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Chapter 1.10 Logic Gates
1.10 (a) Function of AND, OR, NOT, NAND & NOR Logic gates and
their input/output.
Microprocessors are the central hardware that runs computers. There are several components that
make a processor. The first is the transistor. Next, are logic gates where you put more than one
transistor to work with others. The microprocessor works with binary arithmetic by using binary
math to perform operations. When a microprocessor is designed, along with other design focus
areas "Logic gate cell library (a library is collection of all low level logic functions like AND,
OR and NOT etc.), which is used to implement the logic" is also deeply planned and developed.
Logic gates carry out the instructions mathematical or otherwise that a processor performs, for
example a logic gate performs a logical operation on one or more logic inputs and produces a
single logic output. When you connect a variety of logic gates together, the results are circuits.
The logic is called Boolean logic and is most commonly found in digital circuits. Following five
logic gates are part of syllabus.
1. AND gate,
2. OR gate,
3. NOT gate,
4. NAND gate, and
5. NOR gate.
AND gate:

AND gate symbol
The AND gate is a digital logic gate that behaves according to the table
on your right. A HIGH output (1) results only if both the inputs to the
AND gate are HIGH (1). If neither or only one input to the AND gate
is HIGH, a LOW output results.
INPUT OUTPUT
A B A AND B (Q)
0 0 0
0 1 0
1 0 0
1 1 1
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OR Gate:

OR gate symbol
The OR gate is a digital logic gate that behaves according to the table on
your right. A HIGH output (1) results if one or both the inputs to the gate
are HIGH (1). If neither input is HIGH, a LOW output (0) results.


NOT gate (Inverter):

NOT gate symbol
In digital logic, an inverter or NOT gate is a logic gate which implements
logical negation. Not gate represents perfect switching behavior.

NAND gate:

NAND gate symbol
The Negated AND, NO AND or NAND gate is the opposite of the
digital AND gate, and behaves in a manner that corresponds to the
opposite of AND gate, as shown in the truth table on the right. A LOW
output results only if both the inputs to the gate are HIGH. If one or
both inputs are LOW, a HIGH output results.
The NAND gate is significant because any Boolean function can be
implemented by using a combination of NAND gates.
INPUT
A B
OUTPUT
A + B (Q)
0 0 0
0 1 1
1 0 1
1 1 1
INPUT
A
OUTPUT
NOT A
0 1
1 0
INPUT
A B
OUTPUT
A NAND B (Q)
0 0 1
0 1 1
1 0 1
1 1 0
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NOR gate:

NOR gate symbol
The NOR gate is a digital logic gate that implements logical NOR - it
behaves according to the truth table to the right. A HIGH output (1)
results if both the inputs to the gate are LOW (0). If one or both input is
HIGH (1), a LOW output (0) results. NOR is the result of the negation of
the OR operator.


INPUT
A B
OUTPUT
A NOR B (Q)
0 0 1
0 1 0
1 0 0
1 1 0
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1.10 (b) Calculate outcome from a set of logic gates.

In this part 1.10 (b) we will explore the application of Boolean algebra in the design of electronic
circuits. The basic elements of circuits are gates. Each type of gate implements a Boolean
operation.
Consider Boolean expression a(x)=x; i.e., a(x) is the complement of x. Now a(0)=1 and a(1) =0.
This Boolean operation, i.e., compliment can be implemented using a device called NOT gate or
the Inverter. It can be expressed as below:

NOT gate (INVERTER)
Now consider Boolean expression a(x,y)=xy; i.e., a is the Boolean product of x & y. As we know
that a(0,0)=0, a(0,1)=0, a(1,0)=0 and a(1,1)=1. This Boolean operation, i.e., product can be
implemented using a device called AND gate. It can be expressed as below:

AND gate
Next consider Boolean expression a(x,y)=x+y; i.e., a is the Boolean sum of x & y. As we know
that a(0,0)=0, a(0,1)=1, a(1,0)=1 and a(1,1)=1. This Boolean operation, i.e., sum can be
implemented using a device called OR gate. It can be expressed as below:

OR gate
The circuits for expressions xy and xy are shown below in figures (a) and (b), respectively:



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The circuits for expressions x+y and x+y are shown below in figures (a) and (b), respectively:






The circuit for xy and x+y are shown below in figures (a) and (b), respectively:





If a is xy+xy, then it circuit diagram is shown below,



We now break xy and xy and include their own circuits in diagram above and create a new
circuit with four gates.


In order to simplify the circuit above we can split x and y inputs half way and use it for two or
more gates. So the above diagram can be simplified and presented as:









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Truth Table:
A truth table is a mathematical table used in logicspecifically in connection with Boolean
algebra and Boolean functionsto compute the functional values of logical expressions on each
of their functional arguments, that is, on each combination of values taken by their logical
variables. In particular, truth tables can be used to tell whether an expression is true for all valid
input values, that is, logically valid.
Practically, a truth table is composed of one column for each input variable (for example, A and
B), and one final column for all of the possible results of the logical operation that the table is
meant to represent (for example, A OR B). Each row of the truth table therefore contains one
possible configuration of the input variables (for instance, A=true B=false), and the result of the
operation for those values. Number of possible rows in a truth table is directly dependant on the
number of inputs and can be easily find out by applying 2
n
, where n is the number of inputs
mentioned in truth table. Truth tables for logic gates are already shown above with their
definitions.
Here is a truth table giving definitions of the most commonly used 5 out of the 16 possible truth
functions of 2 binary inputs (P,Q are thus Boolean variables):
P Q P AND Q P OR Q NOT P NOT Q P NAND Q P NOR Q
1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0
1 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
0 1 0 1 1 0 1 0
0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1

Note that total number of rows is, 2
2
= 4.

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1.10 (c) Producing simple logic circuits from Boolean statements.
Consider the following problem:

If button A or button B are on and button C is off then the alarm X goes on

We can convert this onto logic gate terminology (ON = 1 and OFF = 0):
If (A = 1 OR B = 1) AND (C = NOT 1) then (X = 1)
(Notice: rather than write 0 we use NOT 1)

To draw the logic network, we do each part in brackets first i.e. A = 1 OR B = 1 is one gate then
C = NOT 1 is the second gate. These are then joined together by the AND gate. Once the logic
network is drawn we can then test it using a truth table. Remember the original problem we are
looking for the output to be 1 when A or B is 1 and when C is 0. Thus we get the following logic
network and truth table from the network. Looking at the values in the truth table, we will be
able to clearly see that it matches up with the original problem which then gives us confidence
that the logic network is correct.





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Let us now consider a second problem:

A steel rolling mill is to be controlled by a logic network made up of AND, OR and NOT gates
only. The mill receives a stop signal (i.e. S = 1) depending on the following input bits:



A stop signal (S = 1) occurs when:
either Length, L > 100 metres and Velocity, V < 10 m/s
or Temperature, T < 1000 C and Velocity, V > 10 m/s
Draw a logic network and truth table to show all the possible situations when the stop signal
could be received.

The first thing to do is to try and turn the question into a series of logic gates and then the
problem becomes much simplified.

The first statement can be re-written as: (L = 1 AND V = NOT 1) since Length > 100
metres corresponds to a binary value of 1 and Velocity < 10 m/s corresponds to a binary
value of 0 (i.e. NOT 1).
The second statement can be re-written as (T = NOT 1 AND V = 1) since Temperature <
1000C corresponds to a binary value of 0 (i.e. NOT 1) and Velocity > 10 m/s corresponds
to a binary value of 1
Both these statements are joined together by OR which gives us the logic statement:
if (L = 1 AND V = NOT 1) OR (T = NOT 1 AND V = 1) then S = 1

We can now draw the logic network and truth table to give the solution to the original problem
(input L has been put at the bottom of the diagram just to avoid crossing over of lines; it merely
makes it look neater and less complex and isnt essential):

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Points to consider when studying or teaching 1.10.
Following information is just an opinion and is given for the better understanding of chapter 1.10 so that
students are not under or over taught. Teachers must not limit their visualization just to these points.
1. Permanently refreshing memory should not be taught.
2. Circuits that are used to teach may only have two inputs to every gate,
3. Gates in any given circuit must be limited to 4 in number,
4. To teach gates both circles and actual gates shapes can be used. In any case gate name must be
written inside the gate shape or circle,
5. Teaching gates using their shapes is a better idea,
6. Teaching static memory (SRAM) or dynamic memory (DRAM) is INAPPROPRIATE,
7. Teach students to read circuits and draw simple circuits to produce specific outcomes.
8. Students will be required to fill given truth tables after reading the given circuit,

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Example Questions:
In questions 1 to 6, draw each circuit using their proper symbols and produce truth tables.
Remember that if there are TWO inputs then there will be four (2
2
) possible outputs and if
there are THREE inputs there will be eight (2
3
) possible outputs.
i.e:





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Questions 7 to 10 require both the logic network to be created and also the truth table. The
truth table can be derived from the logic network, but also from the problem. This is a check
that the logic network actually represents the original problem.

(7) A computer will only operate if three switches P, S and T are correctly set. An output
signal (X = 1) will occur if P and S are both ON or if P is OFF and S and T are ON. Design a
logic network and draw the truth table for this network.

(8) A traffic signal system will only operate if it receives an output signal (D = 1). This can
only occur if:
either (a) signal A is red (i.e. A = 0)
or (b) signal A is green (i.e. A = 1) and signals B and C are both red (i.e. B and C are both
0)
Design a logic network and draw a truth table for the above system.

(9) A chemical plant gives out a warning signal (W = 1) when the process goes wrong. A
logic network is used to provide input and to decide whether or not W = 1.



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A warning signal (W = 1) will be generated if
either (a) Chemical Rate < 10 m3/s
or (b) Temperature > 87 C and Concentration > 2 moles
or (c) Chemical rate = 10 m3/s and Temperature > 87 C
Draw a logic network and truth table to show all the possible situations when the warning signal
could be received.

(10) A power station has a safety system based on three inputs to a logic network. A warning
signal (S = 1) is produced when certain conditions occur based on these 3 inputs:



A warning signal (S = 1) will be generated if:
either (a) Temperature > 120C and Cooling Water < 100 l/hr
or (b) Temperature < 120C and (Pressure > 10 bar or Cooling Water < 100 l/hr)

Draw a logic network and truth table to show all the possible situations when the warning signal
could be received.

(11)
(a) Two logic gates are the AND gate and the OR gate. Complete the truth tables for these two
gates:

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(b) Complete the truth table for the following logic circuit:

(12)
(a) (i) Complete the truth table for the following logic circuit:

(ii) Which single logic gate has the SAME function as the above logic circuit? [1]