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ASNE DAY 2009: GLOBAL FLEET STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN

GLOBAL FLEET STATION:

DESIGN

C A Dicks and S M Howard, Ministry of Defence, UK, and C G Kennell, Naval Surface Warfare Center, USA

CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP

SUMMARY

The Global Fleet Station (GFS) mission has emerging importance within United States Navy future planning. The mission fosters positive relationships with partner nations by providing operational training, support and humanitarian aid. This paper presents a Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division - Center for Innovation in Ship Design concept for a notional GFS station ship. The concept study was used to investigate notional operational requirements. Important insights into the feasibility of the notional requirements were gained. More importantly, the design impacts of the notional requirements were revealed.

The 6405 tonne design has a modular, re-configurable loading plan based around ISO TEUs, a well deck and a hangar. This flexible configuration provides one ship which is capable of completing the variety of missions associated with GFS. The monohull is designed to merchant standards and uses COTS equipment.

is designed to merchant standards and uses COTS equipment. NOMENCLATURE CISD Center for Innovation in Ship

NOMENCLATURE

CISD

Center for Innovation in Ship Design

COTS

Commercial off the Shelf (equipment)

GFS

Global Fleet Station

HMMWV

HighMobilityMultipurposeWheeledVehicle(“HUMVEE”)

ISO

International Standards Organization

MEG

Military Effectiveness Group

NSWC CD

Naval Surface Warfare Center, Carderock Division

NAVSEA

Naval Sea Systems Command

SOLAS

Safety of Life at Sea (Convention)

SSCS

Ship Space Classification System

SWBS

Ship Weight Breakdown Structure

TEU

Twenty Foot Equivalent Unit ISO Container

USCG

United States Coastguard

USN

United States Navy

INTRODUCTION

This paper introduces a conceptual design for a specifically designed GlobalFleetStation“Station Ship. While no current US Navy plans call for the construction of dedicated vessels to undertake the GFS mission, a mission specific concept design was developed to allow the Military Effectiveness Group of NSWC CD to further develop the proposed operational requirements. It is intended to be used in future development of the GFS operational concept and not as an indication of any future naval construction program.

Global Fleet Station “…isahighlyvisible, positively engaged, persistent sea base of operations from which to interact with partner nation military and civilian populations and the global maritime community" (Ref. 1). The concept can be broken down into two primary mission profiles; training / support and humanitarian aid.

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ASNE DAY 2009: GLOBAL FLEET STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN

While GFS deployments are high priorities within the US Navy, GFS is one of many operational concepts competing for resources in the wider US Navy program. A fundamental tenet of all work detailed in this paper is that resources for GFS will only be available ifitisnottothedetrimentoftheUSNavy’sotherprograms.Hencealldesignworkdetailed here seeks to minimize cost, as well as ensuring cost effectiveness. The Station Ship is intended to be sufficiently low cost and numerous to provide a dedicated GFS capability, freeing other, more capable, vessels to fulfill roles with greater military risk. As such, the design is intended to use commercial construction approaches and is designed to meet merchant ship rules. As the design will not operate in high threat environments, it does not require shock resistance, signature reduction or other specific survivability design features.

The design reported here is based on a hybrid container ship / landing ship dock. The design displaces 6,405 tonnes with a shallow draft allowing operations close to shore and within austere harbors. The design includes a well deck, helicopter landing pad, hangar and two large flexible holds which are serviced by two onboard cranes. The cargo capability is flexible and based on multiples of ISO TEU containers. While the vessel has a full range of safety related command and control features, the overall command and control facilities are at the low end to reduce cost. This is consistent with the premise that the GFS ship will usually be operating independently and will not have a need for much command / control coordination with other Navy ships

THE GLOBAL FLEET STATION CONCEPT

AN INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL FLEET STATION GFS missions are undertaken throughout the developing world in areas where partner nations of the USA are facing instability and deprivation, for example, the Gulf of Guinea. The intention is to support the development and security of the partner nation, thus indirectly supporting US foreign and defense policy. The two main GFS missions are training / support, and humanitarian aid.

The training / support mission aims to provide assistance toapartnernation’smaritimeforceintheoperationand support of small naval craft. A key benefitofthisistheabilitytoenablethepartner’smaritimeforcetoadequately maintain its own equipment and be operationally effective, thus allowing the unique capabilities of the wider USN/USCG to concentrate on major operations requiring the most capable ships.

In many cases, the training and support will be in Riverine, Green Water or Littoral operations undertaken by the partner nation in patrol craft and ships. As a result, it is considered that the correct method of achieving this is to focus extensivelyontraininganddevelopmentofthepartner’smilitaryforcesability to operate its own forces. In addition the USN/USCG help partner maritime forces to more effectively accomplish their missions. Putting that training into practice could lead to several types of operation including internal defense, anti-piracy, protection of offshore economic assets and peacekeeping.

When considering how to improve the operation and support skills of a partner nation, several options are feasible, but experience has shown that a combination of practical training in a joint operating context with both the partner nation’s craft and USN craft works best. Although some classroom based elements are necessary there is general agreement that on the job training”works better than strictly classroom training. Onboard training using mixed crews of US and partner nation personnel is considered very effective.

The GFS Humanitarian Aid mission is based on the concept of aiding civilians in partner nations: government to government, people-to-people.Itisthetraditional“hearts & minds”approachwiththeprovision ofmedical, infrastructure and educational benefits to a local populace by the US Navy, other government agencies and non- governmental organizations; for example by running vaccination clinics, digging wells, and building schools. The GFS Humanitarian Aid mission is primarily for sustained humanitarian support including provision of medical facilities, supply logistics, training of partner nation personnel, organizational headquarters facilities, transportation and consequence management facilities.

Thecomplementary“DisasterRelief”element(forexampletheresponsetothe2004IndianOceanTsunami)isnot

considered here as a fundamental part of the GFS mission due to the implications it has on the speed of response of the ship, the number of ships required to provide effective response across the globe, and the impact of these on size, complexity and total program cost. It is considered that provision of Disaster Relief will remain a pan-Navy task undertaken by the diversion of the most capable ship in the right region at the right time to support disaster relief.

While the specifics of the GFS missions differ, there are several common elements between the Training/Support and Humanitarian missions that imply that a single, flexible ship could undertake both roles. The first of these is persistent presence. When considering the Training / Support mission, experience has shown that long stays permit relationship building which leads to trust and, in turn, to more effective training and mentoring. In addition, these long-term relationships lead to increased cooperation and effectiveness.

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ASNE DAY 2009: GLOBAL FLEET STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN

“[M.A.Thomas]observedadirectcorrelationbetweenthenumberofU.S.visits to Thailand and the quality of interactionbetweenU.S.andThaimilitarypersonnel”(Ref 2).

Humanitarian Assistance benefits from extended duration stays, measured in weeks and months, to avoid superficial improvements to deep rooted problems.

“Wehavenotbeeninoneplacelongenoughandourpediatricianhashadtoturndowncases”(Ref. 3)

Taken as a whole, these suggest that persistence is the key to building relationships and trust and that a persistent presence is a key requirement of platforms used to support GFS. Trust is also increased by close co-operation on board a ship.

GFS missions can be undertaken by many of the operational ships within the US Navy. These ships are not GFS specific designs. While having the significant advantage of being both available and capable of meeting many of the GFS requirements, they have been designed primarily for different roles and possess characteristics that may make them impractical, unavailable or not cost effective for routine use as GFS ships. Some of the characteristics that are present in these ships are unnecessary or not beneficial, or add significantly to the cost of undertaking the GFS operation are shown below:

Large size, especially draft, preventing access to austere ports or shallow water and introducing complex logistics arrangements for ship to shore transport.

Higher operating cost.

Larger ship’scomplement,addingtooperatingcost.

Higher maximum speed impacting logistics requirements and cost.

Military mission capability (Complex, sensitive, but irrelevant to the GFS mission)

Readiness profiles, training requirements, and primary tasking that prevent repeated deployment for long periods on a GFS mission.

Partial provision of GFS mission requirements; for example, provision of Humanitarian Aid, but without a Training /Support capability.

As a result, MEG / CISD have developed adedicated“Station Ship”meetingnotional GFS requirements to operate in conjunction with US and partner nation green and brown water craft. The Station Ship will be detailed in the subsequent sections of this paper.

ANINITIALSETOF“STATIONSHIP”REQUIREMENTS To develop the Station Ship concept, all the requirements that, to date, have been partially or fully met by using non- dedicated ships were reconsidered. This section summarizes the derived requirements for the Station Ship. The overarchingprinciplewasthatadedicated“GFSStationShip”mustefficientlysupportGFStasksincludingamyriadof subsidiary tasks without impacting wider US Navy acquisition programs. The key objective was that the ship must be rendered affordable and adaptable. This was accomplished by excluding design features solely required for high intensity military operations and focusing on features required to support a partner nation of limited means. The key characteristics of the Station Ship are noted (Table 1) with additional requirements for each of the two main operational roles (Table 2). The requirement for the GFS station ship to complete the missions resulted in the development of a unified set of requirements for the ship design (Table 3).

Key Requirement

Design Implication

Inexpensive

Many naval standards and features are not affordable, to allow the provision of sufficient hulls throughout the 4-5 likely GFS locations.

Ship Speed and Range

Ship speed is limited to reduce cost. Ship endurance to be sufficient to allow persistent presence requirements to be met.

Multi-Mission Capability / Flexibility

The ship will have to perform in several roles, switching between training/support and humanitarian roles quickly and easily.

Transport and service other watercraft

ProvidemothershipcapabilitiesforbothUSandpartnernation’ssmallboats. Provide engineering support and training capabilities for the boats and their crews.

Combat System, Command and Control System

Systems should be limited to safe operation / self defense / force protection measures only.

Table 1 Key Characteristics of a GFS Station Ship

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ASNE DAY 2009: GLOBAL FLEET STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN

To address the high level of versatility required in the GFS requirements, a modular cargo system is used in this design. This permits a basic ship to be loaded with mission specific packages the size of one or more TEUs. The basic ISO TEU container can be designed for a wide variety of configurations and provide many different capabilities. For example, there are COTS accommodation blocks and a variety of medical facilities based on multiples of TEUs. The addition of mission specific TEUs allows the basic ship to be transformed into a ship capable of performing multiple

Training / Support

Humanitarian Aid

Classroom facilities and equipment training spaces for equipment maintenance and operation

Ship must be capable of operating in varying roles carrying various types/amounts of cargo (e.g. construction equipment, hospital modules).

Ship characteristics should permit operations by small boats.

Ship dimensions and maneuverability should allow access to austere ports and shallow water.

Provide facilities for stowage, operations and maintenance of Partner and US owned small boats

A sufficiently large quantity and variety of stores and equipment for different humanitarian aid scenarios.

Accommodationforship’screw, training detachment and Partner Nation trainees.

Accommodation for ship's crew and additional specialist personnel.

Command and control a flotilla of small boats during training and operations.

Command and control for humanitarian aid operations.

Capability for safe management of small arms and force protection weapons.

Generation, stowage and provision of humanitarian aid supplies (e.g. fresh water supply, shore side electricity).

Table 2 Mission Specific GFS Station Ship Key Requirements

Particular

Requirements

Beam (m)

< 32

Loaded Draft (m)

< 4.5

Cruising Speed

15

(knots)

Max Speed (knots)

18

Range @ 15 Knots (nm)

6,000

Supply Endurance

30+

(days)

Cargo (TEUs)

50

Vehicles

Specified wheeled

military vehicles

Cranage Lift (tonnes)

25

Boats

2 Spec Ops Mk V or smaller

Particular

Requirements

Permanent Crew

60

persons

Mission Crew

35

persons +1 VIP

Segregation

Separate accommodation areas for mission and permanent crew

Accommodations

 

Standard

US Navy

Water Generation

43

tonnes per day

Water Storage (tonnes) (for humanitarian aid)

207

Power Offload (MW) (for shore supply)

3

Guns

360 degree force protection

Aviation

1 x SH-60 or 2 x UAVs

Classification

Merchant Ship

Table 3 - Table of Notional Design Requirements for a GFS Station Ship

EVOLUTION OF THE SHIP CONCEPT Four different ship types were identified, each exhibiting some, but not all, of the features required from the Station Ship. The four ship types were: US Coast Guard Cutter, Handymax sized container ship, Heavy Lift Ship and Landing Platform Dock. Elements of all four types were included in three initial concept designs that were considered further.

The ship was designed using an iterative weight and volume balancing synthesis spreadsheet. Simultaneously a CAD model of the architectural arrangements of the vessel was generated to integrate the architectural synthesis of the design with the development of gross characteristics. Key architectural features of the design such as the cargo hold arrangements, weather deck arrangements, dock and helo deck played a substantial role in sizing the gross dimensions of the ship. The graphic evolution of the design through the iterations is shown below. The first concept (Concept 1a,

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ASNE DAY 2009: GLOBAL FLEET STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN

Figure 1) featured a traditional well deck with cargo bays and helo deck amidships. Concept 1b (Figure 2) featured a significantly more radical arrangement with a submersible deck for boat operations and two cargo sections. This concept also included a bow helo deck. The bow helo deck was introduced to minimize vessel length given that volume, beam and draught were being driven by other requirements, notably the requirement for the boat facilities and the need for shallow water operations. Concept 1c (Figure 3) maintained this feature while investigating a vessel concept without a well deck and using davits for boat operations. The most promising features of these three concept designs were integrated and developed further into the final Station Ship concept design.

further into the final Station Ship concept design. Figure 1 Concept Design 1a Figure 2 Concept

Figure 1 Concept Design 1a

Station Ship concept design. Figure 1 Concept Design 1a Figure 2 Concept Design 1b Figure 3

Figure 2 Concept Design 1b

Figure 1 Concept Design 1a Figure 2 Concept Design 1b Figure 3 Concept Design 1c A

Figure 3 Concept Design 1c

A GLOBAL FLEET STATION STATION SHIPCONCEPT

DESIGN OVERVIEW The final ship concept is a hybrid container ship / landing ship design, classified under Merchant Ship Class rules with a few naval enhancements. The ship has a small well deck, helicopter landing pad and hangar. In addition, it has two large flexible container or vehicle holds with removable hatches. These are serviced by two cranes located on the port side of the ship. Additional TEUs or other cargo can be carried on the removable hatches. The cargo capacity is flexible and capable of carrying a wide range of solid cargo limited only by overall size and weight.

Particular

 

Value

Length Between Perpendiculars (m)

 

140

Beam (m)

 

17.38

Draft (m)

 

4.5

Hull Depth (m)

 

11.9

Loaded Displacement (tonnes)

 

6,405

Lightship Displacement (tonnes)

 

4,797

Design Speed (knots)

 

15

Max Speed (knots)

 

18

Range @ 15 knots (nm)

 

6,000

Engine Type (Diesels)

2

x 12V26 Wartsila Diesels (3,900 kW)

Azimuth Pods

4 x ABB compact pods, size 3

Aircraft

 

1 x H-60 Helicopter + 2 x Fire Scout UAVs

Well Deck Dimensions (m)

 

14.7 X 25

Armament

5

x Stabilized Gun Mounts

Ship Crew

 

60

Mission Complement

 

35 + 1 VIP

Transient Austere Complement

 

83

Table 4 - Principal Particulars for GFS Station Ship

The selection of standards for the vessel was deemed important to avoid mission creep from the simple and inexpensive vessel originally envisaged to a more capable Landing Platform Dock. Key weight scaling algorithms were derived from merchant ship based sources, although the vast majority of weight and scaling algorithms are based on LPD-17 derived data for function such as outfit and auxiliaries.

The ship will not be required to operate in high threat environments and hence does not require shock or signature reduction features. Armament is limited to 5 small caliber stabilized gun mounts for force protection in addition to the equipment carried by the organic boats and the embarked military force. A two compartment merchant ship stability standard is intended. Equipment fitted to the vessel is to be from commercial off the shelf sources, without recourse to development programs.

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ASNE DAY 2009: GLOBAL FLEET STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN

A full electric propulsion system was selected because it provides flexibility to generate power for propulsion use, hotel

services or for shore supply. A fully electric ship also allows flexibility in the placement of main propulsion machinery.

This allowed the placement of the engines forward in the ship without a large shaft weight penalty and precluding possible architectural conflicts between the propulsion arrangements, cargo spaces and well deck.

Four compact pods were selected as representative equipment fits and fitted in two contra-rotating pairs of pods, with steerable aft pods. Small rudders were also placed aft of the propeller to provide the ability to make small alterations to the heading while underway without rotating the pods. The selection of podded propulsors was driven primarily by the draft requirement and the power needed to propel the ship. The pod height from blade tip to hull was constrained to less than 4m. Two 12V26 Wartsila diesel generators with a combined power of 7.8MW were selected as the prime movers. The propulsion required is 5 MW (18 kts). The ship service power was estimated at 1.5MW. The maximum trial speed

is predicted to be 19 knots.

Figure 4 - GFS Station Ship Concept

WEIGHT & SPACE ESTIMATES The weight and space estimates were developed using theUSNavy’sSWBSandSSCSsystems. The largest weight and space elements were calculated from first principles or algorithms derived from previous ship data, notably the LPD-17 class. One digit weight summaries for the GFS Station Ship are detailed in Table 5, with an area summary at Table 6. 380 tonnes of margins (7.8 % of lightship) have been distributed among lightship groups, with the margin for each lightship weight group varying between 5 and 10% depending on the level of confidence in the individual estimates.

MISSION SYSTEMS, EQUIPMENT AND CAPABILITIES

A well deck and associated ballast system was added to the design to allow for the recovery and stowage of a variety of

US and partner nation patrol craft and landing craft. The largest ships that can be accommodated are a pair of Special Operations Craft Mk V boats. For humanitarian operations, landing craft (based on the LCM 6 footprint) can be carried

to provide logistics delivery capability to the shore. Access to the well deck from the aft internal cargo hold allows

wheeled vehicles or cargo to be stowed and shipped to shore.

Helicopter operations for this ship are not intended to be undertaken in significant seas with forward speed. The final design shows a deck arrangement with a forward helicopter deck. This arrangement was selected to minimize length by avoiding spatial conflicts with the open well deck, hatches and container stowage cranes at the stern. During the

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majority of GFS missions, the helicopter deck will only be used when the ship is on station off a coastline or is moored. The forward helicopter deck is not a new concept and has been used in the offshore oil industry extensively for many years.

The accelerations on the flight deck with the ship operating at various speeds, headings and sea states was identified. The sea states analyzed were 3, 4, 6 and 8 at 0, 15 and 18 knots. The seakeeping analysis was completed using the Maxsurf Seakeeper package, a frequency domain seakeeping modeling program and showed an RMS acceleration on the flight deck is less than 0.5 ms -2 (0.05g) for all tested sea states.

An internal multi-purpose space was included in the design to support a variety of missions. The space included a 35 person lecture theater, an 18 person computer suite, lockers, a store room, sanitation facilities, and a range of multi- configurable spaces. The multi-configurable space can be outfitted with a variety of equipment to transform it into what is required for the current mission. An example configuration is illustrated in Figure 5.

Group

Weight (tonnes)

SWBS 100 - Hull Structures

3,047

SWBS 200 - Propulsion Plant

456

SWBS 300 - Electric Plant, General

105

SWBS 400 - Command + Surveillance

87

SWBS 500 - Auxiliary Systems, General

676

SWBS 600 - Outfitting

504

SWBS 700 - Armament

1

Lightship

4,880

SWBS F00 Variable Loads (including below)

1,525

Fuel Load (Ships Diesel) (tonnes)

292

Max total mass of all cargo (tonnes)

728

Aircraft Fuel Load (tonnes)

25

Loaded Displacement

6,405

Table 5 - SWBS Weight Summary

Group

Description

Area (m2)

1

Mission Support

548.2

2

Human Support

1057.4

3

Ship Support

3392.1

4

Ship Machinery System

554.0

Table 6 - SWBS Space Summary

3392.1 4 Ship Machinery System 554.0 Table 6 - SWBS Space Summary Figure 5 - Internal

Figure 5 - Internal Multipurpose Space

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ASNE DAY 2009: GLOBAL FLEET STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN

   

Humanitarian Aid Mission

 

Training and Support Mission

(Medical Support sub-variant)

(Boat Operations and Auxiliary Troop Lift sub-variants)

Vehicles

 

N/A

 

N/A

10

x Truck

   

15

x HMMWV

Accessible TEUs

 

60

36

5

Inaccessible TEUs

0

8

40

Helicopters

1

x SH - 60

1

x SH - 60

1 x SH - 60

2

x Fire Scout UAV

2

x Fire Scout UAV

2 x Fire Scout UAV

Boats

2

x LCM 6 sized landing craft

4

x Spec Ops Mk 5

1 x Spec Ops Mk 5

   

1 x LCM 6 sized landing craft

Other Aircraft

 

N/A

 

N/A

1 x Seaplane

Mission Personnel

 

60

x Ships Crew, 108 x Patients

60 x Ships Crew, 35 x Training

60

x Ships Crew, 35 x Full

93

x Medical Staff or Non

Staff, 83 x Trainees

83

x Austere, 32 x TEU based

Governmental Staff

Accommodation

Table 7 Representative Humanitarian Aid and Training / Support Mission Payloads

Particular

 

Value

Number of container holds

 

2

Internal capacity of Hold 1

 

40 ISO TEU Containers

Internal capacity of Hold 2

40

ISO TEU Containers or 5 x 24.3m vehicle lanes

Above Hold 1 deck capacity (Hatches 1, 2)

40 ISO TEU Containers or 5 x 24.3 vehicle lanes

Above Hold 2 deck capacity (Hatches 3,4)

20

ISO TEU Containers or 5 x 24.3m vehicle lanes

Max total mass of all cargo (tonnes)

 

728

Table 8 - Cargo Hold Dimensions and Capacities

OPERATIONAL LOADING

The assumed loading configurations for the two principle GFS missions, Training / Support (with Boat Operations and Auxiliary Troop lift sub-variants) and Humanitarian Aid are shown in Table 7. The flexible loading arrangement is based primarily on ISO TEUs but can carry solid cargo within weight and space limits. The cargo area and maximum cargo weight restrictions are shown in Table 8. The cargo holds have a combined area of 766m 2 and the cargo hatches have a combined area of 674m 2 . The cargo hold and hatches can be loaded with combinations of vehicles, containers or solid stores. Only the aft cargo hold can organically offload vehicles at sea. There are two types of container stowage location, accessible and inaccessible. Accessible TEUs contain cargo or equipment that can be fully accessed and used

at sea. Inaccessible TEUs contain cargo which is purely for transportation to a port for offload. The arrangements of the

vessel with an indicative load of cargo, boats and vehicles are presented at Figure 6 and Figure 7.

HUMANITARIAN AID OPERATIONS LOADING

A medical treatment ship was selected as the representative Humanitarian Aid mission. The loading arrangement was

scaled from the hospital ship arrangement of Reference. 4. The GFS Station Ship has 60 accessible container locations

and these were assigned to roles to give a capability of dealing with 108 patients. The Emergency and Intensive Care Units were placed on the weatherdeck as short a distance from the helicopter deck as possible. The wards were placed

in the holds to give greater environmental protection.

TRAINING / SUPPORT OPERATIONS LOADINGS Profile views of two different Training/Support missions are shown in Figure 9 and Figure 10. Figure 9 shows the ship equipped to support boat operations while Figure 10 illustrates its potential to deploy troops. It is envisaged that the mission would require an increased number of patrol boats. In addition to the two patrol boats berthed in the well deck, two additional patrol boats are stowed on the weather deck. This loading condition limits the mass of the patrol boats to the maximum lifting capacity of the cranes which, at half span, is 50 tonnes. 36 accessible ISO containers are used to store engineering supplies, and provide workshop and support capabilities.

In the Auxiliary Troop Lift sub mission the ship is capable of accommodating a light infantry company consisting of

150 men and associated equipment. To berth a company, 32 troops would be accommodated in TEU accommodation modules in addition to the 83 troops in the internal austere accommodation and 35 in the multi purpose space. The vehicle requirement for a company can vary, but a representative loading of ten 7 ton trucks and 15 HMMWVs was assumed. With this payload, the remaining TEU bays have been designated for operational equipment and supplies stowage.

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STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN Figure 6 GFS Station Ship General Arrangement (Upper

Figure 6 GFS Station Ship General Arrangement (Upper Decks & Superstructure)

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ASNE DAY 2009: GLOBAL FLEET STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN

STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN Figure 7 GFS Station Ship General Arrangement (Lower

Figure 7 GFS Station Ship General Arrangement (Lower Decks)

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STATION: CHARACTERISTICS OF A DEDICATED CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN Figure 8 - Humanitarian Aid Ship Layout Figure

Figure 8 - Humanitarian Aid Ship Layout

CONCEPT SHIP DESIGN Figure 8 - Humanitarian Aid Ship Layout Figure 9 - Training/Support Layout (Boat

Figure 9 - Training/Support Layout (Boat Operations Sub Variant)

9 - Training/Support Layout (Boat Operations Sub Variant) Figure 10 - Training/Support Layout (Auxiliary Troop Lift

Figure 10 - Training/Support Layout (Auxiliary Troop Lift Sub Variant)

CONCLUSIONS

The GFS mission hasdevelopedintoanimportantpartoftheUSNavy’splanstofostergoodwillandsupportpartner nations. The GFS concept currently uses US Navy ships in a role they were not designed for. A dedicated GFS Station Ship design was developed to give insight into the requirements and characteristics of a dedicated GFS vessel, to aid the development of the operational requirement.

The Station Ship developed and detailed in this paper is a 6,405 tonne ship with a 140m length. It has a shallow draft for austere port access. The ship has a well deck and cargo decks capable of carrying many different combinations of small boats, vehicles and cargo. The cargo is predominantly in the form of ISO container sized modules used to supply facilities for hospitals, workshops, maintenance and training as well as general cargo stowage. The ship also has multi- mission spaces that can provide generic office, accommodation and training spaces for several different mission profiles.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

All views expressed in this paper are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the UK Ministry of Defence or the US Department of the Navy. CISD is jointly sponsored by ONR and Naval Sea Systems Command and this support is gratefully acknowledged.

The authors wish to acknowledge the support of the leaders of the NAVSEA 05D-sponsored study that led to this project (Mark A. Campbell and John H. Krempasky) and the exchange program funding provided by the UKMOD’s Director Equipment Capability (Expeditionary Logistics & Support) and the Defense Engineering & Science Group.

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REFERENCES

1. “GlobalFleetStationConceptofOperations”,USFleetForcesCommand, 10 March 2008.

2.“EnlistingMadisonAvenueTheMarketingApproachtoEarningPopularSupportinTheatersofOperation”,T.C.

Helmus, C. P. Russell, W. Glenn RAND Corporation, 2007.

3. Quote from Dr. N. Norris, aboard USNS Comfort, Financial Times, 8 July 2007.

AUTHORS BIOGRAPHY

Dr Chris Dicks is the UK Ministry of Defence exchange Naval Architect at the Center for Innovation in Ship Design, Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division, Carderock, Maryland, USA. He supports US Navy research, design and development activities in the areas of high speed sealift and seabasing. Prior to this he was Head of Naval ArchitecturefortheRoyalNavy’scurrentAircraftCarriers,AmphibiousAssaultShipsandDestroyers.

MrSimon“Matt”Howardwas a GraduateNavalArchitectontheMinistryofDefence’sDefenceEngineeringand Science Group training scheme. Between August 2007 and February 2008 he undertook a training placement at CISD andfocusedonthedevelopmentoftheGFS“Station Ship”concept.In December 2008, Matt graduated from the training scheme and is currently a Naval Architect in MOD’sAfloat Support project team.

Dr Colen Kennell is a Naval Architect at the Center for Innovation in Ship Design, Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division. He supports development of advanced ship and seabasing concepts.

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