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University of Sarajevo

Faculty of Philosophy
English Department
Contemporary English language II











PORTFOLIO TOPICS:

Cars and driving in the United Kingdom;
Tea tradition in the United Kingdom;
Lord George Gordon Byron;
Mehmedalija Mak Dizdar.










Teaching assistant: Students:
Selma uliman Merima Zahirovi
Maida Krupi
Amina Kurtovi

Sarajevo, April 2011
2
Contents:

1.0 Cars and driving in the UK...........................................................................................3
1.1 Introduction...............................................................................................................3
1.2 History of driving......................................................................................................4
1.3 Left-driving and right-driving countries...................................................................5
1.4 UK cars.....................................................................................................................6
1.5 National Speed Limit for driving in the UK..............................................................7
2.0 Tea tradition in the United Kingdom...........................................................................9
2.1 Introduction...............................................................................................................9
2.2 History of Tea Time................................................................................................10
2.3 British tea ritual......................................................................................................11
2.4 Tea visits.................................................................................................................12
3.0 Lord George Gordon Byron........................................................................................16
3.1 Introduction.............................................................................................................16
3.2 Biography................................................................................................................17
4.0 Mehmedalija Mak Dizdar...........................................................................................20
4.1 Introduction.............................................................................................................20
4.2 Biography and work................................................................................................21
4.3 Dizdars poem.........................................................................................................23
4.4 Kameni spava-Stone sleeper........................................................................24
5.0 Sources........................................................................................................................26









3
1.1
1.0 Cars and driving in the UK


About a quarter of the world drives on the left, and the countries that do are mostly old
British colonies.In the past, almost everybody travelled on the left side of the road
because that was the most sensible option for feudal, violent societies. Since most people
are right-handed, swordsmen preferred to keep to the left in order to have their right arm
nearer to an opponent and their scabbard further from him. Moreover, it reduced the
chance of the scabbard (worn on the left) hitting other people. Furthermore, a right-
handed person finds it easier to mount a horse from the left side of the horse, and it would
be very difficult to do otherwise if wearing a sword (which would be worn on the left). It
is safer to mount and dismount towards the side of the road, rather than in the middle of
traffic, so if one mounts on the left, then the horse should be ridden on the left side of the
road.
Introduction:
(http://users.telenet.be/worldstandards/driving%20on%20the%20left.htm#history)








4
(
1.2 History of driving:
The French Revolution of 1789 gave a huge impetus to right-hand travel in Europe. The
fact is, before the Revolution, the aristocracy traveled on the left of the road, forcing the
peasantry over to the right, but after the storming of the Bastille and the subsequent
events, aristocrats preferred to keep a low profile and joined the peasants on the right. A
change was carried out all over continental Europe by Napoleon. The reason it changed
under Napoleon was because he was left handed and his armies had to march on the right
so he could keep his sword arm between him and any opponent. From then on, any part
of the world which was at some time part of the British Empire was thus left hand and
any part colonized by the French was right hand.
http://users.telenet.be/worldstandards/driving%20on%20the%20left.htm#history)
With the expansion of travel and road building in the 1800s, traffic regulations were
made in every country. Left-hand driving was made mandatory in Britain in 1835. In the
1960s the countrys conservative powers did everything they could to nip the proposal in
the bud. Furthermore, the fact that it would cost billions of pounds to change everything
round wasnt much of an incentive. Today, only four European countries still drive on the
left: the United Kingdom, Ireland, Cyprus and Malta.
(http://users.telenet.be/worldstandards/driving%20on%20the%20left.htm#history)








5
Left-driving countries
1.3 Left-driving and right-driving countries:

Right-driving countries
Anguilla Dominica Bermuda Afghanistan Kuwait Laos
Antigua and
Barbuda
Cayman
Islands
Bhutan Albania Korea Latvia
Australia Brunei Botswana Angola J ordan Lebanon
Bahamas Cyprus Cook Islands Argentina Italy Libya
Bangladesh Fiji Christmas
Island
Bosnia and
Herzegovina
Israel Luxemburg
Barbados Guyana East Timor Brazil Iraq Macedonia
United
Kingdom
Isle of Man Falkland Isles Bulgaria Iran Madagascar
Virgin
Islands
Hong Kong Grenada Canada Hungary United States
Zambia Ireland Channel
Islands
Chile Serbia Mexico
Zimbabwe Indonesia Kiribati Croatia Haiti Mongolia
Uganda J amaica Cocos Islands China Greece Monaco
South Africa J apan Macau Colombia Ghana Morocco
Samoa Kenya Malawi Montenegro Germany Niger
Tonga Malta Lesotho Cuba Georgia Nigeria
Thailand Namibia Mozambique Denmark Gambia Panama
Singapore Nauru Pakistan Dominican
Republic
Gabon Peru
Sri Lanka New Zealand Saint Lucia Estonia France Qatar

(http://users.telenet.be/worldstandards/driving%20on%20the%20left.htm#rightdriving)

6
1.4 UK cars
There are three main roads in Britain:
"M" roads are like American freeways. They are known as motorways and are fast roads.
They have three or four lanes. "A" roads are not controlled-access: they range from two-
lane divided highways ("dual carriage ways") down to one-lane roads. They are the main
routes between towns. "B" roads are the smallest of the three. They may be in the open or
have impentrable foliage right up to the road. In Britain the steering wheel is on the right.
However the pedals are in the same position as in left-handed cars, with the accelerator
(gas pedal) on the right. The gears and almost always the handbrake (parking brake) is
operated with the left hand.Most cars in Britain are manual cars i.e have a gear stick.
http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/driving.html)

(http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/driving.html)

1. (http://retrouver.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/driving_left_0903.jpg)
2. (http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/driving.html)

7
The minimum age for driving a car in the UK is 17, and 16 for riding a moped or
motorbike with a maximum engine capacity of 50cc. (
1.5 National Speed Limit for driving in the UK
http://www.woodlands-
junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/driving.html)
There are some 225,000 miles (362,000 km) of roads in Britain. Many of the roads are
built on the old roads laid down by the Romans centuries ago. Roads in Britain range
from wide modern motorways down to narrow country lanes usually bordered by hedges,
stone walls, grassy banks or ditches. Cities and towns tend to have compact streets
because they date back to well before cars were invented, and were certainly not planned
for large lorries (trucks).All speed limits and distances, on signs, are given in miles or
miles per hour. 1 mile is about 1.6 km. (http://www.woodlands-
junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/driving.html)
Round signs indicate speed limits with the limit amount circled by a red band. When the
speed limit has stopped then there is a black line at an angle crossing over a white circle.

Maximum speed limit in miles per
hour
National speed limits apply



(http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/driving.html)
Motorways and dual carriage ways: 112km/h / 70mph
The National Speed limits
Unrestricted single carriageway roads: 96km/h / 60mph
Built up areas e.g. towns and villages: 48km/h / 30mph
Residential areas: 35km/h / 20mph
8
The following national speed limits apply to all roads unless there are signs to indicate
otherwise - all speeds are shown in MPH.
Type of
Vehicles
Built-up
Areas
Single
Carriageway
Dual
Carriageway
Motorways
National
Speed
limits -
unless you
are one of
the
following
groups:
30 60 70 70
30
Cars
towing
caravans &
trailers
50 60 60
30
Buses and
Coaches
(Less than
12 meters
long)
50 60 70
30
Goods
Vehicles
(less than
7.5 tonnes
max laden
weight
50 60 70
30
HGV's
(more than
7.5 tonnes
max laden
weight)
40 50 60

(http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/driving.html)
(WORD COUNT: 988)
9
2.0 Tea tradition in the United Kingdom

2.1 Introduction:
Britain, and particularly England, is strongly associated with tea. A cup of tea is a British
tradition, and many people cannot think of the country without thinking of tea. The usual
story for the origin of tea drinking involves leaves from a Camellia plant accidentally
falling into a pot of boiling water 4,700 years ago. The Chinese Emperor Shen Nung is
then said to have drunk the resulting brew and liked it. Tea drinking remained a Chinese
and then a J apanese custom for many centuries, the drinking of tea becoming formalized,
particularly in the J apanese tea ceremony.
(http://www.infobritain.co.uk/Tea.htm)

(http://blogs.ibs-llc.net/media/shared/global/may-tea9.jpg)

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2.2 History of Tea Time
Prior to the introduction of tea into Britain, the English had two main meals, breakfast
and dinner. Breakfast was ale, bread, and beef. During the middle of the eighteenth
century, dinner for the upper and middle classes had shifted from noontime to an evening
meal that was served at a fashionable late hour. (http://chriselbert.com/Tag/tea/)
Dinner was a long, massive meal at the end of the day. Afternoon tea was introduced in
England by Anna, the seventh Duchess of Bedford, in the year 1840. The Duchess would
become hungry around four o'clock in the afternoon. The evening meal in her household
was served fashionably late at eight o'clock, thus leaving a long period of time between
lunch and dinner. The Duchess asked that a tray of tea, bread and butter (some time
earlier, the Earl of Sandwich had had the idea of putting a filling between two slices of
bread) and cake be brought to her room during the late afternoon. This became a habit of
hers and she began inviting friends to join her.
This pause for tea became a fashionable social event. During the 1880's upper-class and
society women would change into long gowns, gloves and hats for their afternoon tea
which was usually served in the drawing room between four and five o'clock.
Nowadays however, in the average suburban home, afternoon tea is likely to be just a
biscuit or small cake and a mug of tea, usually produced using a teabag.
(http://www.life123.com/question/Afternoon-Tea-in-England)








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The kettle is boiled and water poured into a tea pot.
2.3 British tea ritual

A typical semi-formal British tea ritual might run as follows:
Water is swirled around the pot to warm it and then poured out.
Loose tea leaves-nowadays often tea bags or the dusts from a ripped-open tea
bag are then added to the pot.
Water is added to the pot and allowed to brew for several minutes while a tea
cosy is placed on the pot to keep the tea warm. If the tea is allowed to brew
for too long, id est more than 10 minutes, it will become "stewed", resulting in
a very bitter, astringent taste.
Milk may be added to the tea cup, the host asking the guest if milk is wanted,
although milk may alternatively be added after the tea is poured.
A tea strainer, like a miniature sieve, is placed over the top of the cup and the
tea poured in.
The straight black tea is then given to guests and they are allowed to add milk
and sugar to their taste.
The pot will normally hold enough tea so as not to be empty after filling the
cups of all the guests. If this is the case, the tea cosy is replaced after everyone
has been served.
(http://www.tealandia.com/british.html)





12
Bettys
2.4 Tea visits
The first Bettys tea room opened in Harrogate, Yorkshire in 1919. Its founder was a
Swiss confectioner Frederick Belmont, who intended to move to the south coast of
England to set up his own business. In a new country, unable to speak a word of the
language, he got on the wrong train and ended up in Yorkshire. After initial dismay,
Frederick decided he liked Yorkshire and set up his business there. His tea shop, Bettys
was an immediate success. In the 1920s Frederick was able to open branches elsewhere
in Yorkshire, and there are now branches in York, Northallerton, Ilkley, and at the Royal
Horticultural Society gardens at Harlow Carr. The York tea room was particularly
popular during the Second World War. American and Canadian aircrew used to meet
there, and many of these men engraved their signatures on Bettys' Mirror using a
diamond pen. The mirror remains on display at Bettys in York today. Bettys tea rooms
remain extremely popular. It is one of the many ironies of national identity that shops
considered so traditionally English were actually set up by a Swiss emigre, who didn't
speak a word of English, and got lost on his way to the south coast.
(http://www.infobritain.co.uk/Tea.htm)

http://www.infobritain.co.uk/Tea.htm
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Cutty Sark
The tea clipper Cutty Sark is now in dry dock in Greenwich. She was built in 1869, to
win the race to bring the prized first tea crop of the season round the Cape of Good Hope
to Britain. The Suez Canal, through which sailing ships could not pass, opened in the
same year. This meant Cutty Sark's time was over even as she was being launched.
Although Cutty Sark carried tea only until 1877 she represented the peak of clipper ship
technology, set many speed records and remained as a working ship until 1938. Cutty
Sark was damaged in a fire which broke out on the 21st of May 2007. It is hoped that the
ship will eventually be restored.
(http://www.infobritain.co.uk/Tea.htm)

(http://withfriendship.com/images/h/36537/cutty-sark6.jpg)



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Hay's Galleria
Built in the mid 1850s by Henry Cubitt, this was once the dock receiving tea clipper ships
which had raced around the Cape of Good Hope from China. The area has been carefully
restored and is now an attractive complex of shops and restaurants. Pictures on the wall at
the entrance show Hay's Galleria as it once was. A huge, surreal bronze sculpture of a
ship, called The Navigators,
(
commemorates Hay's Galleria's maritime heritage.
http://www.infobritain.co.uk/Tea.htm)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/ba/Hay%27s_Galleria_-
_September_2007.jpg)

15
The Ritz
There are five sittings everyday, at 11.30am, 1.30pm, 3.30pm, 5.30pm, and 7.30pm. In
the original ceremony, afternoon tea would always be served at 5pm, so for a particularly
authentic experience go for a 5.30pm sitting. The Ritz is a formal environment, and there
is a dress code for public areas. A jacket and tie are advisable for gentlemen. No jeans or
training shoes are permitted. Tea is served in the Palm Court, and booking is essential.
There may be up to a twelve week wait for a table.
(http://www.infobritain.co.uk/Tea.htm)

(http://www.infobritain.co.uk/Ritz.htm)
(WORD COUNT: 1092)



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3.0 Lord George Gordon Byron
Lord George Gordon Byron (1788-1824) was as famous in his lifetime for his personality
cult as for his poetry. He created the concept of the 'Byronic hero' - a defiant, melancholy
young man, brooding on some mysterious, unforgivable event in his past. Byron's
influence on European poetry, music, novel, opera, and painting has been immense,
although the poet was widely condemned on moral grounds by his contemporaries
(
3.1 Introduction:

http://www.online-literature.com/byron/).




(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_Fc2ja6CdPYI/TTuFUPydE9I/AAAAAAAAAEU/7mQF5npQ
a5M/s400/LordByron3.jpeg)


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3.2 Biography:
Lord George Gordon Byron was the son of Captain J ohn Byron, and Catherine Gordon of
Gight, who was his second wife. He was born with a club-foot and became extreme
sensitivity about his lameness.His life did not become easier when he received painful
treatments for his foot by a quack practitioner in 1799. Eventually he got a corrective
boot. At home, Byron's alcoholic governess made sexual advances when he was nine.
According to some sources, the lord who rented his mansion before he inherited it also
seduced Byron. In his works short and stout Byron glorified proud heroes, who overcome
hardships. The poet himself was only 5 feet 8 1/2 inches tall and his widely varying
weight ranged from 137 to 202 pounds. He once said that everything he swallowed was
instantly changed to tallow and deposited on his ribs.One of his friends noted that at the
age of about 30 he looked 40 and "the knuckles of his hands were lost in
fat."(http://www.readprint.com/author-15/Lord-George-Gordon-Byron-books).Byron
spent his early childhood years in poor surroundings in Aberdeen, where he was educated
until he was ten. His father died in 1791, and the fifth baron's grandson was killed in
1794. After he inherited the title and property of his great-uncle in 1798, he went on to
Dulwich, Harrow, where he excelled in swimming, and Cambridge, where he piled up
depths and aroused alarm with bisexual love affairs. Staying at Newstead in 1802, he
probably first met his half-sister, Augusta Leigh.At the age of fifteen he fell in love with
Mary Chaworth,his distant cousin, whom he wrote the poem 'To Emma'
(http://www.readprint.com/author-15/Lord-George-Gordon-Byron-books). In 1807
appeared Byron's first collection of poetry, Hours of Idleness.It received bad reviews.
The poet answered his critics with satire English Bards and Scotch Reviews in 1808.Next
year he took his seat in the House of Lords, and set out on his grand tour, visiting Spain,
Albania, Greece, and the Aegean. Success came in 1812 when Byron published the first
two cantos of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage."I awoke one morning and found myself
famous," he later said (http://www.readprint.com/author-15/Lord-George-Gordon-Byron-
books).In the summer of 1813, Byron apparently entered into a more than brotherly
relationship with his half-sister Augusta Leigh with whom he was later suspected of
having an incestuous relationship.In 1814 Augusta gave birth to Elizabeth Medora, who
18
was generally supposed to be Byron's. Byron married Anne Isabella Milbanke in 1815.
The marriage was unhappy, and they obtained legal separation next year.
When the rumors of his incest had raised and debts were accumulating, Byron left
England in 1816, never to return. ''The only virtue they honor in England is
hypocrisy,''(http://www.readprint.com/author-15/Lord-George-Gordon-Byron-books), he
once wrote a friend. Byron spent two years in Italy. Byron lived with Teresa, Countess
Guiccioli, in Venice, and followed her household to Ravenna. Teresa left her husband for
Byron. During the years in Italy, Byron wrote Lament of Tasso, Mazeppa, the Prophecy
of Dante, and started Don Juan, his satiric masterpiece. While in Ravenna and Pisa,
Byron became deeply interested in drama, and wrote among others The two Foscari,
Sardanapalus, Cain and the unfinished Heaven and Earth. After a long creative
period, Byron had come to feel that action was more important than poetry. With good
wishes from Goethe, Byron sailed to Greece to aid the Greek's, who had risen against
their Ottoman overlords. However, before Byron saw any serious military action, he
contracted the fever from which he died in Missolonghi on 19 April 1824.The Greeks
wished to bury him in Athens, but only his heart stayed in the country. Part of his skull
and his internal organs had been removed for souvenirs. Byron's body was returned to
England but refused by the deans of both Westminister and St Paul's. Finally, Byron's
coffin was placed in the family vault at Hucknall Torkard, near Newstead Abbey in
Nottinghamshire (http://www.online-literature.com/byron/). Here are some quotes of
Byron:
Always laugh when you can. It is cheap medicine.
For the sword outwears its sheath, And the soul wears out the breast, And the
heart must pause for breath, And love itself have rest.
How sweet and soothing is this hour of calm! I thank thee, night! for thou has
chased away these horrid bodements which, amidst the throng, I could not dissipate; and
with the blessing of thy benign and quiet influence now will I to my couch, although to
rest is almost wronging such a night as this.
[Poetry] is the lava of the imagination whose eruption prevents an earthquake.
"Like the measles, love is most dangerous when it comes late in life."
19
"I have great hopes that we shall love each other all our lives as much as if we had
never married at all. "
"Hate is by far the greatest pleasure; men love in haste, but detest in leisure. "
"I love not man the less, but nature more"
"There is something pagan in me that I cannot shake off. In short, I deny nothing,
but doubt everything."
"In secret we met -
In silence I grieve,
That thy heart could forget,
Thy spirit deceive.
If I should meet thee
After long years,
How should I greet thee? -
With silence and tears."
(http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/44407.George_Gordon_Byron)
(WORD COUNT: 950)















20
4.0 Mehmedalija Mak Dizdar

(
4.1 Introduction:

Mehmedalija Mak Dizdar was probably one of the greatest Bosnian and Herzegovina
poets of the 2nd half of the 20th century. Dizdar was a prominent figure in cultural life of
Bosnia and Herzegovina, working as the editor in chief of the daily "Osloboenje", head
of a few state-sponsored publishing houses and, finally, as a professional writer and the
president of "Writers union of Bosnia and Herzegovina" until his death.
http://www.uik.ba/pisci.php)
Dizdar's most famous poem collection "Kameni spava"; -" The Stone Sleeper" (1966),
was inspired by the cult traditional art of steci. Other collections of Dizdar, such as
"Vidovopoljske noi", "Plivaica", "Okrutnosti kruga", "Koljena za madonu", "Modra
rijeka" and others, are also very popular among poetry lovers.
(http://www.bhmisijaun.org/culture.html)
















21
(
4.2 Biography and work
Mehmedalija Mak Dizdar was born in Stolac, Bosnia and Herzegovina in 1917. In 1936,
Dizdar relocated to Sarajevo where he attended and graduated from the Gymnasium.
Dizdar spent his World War II years as a supporter of the Communist Partisans. After the
war, Dizdar was a prominent figure in the cultural life of Bosnia and Herzegovina,
working as the editor-in-chief of the daily "Osloboenje" (Liberation).He served as head
of a few state-sponsored publishing houses and eventually became a professional writer
and the President of the Writers' Union of Bosnia and Herzegovina, a post he held until
his death.
http://www.okc-
gradacac.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1822:mehmedalija-
mak-dizdar-1917-1971&catid=304:znameniti-bonjaci&Itemid=546).As a poet, Dizdar
has in two poetic collections and longer poems, "Kameni spava"-"Stone sleeper" (1966-
1971) and "Modra rijeka" (1971) achieved magnificent fusion of seemingly disparate
elements: inspired by medieval Bosnian tombstones ("steci" or "mramorovi"/marbles)
and their gnomic inscriptions on ephemerality of life, he produced exquisitely structured
collection of pregnant verses saturated with his own, intimate, and yet universal vision of
life and death that owes much to the Christian and Muslim Gnostic sensibility of life as a
passage between "tomb and stars" - but not curtailed by any dogma.
(http://www.uik.ba/pisci.php).Mak Dizdar also fought against the forced influence of the
Serbian language on the Bosnian language, as Dizdar called it, in his article "Marginalije
o jeziku i oko njega", -ivot, XIX/11 - 12, Sarajevo, 1970, 109-120. (http://www.okc-
gradacac.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1822:mehmedalija-
mak-dizdar-1917-1971&catid=304:znameniti-bonjaci&Itemid=546).After the collapse of
Communism and following the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Dizdar's poetic magnum
opus has remained the cornerstone of modern Bosnia-Herzegovina literature.Dizdar's
vision of life and death expresses, paradoxically, both Gnostic horror of corporeality and
a sense of blessedness of the entire earth and Universe. Seems that as diverse strands as
radiance of Bosnian pre-Ottoman cultural heritage exemplified in writings of Bosnian
Christians, sayings of heterodox Islamic visionary mystics and Croatian vernacular
22
linguistic idiom that fully emerged in 1400s, rich with archaic and spiritual meanings,
have fused in a remarkable poetic opus- firmly rooted in Bosnian soil and universal in
aesthetic and spiritual eminence (http://www.bhmisijaun.org/culture.html).












































23
Unwilling Warrior
1

1
Translated by Francis R. Jones

This old head has lived through many a war
From the hills of the north to the south seas
shore
And glory wreathed it everywhere
To the horn and sackbuts warring blare
In a single battle I caught two wounds
But they healed my wounds with a flowers
juice
Until I lost my right hand in a final fight
And all my glory and praise vanished in
bloody days
Glory like mist which rises into the skies
Glory like straw which blazes up and dies
To be given back my shilling is nothing new
on earth
To be left alone on an empty road is poor
reward
They whispered round me Now thats what
his life were worth
They do not know that wounded I still
overheard
Nor do they know that I will deal my final
blow
To this evil fate whose ways are known
To me alone



(http://www.anvilpresspoetry.com/pages/
store/products/ec_view.asp?PID=124)


Nevoljni vojno
2
Sobom i sam

Kroz mnoge ova glava vojne projde
Od morja junog do sjevernog gorja
I svugdje su je vjenale ast i slava
Uz zvuke ubojne roga i trube strojne
U bitci jednoj dvogubo ranjen sam ja
Rane mi vadili mlijeom od cvijeta
U rvanju potonjem al desnica mi pala
A hvala i slava na dane krvi na rane nestala
Slava ko magla to se u nebo nenadno digla
Slava ko slama to je u oganj stigla
to ostah bez slube novo nije na svijetu
tom
Bez drube to ostah hudo je na putu pustom
Okolo apu kako mi ivot bje uzaludan
Ne znaju da ranjen ovako ve sam budan
Ne znaju kako u potonji udarac da dam
Zlehudi o kojoj sada sve znam

2
(http://mssbusovaca.com.ba/www%20lektir
e/IV-R/Mak_Dizdar-Kameni_spavac.pdf)

24
Inspired by tombstones and their inscriptions, Mak Dizdars rich and haunting poems in
"Kameni spava", his most famous work, are a journey into the mysterious heart of
medieval Bosnia. The poems form a three-way dialogue between the modern poet, the
Christian heretics awaiting J udgment Day beneath their enigmatically-carved tombstones,
and the heretic-hunters. Beneath the local and temporal, Dizdar explores universal issues:
the value of resistance, though it might be futile; of faith, though it might be illusory; and
of life, though it ends in death.


4.3 Kameni spava-Stone sleeper


(http://sanela.info/ext/wp/sanela/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/Mehmedalija-Mak-
Dizdar.png)
A poem by Mak Dizdar on the memorial of the Tuzla massacre: "Ovdje se ne ivi samo
da bi se ivjelo. Ovdje se ne ivi samo da bi se umrlo. Ovdje se i umire da bi se ivjelo."
25

(http://www.knjiga.ba/images/products/kameni_spavac_brs.jpg)
Steak je za mene ono to nije za druge, ono to na njem i u njemu nisu drugi unijeli ni
znali da vide. Jest kamen, ali jeste i rije, jest zemlja, ali jeste i nebo, jeste materija, ali
jeste i duh, jest krik, ali jeste i pjesma, jest smrt, ali jeste i ivot, jest prolost, ali jeste i
budunost. (http://www.bosnacitat.com/citati/15260)


(WORD COUNT: 929)









26

5.0 Sources:
http://users.telenet.be/worldstandards/driving%20on%20the%20left.htm#history
http://users.telenet.be/worldstandards/driving%20on%20the%20left.htm#rightdriv
ing
http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/questions/driving.html
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