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HANDBOOK

This handbook provides essential information on the tutorial tasks, blog, tips and helpful guides for the Digital Imaging
Unit
Unit Blog http://dphot.tumblr.com/
Flickr Group http://www.ickr.com/groups/phot/
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY
HAND!IN Friday 24th April by 3pm
DPHOT
2013/14
The unit blog will provide you with handouts and links and keep you informed of practical
knowledge in getting to know your camera, software and also taking photographs. Please make sure
you visit the blog as much as possible.
As part of the unit you will have to provide a working journal of your visual ideas and photography. You
have a choice of what to use - blog, sketchbook or both perhaps. Each of you will be used to working in
a particular way and as long as you keep your blog or sketchbook up to date on a weekly basis then
the choice is yours. We will need to see your progress every week.
UNIT BLOG - http://dphot.tumblr.com/
The unit Flickr group is a great way for you to share your photographs with other students on the
unit. I encourage you to seek comments and also look for inspiration. Perhaps join some other
groups?
Flickr Group - http://www.ickr.com/groups/phot/
GETTING STARTED
With any new unit you will need to start thinking about managing your time and work from the start.
You will be handed a series of tasks that will get you using your camera from week 1. Please prepare
your les, camera/s and decide on how you will present your work at the sessions. You will be asked
to discuss your work each week. Please BE PREPARED.
PROJECT MANAGEMENT ! digital cameras enable you to upload your images to a computer with
cables and some now have wireless capabilities.
FOLDERS - Prepare folders on your student drive (5gb storage).
COLLATING / EDITING - Adobe Photoshop, Lightroom, Apple Aperture and Apples iPhoto all have
image browsers to view your work, edit and collate.
EXTERNAL STORAGE - A good way to have easy access and carry around your master les/images
from home and uni. Try and buy 500gb+
CrashPlan - http://www.crashplan.com/ or similar - online data back-up
Drop Box, Google Drive are good for storing data and transfer - also available as mobile apps.
WEBSITES
Flickr Free Account - 1 terabyte upload free. Flickr Pro Account - Unlimited uploads and ad free for
16 per year.
Also Google Picasa which is free
CAMERA ! you will be required to have your own camera for this unit. It needs to be digital and
have if possible, manual controls. Students in the past have used mobile phone cameras and
borrowed high end digital cameras from the photography department. If you are planning on
buying a camera then talk to Gary, Chris or Claire for advice.
Get to know your camera inside out. Experiment with the settings, visit the cameras website and also
look at the Flickr group for your cameras make/model as there are some great discussions forums
with hints and tips about use and experimentation.
SOFTWARE - In class we have access to Adobe Lightroom, Adobe Photoshop and iPhoto. You can
get 30 day free trial of Adobe products from their website at www.adobe.com and iPhoto is free on
Macs. Other solutions are the online version of Photoshop - http://www.photoshop.com/tools and
they also have an iPhone app. Open Source - Photoshop Gimp a free clone of Adobes software -
http://www.gimp.org/
Look around as there are plenty of other similar products http://www.apple.com/aperture/ (Mac
and used by professional photographers), Camera Bag 2 - http://www.nevercenter.com/
-http://www.pixelmator.com/, http://www.photoscape.org/ps/main/index.php , and if you are an
iPhone user then see the next page.
Mobilography / iPhoneography
Apps for photography via mobile phones have become very popular since Apples iPhone and a quick
scan on the app store will give you thousands of choices. Some of the best free apps are:
Photoshop Express
Retro Camera Plus
Mill Colour
Camera Plus
instagram
EyeEm
Best Paid Apps:
Camera Bag
Hipstamatic
Quad Camera
Toy Camera
Tilt Shift Gen
Pro HDR
Loads on the Android too . . apparently.
Flickr Groups:
http://www.ickr.com/groups/mobilography/
http://www.ickr.com/groups/iphoneography-portsmouth/
http://www.ickr.com/groups/iphoneography/
There are hundreds . .
also keep your
blog up to date with
Tumblr app for
mobile
DIGPIM Basics Ideas, help and resources
What Camera?
DIGPIM Basics Ideas, help and resources
What Camera?
WWW.LOMOGRAPHY.COM
DIGITAL SLR
DIGITAL COMPACT
DIGITAL SUPER COMPACT
DIGPIM Basics Ideas, help and resources
MICRO CAMERA
SCANNER AS CAMERA
POLAROID
WWW.POLANOID.NET
PHONE CAMERAS
What Camera?
DIGPIM Basics Ideas, help and resources
What Camera?
Decide on a budget
Always try and get as wide a lens as possible - 24mm/
28mm (not many compact cameras have this)
You do not need an expensive camera - this does not
equal a good photographer.
If you buy a Digital SLR camera then also try and get a
compact.
DIGPIM Basics Ideas, help and resources
What Camera?
Get at least a 2gb memory card (7dayshop.com)
Look on Ebay / Amazon / LCE 2nd Hand store - save
For this unit - mix it up. Try Hi-/Low-Fi
Once you have your camera sorted then GET TO KNOW IT
INSIDE OUT - What are the capabilities? look at user
groups and also join that cameras Flickr Group etc....
DIGPIM Basics Ideas, help and resources
Now you have a camera....
Start to open your eyes to all around you.
Look for shadows, forms, lines, colours,
perspectives, reections, angles,
textures etc
Be a collector - letters, numbers, doors,
hands, grafti, found objects etc
Te camera is an instrument that teaches
people how to see without a camera.
Dorothea Lange
Digital Photography
DPHOT

HEMIS Code U20192
ABSTRACT
This course introduces the underlying principles of digital photography. Students will learn how digital cameras work
and how to create digital images, appreciate experimental, abstract and traditional photographic techniques and
learn how to display, compress and store photographs on a variety of platforms.
AIM
1. To enable students to appreciate the fundamental principles, the technical resources and the creative potential of
digital photography.
LEARNING OUTCOMES
On successful completion of this unit, students should be able to:
1. Demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the application of Digital Photography as an integral element
within design
2. Understand the physical technology and methods responsible for creating digital images
3. Identify how digital photography benefits the industry and aids the print process
Hand In Date: Friday April 24th by 3pm
ASSESSMENT PATTERN
Coursework (100%) The students will produce an evaluative, working journal and a presentation of photographs.
The work will be unsupervised and tutor assessed. You must choose and present your work with close attention to the
relationship/theme. There will be a series of assignments which all relate to the unit aims and generate content for
your final body of work.
Students MUST select core subjects from the 18 listed in the handbookt.
Students will then produce photographs from their selected core subject areas. (a max of 30 photographs)
Delivery
1. A working journal (blog or sketchbook)
2. A presentation of final images either printed, exhibition or online.
Students are expected to produce a portfolio of photographic work and associated journal of process experiments,
image plans, drawings, written and visual material, demonstrating both thematic and technical research and
experimentation in technique, format and media.
This needs to be completed either in a blog or a sketchbook format.
Completed photographic prints and online showcases should be executed with high regard
to presentation and photographic convention and wherever appropriate work should be
fully edited and presented in a professional manner.
NAME !

Assignments ! Have these all been completed to a professional standard?


Magazine Publication | Interview | Techniques | Promotion (40%)
References / URLS / Credits for inspiration / Research / Production & Processes.

Blog / Sketchbook ! Is the Production / Ideas Process clear? (20%)


Screengrabs (video and/or still) / Idea Process / Behind the scenes / Planning /
Editing / Subject Analysis & Feedback / Software Use.
Use of blog /sketchbook to present the above effectively.

Presentation / Evaluation ! Is the final presentation of photographs


suitable for display as a showcase? Have you evaluated your final photographs?
(40%)

Presentation
Quality of work / Relevance / Advertising ! online & offline / Display options and
professional presentation of work / Flow

Evaluation !
Have you described your subjects processes clearly and concisely ?
Have you considered and examined the merits and problems of the subjects?
Have you evaluated your subject matter, equipment and editing?
What you would do differently?
OVERALL MARK
FEEDBACK
Claire Sambrook / Gary Bown 2013
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGING
ASSESSMENT 2013/14
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URBAN
MOTION
MUSIC / GIG
DIGITAL DARKROOM
NIGHT LIGHT
CANDID
PORTRAIT
SEASIDE
WEATHER
LANDSCAPE / CITYSCAPE
COMMERCIAL
NATURE
ARCHITECTURE
FASHION / CULTURE
ABSTRACT
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BLOG EXAMPLES
http://jack-daly.tumblr.com/
http://sd-digialphotography.tumblr.com/
http://katana1.tumblr.com/
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCw9Ff-1Q6k&feature=player_embedded
THERE WILL BE MORE EXAMPLES SHOWN IN CLASS OVER THE YEAR.
Your frst 10,000 photographs are your worst.
Henri Cartier-Bresson
Which of the photographs is my favorite? Te one Im
going to take tomorrow.
Imogen Cunningham
To me, photography is an art of observation. It's about
fnding something interesting in an ordinary place... I've
found it has little to do with the things you see and eve-
rything to do with the way you see them.
Elliott Erwitt
If a day goes by without my doing something related to
photography, it's as though I've neglected something es-
sential to my existence, as though I had forgotten to
wake up.
Richard Avedon
Youve got to push yourself harder. Youve got to start
looking for pictures nobody else could take. Youve got
to take the tools you have and probe deeper.
William Albert Allard
Final Showcase examples
http://robertstocktondigitalphotography.tumblr.com/ http://katana1.tumblr.com/
http://blog.getdesigns.co.uk/
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http://www.selfpublishbehappy.com/
taken from the
Photo Idea Index
Book
SUBJECT EXAMPLE TIPS
Urban city, decay, street, industrial, bridges, city
people,
Always carry your camera, shoot from the hip, turn off
sounds - be quiet, get dirty
Motion Blur, panning, freezing. Motion can also
be implied in a picture by the use of
dynamic composition - for example using
powerful diagonal elements in the frame,
or showing people or objects leaving
from an edge of the frame, perhaps even
cut off by it.
The technical aspects of shooting motion are easy: a
fast shutter speed (or the action or sports setting) will
freeze motion, a slow one will introduce motion blur.
Dont be afraid to experiment with extreme cropping
or split into 3 sections.
Music/Gig Sense of movement, passion, singer and
mic, capture energy and mix of lights,
crowd shots, instruments.
Backstage.
The low lighting environment of a live gig presents
several problems to be overcome, the most trouble-
some being exposure and focus. Film speed 400 and
f2.8 will give you a good overall shot. Unless you are
familiar with the band then you cannot determine what
the lighting will do. Take a spare battery and shoot as
much as possible. Also take a small torch to check
settings etc. Experient with slow shutter speeds to
make the lighting streak.
Digital Darkroom Pushing the limits using photoshop etc,
change the entire look of an image,
extreme cropping, masking and montage.
Stitching various images together to
make one nal shot. Taking layers from
several images to make one.
Remember to save your work as a photoshop le (psd).
Be subtle and dont be afraid to use as many layers,
colours and styles as possible.
www.computerarts.co.uk is great for ideas.
Night Light Car headlights, architecture lighting, ash
outdoors/portrait, action shots with ash,
the moon, cityscape,long exposure,
lasers, copper
A tripod and slow shutter speed to capture headlights.
Or you could rest the camera on a wall for the long
exposure. Experiment with your camera ash settings
and take shots of portraits with car headlights in the
background. Painting with light - use a torch and slow
shutter speed to capture the effects.
Candid Un-posed and unplanned, immediate and
unobtrusive
Technical equipment successfully employed for candid
photography is
typically lightweight, small and
unobtrusive rather than big and intimidating. Timing is
so important with Candid photography so always be
on the look out for an opportunity and carry a small
camera with you. Be sensitive to your subject. In some
countries people will shy away from the camera as
they feel you are taking their soul away by capturing
their image.
Dont use ash!
CORE SUBJECTS
SUBJECT EXAMPLE TIPS
Portrait Close-up, portray character in
environment, lines on face/
abstract, movement, candid, head
and shoulders
The3 general types of portrait photography are: close-ups
or facial shots, upper body shots, or environmental portraits
(where you focus on the subject and the surrounding envi-
ronment that gives the subject character). Some of the best
portraits are where the subjects look completely comfortable
like their not looking at a camera. When people try to smile
or make a certain kind of face for the camera it usually
doesn't seem very genuine. The trick is to capture the image
when the subject(s) aren't necessarily focused on the
camera. The main purpose of portrait photography is to
capture the essence of the subject(s).
Seaside Sand, sea, close-up, landscapes,
splashes, waves, bucket and spade,
amusements,
Many people take shots looking out to sea so why not turn around
at the seashore and look for interesting opportunities. One com!
mon problem with landscape beach photographs is that while
they might capture a beautiful scene they actually have no point
of interest and can as a result be rather empty and boring. When
taking a shot look for a point of interest or focal point that will
give those looking at your photo a place for their eye to rest. Per!
haps its a pattern in the sand, a set of footprints, the crashing of
waves over a rock, a pier etc. Also look for the little things that
tell the story of going to the beach like shoes at the waters edge,
sand castles, sunglasses, etc.
Lastly protect your camera against the salt..it will
kill it!
Weather Snow, wind, rain, sun, storms,
sunsets/sunrises, the effects of
weather on a building, erosion,
melting ice-cream, water on a
window, puddles and reections,
sun rays after a storm and through
trees.
Try to capture the atmosphere as much as possible. A forest
early morning - mist - could work better as black and white to
capture the atmosphere. A close up of a wave and splashes
of sea water could convey a storm?
When it rains you will probably have to use either a longer
shutter speed or a wider aperture because the clouds tend to
also block out direct sunlight.
Landscape/
Cityscape
Skies, mountains, valleys, trees,
rivers, and forests. A landscape is a
section or portion of scenery as
seen from a single viewpoint.
Scenery is the subject of a
landscape image. Typically, people
and animals are not shown in a
landscape, unless they are
relatively small in the image and
have been included in the
composition to show scale.
Normally 3 styles of Landscape
representational, impressionistic
and abstract. Cityscape is the same
as landscape but includes all the
features of an urban setting.
Experiment with having something in the foreground and use
this as your basis to frame the shot. Doing this adds scale to
the overall image.
Timing and opportunity play an important part.
SUBJECT EXAMPLE TIPS
Commercial Photography made or licensed for
the purpose of selling a product,
service or idea where ne-art
photography is created as an end
in itself.
Product pack shots, high street
photography - weddings, portraits,
fashion, travel etc
Work to the client brief and understand the audience that
you are pitching to. For this unit you could look at images of
the city (postcard task or tourism department of the council).
It is important to always make sure that the product that you
are selling is visible and of the highest quality.
Nature Taken outdoors and devoted to
displaying natural elements such as
landscapes, wildlife, plants, and
close-ups of natural scenes and
textures.
Photographing Nature Requires Attention
Whether youre photographing wildlife, plants or a won-
drous sunset, be aware of your surroundings. Follow these
tips to capture the best opportunities for nature photos:
Be aware of all of your senses: your ear may hear something
that your eyes have missed.
Maintain perspective: when changing locations, check out
where you have just been so you know where to travel next
to get another amazing shot.
Pay attention to your surroundings: look up and down, as
well as side to side.
Study your subjects habits: know how to anticipate an up-
coming photo opportunity or when to ee.
Architecture In and outside a building structure
or environment. Old and new,
modern and traditional, small or
large scale. Bridges, doors,
windows. Industrial, Ruins.
Be careful of your angles. Look at the shadows at every
angle - this can help with the mood/texture and also add
depth. Slow lm speed, large depth of eld, slow shutter =
tripod essential or nd a sturdy and straight wall. Look at
abstract, BOLD shapes that pop out. Use a mirror to reect
light and also add a new perspective.
Fashion Trends, culture, clothes - think in the
broadest sense. What is
considered fashionable?
Look at unique settings to showcase the model and the
clothes etc. Dont confuse this with Glamour Photography.
From the early days to the present Fashion Photographers
were/are always the risk-takers and experiment constantly
with light, subject and colour.
Abstract Real subjects, sharp focused and
un-manipulated except for normal
darkroom adjustments such as
contrast, exposure and dodging
and burning. Angles, texture,
macro, reections, shadows,
mirrors, glass. Has no rules.
Use colours/non and patterns to create an images. Let the
viewer be intrigued as to the subject.
Use your imagination
Human Form Photographer Greg Gorman
specialises in Human form.
I dissected each persons face
individually with different tech-
niques, such as lighting, camera
angle, the focal range of various
lenses. You can always hang a
light over someones head and get
an image that looks like the person.
To me, the more interesting images
are ones that leave something to
the imagination.
Get in close and look at obscure angels. Use a macro setting
to photograph the texture of the skin and highlight skin
tones. Play with shadows on the skin.
Self Initiated Open Open
What Makes A Good Picture?
This is the eternal question every photographer asks and is indeed asked perhaps every week. The answer, well
beauty is in the eye of the beholder but there are certain elements within photography that when in place will cer-
tainly produce a better image than when not.
When you are a photographer I believe that you really do start to see and notice things differently. You
begin to notice form, shape, colour and light, which when used together will create a strong photograph.
The following photographic techniques and elements are all part of the photographic creative eye and together are
what help to make a good picture.
1. Which Format
Vertical or horizontal? It is a common mistake made by the amateur photographer to use the camera always in the
horizontal position. This is mainly due to the fact that cameras are made to fit in the hand more comfortably this
way.
However if your subject matter is essentially vertical by nature, like a tall building or the composition of your sub-
ject warrants the vertical format, don't be shy in turning your camera around and using this
format to explore the photographic possibilities.
2. Filling The Frame
How many times has a great shot been ruined by an ugly distracting background? To give your photography more
impact, fill the entire frame with your subject matter. This can be done by either moving in closer or by using a
zoom lens.
3. Where to Place the Subject
Where your subject is placed within your shot will determine its dominance and importance within the image.
Compositionally it is also a good idea not to place your main subject bang centre of the shot. Instead use the rule of
thirds where you place the subject to one side of your frame.
Some cameras have this facility built in, where you can superimpose a grid onto your viewfinder to use as a guide. If
not it is easy to imagine the grid for yourself.
Remember you may have to use auto lock focus to make sure your subject is completely sharp. Simply have click
your camera shutter on your subject then while holding the shutter still, reposition your shot using the rule of thirds
and take the shot.
4. Using the Foreground
Often including foreground detail will help to give your image a sense of depth and distance.
Raising your viewpoint and angling your camera downwards can emphasize the foreground.
5. Moving around your subject
Never be satisfied with one viewpoint of your subject. Take your time and walk around it to see if the composition
can be improved.
Take several different shots from different angles and positions. This will ensure that you will not have missed per-
haps a better shot than you would have first taken.
6. High or low viewpoint?
If you are unable to move around your subject matter, it is still possible to get different view points by either
crouching down and taking your shot pointing upwards.
This may allow you to catch a beautiful sky for your background. Alternatively if you can stand higher than your
subject and point downwards you will be able to fill the frame entirely with your subject, avoid distracting skies
etc.
7. Using Frames Within Frames
It is possible to create well-balanced and striking images by using natural frames. For instance, doorways and
windows can act as natural frames for your main subject.
Look for these natural frames, they occur more than you may first realise. Even trees, archways and even the
brim of someone's hat can be used to create a frame around your main subject.
8. Emphasizing your subject
By focusing completely on your subject and having a narrow aperture will emphasize the importance of the
composition and remove any distracting and unnecessary aspects within the image.
9. Introducing a Sense Of Scale.
Often when photographing large-scale subjects it can be difficult to really portray its size within the photograph
without something for comparison.
If possible try to include something close to the main subject that will be able to allow the view to see the actual
size of the subject. Placing a person within shot is particularly good for this.
10. How To Use Line
Use linear perspective to give images a strong sense of depth. For instance a winding road going off into the dis-
tance.
Or subjects that are placed one behind another will appear to get smaller and again give the illusion of depth.
For instance a line of street bollards one behind the other will give this illusion.
11. Colour For Emphasis
Colour can be used to dictate the main areas of interest within a composition. For instance a small area of col-
our contrasting significantly within its surroundings can dramatically become the dominant feature of the im-
age.
12. Colour & Mood
Colour can be used to influence the mood of an image. For instance, bright bold colours will indicate a happy up
beat feel whereas pastel or light colours will induce a sense of clam and tranquillity.
Also colours such as red and orange will portray a sense of heat and so will help to create a feeling of summer
and holidays. Whereas, blues and greens are colder and will enforce the feeling of winter and dawn.
RESEARCH LINKS
Large list here - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_photographers
Annie Leibovitz - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Annie_Leibovitz
Robert Mapplethorpe - http://www.mapplethorpe.org/
Rankin - http://rankin.co.uk/
Steven Klein - http://kleinstudio.us/
Diane Arbus - http://diane-arbus-photography.com/
Bill Brandt - http://www.billbrandt.com/
Lee Friedlander - http://www.atgetphotography.com/The-Photographers/Lee-Friedlander.html
Herb Ritts - http://www.herbritts.com/
OTHER PHOTOGRAPHY LINKS
www.photographymad.com/
http://www.ickr.com/ image social networking, you can post videos too.
http://www.moo.com/ excellent and cheap business cards
www.kylekelleyphoto.com/links.htm
www.poladroid.net/
www.magmabooks.com/
www.photoeye.com/magazine/
www.photocritic.org/
www.photoxels.com/digital-photography-tutorials.html
www.digital-photography-school.com/category/composition-tips/
www.constantvzw.org/cn_core/linxx/index.php
www.russertron.com/site/
www.popphoto.com/popularphotographypodcasts/3452/podcast-...
www.aperture.org/
www.dazeddigital.com/Default.aspx
www.irisf64.com/Default.aspx
www.halfhill.com/openash.html
www.mindfulmotionphoto.com/portfolio/s//
www.nikon.com/about/feelnikon/universcale/index.htm
www.selfportrait.net/
www.tkopix.com/process.html
www.eroltaskoparan.com/
www.projectphotoshoplightroom.com/
www.annacady.com/index.html
www.bighugelabs.com/ickr/
www.photojojo.com/content/
www.polanoid.net/
www.day19.com/v6/
www.slowlight.net/blog/
www.day19.com/v6/polaroidproject.html
www.christophehuet.com/
www.janvonholleben.com/dof_extra.html
www.andrewzuckerman.com/
www.wikihow.com/Make-a-Pop-up-Photograph
www.learn.adobe.com/wiki/display/lr/home
www.shamptonian.org/2008.02.13/the-worlds-rst-ihole/
www.afcook.co.uk/index.html
www.jpgmag.com/
www.lomography.com/
www.rankin.co.uk/
www.mattstuart.com/
www.estevanoriol.com/
www.books.google.com/books?client=safari
www.simonhoegsberg.com/
www.andreagalvani.com/
www.zwarteko!e.com/
www.creativebits.org/cool_business_card_designs
http://www.mattsills.co.uk/#/
http://www.perou.co.uk/
STUDENT BLOG EXAMPLES
http://sd-digialphotography.tumblr.com/
http://jack-daly.tumblr.com/
http://loublissphoto.wordpress.com/
http://chrisbennettdigitalphotography.tumblr.com/
http://katana1.tumblr.com/
http://robertstocktondigitalphotography.tumblr.com/
http://katana1.tumblr.com/
http://blog.getdesigns.co.uk/
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Claire Sambrook - claire.sambrook@port.ac.uk | http://clairesambrook.tumblr.com/
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