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Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk on CD-ROM

Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk on UFD


Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk on Hard Disk
Walkthrough: Boot Windows PE from CD-ROM
Walkthrough: Boot Windows PE from Hard Disk
Walkthrough: Create a Custom Windows PE Image
Walkthrough: Create a Windows RE Image
Walkthrough: Deploy a Windows RE Image on Hard Drive
Walkthrough: Create a Windows RE Recovery Media
Add a Device Driver to an Offline Windows PE Image
Add a Device Driver to an Online Windows PE Image
Include a Custom Script in a Windows PE Image
Add an Application to a Windows PE Image
Add a Package to a Windows PE Image
Add a Language Pack to a Windows PE Image
Add an Update to a Windows PE Image
Prepare a Windows PE Image
View Current Packages in a Windows PE Image
Configure IPSec support for Windows PE Client
Customizing the Windows RE Experience

Booting Windows PE
After creating a custom Windows PE image, you must decide how the image will boot up and where it will
run from. The first method is booting from a removable media into random access memory (RAM) and
then running directly from a RAM disk. The second method is booting and running directly from a CD or
the hard disk.
There are five methods of starting Windows PE by using a RAM disk. You can create bootable
Windows PE RAM disk images on:
• CD-ROM.
• A USB flash drive (UFD).
• A hard disk.
• A Windows Deployment Services (Windows DS) server. You can access the image by way of PXE
boot.
• A supported PXE server. You can access the image by way of PXE boot.
Normally, when you start a computer from a hard disk drive, a CD-ROM, or a Windows DS (PXE) server,
Windows keeps operating system file handles open and dedicated to that instance of Windows. Therefore,
you cannot remove the CD that you used to start the computer and insert another CD. You cannot delete
the hard disk partition from which you started the computer. The Windows DS (PXE) server that is used to
start the computer must keep those file handles open, and Windows PE client computers cannot be
detached from the network without causing Windows PE to become unstable.
The size of Windows PE enables the entire Windows PE operating system image to load into random
access memory (RAM) and to start the computer from a RAM disk. The RAM disk boot feature provides a
virtual CD file system in memory.
The Windows operating system Setup Loader now supports loading Windows PE from a RAM disk. The
RAM disk driver supports loading an ISO-9660 (CD) image as a RAM disk. Booting Windows PE from a
RAM disk enables you to:
• Swap the CD that is used to start the computer and insert another CD to add drivers, utilities,
applications, or a Windows operating system image.
• Start the computer from a Windows DS (PXE) server with the ability to disconnect from the
network once Windows PE has loaded. After the initial download of the Windows PE image, there
is no longer any dependency on network resources, such as file handles, which normally must
remain loaded until the Windows PE client computer restarts.
• Delete and repartition the hard disk from which Windows PE has just started.
• Decrease total boot time.

Note
Windows PE assigns X as the drive letter of any media that it boots from, and the assignment cannot
be modified.

Requirements
The following items are required for starting Windows PE by using a RAM disk:
• An x86, amd64, or IA64-based computer.
• A bootable Windows PE image created from a Windows PE 2.0 base image.
• A minimum of 512 megabytes (MB) of RAM when using the default Windows PE disk image
If you use a customized RAM disk image, the computer's RAM must be at least 100 MB more than
the size of the customized RAM disk image. If there is not enough RAM to store the RAM disk
image and to start the operating system, Windows PE will fail to boot.

Building a Windows PE Image


The first step in creating a customized Windows PE 2.0 image is to modify the base Windows PE image
(Winpe.wim) by using ImageX and PEImg tools. ImageX is required to extract the files to a local directory.
PEImg enables you to add and to remove packages, and to add out-of-box drivers and language packs.
ImageX then enables you to recapture changes back into a .wim file.
The following diagram illustrates how a custom Windows PE image is built.
The general process for creating a custom Windows PE image includes:
1. Applying the base image (Winpe.wim) by using ImageX to a local directory share. For
example,

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imagex /apply WinPE.wim 1 C:\myWinPE
2. Using the peimg /list command to see which packages are installed and available for
installation. For example,

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peimg /list C:\myWinPE\Windows
3. Adding drivers, packages, and language packs as appropriate by using peimg /install
command. For example, to add the HTA package,

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peimg /install=WinPE-HTA-Package C:\myWinPE\Windows
4. Copying any additional files or tools that you intend to include in the image. For
example,

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C:\myWinPE\Program Files\myapp\myapp.exe.
5. Preparing the image by using the peimg /prep command. This command will remove
any packages and language packs that are not designated for the final image. For
example,

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peimg /prep c:\myWinPE\Windows
6. Capturing the new bootable image by using ImageX. For example,

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imagex /boot /compress max /capture c:\myWinPE c:\boot.wim "My Winpe Image"
The customized image is now ready to be copied or burned to bootable media. The most common method
is to create an .iso file and then burn the image onto a CD-ROM. For more information about bootable
methods, see Booting Windows PE.
Supported Packages
Windows PE 2.0 provides the following optional packages:

Package Name Description

WinPE-FONTSupport-<region>-Packages Additional font support for ja-jp, ko-kr, zh-cn, zh-hk, and zh-tw.

WinPE-HTA-Package HTML Application support

WinPE-MDAC-Package Microsoft Data Access Component support

WinPE-Scripting-Package Windows Script Host support

WinPE-SRT-Package Windows Recovery Environment support

WinPE-WMI-Packages Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) support

WinPE-XML-Package Microsoft XML (MSMXL) Parser support

Note

The base Windows PE image (Winpe.wim) contains all the packages listed above, but they are
not installed. They are only staged. You must use the PEImg tool to install the appropriate
packages. When you run the peimg /prep command, packages that are not installed will be
removed from the final image.

Supported Customizations
Windows PE 2.0 supports the following customizations:
• Adding and removing packages and language packs from the base image.
• Adding third-party drivers and third-party components.
• Adding Windows PE updates.
• Adding out-of-box Windows PE language packs.
• Customizing temporary storage.

Limitations
Once the peimg /prep command is applied to an image, the image is final. You can no longer add or
remove packages. However, you can still add drivers and language packs.
Note

It is recommended that you recapture and save a copy of the image prior to running the
peimg /prep command. This ensures that you have a customized base image that you can
later modify. You must then reapply your customized base image, run the peimg /prep
command against the image to optimize for size, and then recapture the new image.

Customizing Windows PE Environment


You can customize your Windows PE image to include specific environment settings when Windows PE
boots up. For example, you can define specific network requirements, run customized scripts, or start
customized applications. You can define these settings by using a combination of Winpeshl.ini,
Startnet.cmd, and Unattend.xml.
You can launch customized applications by using winpeshl.ini, define custom command-line scripts by
using Startnet.cmd, and define various Windows PE settings and actions by using Unattend.xml. For more
information, see Include a Custom Script in a Windows PE Image.
You can define temporary storage to support customized applications. For more information, see Add an
Application to a Windows PE Image.

Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk on


CD-ROM
This walkthrough describes how you can create a bootable Windows PE RAM disk on CD-ROM by using
the Copype.cmd script. Windows PE RAM enables you to start a computer for the purposes of deployment
and recovery. Windows PE RAM boots directly into memory, enabling you to remove the Windows PE
media after the computer boots.

Note
This method enables you to boot directly into memory and assigns the drive letter X, which does not
correspond to the media (USB flash drive or CD-ROM) from which you booted. Ensure that you have
sufficient memory to support the size of your Windows PE image plus any additional memory
requirements, for example, if you plan on running any customized applications that need additional working
memory.

Prerequisites
To complete this walkthrough, you need the following:
• A technician computer, which provides all the tools and the source files. For more information, see
Building a Technician Computer.
• CD-ROM burning software. The Windows OPK, Windows AIK, and Windows PE Kit do not
include CD-ROM or DVD-ROM burning software. However, you can obtain burning software
from the Windows 2003 Resource Kit (cdburn and dvdburn) or use any third-party software.
• A blank CD-ROM.
Step 1: Set up a Windows PE build environment
In this step, you create a required directory structure that supports building a Windows PE image.
1. On your technician computer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Windows OPK or
Windows AIK, and then click Windows PE Tools Command Prompt.
The menu shortcut opens a Command Prompt window and automatically sets environment
variables to point to all the necessary tools. By default, all tools are installed at C:\Program
Files\<version>\Tools, where <version> can be Windows OPK or Windows AIK.
2. At the command prompt, run the Copype.cmd script.
The script requires two arguments: hardware architecture and destination location. For example,
copype.cmd <architecture> <destination>
where <architecture> can be x86, amd64, or ia64 and <destination> is a path to a local
directory. For example,
copype.cmd x86 c:\winpe_x86
The script creates the following directory structure and copies all the necessary files for that
architecture. For example,
\winpe_x86
\winpe_x86\ISO
\winpe_x86\mount

Step 2: (Optional) Add additional customizations


This step is optional, but recommended. You can add applications and scripts to your Windows PE image
that you might need while working in Windows PE. The following is a list of common tools to include in
your Windows PE image.
• ImageX - A tool for capturing and applying images during deployment scenarios. For example, at a
command prompt, type:
copy “c:\program files\<version>\Tools\x86\imagex.exe” c:\winpe_x86\iso\
• Package Manager (Pkgmgr.exe) - A tool for servicing Windows images (.wim files) offline. You
must copy the entire \Servicing folder. Offline servicing requires ImageX. For example,
xcopy “c:\program files\<version>\Tools\<architecture>\Servicing”
c:\winpe_x86\iso\Servicing /s
copy %windir%\system32\msxml6*.dll c:\winpe_x86\iso\Servicing
where <version> can be Windows OPK or Windows AIK and <architecture> can be x86, amd64, or ia64.
In both of the previous examples, the tools are not loaded into memory during a Windows PE RAM boot.
The media must be available to access the tools.
Step 3: (Optional) Create an exclusion list
This step is optional, but recommended if you include ImageX as part of your Windows PE image. During
an ImageX capture operation, some files might be locked, which will cause ImageX to fail. You can
exclude specific files from being captured by creating a configuration file called Wimscript.ini. A
configuration file is a text file. The following is a sample configuration file that includes common files that
you must exclude during a capture operation.
1. Create a configuration file called Wimscript.ini by using any text editor (for example, Notepad).

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[ExclusionList]
ntfs.log
hiberfil.sys
pagefile.sys
"System Volume Information"
RECYCLER
Windows\CSC

[CompressionExclusionList]
*.mp3
*.zip
*.cab
\WINDOWS\inf\*.pnf
You can add additional files or directories that you intend to exclude during a capture operation.
For more information about configuration files, see Create an ImageX Configuration File.
2. Save the configuration file to the same location as ImageX as specified in Step 2. For example,

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c:\winpe_x86\iso\
ImageX will automatically detect wimscript.ini only if it is saved to the same location.
Step 4: Create a bootable CD-ROM
This step describes how to put a Windows PE RAM disk onto a CD-ROM. This option requires that you
create an .iso file by using the Oscdimg tool.
1. On your technician computer, create an .iso file with Oscdimg. At a command prompt, type:

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oscdimg -n -bc:\winpe_x86\etfsboot.com c:\winpe_x86\ISO
c:\winpe_x86\winpe_x86.iso
For IA-64 architecture, replace Etfsboot.com with Efisys.bin.
2. Burn the image (Winpe_x86.iso) onto a CD-ROM.

Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk


on UFD
This walkthrough describes how you can create a bootable Windows PE RAM disk on a USB flash drive
(UFD) device by using the Copype.cmd script. Windows PE RAM enables you to start a computer for the
purposes of deployment or recovery. Windows PE RAM boots directly into memory, enabling you to
remove the Windows PE media after boot.

Note
This method boots directly into memory and is assigned the drive letter X, which does not correspond to the
media (UFD, CD-ROM) from which you booted. Ensure that you have sufficient memory to support the
size of your Windows PE image plus any additional memory requirements, for example, if you plan on
running any customized applications that need additional working memory.
Important
If you use a UFD device to initiate a Windows Vista installation, you must leave the UFD device in the
computer until Windows Vista Setup has successfully completed the Windows PE phase of setup. If you
remove the UFD device prior to disk configuration (Windows PE phase), setup fails.

Prerequisites
To complete this walkthrough, you need the following:
• A technician computer, which provides all the tools and the source files. For more information, see
Building a Technician Computer.
• Access to a computer running Windows Vista or a Windows PE session.
• A UFD device. The size of the UFD device must be at least 64 megabytes (MB) larger than your
Windows PE image plus any additional files that you include.
Step 1: Set up a Windows PE build environment
In this step, you create a required directory structure that supports building a Windows PE image.
1. On your technician computer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Windows OPK or
Windows AIK, and then click Windows PE Tools Command Prompt.
The menu shortcut opens a command prompt window and automatically sets environment variables
to point to all the necessary tools. By default, all tools are installed at C:\Program
Files\<version>\Tools, where <version> can be Windows OPK or Windows AIK.
2. At the command prompt, run the Copype.cmd script. The script requires two arguments: hardware
architecture and destination location.

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copype.cmd <arch> <destination>
where <arch> can be x86, amd64, or ia64 and <destination> is a path to local directory. For
example,
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copype.cmd x86 c:\winpe_x86
Running the script creates the following directory structure and copies all the necessary files for that
architecture. For example,
\Winpe_x86
\Winpe_x86\ISO
\Winpe_x86\Mount
Step 2: Add additional customizations
This step is optional but recommended. You can add applications and scripts to your Windows PE image
that you might need while working in Windows PE. The following are common tools to include in your
Windows PE image.
• ImageX
A tool for capturing and applying images during deployment scenarios. For example,

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copy “c:\program files\<version>\Tools\x86\imagex.exe” c:\winpe_x86\iso\
• Package Manager (Pkgmgr.exe)
A tool for servicing Windows images (.wim) offline. You must copy the entire \Servicing folder
and MSXML 6 binaries. Offline servicing requires ImageX. For example,

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xcopy “c:\program files\<version>\Tools\<architecture>\Servicing”
c:\winpe_x86\iso\Servicing /s
copy %windir%\system32\msxml6*.dll c:\winpe_x86\iso\Servicing
where <version> can be Windows OPK or Windows AIK and <architecture> can be x86, amd64,
or ia64.
In both examples, the tools are not loaded into memory during a Windows PE RAM boot. The media must
be available to access the tools.
Step 3: Create an exclusion list
This step is optional but recommended if you include ImageX as part of your Windows PE image. During
an ImageX capture operation, some files might be locked, which causes ImageX to fail. You can exclude
specific files from being captured by creating a configuration text file called Wimscript.ini. The following
is a sample configuration file that includes common files that you must exclude during a capture operation.

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[ExclusionList]
ntfs.log
hiberfil.sys
pagefile.sys
"System Volume Information"
RECYCLER
Windows\CSC

[CompressionExclusionList]
*.mp3
*.zip
*.cab
\WINDOWS\inf\*.pnf
Add additional files or directories that you intend to exclude during a capture operation. For more
information about configuration files, see Create an ImageX Configuration File.
Save the configuration file to the same location as ImageX as specified in Step 2. For example,

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c:\winpe_x86\iso\
ImageX will automatically detect Wimscript.ini only if it is saved to the same location.
Step 4: Prepare UFD device
Before you can place Windows PE on a USB flash drive (UFD) device, you must use Diskpart to format
the UFD with a Windows Vista or Windows PE environment.
1. From a running Windows Vista operation system or Windows PE session, insert your UFD device.
2. At a command prompt, use Diskpart to format the device as FAT32 spanning the entire device, and
set the partition as active. For example,

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diskpart
select disk 1
clean
create partition primary size=<size of device>
select partition 1
active
format fs=fat32
assign
exit
The example above assumes Disk 1 is the UFD.
3. On your technician computer, copy all the content in the \ISO directory onto your UFD device. You
can manually create the directory structure or use the xcopy command to automatically build and to
copy the appropriate files from your technician computer to your UFD device. For example,

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xcopy c:\winpe_x86\iso\*.* /s /e /f f:\
where c is the letter of your technician computer hard disk and f is the letter of your UFD device.
Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk
on Hard Disk
This walkthrough describes how you can create a bootable Windows PE RAM disk on a hard disk by using
Windows PE RAM Disk media (such as a USB flash drive or CD-ROM). Staging Windows PE RAM on
hard disk enables a number of different scenarios, including deployment, recovery, and diagnostics.
Windows PE RAM boots directly into memory, enabling you to reformat or to modify the hard drive after
boot. In this example, you build a Windows PE RAM Disk CD-ROM or UFD media. You use the bootable
media to start the new computer, format the hard drive, and then copy the Windows PE source files to the
hard drive.
Prerequisites
To complete this walkthrough, you need the following:
• A technician computer, which provides all the tools and the source files. For more information, see
Building a Technician Computer.
• A blank CD-ROM and CD-ROM-burning software, if you chose to create a Windows PE CD.
• A USB flash drive (UFD) device if you are creating a bootable UFD device. You will need access
to a computer running Windows Vista.
Step 1: Create a bootable Windows PE RAM media
Select one of these options and follow the instructions for building a bootable Windows PE RAM media.
After you create your bootable media, continue to the next step.
• Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk on CD-ROM
• Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk on UFD
Step 2: Prepare the hard drive
Boot the new computer with your Windows PE media and format the hard drive.
1. On the new computer, insert your Windows PE media and restart the computer.
Windows PE will start and will launch the Command Prompt window.

Note
If the hard drive contains an active partition, you must override the boot order to boot from the
CD/DVD-ROM drive. During initial boot, select the appropriate function key to override the boot
order. If this is a new computer, the hard drive will be unformatted, and you can skip this step.
2. Format the hard drive by using DiskPart.
Windows PE RAM Disk requires an active partition with a size no less than the size of your
Windows PE image. At a command prompt, type:

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diskpart
select disk 0
clean
create partition primary size=350
select partition 1
active
format
exit

Step 3: Copy Windows PE source files to hard disk


Once you have a formatted, active partition, you can copy the Windows PE source files from your bootable
media to the hard disk. A Windows PE RAM disk requires the following directory structure.
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\boot
\sources
You can manually create the directory structure or use the xcopy command to automatically build and to
copy the appropriate files from your bootable media. At a command prompt, type:

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xcopy d:\*.* /s /e /f c:\
where d is the letter of your CD-ROM drive or UFD media and c is the letter of your hard disk.

Walkthrough: Boot Windows PE from CD-ROM


This walkthrough describes how to boot Windows PE directly from CD-ROM/DVD-ROM media but not
into a RAM disk. This method enables you to start a computer that has fewer than 512 megabytes (MB) of
memory for the purpose of deployment or recovery.
Prerequisites
To complete this walkthrough, you need the following:
• A technician computer, which provides all the tools and the source files. For more information, see
Building a Technician Computer.
• CD-ROM burning software. Microsoft Windows OPK, Windows AIK, and Windows PE Kit do not
include CD-ROM- or DVD-ROM-burning software. However, you can obtain burning software
from the Windows 2003 Resource Kit (cdburn and dvdburn) or use any third-party software.
• A blank CD-ROM or DVD-ROM.
Step 1: Set up a Windows PE build environment
In this step, you will create a directory structure that supports building a Windows PE image.
1. On your technician computer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Windows OPK or
Windows AIK, and click Windows PE Tools Command Prompt.

Important
If you are running Windows Vista, you must select run as Administrator.
2. The menu shortcut opens a command prompt window and automatically sets environment variables
to point to all the necessary tools. By default, all tools are installed at C:\Program
Files\<version>\Tools, where <version> can be Windows OPK or Windows AIK.
3. At the command prompt, run the Copype.cmd script. The script requires two arguments: hardware
architecture and destination location. For example,
copype.cmd <arch> <destination>
where <arch> can be x86, amd64, or ia64 and <destination> is a path to a local directory. For
example,
copype.cmd x86 c:\winpe_x86
The script creates the following directory structure and copies all the necessary files for that
architecture. For example,
\winpe_x86
\winpe_x86\ISO
\winpe_x86\mount

Step 2: Add boot support


In this step, you will add boot files to your Windows PE image. Before you can add files to the image, you
must expand the image by using the imagex /apply command.
1. At the command prompt, apply the image to the \mount directory by using the ImageX tool. For
example,
imagex /apply c:\winpe_x86\winpe.wim 1 C:\winpe_x86\mount
2. Add the appropriate boot support files and directory. For example,
copy c:\winpe_x86\ISO\bootmgr c:\winpe_x86\mount
mkdir c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot

Step 3: (Optional) Add additional customizations


This step is optional but recommended. You can add applications and scripts to your Windows PE image
that you might need while working in Windows PE. The following is a list of common tools to include in
your Windows PE image.
• ImageX - A tool for capturing and applying images during deployment scenarios. For example, at a
command prompt, type:
copy “c:\program files\<version>\Tools\x86\imagex.exe” c:\winpe_x86\mount
• Package Manager (Pkgmgr.exe) - A tool for servicing Windows images (.wim files) offline. You
must copy the entire \Servicing folder. Offline servicing requires ImageX. For example,
xcopy “c:\program files\<version>\Tools\<architecture>\Servicing”
c:\winpe_x86\mount\Servicing /s
copy %WINDIR%\system32\msxml6*.dll c:\winpe_x86\mount\Servicing
where <version> can be Windows OPK or Windows AIK and <architecture> can be x86, amd64, or ia64.
In both previous examples, the tools are not loaded into memory during a Windows PE RAM boot. The
media must be available to access the tools.
Step 4: (Optional) Create an exclusion list
This step is optional, but recommended if you include ImageX as part of your Windows PE image. During
an ImageX capture operation, some files might be locked, which will cause ImageX to fail. You can
exclude specific files from being captured by creating a configuration file called Wimscript.ini. A
configuration file is a text file; the following is a sample configuration file that includes common files that
you must exclude during a capture operation.
1. Create a configuration file called Wimscript.ini by using any text editor, such as Notepad.

Copy Code
[ExclusionList]
ntfs.log
hiberfil.sys
pagefile.sys
"System Volume Information"
RECYCLER
Windows\CSC

[CompressionExclusionList]
*.mp3
*.zip
*.cab
\WINDOWS\inf\*.pnf
You can add additional files or directories that you intend to exclude during a capture operation.
For more information about configuration files, see Create an ImageX Configuration File.
2. Save the configuration file to the same location of ImageX as specified in step 3. For example,
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c:\winpe_x86\mount\
ImageX will automatically detect Wimscript.ini only if it is saved to the same location.
Step 5: Configure BCD Store
In this step, you create a new boot configuration file called BCD by using BCDEdit. BCD replaces
Boot.ini. BCDEdit is a command-line tool designed to manage BCD stores. BCDEdit is available in
Windows PE and in Windows Vista. For example,
Bcdedit /createstore c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD
Bcdedit /store c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD –create {bootmgr} /d “Boot Manager”
Bcdedit /store c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD –set {bootmgr} device boot
Bcdedit /store c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD –create /d “WINPE” –application osloader
The last command returns a GUID value. Substitute <GUID> with this value in the following examples.
Bcdedit /store c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD –set <GUID> osdevice boot
Bcdedit /store c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD –set <GUID> device boot
Bcdedit /store c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD –set <GUID> path
\windows\system32\winload.exe
Bcdedit /store c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD –set <GUID> systemroot \windows
Bcdedit /store c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD –set <GUID> winpe yes
Bcdedit /store c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD –set <GUID> detecthal yes
Bcdedit /store c:\winpe_x86\mount\boot\BCD –displayorder <GUID> -addlast

Step 6: Create a bootable CD-ROM


In this step, you put a Windows PE RAM disk onto a CD-ROM. This option requires that you create an .iso
file by using the Oscdimg tool.
1. On your technician computer, create an .iso file with Oscdimg. At a command prompt, type:

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oscdimg -n -m -o -bc:\winpe_x86\etfsboot.com c:\winpe_x86\mount
c:\winpe_x86\winpe_x86.iso
For IA-64 architecture, replace Etfsboot.com with Efisys.bin.
2. Burn the image (Winpe_x86.iso) onto a CD-ROM.

Walkthrough: Boot Windows PE from Hard Disk


This walkthrough describes how to boot Windows PE directly from a hard disk but not into a RAM disk.
This enables you to start a computer for the purposes of deployment and recovery.
Prerequisites
To complete this walkthrough, you need the following:
• A technician computer that provides all the tools and the source files. For more information, see
Building a Technician Computer.
Step 1: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Media
Select one of these options and follow the instructions for building a bootable Windows PE RAM media.
Ensure that you include ImageX with your image. After you create your bootable media, continue to the
next step.
• Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk on CD-ROM
• Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk on UFD
Step 2: Prepare the Hard Drive
In this step, you boot the new computer with your Windows PE media and format the hard drive.
1. On the new computer, insert your Windows PE media and restart the computer.
Windows PE starts and launches a Command Prompt window.

Note
If the hard drive contains an active partition, you must override the boot order to boot from the
CD/DVD drive. During initial boot, select the appropriate function key to override the boot order. If
this is a new computer, the hard drive will be unformatted, so you can skip this step.
2. At a command prompt, format the hard drive by using DiskPart. Windows PE requires an active
partition with a size equal to or greater than the size of your Windows PE image. For example,

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diskpart
select disk 0
clean
create partition primary size=<insert size>
select partition 1
active
format fs=ntfs
exit

Step 3: Copy Windows PE Files to the Hard Disk


In this step, you copy Windows PE resource files to the hard drive from your bootable media. You need
ImageX to apply the Boot.wim to the hard drive. This example assumes the hard drive is blank.
1. At a command prompt, use ImageX to apply the Windows PE image (Boot.wim) from your
bootable media to the hard drive. For example,

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d:\imagex /apply d:\sources\boot.wim 1 c:
where d is the letter of your bootable Windows PE media that contains ImageX and a Windows PE
image.
2. Copy the \Boot folder from your bootable media to the root of your hard drive. For example,

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xcopy d:\boot\*.* /e /f c:\boot\
3. Copy the Bootmgr file (no file name extension) from your bootable media to the root of your hard
drive. For example,

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copy d:\bootmgr c:
4. Delete the boot configuration data (BCD) file that you copied from your bootable media. (You will
create a new one in the next step.) For example,

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del c:\boot\bcd

Step 4: Configure BCD Store


In this step, you will create a new boot configuration file called BCD by using BCDEdit. BCD replaces
Boot.ini. BCDEdit is a command-line tool that is designed to manage BCD stores. BCDEdit is available in
Windows PE and Windows Vista. For example,

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Bcdedit –createstore c:\temp\BCD
Bcdedit –store c:\temp\BCD –create {bootmgr} /d “Boot Manager”
Bcdedit –store c:\temp\BCD –set {bootmgr} device boot
Bcdedit –store c:\temp\BCD –create /d “WINPE” –application osloader
Bcdedit –import c:\temp\BCD
The last command returns a GUID value. Substitute <GUID> with this value in the following examples.

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Bcdedit –store c:\boot\BCD –set <GUID> osdevice partition=boot
Bcdedit –store c:\boot\BCD –set <GUID> device partition=boot
Bcdedit –store c:\boot\BCD –set <GUID> path \windows\system32\boot\winload.exe

Bcdedit –store c:\boot\BCD –set <GUID> systemroot \windows

Bcdedit –store c:\boot\BCD –set <GUID> winpe yes


Bcdedit –store c:\boot\BCD –set <GUID> detecthal yes

Bcdedit –store c:\boot\BCD –displayorder <GUID> -addlast


Your computer is now ready to boot Windows PE directly from the hard disk.

Walkthrough: Create a Custom Windows PE


Image
This walkthrough describes how to create a customized Windows PE image. The primary tool for
customizing Windows PE 2.0 is PEImg, a Windows PE command-line tool. After creating a customized
image, you can deploy the image to a hard disk or create a bootable Windows PE RAM disk on a CD-
ROM, a USB flash drive (UFD) or a hard disk.

Note

A Windows PE RAM disk boots directly into memory and is assigned the drive letter X, which
does not correspond to the media (for example, a UFD or a CD-ROM) from which you booted.
Ensure that you have sufficient memory to support the size of your Windows PE image plus
any additional memory requirements, for example, if you plan on running any customized
applications that need additional working memory.

Prerequisites
To complete this walkthrough, you need the following:
• A technician computer that provides all the tools and the source files. For more
information, see Building a Technician Computer.

Step 1: Set up a Windows PE Build Environment


In this step, you create a required directory structure that supports building a Windows PE image.
1. On your technician computer, click Start, point to All Programs, point to
Windows OPK or Windows AIK, and then click Windows PE Tools Command
Prompt.
The menu shortcut opens a Command Prompt window and automatically sets
environment variables to point to all the necessary tools. By default, all tools are
installed at C:\Program Files\version\Tools, where version can be Windows OPK or
Windows AIK.
2. At the command prompt, run the Copype.cmd script. The script requires two
arguments: hardware architecture and destination location. For example,

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copype.cmd <architecture> <destination>
where <architecture> can be x86, amd64, or ia64 and <destination> is a path to
the local directory. For example,

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copype.cmd x86 c:\winpe_x86


The script creates the following directory structure and copies all the necessary files
for that architecture. For example,

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\winpe_x86
\winpe_x86\ISO
\winpe_x86\mount

Step 2: Mount the Base Windows PE Image


In this step, you mount the base image to a local directory so that you can add or remove packages.
• At the command prompt, mount the base Windows PE image (Winpe.wim) to the
\Mount directory by using ImageX. For example,

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imagex /mountrw c:\winpe_x86\winpe.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount

Step 3: Add Additional Packages


By using the Peimg tool, you install Windows features by using the /install option. Windows features are
included with the base image (Winpe.wim) but are not installed. You can also import packages and add
drivers and language packs. For more information, see Windows PE Customization How-To Topics.
1. Add a Windows feature to the base image by using the peimg /install command. For
example,

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peimg /install=<pkg> c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
where <pkg> denotes the package name. A list of available packages and their
names can be obtained by using the /list command. You can use wildcards to specify
a package name. Any packages with matching names will be installed. For example,

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peimg /install=WinPE-HTA-Package c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows


-or-

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peimg /install=*HTA* c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows


where wildcards denote any package with HTA in the package name.
Windows PE 2.0 provides the following Windows features referred to as packages.

Package Name Description

WinPE-FONTSupport-<region>-
Additional font support for ja-jp, ko-kr, zh-cn, zh-hk, and zh-tw.
Packages

WinPE-HTA-Package HTML application support

WinPE-MDAC-Package Microsoft Data Access Component support

WinPE-Scripting-Package Windows Script Host support

Windows Recovery Environment component (available only on


WinPE-SRT-Package
the Windows OPK)

WinPE-WMI-Packages Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI) support

WinPE-XML-Package Microsoft XML (MSXML) parser support

2. Repeat Step 1 for each package.


3. Verify that the packages were installed by using the peimg /list command to view all
packages in the current image. For example,

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peimg /list c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
In the INS column, (+) denotes installed packages and (-) denotes not installed.

Step 4: (Optional) Add Additional Customizations


This step is optional but recommended. You can add applications and scripts to your Windows PE image
that you might need while working in Windows PE. The following is a list of common tools to include in
your Windows PE image.
• ImageX
A command-line tool for capturing and applying images during deployment scenarios.
For example, at a command prompt,
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copy “c:\program files\<version>\Tools\x86\imagex.exe” c:\winpe_x86\iso\
• Package Manager (Pkgmgr.exe)
A tool for servicing Windows image (.wim) files offline. You must copy the entire
\Servicing folder and MSXML6 binaries. Offline servicing requires ImageX. For
example,

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xcopy “c:\program files\<version>\Tools\<architecture>\Servicing”
c:\winpe_x86\iso\Servicing /s
copy %windir%\system32\msxml6*.dll c:\winpe_x86\iso\Servicing
where <version> can be Windows OPK or Windows AIK and <architecture> can be
x86, amd64 or ia64. In both previous examples, the tools are not loaded into
memory during a Windows PE RAM boot. The media must be available to access the
tools.
To load the tools into memory along with Windows PE, copy the source files into the
mounted \Windows directory. For example,

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c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows

Important

Adding files to the \Windows directory will increase the size of your Windows PE RAM
image. Ensure that your computer has sufficient memory to boot Windows PE and to
run various applications.

Step 5: Prepare the Image


In this step, you prepare the image by using the peimg /prep command. This operation removes any non-
installed packages from the final image. This operation reduces the overall image size. For example,

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peimg /prep c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows


The /prep option cannot be reverted, and after the /prep option is run, the /install, /uninstall, /import, and
/list options will not function, while the /lang and /inf options will continue to function. The Peimg tool
prompts you to confirm the command. To suppress this prompt for scripting, add the /f option.
Step 6: Commit Changes to the Image
In this step, you commit the changes to the original image file (Winpe.wim) by using the ImageX
/unmount option with the /commit option. For example,

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imagex /unmount c:\winpe_x86\mount /commit

Step 7: Replace the Default Boot.wim File


In this step, you replace the default Boot.wim in the \ISO directory with your new customized image. The
image must be called Boot.wim. For example,

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copy c:\winpe_x86\winpe.wim c:\winpe_x86\ISO\sources\boot.wim

Next Step
You now have a customized Windows PE RAM disk image that you can place on bootable media, like a
CD-ROM or a UFD.
To create a bootable CD-ROM
1. On your technician computer, at a command prompt, create an .iso file by using
Oscdimg. For example,

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oscdimg -n -bc:\winpe_x86\etfsboot.com c:\winpe_x86\ISO
c:\winpe_x86\winpe_x86.iso
For IA-64 architecture, replace Etfsboot.com with Efisys.bin.

2. Burn the image (Winpe_x86.iso) to a CD-ROM.

To create a bootable UFD


1. During a running Windows Vista operation system or a Windows PE session, insert
your UFD device.
2. At a command prompt, use Diskpart to format the device as FAT32 spanning the
entire device, setting the partition to active. For example,

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diskpart
select disk 1
clean
create partition primary size=<size of device>
select partition 1
active
format fs=fat32
assign
exit
where the value of disk 1 is equal to UFD.

3. On your technician computer, copy all the content in the \ISO directory to your UFD
device. You can manually create the directory structure or use the xcopy command to
automatically build and copy the appropriate files from your technician computer to
your UFD device. For example,

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xcopy c:\winpe_x86\iso\*.* /s /e /f f:\
where c is the letter of your technician computer hard disk and f is the letter of your
UFD device.

You can further customize your Windows PE image by adding language packs, customized scripts, and
drivers. For more information, see Windows PE Customization How-To Topics.
Walkthrough: Create a Windows RE Image
This walkthrough describes how to build a Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE) image.
Windows RE is a solution based on Windows PE 2.0. In this example, you create a customized
Windows RE image on your technician computer.

Important

This walkthrough outlines how to build the Windows RE solution, not a complete
Windows Vista image. You must still create a separate Windows Vista installation.

This walkthrough illustrates a hidden (type 0x27) Windows RE disk configuration. In the following
illustration, the Windows RE partition is located in front of the Windows Vista partition.
Windows RE-only (hidden)

Windows RE Windows Vista


Type 0x27 Type 0x7
1GB (active)

There are other Windows RE disk configurations that coexist with Bitlocker Drive Encryption. For more
information on disk configurations, see Preinstallation Design.
Prerequisites
To complete this walkthrough, you will need the following:
• A technician computer that provides all the tools and the source files. For more
information, see Building a Technician Computer.
• An authorized copy of a Windows Vista product DVD.

Step 1: Set up a Windows PE build environment


In this step, you create a directory structure that supports building a Windows PE image. You apply a
Windows PE image to the \Mount directory so that you can add Windows RE customizations.
1. On your technician computer, click Start, point to AllPrograms, then Windows OPK
or Windows AIK, and then click Windows PE Tools Command Prompt.
The menu shortcut opens a Command Prompt window and automatically sets
environment variables to point to all the necessary tools.
2. At the command prompt, run the Copype.cmd script. The script requires two
arguments, hardware architecture and destination location.

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copype.cmd <architecture> <destination>
where <architecture> can be x86, amd64, or ia64 and <destination> is a path to
the local directory. For example,

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copype.cmd x86 c:\winre_x86


The script creates the directory structure and copies all the necessary files for that
architecture. For example,

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\winre_x86
\winre_x86\ISO
\winre_x86\mount
3. In this step, you mount a Windows PE image. For Windows OPK customers, you modify
the base Windows PE image (Winpe.wim). For Windows AIK customers, you modify the
default Windows RE image available from your Windows Vista product DVD.

Important

Windows AIK does not support the creation of a Windows RE solution by using the base
Windows PE image (Winpe.wim).

4. For Windows OPK, use the ImageX /apply option (or mountrw command) to mount
the base Windows PE image. For example,

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6. imagex /apply c:\winre_x86\winpe.wim 1 c:\winre_x86\mount
7. For Windows AIK, copy and mount the Windows PE image from the Windows Vista
product DVD by using ImageX and skip Step 2. For example,
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9. imagex.exe /export /boot <DVD_Drive>\sources\boot.wim 2 c:\winre_x86\winre.wim
“Windows Recovery Environment”
10.imagex.exe /mountrw c:\winre_x86\winre.wim 1 c:\winre_x86\mount

Step 2: Add Windows PE packages (Windows OPK only)


This step is required only for Windows OPK. In this step, you use the Peimg tool to add all the required
Windows PE packages to your customized image. Windows PE packages are included with the base image
(Winpe.wim) but are not installed. You must explicitly install the packages by using the peimg /install
command. You can also import packages and add language packs. For more information, see Windows PE
Customization How-To Topics.
1. In a Windows PE Tools Command Prompt window, type the following,

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peimg.exe /install=WinPE-SRT* C:\winre_x86\mount\Windows
peimg.exe /install=WinPE-Scripting* C:\winre_x86\mount\Windows
peimg.exe /install=WinPE-WMI* C:\winre_x86\mount\Windows
2. Verify that the components were installed by using the peimg /list command to view
all packages in the current image. For example,

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peimg /list c:\winre_x86\mount\Windows
In the INS column, (+) denotes installed packages and (-) denotes not installed.

Step 3: Add custom Windows RE scripts


In this step, you add a customized Windows RE scripts to your image. You create a script called
Winpeshl.ini that will launch the Windows RE shell during a failover.
1. By using a text editor, create a file called Winpeshl.ini. For example,

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[LaunchApp]
AppPath=X:\sources\recovery\recenv.exe
2. Copy the file to the \Windows\System32 directory in your working Windows PE
directory. For example,

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copy winpeshl.ini C:\winre_x86\mount\Windows\System32

Step 4: (Optional) Add mass-storage drivers


If necessary, you can include third-party drivers (.inf files) in your Windows RE image by using the
peimg.exe /inf command. For example,

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peimg.exe /inf=<path> C:\winre_x86\mount\Windows


where <path> is the location of the. inf file.
Step 5: Add custom tools to Windows RE
This step is optional for Windows Vista, but required for Windows Server 2008. Specifically, you must
enable the server mode for Windows RE. For more information, see Customizing the Windows RE
Experience.
You can customize Windows RE shell by creating an .xml file called WinREConfig.xml.
WinREConfig.xml enables you to define customized support and diagnostic tools within Windows RE. For
example, you can provide an option to reinstall the factory image if Windows RE is unable to recover the
system.
Step 6: Capture the image
In this step, you capture all the customization back into a Windows image (.wim) file.
• For Windows OPK, in a Windows PE Tools Command Prompt window, capture your
customizations by using ImageX. For example,

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imagex.exe /capture c:\winre_x86\mount C:\winre_x86\winre.wim "Windows RE Image"
/boot /compress max
• For Windows AIK, in a Windows PE Tools Command Prompt window, commit your
customizations and unmount the image by using ImageX. For example,

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imagex.exe /unmount /commit c:\winre_x86\mount
Walkthrough: Deploy a Windows RE Image on
Hard Drive
This walkthrough describes how to deploy a Windows Recovery Environment (Windows RE) image onto a
hard drive. Windows RE is a solution that is based on Windows PE 2.0. In this example, you build a master
computer that contains two partitions, one for Windows Vista and one for Windows RE. Once installed,
you configure Windows Vista Boot Manager to automatically failover to Windows RE when
Windows Vista is unable to boot.

Important

This walkthrough outlines how to build the Windows RE solution, not a complete
Windows Vista image. You must still create a separate Windows Vista installation.

This walkthrough illustrates a hidden (type 0x27) Windows RE disk configuration. In the following
illustration, the Windows RE partition is located in front of the Windows Vista partition.
Windows RE-only (hidden)

Windows RE Windows Vista


Type 0x27 Type 0x7
1 gigabyte (GB) (active)

There are other Windows RE disk configurations that coexist with Bitlocker Drive Encryption. For more
information about disk configurations, see Preinstallation Design.
Prerequisites
To complete this walkthrough, you will need the following:
• A Windows RE image as described in Walkthrough: Create a Windows RE Image.
• A technician computer that provides all the tools and the source files. For more
information, see Building a Technician Computer.
• An authorized copy of Windows Vista.
• A USB flash drive (UFD). In this example, the storage size must be 256 megabytes
(MB) or bigger, depending on how many additional applications that you include in
your Windows RE image.
• A master computer on which you will deploy Windows Vista and Windows RE.

Step 1: Create an answer file


In this step, you build a catalog file (.clg) and a new blank answer file. A .clg file is a binary file that
contains the state of all the settings and the packages in a Windows image.
1. On your technician computer, insert the Windows Vista product DVD into the local
DVD drive.
2. Navigate to the \Sources directory on the Windows Vista DVD. Copy the Install.wim file
to your technician computer.
3. Click Start, point to Programs, point to Microsoft Windows OPK (or
Windows AIK), and then click Windows System Image Manager.
4. On the File menu, click Select Windows Image.
5. In the Select a Windows Image dialog box, navigate to the location where you
saved the Install.wim file, and then click Open.

Note

A warning will appear that a catalog does not exist. Click OK to create a catalog. A
catalog file (.clg) is a local file that contains all the available settings.

6. On the File menu, click New Answer File.

Step 2: Define Windows RE settings


In this step, you define Windows RE partition requirements in your answer file. In addition, you will set a
synchronous command to run a SetAutofailover.cmd script.
1. In Windows SIM, in the Windows Image pane, expand the Components node to
display available settings.
2. In the expanded list of components, add the following components to your answer file
by right-clicking the component and then by selecting the appropriate configuration
pass.

Configuratio
Component
n Pass

Microsoft-Windows-
1 windowsPE
Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk\CreatePartitions\CreatePartition

Microsoft-Windows-
1 windowsPE
Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk\ModifyPartitions\ModifyPartition

Microsoft-Windows-Setup\ImageInstall\DataImage\InstallFrom 1 windowsPE

Microsoft-Windows-Setup\ImageInstall\DataImage\InstallTo 1 windowsPE

Note

Expand the component list until you see the lowest setting that is listed above, and
then add that setting to your answer file. This shortcut will add the setting and all
parent settings to your answer file in one step.

3. All the settings that you added must appear in the Answer File window. Select and
configure each setting as specified below.

Component Value
Microsoft-Windows-Setup\DiskConfiguration WillShowUI = OnError
DiskID = 0
Microsoft-Windows-Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk WillWipeDisk = true
Extend = false
Order = 1
Size = 1500

Note
Microsoft-Windows-
Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk\CreatePartitions\CreatePartition You can adjust size
accordingly; this example
uses 1.5 gigabytes (GB).
Type = Primary
Active = false
Extend = false
Microsoft-Windows-Setup Format = NTFS
\DiskConfiguration\Disk\ModifyPartitions\ModifyPartition Label = WinRE
Order = 1
PartitionID = 1

Microsoft-Windows-Setup\ImageInstall\DataImage Order = 1
Path = <location of your
custom Windows RE image>
Microsoft-Windows-Setup\ImageInstall\DataImage\InstallFrom For example,
C:\winre_x86\winre.wim
DiskID = 0
PartitionID = 1

Note

The Credentials settings are


Microsoft-Windows-Setup\ImageInstall\DataImage\InstallTo not required for this
walkthrough. You must delete
the Credentials entry from
your answer file to validate
your answer file.

4. Validate the answer file, click Tools, and then click Validate Answer File.
If an error occurs, correct the error and revalidate the answer file.
5. Save the answer file.

Step 3: Define Windows settings


By using the same answer file from Step 2, you define Windows Vista settings. The settings in this
example will configure a single partition, will set the locale, and will boot the computer into Audit mode.
1. In Windows SIM, in the Windows Image pane, expand the Components node to
display available settings.
2. In the expanded list of components, add the following components to your answer file.

Component Configuration
Pass

Microsoft-Windows-Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk\CreatePartitions\
1 windowsPE
CreatePartition

Microsoft-Windows-Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk\ModifyPartitions\
1 windowsPE
ModifyPartition

Microsoft-Windows-Setup\ImageInstall\OSImage\InstallTo 1 windowsPE

Microsoft-Windows-Setup\UserData 1 windowsPE

Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup \OEMInformation 4 specialize

Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup \AutoLogon 7 auditSystem

Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup\OOBE 7 oobeSystem

Microsoft-Windows-International-Core-WinPE\SetupUILanguage 1 windowsPE

Microsoft-Windows-Deployment\Reseal 7 oobeSystem

Microsoft-Windows-PnpSysprep 3 generalize

3. All the settings that you added must appear in the Answer File pane. Select and
configure each setting as specified below.

Component Value

Extend = false
Order = 2
Size = 15000

Note
Microsoft-Windows-
Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk\CreatePartitions\CreatePartition You can adjust the Size
accordingly; this example
uses 15 GB.
Type = Primary
Active = true
Extend = false
Format = NTFS
Microsoft-Windows-Setup Label = OS_Install
\DiskConfiguration\Disk\ModifyPartitions\ModifyPartition Letter = C
Order = 2
PartitionID = 2

Microsoft-Windows-Setup\ImageInstall\OSImage\ WillShowUI = OnError


DiskID = 0
Microsoft-Windows-Setup\ImageInstall\OSImage\InstallTo PartitionID = 2

Microsoft-Windows-Setup \UserData AcceptEula = true


Key = <product key>
Microsoft-Windows-Setup \UserData\ProductKey WillShowUI = OnError
HelpCustomized = false
Manufacturer = <company
name>
SupportHours = <support
Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup \OEMInformation hours>
SupportPhone = <support
number>
SupportURL = <support URL>
Enabled = true
Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup \AutoLogon LogonCount = 5
Username = Administrator
ProtectYourPC = 3
Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup \OOBE NetworkLocation = Work
InputLocale = <Input
Locale>
SystemLocale = <System
Microsoft-Windows-International-Core-WinPE Locale>
UILanguage = <UI Language>
UserLocale = <User Locale>

Microsoft-Windows-International-Core-WinPE\SetupUILanguage UILanguage = <UI Language>


ForceShutdown = true
Microsoft-Windows-Deployment\Reseal Mode = Audit
PersistAllDeviceInstalls =
Microsoft-Windows-PnpSysprep True
These settings outline a basic unattended installation; no user input is required during
Windows Setup. When the installation is complete, the computer will reboot to Audit
mode. Windows Welcome does not run in Audit mode. For more information about
Audit mode, see Customize Windows in Audit Mode.
In Audit mode, you can perform additional customizations and configurations. When
complete, OEMs and system builders must run sysprep /oobe to enable
Windows Welcome the next time the computer restarts. Windows Welcome prompts
the end user to read the Microsoft Software License Terms and to configure the
computer.

4. Validate your answer. To do this, click Tools, and then click Validate Answer File.
If an error occurs, correct the error and revalidate.
5. Save your answer file.

Step 4: Create a configuration set


In this step, you create a configuration set. The benefit of this method is that all the files that are necessary
for the installation are contained in one location. In this example, you save the configuration set to a USB
flash drive (UFD).
1. In Windows SIM, on the Tools menu, select Create Configuration Set.
The Create Configuration Set window opens.
2. Specify a destination location where you intend to publish the configuration set (for
example, directly to your UFD), and then click OK.

Important
This feature creates an answer file (Autounattend.xml) and a resource folder
(\AutoUnattend_Files). In this example, both the file and the folder must be located at
the root of your UFD.

Step 5: Add partition repair script


In this step, you create a partition repair script called WinREPartitionInfo.xml. The script helps repair
hidden and customized partitions if disk corruption occurs.
1. Create an .xml file called WinREPartitionInfo.xml with the following content.

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<WinREPartitionInfo>
<NotActive/>
<WinREHiddenPartition/>
</WinREPartitionInfo>
<NotActive> instructs Windows RE not to set the first partition to active in the event
you have multiple boot partitions. <WinREHiddenPartition> instructs Windows RE to
set the Windows RE partition as type 0x27 with no drive letter assigned. This method
does not support other hidden partition types.

2. By using your removable media, place a copy of the file at the root of each hidden or
customized partition.

Step 6: Copy script to USB flash drive


In this step, you include the provided Setautofailover.cmd script, which configures Windows Vista to start
Windows RE during a failover. You copy the script to your UFD.
• Copy Setautofailover.cmd to the root of your UFD. For example,

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copy c:\Program Files\<version>\recovery\setautofailover.cmd e:
where <version> can be Windows OPK or Windows AIK and e is the letter of the root
of your UFD.

Step 7: Build your master installation


In this step, you build your master installation by using a Windows Vista product DVD and your
configuration set. After setup completes, you manually run the Setautofailover.cmd script.
1. Turn on the master computer.
2. Insert both the removable media containing your configuration set and the
Windows Vista product DVD into the new computer.
3. Restart the computer (CTRL+ALT+DEL).
Windows Setup (Setup.exe) begins automatically. By default, Windows Setup searches
all removable media for an answer file called Autounattend.xml.
4. After Setup completes, the computer starts in Audit mode. Verify that all your
customizations were applied.
5. At a command prompt, run Setautofailover.cmd with the following parameters.

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e:\Windows\setautofailover.cmd /target d: /mainos {default} /disk 0 /partition 1
where e is the letter of the root of your UFD device. When you are finished, reseal and
shut down the computer. In the System Preparation Tool dialog box, select the
appropriate options.
For Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) systems, you must configure use for GUID
Partition Table (GPT) disk. To configure for GPT, add the /gpt option. Here is an
example of this command.

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e:\Windows\setautofailover.cmd /target d: /mainos {default} /disk 0 /partition 1


/gpt

Important

If you select the sysprep generalize option, the failover settings will be removed. To
generalize the image for build-to-plan (BTO) environments, run Setautofailover.cmd
during the oobeSystem pass. For example, copy the script to the root of the hard drive
and specify a RunsynchronousCommand during oobeSystem pass in your answer file.
To do this, select Insert, then Synchronous Command, and then Pass 7
oobesystem.

Alternate Configuration: Windows RE as a .wim File


Windows RE can also be installed directly as a .wim file instead of an expanded image on the hard disk
partition. When you use this configuration:
• The Windows RE .wim image file must be named Winre.wim.
• The Windows RE .wim image file must be located at the root directory of the target
partition.
• When defining the Windows RE settings in the answer file, the following components
should be used.

Configuratio
Component
n Pass

Microsoft-Windows-
1 windowsPE
Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk\CreatePartitions\CreatePartition

Microsoft-Windows-
1 windowsPE
Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk\ModifyPartitions\ModifyPartition

Microsoft-Windows-Setup\RunSynchronous\RunsynchronousCommand 1 windowsPE

• The settings should be configured as follows:

Component Value

WillShowUI = OnError
Microsoft-Windows-Setup\DiskConfiguration
DiskID = 0
Microsoft-Windows-Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk WillWipeDisk = true
Extend = false
Order = 1
Size = 1500

Note
Microsoft-Windows-
Setup\DiskConfiguration\Disk\CreatePartitions\CreatePartition You can adjust Size
accordingly. This example
uses 1.5 GB.
Type = Primary
Active = false
Extend = false
Microsoft-Windows-Setup Format = NTFS
\DiskConfiguration\Disk\ModifyPartitions\ModifyPartition Label = WinRE
Order = 1
PartitionID = 1

Copies Windows RE image file.


Order = 1
Path = "d:CopyWinRE.cmd"

Note

You must create the


CopyWinRE.cmd script to
Microsoft-Windows- copy both your Windows RE
Setup\RunSynchronous\RunsynchronousCommand
image and the boot.sdi file to
(windowsPE Configuration Pass) the destination partition.
Boot.sdi can be found in your
Windows PE build
environment under the
\ISO\Boot directory (for
example,
C:\Winre_x86\ISO\Boot).

To set the automatic failover mechanism by using the /wim option, run the following command:
setautofailover.cmd /wim /target d: /mainos {default} /disk 0 /partition 1
The /wim option in Setautofailover.cmd configures the computer to use Winre.wim from the root directory
of the destination partition as the Windows RE image.
For Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) systems, you must configure use for GUID Partition Table (GPT)
disk. To configure for GPT, add the /gpt option. For example,
setautofailover.cmd /wim /target d: /mainos {default} /disk 0 /partition 1 /gpt

Walkthrough: Create a Windows RE Recovery Media


This walkthrough describes how to create a recovery media using Windows Recovery Environment
(Windows RE) and Windows PE. In the event of a system failure, you can boot the computer with this
recovery media and attempt to fix the system.
Prerequisites
To complete this walkthrough, you will need the following:
• A Windows RE image.
• A technician computer that provides all the tools and source files. For more information, see
Building a Technician Computer.
• Blank media, for example, a USB flash drive (UFD) or CD-ROM. In this example, the storage size
must be 256 megabytes (MB) or bigger, depending on how many additional applications you
include in your Windows RE image.
Step 1: Create a Windows RE Image
If you have a Windows RE image, skip to Step 2, otherwise, create a Windows RE image as described in
Walkthrough: Create a Windows RE Image.
Step 2: Create a bootable media
In this step, you create a bootable Windows PE media and replace the default boot image with your custom
Windows RE image.
1. Select one of the methods for creating a bootable media.
○ Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk on CD-ROM
○ Walkthrough: Create a Bootable Windows PE RAM Disk on UFD
2. Following the walkthrough instructions with one addition: Prior to copying or burning the image to
media, replace the Windows PE boot image (ISO\Boot.wim) with your Windows RE image. For
example,

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copy c:\winre_x86\winre.wim c:\ISO\sources\boot.wim

Important
You must rename your Windows RE image to Boot.wim, otherwise the image will not boot.

Add a Device Driver to an Offline Windows PE Image


The following procedure demonstrates how to use the PEImg tool to add a device driver (.inf) to an offline
Windows PE image. Before you can run any PEImg command, you must first apply or mount the
Windows PE image by using ImageX. Windows PE provides a base image (Winpe.wim) that you can
customize. For an example of how to build custom Windows PE images, see Windows PE Walkthroughs.
To add a device driver to an offline Windows PE image
1. Apply the base image (Winpe.wim) by using ImageX to a local Windows PE directory. For
example:
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imagex /apply WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
-OR-
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imagex /mountrw WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
2. Add the .inf file to the base image by using the peimg /inf command. For example:

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peimg /inf=<path> c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
where <path> is the location of the .inf file.
3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 for each additional device driver.
When you finish customizing the image, prepare the image for deployment by using the peimg
/prep command.
After you prepare the image, you can burn the image to the designated media. First, recapture or commit
the local Windows PE directory into a .wim file by using ImageX, create an .iso file by using one of the
provided tools, and then burn the .iso file to the appropriate media.

Add a Device Driver to an Online Windows PE Image


You can add out-of-box drivers to a running Windows PE environment by using the Drvload tool. Drvload
uses one or more driver .inf files as inputs. To add a driver to an offline Windows PE image, use the PEimg
tool.
If the driver .inf file requires a reboot, Windows PE will ignore the request. If the driver .sys file requires a
reboot, then the driver cannot be added with Drvload.
To add a device driver to an online Windows PE image
• At a command prompt, type
drvload.exe inf_path
where inf_path is the path to a device driver. You can specify multiple paths by separating each
inf_path entry with a comma.

Include a Custom Script in a Windows PE Image


The following procedure demonstrates how to add a customized script to a Windows PE image offline.
Windows PE provides three methods for launching custom scripts: Winpeshl.ini, Startnet.cmd, and
Unattend.xml. The Windows PE default interface is a Command Prompt window. However, you can create
a customized Winpeshl.ini file to run your own shell application. You can also create your own version of
Startnet.cmd to run a specific set of commands, batch files, or scripts. Unattend.xml is a new answer file
format for Windows PE 2.0, which replaces Winbom.ini and Winpeoem.sif.
Before you can add any customized scripts, you must first apply or mount the base Windows PE image
(Winpe.wim) by using ImageX.
Add a Customized Script with Winpeshl.ini
You can launch a customized shell application by using a file called Winpeshl.ini. Winpeshl.exe will
process the settings in Winpeshl.ini during boot. If you create a customized Winpeshl.ini and require Plug
and Play or network support, you must include a call to Wipeinit.exe. Wpeinit.exe specifically installs Plug
and Play devices, processes Unattend.xml settings, and loads network resources.
1. Create a customized Windows PE image as shown in Walkthrough: Create a Custom Windows PE
Image. During Step 4 of that process ("Add additional customizations"), use the following steps.
2. Create a text file called Winpeshl.ini by using a text editor (such as Notepad) with the following
structure. For example,

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[LaunchApp]
AppPath = %SYSTEMDRIVE%\myshell.exe
[LaunchApps]
%SYSTEMDRIVE%\mydir\application1.exe, -option1 -option2
application2.exe, -option1 -option2
Set the AppPath entry to the path to your shell application. The path can
either be fully qualified or
use environment variables, such as %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\Myshell.exe. The AppPath entry
does not support command-line options.
3. Save the file to %SYSTEMROOT%\System32 of your customized Windows PE image.
4. Recapture your Windows PE image as described in Walkthrough: Create a Custom Windows PE
Image.
Add a Customized Script with Startnet.cmd
You can add customized command-line scripts in Windows PE by using Startnet.cmd. By default,
Windows PE includes a Startnet.cmd script located at %SYSTEMROOT%\System32 of your customized
Windows PE image. Startnet.cmd currently starts Wpeinit.exe. Wpeinit.exe specifically installs Plug and
Play devices, processes Unattend.xml settings, and loads network resources.
1. Create a customized Windows PE image as described in Walkthrough: Create a Custom Windows
PE Image. During Step 4 of that process ("Add additional customizations"), use the following steps.
2. Edit Startnet.cmd to include your customized commands.

Note
For Plug and Play or networking support, ensure that you include a call to wpeinit in your
customized Startnet.cmd script.
3. Save your changes and recapture your Windows PE image as described in Walkthrough: Create a
Custom Windows PE Image.
Add Customizations with Unattend.xml
You can use an answer file with Windows PE to specify various settings and actions. When Windows PE
starts, it implicitly looks for a file called Unattend.xml at the root of any bootable device (for example, a
USB flash drive or a floppy disk). You can also specify an Unattend.xml file by using Startnet.cmd and
Wpeinit.exe.
To learn more about creating an answer file, see Building an Answer File.
To learn more about Wpeinit, see Wpeinit Command-Line Options and the previous section on using
Startnet.cmd.

Add an Application to a Windows PE Image


The following procedure demonstrates how to add a custom application to a Windows PE image offline.
For example, if you have diagnostic software or custom tools that are a core part of your validation process,
you can include these tools in your custom Windows PE installation before preinstalling the operating
system.
To add an application to a customized Windows PE image, create a folder for the application in the
Windows PE image (such as \Tools) or copy the application to the \System32 folder of the Windows PE
image. If your application requires temporary storage, you can specify a custom scratch space as part of
your image.
Before you can add any applications, you must first use ImageX to apply or mount the Windows PE image.
Windows PE provides a base image (Winpe.wim) that you can customize.
For an example of how to build custom Windows PE images, see Windows PE Walkthroughs.
To add an application to a Windows PE image offline
1. Apply the base image (Winpe.wim) by using ImageX to a local Windows PE directory. For
example,

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imagex /apply WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
-or-
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imagex /mountrw WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
2. Copy the necessary application files to your local Windows PE directory. For example,
C:\Winpe_x86\Tools to include the application on the bootable media or
C:\Winpe_x86\Mount\Windows\MyApp\.
3. Repeat the first two steps for each additional custom application.
4. To start the application automatically when Windows PE boots, you can create a startup script by
using a Winpeshl.ini file. For an example, see Include a Custom Script in a Windows PE Image.
5. If your application requires temporary storage, you can allocate additional memory using the peimg
/scratchspace command. Valid sizes include 32, 64, 128, 256, or 512 megabytes (MB). This
feature is only available offline. You cannot adjust this setting while a Windows PE session is
running.

Important
Make sure you have sufficient memory to load and run your custom Windows PE image. In addition
to the image size, you should have at least 256 MB of available working memory. If you have
limited memory, define a page file (Pagefile.sys) to improve memory management. For more
information on implementing a page file, see Wpeutil Command-Line Options.
6. When you finish customizing the image, prepare the image for deployment by using the peimg
/prep command.
After preparing the image, you can burn the image to media. First, recapture or commit the local
Windows PE directory to a .wim file by using ImageX, create an .iso file by using one of the provided
tools, and then burn the .iso file to the appropriate media.

Add a Package to a Windows PE Image


The following procedure demonstrates how to use PEImg to add packages to a Windows PE image offline.
Before you can run any PEImg command, you must first apply or mount the base Windows PE image
(Winpe.wim) by using ImageX.
Windows PE 2.0 includes the following packages. These packages are contained in the base Windows PE
image (Winpe.wim) but are not installed by default. You must add them to your image by using the
peimg /install command.
Package Name Description

WinPE-HTA-Package HTML Application support

WinPE-MDAC-Package Microsoft Data Access Component support

WinPE-Scripting-Package Windows Script Host support

WinPE-SRT-Package Windows Recovery Environment component

WinPE-XML-Package Microsoft XML (MSMXL) Parser support

For an example of how to build custom Windows PE images, see Windows PE Walkthroughs.
To add a package to a Windows PE image offline
1. Apply the base image (Winpe.wim) by using ImageX to a local Windows PE directory.
For example,

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imagex /apply WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
-OR-

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imagex /mountrw WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\


When using imagex /apply to a base image, you cannot delete the working directory
directly after adding a package. Peimg.exe applies ACLs on certain Windows PE source
files. This limitation does not exist if you use the imagex /mount command. To work
around this limitation, you must manually take ownership of the files. For example, at
a command prompt,

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Takeown /F c:\winpe_x86\* /R
Cacls c:\winpe_x86\* /T /G <user>:F
Rd /s /q c:\winpe_x86\
Where <user> is the name of your user account.

2. Add a package to the base image by using the peimg /install command. For
example,

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peimg /install=<pkg> c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
where <pkg> denotes the package name. A list of available packages and their names
can be obtained by using the /list option. You can use wildcards to specify a package
name. Any packages with matching names will be installed. For example,

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peimg /install=WinPE-HTA-Package c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows.
-OR-

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peimg /install=*HTA* c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows


where wildcards denote any package with HTA in the package name.

3. Repeat for each additional package.


When you finish customizing the image, prepare the image for deployment by using
the peimg /prep command.
After the image is prepared, you can burn the image to media. First, recapture or commit the local
Windows PE directory to a .wim by using ImageX, create an .iso file by using one of the provided tools,
and then burn the .iso file to the appropriate media.

Add a Language Pack to a Windows PE Image


The following procedure demonstrates how to use PEImg to add a Windows PE language pack to a
Windows PE image offline. Before you can run any PEImg command, you must first apply or mount the
Windows PE image by using ImageX. Windows PE provides a base image (Winpe.wim) that you can
customize.
The /lang option sets the locale and the user interface (UI) language of a Windows PE image. You must
first import and install a language pack before using the /lang option. You can perform this on a
Windows PE image prepared with the /prep option.
To add a language pack to a Windows PE image offline
1. Apply the base image (Winpe.wim) by using ImageX to a local Windows PE directory. For
example,

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imagex /apply WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
-OR-
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imagex /mountrw WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
2. Import the Windows PE language pack into your working directory. For example,

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peimg /import=<path> c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
Where <path> is location of the language pack.
3. Once imported, install the language pack. For example,

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peimg /install=<pkg> c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
Where <pkg> denotes the package name. A list of available packages and their names can be
obtained by using the /list option. If you add the /verbose option, the output will display the full
package name. Wildcards can be used when specifying a package name. Any packages with
matching names will be installed. For example,
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peimg /install=*JA-JP* c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
Where wildcards denote any package with JA-JP in the package name.
4. Set the language by using the /lang option with the following syntax.

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peimg /lang=<culture> <image path>
Where <culture> is the culture name property of the specified language. For example,
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peimg /lang=JA-JP c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
When you finish customizing the image, prepare the image for deployment by using peimg /prep
command.
After preparing the image, you can burn the image to media. First, recapture or commit the local
Windows PE directory to a .wim file by using ImageX, create an .iso file by using one of the provided
tools, and then burn the .iso file to the appropriate media. Your Windows PE image will now boot into the
language that you specified.

Add an Update to a Windows PE Image


The following procedure demonstrates how to use PEImg to add a Windows PE update to a Windows PE
image offline. Most hotfixes from Windows Update do not apply to Windows PE because of the following
reasons:
• Windows PE is a small subset of the Windows operating system.
• Windows PE runs very few services.
• Windows PE usually runs on a read-only file system.
Before you can run any PEImg command, you must first apply or mount the Windows PE image by using
ImageX. Windows PE provides a base image (Winpe.wim) that you can customize.
For an example of how to build custom Windows PE images, see Windows PE Walkthroughs.
To add a Windows PE update to a Windows PE image offline
1. Apply the base image (Winpe.wim) by using ImageX to a local Windows PE directory. For
example,

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imagex /apply WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
-OR-
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imagex /mountrw WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
2. Add an update to the base image by using the peimg /import command. For example,

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peimg /import=<path> c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
Where <path> is location of the update.
3. Determine the name of the update by using the peimg /list command. For example,

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peimg /list
4. Add the update to the base image by using the peimg /install command. For example,

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peimg /install=<updatename> c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
5. Repeat for each additional update.
When you finish customizing the image, prepare the image for deployment by using the peimg
/prep command.
After the image is prepared, you can burn the image to media. First, recapture or commit the local
Windows PE directory to a .wim by using ImageX, create an .iso file by using one of the provided tools,
and then burn the .iso file to the appropriate media.

Prepare a Windows PE Image


The following procedure demonstrates how to use the PEImg tool to prepare a Windows PE image for
deployment. After you customize your image, the peimg /prep command will optimize the image for size
by removing non-installed packages from the base image. This operation cannot be reverted, and, after the
/prep option is run, the /install, /uninstall, /import, and /list commands will not function.
You can still add drivers and language packs by using the /inf and /lang commands, respectively. The
tool will prompt you before executing the command. You can suppress the prompt using the /f option.

Note
It is recommended that you recapture and save a copy of the image before running the /prep option. This
ensures that you have a custom base image that you can later modify. You can then reapply your custom
base image, run the /prep option to optimize for size, and then recapture the image to a new file.
For an example on how to build custom Windows PE images, see Windows PE Walkthroughs.
To prepare a Windows PE image for deployment
1. At a command prompt, run peimg /prep on your local Windows PE build directory. For example:

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peimg /prep c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows
2. After you prepare the image, you can burn the image to media. First, recapture or commit the local
Windows PE directory to a .wim file by using ImageX, create an .iso file by using one of the
provided tools, and then burn the .iso file to the appropriate media.

View Current Packages in a Windows PE Image


The following procedure demonstrates how to use the PEImg tool to view what packages are currently
available and installed on the current Windows PE image. Before you can run any PEImg command, you
must first apply or mount the Windows PE image by using ImageX. Windows PE provides a base image
(Winpe.wim) that contains all available packages. By default, these packages are not installed. You must
explicitly install them by using the peimg /install command.

Note
This command will not work if you already prepared the image by using the peimg /prep command.

To view available packages in the current Windows PE image


1. Apply the base image (Winpe.wim) by using ImageX to a local Windows PE directory. For
example:

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imagex /apply WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
-OR-
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imagex /mountrw WinPE.wim 1 c:\winpe_x86\mount\
2. Run the peimg /list command to view all packages in the current image. For example:

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peimg /list c:\winpe_x86\mount\Windows

Important
Mounting an image in Windows PE is not supported.
If you add the /verbose option, the output will display the full package name. In the INS column, (+)
denotes installed packages and (-) denotes not installed.

Configure IPSec support for Windows PE Client


This topic describes how to configure an IP Security (IPsec) network for Windows PE Clients.
Windows PE supports IPsec protocol by default, but in some cases the computer you want to connect to
will not allow a connection. You must configure the security policy to allow the Windows PE client to
connect.
By default, Windows PE IPsec policy uses the following security and authentication methods:
• MM Security Offer: AES128-SHA1-ECP256;
• MM Authentication Method: Anonymous
• QM Policy: 3DES-SHA1; AES128-SHA1
• QM Authentication Method: NTLMv2
To configure an IPsec policy
1. On the networked computer you are trying to access, configure the following:
2. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Windows Firewall with Advanced
Security.
3. In the left pane, right-click Windows Firewall with Advanced Security and then select
Properties.
4. On the Windows Firewall with Advanced Security on Local Computer Properties window,
select the IPsec Settings Tab, under the IPsec defaults section, click the Customize button.
The Customize IPsec Settings window opens.
5. In Customize IPsec Settings, in Key exchange (Main Mode), select Customize.
The Customize Advanced Key Exchange Settings window opens.
6. In the Key Exchange Algorithm section, select Elliptical Curve Diffie-Hellman P-256.
7. In the Security Methods section, verify that the SHA1 (Integrity) AES-128 (Encryption) method
is included in the list of security methods, and then click OK.
8. In the left pane, right-click the Connection Security Rule Node, and then select New Rule.
9. In the New Connection Security Rule Wizard, select Custom, and then click Next.
10. In the Endpoints section, add the IP addresses of the Windows PE machines (Endpoint 1) and the
local machine (Endpoint 2), and then click Next.
11. In the Requirements section, select Require Authentication for inbound and outbound
connections option, and then click Next.
12. In the Authentication Method section, select the Advanced option, and then click the Customize
button.
13. In Customize Advanced Authentication Methods, in the First authentication area, select the
First Authentication Method is optional check box.
14. In Customize Advanced Authentication Methods, in the Second authentication area, click
Add., and then, in Second Authentication Method, select User (NTLMv2) option, click OK, and
then click OK again.
The New Connection Security Rule Wizard window opens.
15. In the Profile window, select the profile to which this rule applies, and then click Next.
16. In the Name window, enter a name and description for the rule, and then click Finish.

Customizing the Windows RE Experience


You can customize the user experience of Windows RE by creating an .xml file called WinREConfig.xml,
which enables you to define custom support and diagnostic tools within Windows RE.
To customize the Windows RE experience
1. Create a tools subdirectory in your working Windows RE directory. For example,

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\Sources\Recovery\Tools
2. Create an .xml file called WinREConfig.xml, with the following syntax.

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<Recovery>
<Server/>
<RecoveryTools>
<RelativeFilePath> Tools.exe</RelativeFilePath>
</RecoveryTools>
<SupportTool AutoLaunch=”Yes”/”No”>
<RelativeFilePath> Tools.exe</RelativeFilePath>
</SupportTool>
<CustomFrontEnd>
<RelativeFilePath> Tools.exe</RelativeFilePath>
</CustomFrontEnd>
<AlwaysAuthenticate/>
<NonAdminToolsOnly/>
<StartupRepair>
<NoNetworking/>
<NoAutoLaunchFromCD/>
</StartupRepair>
</Recovery>
Choose the customizations that you intend to enable and include the corresponding
elements in your WinREConfig.xml file. The following table describes these XML
elements.

Element Description

Server Sets Windows RE to run in server mode. When specified, client-specific


Windows RE options are not displayed. This setting is required when installing
Windows RE on a server system.

Link to the customized recovery application to be included in the System


Recovery Options menu. Only one application can be specified. The icon
RecoveryTools shown is extracted from the first available icon in the application executable.
The title and the description of the link are extracted from the "Product name"
and "File description" attributes of the application executable file.

Denotes customized support or the diagnostic tool that can be launched from a
SupportTool link when Startup Repair is unable to repair the operating system. Only one tool
can be specified.

Automatically launches the tool specified in SupportTool when the value is set
AutoLaunch equal to Yes. This setting does not apply to cases when no startup failure is
detected or a hardware error is detected.

Specifies an application to be launched instead of the Windows RE default user


interface (UI) unless one of the following is true. Windows RE is launched:
○ From CD/DVD.
○ Automatically.
CustomFrontEnd ○ From the F8 menu.
This application must set the registry value
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\RecoveryEnvironme
nt\TargetOS to the path of the Windows directory of Windows Vista.
This XML element is optional.

The relative path from the \Tools subfolder of the folder in which Recenv.exe
RelativeFilePath resides. For example, if Recenv.exe is located in X:\WinRE\, the path
designated in this field is relative to X:\WinRE\tools.

Authentication is enforced, regardless of the start location of Windows RE,


AlwaysAuthentica including media. If the username/password database on the offline Windows
te operating system is corrupt or otherwise inaccessible, users will not be able to
access the recovery tools in Windows RE.

NonAdminToolsOnl Only Startup Repair and the application specified in <RecoveryTools> (if
y present) is accessible through the Recovery menu. All other options are hidden.
StartupRepair Contains a list of Startup Repair-specific settings.

NoNetworking
Disables the sending of diagnostic and repair data to Microsoft. Startup Repair
will not turn on networking after a failed repair attempt.

Prevents Windows RE from launching Startup Repair automatically when it is


NoAutoLaunchFrom
CD booted from optical media and a boot failure in the offline operating system has
been detected.

3. Save the file in your working Windows RE directory under \Sources\Recovery\Tools.