more the residents recycle, the lighter the
garbage, and the less the township pays in garbage fees.
With expectations to begin Single Stream Recycling the
week after Labor Day, around Sept. 8, homeowners will be
expected to combine all metals, plastics, bottles, fiber includ-
ing paper products and boxes, as well as No. 3 and #6 plastics.
All plastic items contain a triangle with a coding numbered
from one to seven that outline its type of plastic and how it is
used after it is recycled.
For residents who do want to use one larger can to place all
of their recyclables, the Mt. Olive Recreation Department is
selling 65 gallon recycling cans for $50 with all proceeds
going back to support the recreation department. The cans are
the left over smaller garbage cans that had been purchased last
year for senior residents or smaller households who do not
need the larger 96 gallon can as part of the new garbage sys-
tem, explains Quinn.
With the new single stream recycling, residents will no
longer be required to tie their newspapers and can mix them
with their other recyclables. Larger pieces of fiber, such as
cardboard or pizza boxes, that cannot fit into the recycling
can will need to be tied to prevent them from blowing all over
the place, he says.
The smaller fiber items such as cereal boxes and junk mail
can be mixed right into the plastics.
If it takes up too much space and they are jamming it in,
its not going to work, says Quinn. Tie it so it doesnt blow
around and mess up the neighborhood.
As far as used motor oil or any oil, place in sealed plastic
jugs at curbside for pick up.
As far as paint, oil based paint is not accepted. The paint
has to be latex, with the can opened and dried with a drying
agent such as cat litter in order to be picked up, says Quinn.
Any liquid paint can be placed in the regular garbage stream
for pick up.
Oil-based stains must be brought to the transfer station on
Gold Mine Rd. in Budd Lake to be placed with the hazardous
waste items, says Quinn. Residents can call 973-347-8106 to
make an appointment for drop off.
Bulk items get picked up on Mondays, and metal items on
Thursdays.
With the influx of bears especially on garbage night, Quinn
suggests placing garbage at curbside in the early morning by
5 a.m. so residents do not miss their pick up. If garbage is
placed out the night before, and even early morning, make
sure garbage bags are tightly tied in sealed bags so they
[bears] dont smell any scent.
Full Stream Ahead With Co-Mingled Recycling
New Year Greeting
Page 32, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
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COOKING CLASSES
ARE BACK!
September 22nd!
By Cheryl Conway
T
he choices are endless on the menu at
the new Eastern Asian Bistro in Budd
Lake with so many tasty ingredients
that vary per dish, but no matter the selection,
customers can enjoy all healthy vegetables
picked fresh and not out of a can.
Operated as the Lucky Garden for 22
years before vacated in 2011, the buildings
new owner- John Zheng of Hawthorne-
grabbed that luck when he found the restau-
rant on Mt. Olive Rd. listed for sale in the
newspaper. He opened his doors on June 17,
offering a wide variety of Asian specialties
with one side of the menu featuring Chinese
cuisine and the other side Japanese, including
sushi and hibachi.
I picked this area, says Zheng, because
of its close proximity to a local sushi place he
has worked at in Succasunna. It was an area
I was familiar with, he says and the location
of Route 46 is ideal to attract customers.
Zheng did his research and found that
Budd Lake is a prime area for families and
middle-age customers that would enjoy
Asian lifestyle dining.
Although Zheng grew up in the restaurant
business, where he did everything from
working as a cook, and server to delivering
food, when he was a teenager at his parents
Chinese restaurant- Zheng Garden in
Hawthorne- this is his first time as owner of a
restaurant. After graduating high school,
Zheng started studying Restaurant Hotel
Management in Brooklyn but after realizing
he was more hands on he switched gears to
attend Lincoln Tech where he earned his
degree in computer science.
Zheng spent four years doing networking,
traveling into the city hating the traffic,
when he decided to get out of the ITC stuff
and find something more local. I wanted to
do something on my own, says Zheng. I
wanted to own a business myself.
With a restaurant background in both
Chinese and Japanese cuisine, and his love
for sushi, Zhen decided to offer all three,
along with a fully stocked bar.
At the Eastern Asian Bistro, everything is
fresh, says Zheng. We dont use canned
goods. We want to encourage healthy eating
Chinese- style.
He offers fresh ingredients, like grown
mushrooms, you dont see and get that in a
regular take-out place, says Zheng. Just
saying we dont serve canned products, that
puts us in a high bar. For that reason, Zheng
does not use water chestnuts in his entrees
since they are a canned product.
Zheng, who gets his products from an
Asian market in Paterson, is also trying to
come up with a gluten-free menu which is
hard to do with Chinese food, he says.
Compliments to the culinary experts,
Delight In Chinese And Japanese Cuisine At New Local Bistro
Zheng says The chef we have has been
around for a long time. His dad, who has
been cooking Asian cuisine for the past 20
years, is one of his chefs. Zheng compares
The flavor and the quality of the food
offered at the Eastern Asian Bistro, to the
food prepared at the finest Chinese and
Japanese restaurants in Manhattan. You
have to go into Manhattan for the real
Chinese food, he says.
We do a lot of stuff, homemade wonton,
egg rolls, traditional, all that stuff is home-
made; you can definitely taste the difference.
The tasty homemade wonton soup is
served with five hand-rolled and meat-stuffed
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with any other offer. Expires 10/31/14
Except lunch special. Not be combined
with any other offer. Expires 10/31/14
1 Egg Roll
or (sm) Wonton
or Egg Drop Soup
with purchase of $15.00
(sm) Pork
Fried Rice or
(sm) Chicken Lo Mein
with purchase of $25.00
General Tsos
Chicken or
Sesame Chicken
with purchase of $35.00
come up with a gluten-free menu which is hard to do
with Chinese food, he says.
Compliments to the culinary experts, Zheng says The
chef we have has been around for a long time. His dad,
who has been cooking Asian cuisine for the past 20 years,
is one of his chefs. Zheng compares The flavor and the
quality of the food offered at the Eastern Asian Bistro, to
the food prepared at the finest Chinese and Japanese restau-
rants in Manhattan. You have to go into Manhattan for the
real Chinese food, he says.
We do a lot of stuff, homemade wonton, egg rolls, tra-
ditional, all that stuff is homemade; you can definitely taste
the difference.
The tasty homemade wonton soup is served with five
hand-rolled and meat-stuffed wontons, with fresh crispy
noodles and duck-sauce for dipping.
Zheng offers a wide array of sushi featuring all types of
fish and vegetables, traditional rolls and chef special rolls.
We do a lot of special rolls, says Zheng, that the chef
comes up with. Its different from other places. Theres a
lot of creativity from the chef, like the new sushi pizza
made with dough, raw tuna, salmon, avocado and lightly
sprinkled with caviar.
One favorite is the Sushi & Sashimi, which is a combi-
nation of four pieces of sushi, nine pieces of sashimi and a
spicy tuna roll. Heart-shaped sushi rolls, yellow tail tuna,
red snapper, shrimp, and a salmon is served on an illuminat-
ed glass.
The entre is a beautiful presentation with a multi-
faceted light, a brush of ginger to accent the flavors of the
dish, tuna outside a crafted wooden fence, Wasabi spice
under a Japanese umbrella made out of a lemon, and soy
sauce disguised in a mini tea pot, describes Pat Hars of
Budd Lake, who has dined at the new restaurant several
times since it has opened with his wife, Laura.
The only restaurant in Budd Lake to offer sushi, the Hars
have been enjoying the fresh ingredients, sauces, many dif-
ferent entrees and atmosphere with its modern dcor, spa-
cious placement of tables and newly renovations.
You cant get sushi; theres nowhere in Budd Lake that
does sushi, says Laura Hars. Its good for health con-
scious eaters.
No matter the entre, the presentations are magnificent.
Each dish features an artsy presentation with Japanese
umbrellas, or orange slices, limes or carrots shaped like
flowers.
The Japanese menu also offers Hibachi with combina-
tions of chicken, steak, scallops, shrimp, lobster and vegeta-
bles. Although you dont get the show when the chef
cooks the food in front of the customer, the food is in-
kitchen hibachi, cooked fresh in the kitchen, says Zheng.
A favorite dish is the Lobster Salad, which is served as a
house special appetizer. The fresh lobster is removed with
the lobster shell arranged on the plate for show, served with
shredded lettuce, cut-up cantaloupe, crunchy dry rice and a
sweet cream for dipping.
Another favorite appetizer is the Thai Fish Chips served
with curry and basil.
The main entre menu is endless offering a range of food
items with favorites like the Lo Mein, Barbecue Spare Ribs,
Shrimp Egg Foo Young and other selections with chicken,
beef, pork, seafood and vegetables.
Some of the house specials include The Dragon &
Phoenix, which are tender pieces of battered chicken and
shrimp sauted with snow peas, mushrooms, carrots, bok
choy and cucumber; and the Spicy Crispy Shrimp with
Chinese And Japanese Cuisine...
continued from previous page
continued on next page
Page 34, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
We Offer Daily Specials
Gourmet Pizza Delicious Desserts Catering
Party Trays 3-6 Foot Long Subs Sandwiches
Paninis Salads Antipastos
MONDAY IS PIZZA DAY
2 Large Pies
$
20
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Toppings Extra
1 per family
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Try our Special Sauces
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STUDENTS ONLY!!
2 Slices (Cheese Only)
and FREE Small Drink
For Only
$
2.50
BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL!
Walnuts, with jumbo shrimp, fried walnuts
with Hunan spicy sauce on top with broc-
coli.
To get the restaurant ready, Zheng did a
lot of work like remove the 3,500 square
feet of carpet, realign the uneven floor and
put down tile. He also put in a new
entrance-way, a sushi bar, a new exciting
bar, re-painted, and renovated the bath-
rooms with new tile and dcor.
He also reduced the seating from 200
seats at the former Lucky Garden to 130
seats, to make the dining room more spa-
cious and even open up a dance floor.
Like the food he offers, all of that hard
work and preparation in opening a restau-
rant, has been quite fulfilling.
I enjoy seeing people leave here with a
smile on their face, says Zheng, It makes
me feel I accomplished something; to show
people I could do something good.
During football season, which runs
through February, Zheng is offering a spe-
cial happy hour with an assortment of wings
such as sweet and sour, garlic, or honey, as
well as beer for $20, and television at the
bar for game watching excitement. Happy
hour is from Mon.-Sun., 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
and 9 p.m. to closing.
A variety of wine, mixed drinks and beer
are offered like Peroni beer that accompa-
nies foods with heavier sauces as it cleans
the palate; a huge glass of Sangria that
blends apple, pear, simple syrup and
chardonnay with fresh, red and green
grapes.
The Eastern Asian Bistro is open seven
days a week for lunch and dinner from
Mon.-Thur., 11 a.m. to 10:30 p.m.; Fri.-Sat.,
from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; and Sun., noon to
10 p.m. Lunch specials are offered daily.
For more information, go to easternabb.com
or call 862-254-2110.
Chinese And Japanese Cuisine...
continued from previous page
A
nother school year is underway and
with it comes homework, play dates,
team sports and more, which can
make the task of feeding your kids healthy
snacks a daunting one.
Fortunately, there are several ways parents
can make snack time easier and more nutri-
tious. Healthy, convenient and naturally
sweet options, such as California raisins, are
a great solution for snack time throughout the
school year.
California raisins are an all-natural,
dried-by-the-sun fruit parents can feel good
about giving their kids, says Larry Blagg,
senior vice president of marketing for the
California Raisin Marketing Board. The
ingredient list says it all raisins.
Because they are 100-percent fruit with no
added sugar, raisins contain zero empty calo-
ries, according to the United States
Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food-a-
Pedia website. In fact, a recent study present-
ed at the Canadian Nutrition Society, found
that children who eat raisins as an after-
school snack may prevent excessive calorie
intake and may increase satiety (or feeling
full) when compared to other common
snacks.
For naturally sweet and satisfying ways to
avoid falling into a snacking rut, follow these
simple tips:
1.) Dont leave snacking to chance. Avoid
unhealthy snacks by preparing nutritious
options ahead of time. Try a no-fuss option
like a hearty trail or snack mix and add
California raisins for sweetness without the
sugar.
2.) Make grab-and-go snacks. Make
snacks that are portable. On busy days, hav-
ing go-to snacks that travel well in backpacks,
lunch boxes, your purse or car will save time
and satisfy hungry tummies.
3.) Involve the kids. Create healthy habits
by involving kids in snack preparation. When
kids are engaged in creating their own snacks,
parents can make valuable connections
between food choices and nutrition. Choose
fun and simple recipes kids can make on their
own or with little help.
For more information about California
raisins and more great recipes, please visit
www.loveyourraisins.com, and sign up for a
California Raisins snack pack on the
California raisins Facebook page at face-
book.com/californiaraisins.
Easy Tips for a Healthy School Year
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 35
Visit our website at www.brandasitaliangrill.com
Party Package #1
(6-9 People)
1 Large Pizza
with any 2 toppings
1 Large Plain Pizza
1 Super Large Stromboli
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Also Available...Our Gourmet Appetizers & Dessert Platters
FAMILY COMBO
Tax not included, delivery or pick up only. Not to
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1 Lg. Cheese Pizza
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with choice of dressing 1-2 Lt. Soda
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F
ootball season can only mean one thing time to grab
the best seat in the house, and were not talking about
at the stadium. In fact, 77 percent of Americans think
the best seat in the house is at home in front of an HDTV,
according to a recent survey by McIlhenny Company,
maker of Tabasco brand products. Instead of heading to the
stadium, keep the tailgate at home and throw a homegat-
ing party.
The ultimate homegate is not only about the football game,
its about the food. No matter whats happening on the field,
the spread can be the real game-changer. In fact, the survey
found the following:
78 percent of American adults think good food can
make up for a bad game.
Americans spend, on average, 42 percent of the game
eating or drinking.
Over half of Americans (57 percent) voted the grill as
the most important appliance when hosting a homegate.
For a homegate touchdown, banish the boring and serve
beer-infused chili, which is sure to please all your family,
friends and football fans. For other ways to spice up game
day, visit www.tabasco.com.
Super Good Chili
Prep time: 15 minutes
Cook time: 30 minutes
Servings: 6
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 1/2 pounds ground beef chuck
1 large onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 tablespoon ground cumin
1 (12 ounce) can diced tomatoes
2 (16 ounce) cans pinto beans, drained and rinsed
1 (16 ounce) can red kidney beans, drained and rinsed
1 (12 ounce) can or bottle beer
1 (4 ounce) can diced green chilies
1 tablespoon TABASCO brand Original Red Sauce
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
Shredded cheddar and Monterey Jack cheese, optional
Heat oil in 5-quart saucepot over medium heat. Add beef
and cook until well browned on all sides, about 5 minutes.
With a slotted spoon, remove to bowl.
Add onion and garlic to drippings remaining in skillet;
cook over medium heat until tender, about 5 minutes.
Return meat to saucepot; stir in cumin. Cook 1 minute.
Stir in diced tomatoes with liquid, pinto beans, red kidney
beans, beer, green chilies, Tabasco Sauce and salt. Heat to
boiling over high heat. Reduce heat to low; cover and sim-
mer 20 minutes to blend flavors, stirring occasionally.
Serve with cheese, if desired.
Score a Touchdown This Football Season
Page 36, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
I
n a constant effort to keep pace with the
world around us and our commitment to
providing quality programming, Mount
Olive Recreation has partnered with Ed2Go
and online learning portal offering over 300
higher education courses.
Through this relationship, Mount Olive
Recreation is able to offer a far wider variety
of courses, programs, continuing education
credits and enrichment programs to our resi-
dents, states Jill Daggon, Recreation
Supervisor, With most 6 weeks courses
being offered at $89 this is a great opportuni-
ty to expand your horizons and increase your
career potential in a convenient, self-guided
module with certified, expert instructors that
would be otherwise cost prohibitive for us to
offer in a regular classroom based model.
Experts agree that the benefits of online
learning go beyond mere convenience. In
many instances the online environment is
more conducive to individual learning styles
because it takes into accommodation busy
schedules, family commitments and work
schedule obligations.
Top 10 Reasons for Learning Online at
with Mount Olive Recreation
1. You can attend class anytime, anywhere
you have Web access.
2. You can access course materials 24
hours a day, 7 days a week.
3. You can learn from instructors across
the country and around the world, broadening
your perspective.
4. You'll enhance your ability to communi-
cate effectively through the latest technology.
5. ou'll network with classmates from a
wide range of backgrounds and locations.
6. You can access instructors immediately
through chat, discussion thread, or email,
without having to wait for office hours.
7. You'll have access to a broad spectrum
of relevant content through your online
course Web site.
8. You could earn higher grades because
you can learn at your own pace.
9. You'll learn innovative strategies for vir-
tual teamwork by using electronic communi-
cation to interact with a group. Employers
highly value this skill.
10. You'll benefit from a flexible sched-
ule, which is extremely helpful if you're bal-
ancing your education with work and family
life.
To access the full list of course offerings
from Mount Olive Recreations Continuing
Education and Workforce Development por-
tal visit:
www.MountOliveTownship.com/recre-
ation.html.
Community School Goes Online
Monster Mash 3K Dash/Walk to Support the American Red Cross Blood Bank
T
hings are about to get spooktacular in
the Mount Olive Recreation
Department. Calling all boys and
ghouls, mummies and daddies! Were getting
ready for a howling good time at the Monster
Mash 3K Dash/Walk on Saturday, October
H
ave you seen the Fall brochure for
Mount Olive Recreation yet?
Brochures should go home with all
school aged children in the Mount Olive
area in their Friday folders on September
12th. If you do not yet have your copy con-
tact Recreation. The Fall brochure is the
resource for all Recreation programming
being offered this season. With a variety of
classes, sports, and special events there is
truly something for everyone.
Mount Olive Recreation continues to
pride itself on offering a base of program-
ming that avails our residents and non-resi-
dents alike to fitness, enrichment, art, tech-
nology, science and more at reasonable
prices to allow all our families and individ-
uals to participate.
Registration begins for all Fall program-
ming as of September 1st with most pro-
grams starting on or around October 1st.
Registration can be done online with a
Mastercard or Discover
throughwww.MountOliveTownship.com/re
creation.html. To pay with a check or cash
or if you should have any questions about
Recreation program and special event offer-
ings please call Recreation at 973-691-0900
x7264 or x7264.
Fall Programming Begins October 1st
25th in Turkey Brook Park to support the
American Red Cross Blood Bank.
Beginning at 6:00pm, participants will run or
walk on a 1.86 mile paved course within
Turkey Brook Park at twilight following the
glow sticks and glow in the dark tape to get
around. We assure you, nothing will jump
out at you along the way. Everyone is
encouraged to come in costume but please
remember, this is a family event so lets keep
the costumes from being too gruesome. Once
everyone is back on the event field well con-
tinue the fun with a trick-or-treating activity,
small campfire, food for purchase and
Halloween themed music from our favorite
DJLV3.
Registration is $10 per person before
October 22nd and $20 per person on site the
day of the event. Kids under the age of 5
years are Free. To support the American Red
Cross Blood Bank, Mount Olive Recreation
will host a Starve Dracula Blood Drive on
Wednesday, October 8th from 2:30pm to
7:30pm at Mount Olive Town Hall.
Residents will be asked to register via an
online link available through Recreation.
Those who donate during this drive will earn
a $5 discount off of their Monster Mash reg-
istration fees too!
For more information or to register please
visit www.MountOliveTownship.com/recre-
ation.html.
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 37
W
ith violence disrupting schools, workplaces, the-
aters and other public gatherings, Mount Olive
police, emergency medical services and fire per-
sonnel got together last week to share ideas and begin
preparing for a day they hope will never come.
This is the first time weve trained together this way,
Police Chief Mark Spitzer told the group, adding that he
hopes there will be more training.
Youll likely have more questions than answers at the
end of the day, Mount Olive Police Capt. Steve Beecher
told the gathering. But this is how the conversation
begins.
The group met first with trainers from the Morris County
Sheriffs Office, who reviewed statistics related to violence
Mount Olive Emergency Services Practice Emergency Tactics Together
in public places and talked about general response concepts.
Then police officers, firefighters and emergency medical
technicians talked about handling major incidents together.
Guided by Mount Olive Police instructors, firefighters and
EMS providers got a glimpse of how police officers train
and began to learn where theyll fit into a response.
Members of the Budd Lake Fire Company, the Budd
Lake First Aid Squad and the Flanders Fire Company #1
and Rescue Squad joined local police officers at the event.
Its important that we learn from each other so we can
work together if we ever have a major event in town, said
Flanders Fire Chief Frank Zeller. If we dont know how to
work with each other, well just be in each others way and
be more of a problem than a help.
It certainly gets you thinking about training, equipment
and preparation, said Flanders EMS Capt. Nicole Shields.
We have a lot to learn from each other, said Budd Lake
Fire Chief Robert Sheard. Simple things like the words we
use to describe a building or an action can be different from
organization to organization.
Its interesting that we have the same ultimate goals, but
each organization must handle a different facet of the chal-
lenges well
face to accomplish those goals, added Cassandra Issler,
captain of Budd Lake First Aid Squad.
Three of the agencies have their own websites --
www.flanders-fire-rescue.org, www.buddlakefire.org;
www.mopd.org -- with more information about each organ-
ization. Information about the Budd Lake First Aid Squad is
available on Facebook.
T
he Jonathan Slusher Memorial 5K Run/Walk and Kids
Fun Run, a sanctioned USATF-NJ Grand Prix Race,
begins at 1PM on Sunday, Oct 5 at the bridge in
Califon. The course follows River Road in Califon, loops left
at Hoffman's Crossing, continues back on the Columbia Trail,
finishing at the train station. This is an event within the
Califon Street Festival so non-running family members will
have plenty of exciting things to do at the festival.
Last year's race was run by 127 runners and walkers and 10
children. Sixteen-year-old Erin McLaughlin of Califon fin-
ished first overall with a time of 19:41. Warren Geist of
Asbury was the top finisher in the men's division with a time
of 22:53. Anthony Antonaccio, Sr. finished first in the walkers
division with a time of 48:18. The current course record for
runners is held by David Reed of Middletown with a time of
16:27.3.
The Race is sponsored by the Jonathan Slusher Memorial
Scholarship Foundation a 501-c-3 charity. For the past three
years, in Jon's memory, the foundation has funded 13 schol-
arships of $1,000 each for area high school seniors.
Register on line at http://www.runracenet/finda
race.php?id=14278NJ or at jonhslusher.org. Checks can be
made payable to the Jonathan Slusher Memorial Scholarship
Foundation and mailed to 79 Guinea Hollow Road, Lebanon,
NJ 08833.. For more information call 908-832-7383.
The Jonathan Slusher Memorial 5K Run
Page 38, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
By Michele Guttenberger
T
homas Edison had an unconventional education. He
did not start school until he was eight years old. Port
Heron Michigan did not have a public school so he
attended the private Reverend G. B. Engle School that was
closest to his home. This school had rigid classroom disci-
pline and Edison had a free inquisitive spirt that could not
be tamed. The school claimed Edison was a slow and rest-
less pupil and he needed strict reprimanding. His mother
Nancy Edison strongly disagreed with the schools evalua-
tion of her child. Fortunately, Nancy Edisons past profes-
sion was being a Canadian school teacher and her solution
was to home school her own son. The academic course
work Nancy Edison helped to motivate her son came from
reading R.G. Parker's School of Natural Philosophy and in
the later years from The Cooper Union (http://www.coop-
er.edu/). Historians estimate that Edison had less than a
year of classroom schooling in his lifetime. Yet, he had
great academic skills and a real passion for reading books.
Many of the books he read were advanced literary works for
his age.
In Edisons boyhood era, child labor laws were nonexist-
ent or very lax. It was not unusual for children twelve years
of age to procure regular employment with minimal adult
supervision. The Fort Gratiot train depot was a just a short
stroll from the Edison family home. So, at the age of
twelve, Edison found his first job working for the railroad.
He became a candy butcher on the Grand Trunk Railroad
selling snacks and newspapers to passengers. He got to
experience traveling each day on the sixty-mile run from
Port Huron to Detroit. Preteenager Edison hitched a ride on
the best the late 19th Century offered in distance high speed
transportation while most adults were still traveling by
horse and carriage to their jobs. The long lay overs in this
city presented him with a real world of discovery. This
enabled a precocious young boy the time to explore the big
metropolis on his own terms. He was given several hours
each day to the city. He made use of this idle time by join-
ing the Detroit Young Men's Society. This gave him access
to the place of his dreams, a large library and reading room.
Edison recalled his childhood library visits stating "I didn't
read a few books, I read the library."
Edisons childhood jobs kept him in the epicenter of
technology. It was the rail system that also ushered in the
telegraph system. The telegraph area was news the network
center that provided the information for the newspaper pub-
lication industry. As the rail station newspaper boy, he was
in the epicenter of all national news during a momentous
time of Americas own Civil War. Young Edison was alert-
ed to milestone battlefront news hours or even days before
the rest of America. This new technology of the telegraph
piqued his interest. He got to witness the telegram transmis-
sions being relayed and he read all he could about telegraph
communications with dreams of being an operator of this
new technology. Edison wish came true by a twist of fate.
Edison got the telegraph operator position when he saved
three-year-old Jimmie MacKenzie from a runaway train
heading his way. Jimmie's father was the Mount Clemens,
Michigan station agent J.U. MacKenzie and his gratitude
for saving his sons life was to train Edison as the new tele-
graph operator. This was a job that started the innovative
and technical journey that would become the hallmark of
his ingenious life.
Thomas Edison had an extraordinary blended education
of dual experimental and academic learning. But his deep-
est gratitude was to his professional academic teacher with
these sentiments "My mother was the making of me. She
was so true, so sure of me; and I felt I had something to live
for, someone I must not disappoint." And Thomas Edisons
childhood Fort Gratiot Depot was turned into The Thomas
Edison Depot Museum that offers educational programs in
electricity, energy, communications and magnetism to Port
Hurons local children.
See the results of this extraordinary education. Visit the
Thomas Alva Edison Museum - NPS - Open Wednesday
through Sunday. Hours are 10:00am - 4:00pm. Admission
Fee is $7.00 - 211 Main Street West Orange, NJ 07052 Visit
website for more details http://www.nps.gov/edis/index.ht
Thomas Edison Had An Extraordinary Education
Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News News, September 2014, Page 39
Page 40, September 2014, Tell Them You Saw It In The Mt. Olive News Like us on facebook www.facebook.com/mypaperonline
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I
n the spirit of community collaboration
and teamwork taught through youth
sports, ROUTE 46 CHEVROLET is
supporting Mount Olive Soccer Club
through the Chevrolet Youth Soccer
Program. This sponsorship will include
both monetary and equipment donations
during the 2014 youth soccer season.
Chevrolet Youth Soccer is a grassroots
initiative that establishes a positive relation-
ship between local dealers and the commu-
nities they serve. ROUTE 46 CHEVRO-
LET is sponsoring Mount Olive Soccer
Club as a part of Chevrolets nation-wide
commitment to support youth sports, one
community at a time. Over the course of the
season, ROUTE 46 CHEVROLET will
donate equipment to the organization which
may include: soccer balls, ball bags, ball
pumps, field cones, coachs kits, corner
flags, scrimmage vests, mini pop-up goals
and first aid kits.
Also, thanks to ROUTE 46 CHEVRO-
LET and other participating area Chevrolet
dealers, youth soccer participants will have
a chance to attend a free youth clinic with
local professional soccer coaches.
We are looking forward to a great sea-
son with Mount Olive Soccer Club that will
be filled with exciting games and an
enhanced experience for the teams through
the equipment and cash donations Dave
Shapiro, of ROUTE 46 CHEVROLET said.
Chevrolet Youth Soccer is just one exam-
ple of how committed our dealership is to
supporting the youth and families in our
community.
The 2014 program will provide assis-
tance to nearly 300 organizations in the
Northeastern region and Chevrolet dealers
will contribute over $500,000 in monetary
and equipment donations.
Rt. 46 Chevy is located at 412 U.S. 46,
Budd Lake, NJ 07828. (877) 835-4041
Local Chevrolet Dealer Scores
A Goal Through Successful
Youth Soccer Program
Next Issue Date October 21, 2014
Deadline October 8
Call Joe for info. 973-809-4784
Mayor Rob Greenbaum spoke with 3rd Grader Sana Anwar during the special event Late Night at
Mt. Playmore. Sana was very excited being able to play at Mt. Playmore that evening as well as meet-
ing the Mayor of her town.
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