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The Robert Gordon University

School of Engineering - Postgraduate Programme








MSc Project Handbook











Energy Programme

MSc/PgD/PgC in Asset Integrity Management
MSc/PgD/PgC in Drilling and Well Engineering
MSc/PgD/PgC in Oil and Gas Engineering
MSc/PgD/PgC in Petroleum Production Engineering
MSc/PgD/PgC in Reservoir Engineering
MSc/PgD/PgC in Subsea Engineering











Contributors:

Dr Mohamed Amish
Prof Norman Deans
Laurie Power
J o McCafferty




ENGPG007-Rev1 March 2010
Table of Contents

Introduction................................................................................................................... 4

The Project and the MSc Course.............................................................................. 4
Stage 0 At the start of, or before, the MSc course begins ........................ 5
Stage 1 Semester 1 ......................................................................................... 5
Stage 2 The Specification............................................................................... 6
After Approval the Supervisor ........................................................................ 7
Research & Research Methods ........................................................................ 7

1 Introduction to the MSc Project ......................................................................... 8
1.1 Background to the Project.......................................................................... 8
1.2 Principles of Operation of the MSc Project Scheme.............................. 8
1.3 MSc Project Schedule ................................................................................ 9

2 Project Definition and Management ............................................................... 11
2.1 Projects with Industrial Collaborators..................................................... 11
2.2 Allocation of Supervisors to Students .................................................... 11
2.3 Formal Project Specification.................................................................... 11
2.4 Project Confidentiality ............................................................................... 12
2.5 The use of Specialist Software................................................................ 12
Operation of Project .................................................................................................. 13
2.6 Role and Responsibilities of a Supervisor............................................. 13
2.7 Role and Responsibilities of the Second Marker ................................. 14
2.8 Responsibilities of the Student................................................................ 14
2.9 Keeping on top of your project ................................................................ 15
2.10 Finance and Expenditure some key points........................................ 16

3 Project Execution .............................................................................................. 17
3.1 Liaison with Supervisor ............................................................................ 17
3.2 Technician Support in the School of Engineering ................................ 17
3.3 Safety .......................................................................................................... 18

4 Project Preparation ........................................................................................... 19
4.1 Purposes of the Project Report ............................................................... 19
4.2 Aim of Individual Engineering Research Investigation ........................ 19
4.3 Project Report Types ................................................................................ 19
4.4 Project Length............................................................................................ 20
4.5 Type Size, Font and Margins .................................................................. 20
4.6 General Guidelines for Project Planning ............................................... 21
4.7 Writing the Project ..................................................................................... 21
4.8 Supplementary Advice on Report Writing ............................................. 22
4.9 Arrangement of Project Sections ............................................................ 23
4.10 Caption Page ............................................................................................. 23
4.11 Title Page.................................................................................................... 24
4.12 Confidentiality Statement ......................................................................... 24
4.13 Declaration ................................................................................................. 24
4.14 ODL Employer Supervisor Confirmation ............................................... 24
4.15 Abstract ....................................................................................................... 24



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4.16 Dedication (optional) ................................................................................. 24
4.17 Acknowledgements ................................................................................... 25
4.18 Table of Contents ...................................................................................... 25
4.19 List of Figures ............................................................................................ 25
4.20 List of Tables.............................................................................................. 25
4.21 List of Symbols, Abbreviations, Nomenclature ..................................... 25
4.22 Main Text .................................................................................................... 26
4.23 Equations (positioning, numbering and referencing) ........................... 26
4.24 Diagrams .................................................................................................... 27
4.25 Numbering of Figures, Tables and Captions ........................................ 27
4.26 Units and Abbreviations ........................................................................... 27
4.27 References and Bibliography .................................................................. 27
4.28 Appendices................................................................................................. 28
4.29 Further Reading on Project Writing ........................................................ 29
4.30 Important Dates ......................................................................................... 29

5 Poster and Presentation................................................................................... 30
5.1 Project Poster ............................................................................................ 30
5.2 Poster Design ............................................................................................ 30
5.3 Poster Layout ............................................................................................. 31
5.4 Project Presentation.................................................................................. 31

6 Submission & Assessment of Component Parts of the MSc Project........ 33
6.1 Submission of the Project ........................................................................ 33
6.2 Deadlines and Extensions ....................................................................... 33
6.3 Penalties for Late Submission or Failure of the Project ...................... 35
6.4 Plagiarism & Turnitin................................................................................. 35
6.5 Calculation of Final Project Mark ............................................................ 36
6.6 Assessment of Project.............................................................................. 37
6.7 Role of External Examiners ..................................................................... 38
6.8 Assessment Board Decisions.................................................................. 38
6.9 Publicising your Work ............................................................................... 38

Appendix 1: Exemplar MSc Project Specification ................................................ 39
Appendix 2: Project Risk Assessment Form......................................................... 41
Appendix 3: Confidentiality Statement ................................................................... 42
Appendix 4: Ethics Forms ........................................................................................ 43
Appendix 6: Declaration ........................................................................................... 49
Appendix 7: Sample Contents Page ...................................................................... 50
Appendix 8: Project Checklist.................................................................................. 51
Appendix 9: Template Poster .................................................................................. 53
Appendix 10: Assessment Forms ........................................................................... 54














ENGPG007-Rev1
3 March 2010
Introduction

This Guide is intended to be a resource for all MSc Project students on the MSc
courses of the School of Engineering. So, it applies to full-time, distance-learning and
corporate students in Aberdeen and all over the world.

This revision (2010) presents much the same advice as in previous versions, but
reorganised so that it may be used at different stages in the Project process from
the very beginning of the MSc course through to final submission and assessment.

All MSc students should read this guide, paying particular attention to the sections
which are relevant at a particular stage.

Some sections of the Guide give mandatory instructions for example on format and
font sizes. This is indicated in the text. Other parts of the Guide provide advice and
this should be considered as support for the management of the Project by a student.

The Project Group is happy to give advice at any stage please see the contact details
below. Once the Project Specification has been approved, the principal point of
contact is the Supervisor.



The Project and the MSc Course

The Project has an academic value of one-third of the entire course. The module
descriptor (which can be located in the Module database here:
http://www4.rgu.ac.uk/prospectus/modules/disp_modulesearch.cfm?)
shows that this module has 60 SCOTCAT points and an indicative workload of 600
hours for the student. This is equivalent to a standard working week (say 40 hours)
for 15 weeks between three and four months. This workload is (from experience)
very realistic and should be taken in to account in planning. Some students may be
able to complete the necessary work in less time, but this is unusual.

The Project gives a student the opportunity to demonstrate autonomous, extended
and focused intellectual effort resulting in a level of originality and innovation
appropriate to the degree of Master. It is not a routine exercise in the collection and
presentation of information.

Aside from the academic aspects of the Project directly related to the course, the work
done can be significant in other ways:

Some students wish to progress to do a PhD. The level of ability demonstrated
in the Project is often a major factor in the selection criteria. The MSc Project
can be considered as a small version of a PhD project.

At job interviews, candidates are often questioned closely about their Project
work. Interview panels look for the ability to manage extended work of this
nature since this is a good indicator of future job performance.







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Stage 0 At the start of, or before, the MSc course begins

All students are expected to source their own Project specifications. This approach has
the advantage that a student can choose a project of interest with a sponsor (see
below) of their choice. Exceptionally, full-time students who are unable to do this will
be provided with a Project topic relevant to their course: unfortunately there can be no
discussion about the allocation of a particular topic.

Students should give the choice of topic serious and extended consideration
preferably before joining the course. Full-time students should use every opportunity
to attend technical meetings in Aberdeen in order to network with industry
professionals in order to find a topic. Distance-learning students will, obviously, find
that networking could be a valuable way of finding a Project if one is not available
through the workplace.

There is a tendency to leave any thought about the Project until later in the course
this is unwise. Managing the early modules must take place in parallel with finding a
Project.

Stage 1 Semester 1

Most students will find a Project topic and a sponsor in this period.

What do we mean by a good Project? It is important to understand that this is a
Masters course. An online dictionary definition
1
includes:

Possession of consummate skill
Full command of a subject of study
the state of excelling or surpassing or going beyond usual limits

Of more relevance is the descriptor
2
from the national body which co-
ordinates academic standards:

Demonstrate a systematic understanding of knowledge, and a critical awareness
of current problems and/or new insights, much of which is at, or informed by, the
forefront of their academic discipline, field of study, or area of professional
practice;

Deal with complex issues both systematically and creatively, make sound
judgements in the absence of complete data, and communicate their conclusions
clearly to specialist and non-specialist audiences.

Show a comprehensive understanding of techniques applicable to their own
research or advanced scholarship;

Demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems, and
act autonomously in planning and implementing tasks at a professional or
equivalent level.

Demonstrate originality in the application of knowledge, together with a practical
understanding of how established techniques of research and enquiry are used to
create and interpret knowledge in the discipline;


1
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/mastery - accessed 25 March 2010
2
SCQF Handbook, downloaded from
http://www.scqf.org.uk/AbouttheFramework/LevelDescriptors.aspx - accessed
25 March 2010


ENGPG007-Rev1
5 March 2010

Continue to advance their knowledge and understanding, and develop new skills
to a high level.

Show a conceptual understanding that enables the student:
to evaluate critically current research and advanced scholarship in the
discipline, and to evaluate methodologies and develop critiques of them and,
where appropriate, to propose new hypotheses
to demonstrate the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment
requiring: the exercise of initiative and personal responsibility; decision-making in
complex and unpredictable situations; and the independent learning ability
required for continuing professional development.

If that is a little complex, here is some of the advice from another document from the
School of Engineering:

Masters Level
Mastery means that you become expert in the area of your Project. We expect
that you will show this within the Report, in your Presentation and in all aspects
of your Project work. Your Supervisor from the University will give you advice
and feedback, but the responsibility for managing the Project is entirely yours.

What to Look for in a Good Project
Your Project needs to allow you to show:
Mastery
Effective management
A good level of innovation or originality in dealing with the problem.

Innovation and originality are important features of a good project, and they
mean that you must do more than a review of (say) current practice. You must
go beyond what is already established.

Stage 2 The Specification

The Project Specification is mandatory and should be submitted using the form
provided. It is important that all sections are completed as fully and as clearly as
possible. The document is important as the approved version represents part of
the academic agreement between the University and the student.

The most important parts are:

The contribution. This section should show where the project will add to
what is already known or established.

Threats and Opportunities. This section should anticipate these factors as
far as is possible.

Gantt Chart. It is essential that there is a plan at the very start. You will
not be expected to keep rigidly to this plan.


Specifications are considered by a small panel of academic staff. The outcomes
can be:

Approved - and Supervisor allocated. Contact should be made with the
supervisor as soon as possible.




ENGPG007-Rev1
6 March 2010
Provisional Approval subject to changes. These will be indicated in the
feedback. Students will usually be directed to a member of staff for
guidance. This outcome usually happens when the Project Panel can see
that the potential project is valuable, but where the Specification is not
clearly defined.

Reject. This usually happens when the Specification is of poor quality and
does not meet the academic requirements of the course.


After Approval the Supervisor

It is important to contact the Supervisor as soon as possible. Supervisors are
there to provide advice, but can only do this if regular contact is maintained.
Supervisors should be regarded as one of the available resources to be managed
appropriately by the student.



Research & Research Methods

As your Project work will involve you in research, you should look at how to do
this effectively.

This document
www.brad.ac.uk/acad/management/external/els/pdf/introductiontores
earch.pdf is a good summary.

Also refer to
http://www.bristol.ac.uk/civilengineering/currenttaughtpostgraduates/
msc-water/mschbk.pdf

Additionally there is an RGU document which can be located in the ENM214 MSc
Project module in CampusMoodle.































ENGPG007-Rev1
7 March 2010
1 Introduction to the MSc Project


1.1 Background to the Project

Robert Gordon University places a strong emphasis on the development of engineering
competencies.

The Masters project forms a substantial part of the course (60 out of the total of 180
credit points), and is an important part of the overall assessment for the award of an
MSc.

In the Masters project you are expected to demonstrate mastery of the principles,
techniques and procedures associated with advanced independent study. You will have
to initiate and complete a thorough investigation of an area related to the subject
content and discipline areas of the course.

You will work largely independently, supported by a project supervisor and where
appropriate, other specialists. During the project period, you will have to show that
you have the ability to work effectively from information provided and with little or no
guidance.

In the course of the project, you will have to do some or all of:

initiate a research investigation;
develop strategies for the solution of problems;
evaluate methodological approaches;
gather, analyse and validate data;
apply data analysis methods;
exercise judgement based on incomplete or contradictory information;
hypothesis and synthesis solutions;
communicate research results via a poster, a presentation and a project.

The management of the project has to be carried out within quite strict time limits and
resources, and against the demands of other subjects. Planning and organisation are
important if the project is to be effective in representing your skills and intellect.

The Definitive Course Document for the Energy Programme details the regulations
relating to the course (including the project). You should ensure that you are familiar
with the contents of the Definitive Course Document, copies of which are lodged in the
University's Central Library. You should also refer to the Universitys Academic
Regulations on the University web site:
http:/ / www.rgu.ac.uk/ academicaffairs/ quality/ page.cfm?pge=1826


1.2 Principles of Operation of the MSc Project Scheme

The project work is based on the following principles:
The project is rated at 60 Credits and is equivalent to 600 hours full-time work;
The student is expected to identify a project and a supervisor;
A formal project specification is drawn up;
The project specification and supervisory arrangements are approved by the
School of Engineering and a Supervisor is appointed;
A student who fails to submit a project by the deadline given or who submits late
or who fails the project is allowed one further opportunity for resubmission.





ENGPG007-Rev1
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1.3 MSc Project Schedule


Induction & Project Specification Phase

Responsibilities
Activity
Record
Projects Manager Conducts Project Seminar during Semester 1 (for FT
students only)

PowerPoint
Presentation
Projects
Coordinator
Gives access to students to the ENM214 Project module
in CampusMoodle.

ENM214 Project
module
Student Sources suitable project

Student Submits Project Specification with Gantt Chart to the
Projects Coordinator.

Project
Specification
Projects
Moderation Panel
Reviews Project Specification and either (1) approves
and allocates academic supervisor or (2) rejects with
feedback and confirms date of resubmission. Decision
emailed to student by Projects Coordinator.
Email
confirmation


During Project Write-up Phase

Responsibilities
Activity
Record
Student Starts work on the Project only once is has been
approved. Students have 15 weeks (FT) or 40 weeks
(ODL) in which to complete it.

Student Keeps in regular contact with the academic
supervisor while keeping a diary of work. The student
is responsible for managing their project.

Supervisor Advises and monitors progress of student.

Student Submits 2 x comb bound copies of the project, 1 x A3
laminated poster, 1 x CD containing the project in
Word format and 1 x copy of the Turnitin Originality
Report.







Project diary







2 x Projects
1 x A3 Poster
1 x CD
1 x Originality
Report
Student Prepares their Viva Oral Presentation. PowerPoint
Presentation

Projects
Coordinator

Sends the Viva Timetable to students. Viva Timetable


Student Presents at their Viva to an Assessment Panel of
peers. The Panel grade the Viva and Poster on
Grading Grid forms.
Grading Grids




ENGPG007-Rev1
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Post-Assessment Phase

Responsibilities
Activity
Record
Supervisor First marks 1 x copy of the project and submits the
grading grid to the Projects Coordinator.

2
nd
Marker Second marks 1 x copy of the project and submits the
grading grid to the Projects Coordinator.

Project Grading
Grid

Project Grading
Grid
Projects
Coordinator
Collates 1
st
marker grade, 2
nd
marker grade, Viva
grade and Poster grade and calculates overall Project
grade.

Grades
Spreadsheet
Projects Team Meets to moderate the grades if it is required, otherwise
they are confirmed.

Projects
Coordinator

Processes the grades and presents them to the
Assessment Board.



Assessment
Board
Spreadsheet
Assessment Board Validates the grades.

Projects
Coordinator
Ensures the grades are available to students on the
Student Portal and produces the Transcripts for students
to collect or has them posted.

GRADUATION!
Transcripts




































ENGPG007-Rev1
10 March 2010
2 Project Definition and Management


2.1 Projects with Industrial Collaborators

Students who are sponsored by, or have close contact with an industrial company may
wish to undertake a project which relates to that companys activities. This is
encouraged. The industrial partner may initially like to submit an informal project
description which can be discussed with staff in the School. For those suggestions
which are followed up, a more tightly specified specification is produced in the normal
form. A student undertaking the project will have both an industrial supervisor and an
academic supervisor. He is still expected to spend a significant portion of his work at
the University but may spend periods at the industrial collaborator's premises where
this is appropriate.

This generates real company project work and gives you the motivation to complete
the research successfully. In many cases you will have your own ideas for a potential
project - perhaps drawn from your current work experience. An existing or past
company project is not acceptable; nor is a team project with which you are
associated.

Members of staff in the School of Engineering and the Energy Centre staff have
contacts with outside organisations (e.g. private and public companies, local
authorities, government departments and charities). Such organisations are often the
source of valuable project specifications.

Interests in a particular project area will usually be focused on a single contact within
the organisation. You should try hard to maintain the best possible relationship with
him/her and keep him/her properly informed of your progress. Remember, however,
that they will have other commitments and will have to allocate you only a proportion
of their time.

Your first contact with your Supervisor should be to discuss the project idea. Your
Supervisor will be able to give you more details about the background of the project,
and will suggest other contacts and further reading. Any delay on your part at this
stage is likely to have serious consequences later on.

At an early stage, you should establish detailed objectives for the work involved.


2.2 Allocation of Supervisors to Students

The Projects Team will allocate a supervisor on the basis of the workload of academic
staff and their technical specialities.

2.3 Formal Project Specification

Your project is defined in a Project Specification. This states the aims, objectives and
constraints associated with the project to all concerned. Bear in mind that you are
doing postgraduate work at Masters level and that you are aiming to be the master
of your research subject.

The Project Specification document is developed by you in conjunction with the
Supervisor and submitted to the MSc Projects Coordinator in the Energy Centre. It
then goes through the process of moderation to ensure that:




ENGPG007-Rev1
11 March 2010
the Project Specification is relevant to the course aims and objectives;
the project aims are feasible;
the subject has sufficient potential and an appropriate challenge (in terms of
level and volume) for a Masters degree;
suitable supervisory arrangements are in place;
the resources required to support the project are available within the
University, or accessible elsewhere;
any confidentiality issues and ethics issues have been considered.

An example of a complete Project Specification is in Appendix 1.


2.4 Project Confidentiality

A project may have company/research confidentiality issues, and the report may have
to be considered a confidential document. All investigations, findings, results,
interpretations, conclusions and recommendations contained within the Report are the
property of either the Client, the student involved, and/or The Robert Gordon
University (RGU).
The Report or any part of it will not be published in open literature or otherwise
released to any third parties in any form whatsoever except with the prior written
consent of each RGU, the Student and the Client.
It is understood that upon request, the Report will be made available for inspection by
external examiners and by nominated staff of RGU for assessment and academic audit
purposes.
A sample confidentiality form is given in Appendix 3.


2.5 The use of Specialist Software

Once a student has had their Project Specification approved by the Projects
Moderation Panel, they will be in a better position to gauge as to whether specialist
software is to be used. Students should refer to the Guidelines for Use of Educational
Licences Software. The current version is located in the Postgraduate Support
Module in CampusMoodle.

If specialist software is required, students should complete the Specialist Software
Request form (see Appendix 5) and submit this to the Projects Coordinator in the
first instance.



















ENGPG007-Rev1
12 March 2010
Operation of Project


2.6 Role and Responsibilities of a Supervisor

Supervisors will be able to give help, advice and encouragement when asked, or if
they think that such action is necessary.

The main roles of the supervisor are to:

maintain overall, general, guidance of the project;
direct students towards specialised help;
assess the level of resources (technicians, equipment and finance) available;
provide a critical and rational sounding board for ideas;
assess (mark) the project.

A Supervisor will not do your project for you, nor will they provide a detailed set of
instructions. A project is not like a laboratory exercise, where a detailed method is
given orally or in writing. In your project you will need to develop your own method
and plan. At no point will Supervisors approve (officially or unofficially) any of
your work.

Supervisors will normally arrange to have a series of meetings with you (not normally
less than 6 contact discussions during the project time), but they will want to know as
soon as possible if you run into difficulties.

Remember that Supervisors have other commitments, and you may not be able to
have a long meeting without an appointment. Be prepared to use telephones and e-
mail, and to leave written messages.

Note: If you have any problems contacting either your Supervisor or your Sponsor,
you should contact the Projects Coordinator as soon as possible.

The specific responsibilities of the project Supervisor will, to some extent, depend on
the nature of the project, the level and duration of the project and whether projects
are School generated and allocated or student generated and self-selected. The
responsibilities are to:

assist the student: to clarify the topic; to be clearly focused and not over-
ambitious; and to advise the student on the viability of ideas;

direct the student to relevant areas of information, literature sources and
specialised internal/external help;

advise on appropriate methodologies/techniques;

advise on referencing style and the problem of plagiarism;

maintain regular supervisory contact in accordance with School policy and in
the light of discussion of arrangements with the student; i.e. set-up a series of
discussion sessions;

regularly monitor the student's work. Supervisors should keep a written log of
the opportunities for formal contact offered to students and the actual
occurrences of formal contact. Encourage students to keep a written record of
all supervisory contact/support noting key points of discussion;

assist the student in managing the timetable of the project;




ENGPG007-Rev1
13 March 2010
assist the student in identifying when problems are likely to be encountered
and how they might be tackled;

ensure the student is made aware of inadequate progress and/or standards of
work below the expected level or any assessments which do not reach the
required standard. Consistently unsatisfactory progress should be made known
to the student in writing;

read and comment on drafts of the project, where this is requested by the
student and return such work with constructive criticism and in reasonable
time. Supervisors should not be correcting spelling mistakes and effectively
editing the project/report. Students requiring assistance with this aspect of
their work should be encouraged to seek appropriate assistance from the
Learning Support Centre;

ensure any external communications are appropriate and will not reflect badly
on the University;

participate in assessment of the project;

ensure effective liaison between him/herself, the student, any second
supervisor, and any external person/body involved in the study;

inform the School/the Projects Coordinator of any serious difficulties that
arise.


2.7 Role and Responsibilities of the Second Marker

The main roles of the Second Marker are to:


to participate in assessment of the project

assess (mark) the project i.e. to act as the Co-Examiner

ensure effective liaison between him/herself, the Supervisor, and where relevant,
any external person/body involved in the study.



2.8 Responsibilities of the Student
A project belongs to a student. The prime responsibility for the management of the
project lies with the student, and you must maintain dialogue between yourself and
your supervisor. You are expected to:
(i) manage the relationship with your Supervisor, keeping in regular contact
with him/her according to School policy/arrangements agreed;

(ii) discuss with the Supervisor the type of guidance and comment that you find
most helpful;
(iii) agree a schedule of contact discussions with your Supervisor for
reports/briefing on progress, ensuring the agreed schedule is adhered to
and any deadlines met;

(iv) take the initiative in discussing any problems with the project work and/or
its supervision so that these can be resolved as soon as possible;
(v) keep a diary of work conducted related to the project. This would include:
notes on discussions/correspondence with Supervisor(s) and any other
internal/external specialists; literature read and comments; ideas/designs;
results of tests/experiments; problems found and solutions; equipment




ENGPG007-Rev1
14 March 2010
details and settings; project costs; resources used; diagrams, plans,
sketches, photographs; raw data; disks/CDs etc.;
(vi) submit the project and/or other items in the specified format, on time and
according to the School/The Energy Centre mechanism for handing-in
project work, and to submit for any other related assessments as required
by course regulations.

Do not expect your supervisor to come up with ready-made answers. The
responsibility for solving problems lies with you, but your supervisor will be able to
suggest other methods of approach if you have exhausted all your own ideas.

Difficulties which are the responsibility of the School (eg major equipment
breakdowns) are a different matter, and will be solved by staff (or appropriate
allowances made).


2.9 Keeping on top of your project (Responsibility Plan Hand in Date)

You have now started on your project. Some of you have had experience in projects
from earlier courses and employment. For some it seems like a large task so you
will need to manage the whole process very carefully.

Here are some comments, ideas and suggestions:

a) Responsibility

1. It is your responsibility to manage your project.

2. Now is the time to read through again the Project Guide and the associated
FAQs.

3. Keep in touch regularly with your Supervisor Little and Often would be a
reasonable approach.

4. Do not expect your Supervisor to read and comment on sixty pages within two
days. It is not your Supervisors job to check spelling and punctuation.

5. Alert your Supervisor as early as possible if you are experiencing problems.
Your Supervisor can then support you as you deal with the problems.

b) Plan

6. Prepare a Plan (this is part of the Specification) and monitor your own
progress against the Plan. Take effective action if you are behind targets.

7. Do not, under any circumstances, incur unauthorised expenditure, unless, of
course, you are going to pay this yourself.

8. Keep a project diary.

c) Writing-up/Hand-in Date

9. Begin to structure and write your Report early. It should be possible to identify
Chapter and Section headings and to write the Introduction.

10. Keep back-ups of everything you do on a computer. Last minute crashes are
not an excuse for late hand-ins.



ENGPG007-Rev1
15 March 2010
11. It is your responsibility to decide that your work is ready to hand in on the
deadline. Your Supervisor will not approve your Report beforehand.

2.10 Finance and Expenditure some key points

Some postgraduate projects are financially supported by the industrial sponsor.
Industrial sponsors may also help by providing test facilities, samples, access to data
and so on. It is important that you establish clearly at an early stage the extent of
this help. Do not exceed it.

The financial resources of the School are limited. Some allowance is made for
expenditure on projects, but there is no specific sum allocated against any particular
project.

Use of these funds is subject to the approval of the Head of School. You should make
every attempt to use the considerable existing resources of the School in equipment
and materials.

If you consider that the purchase of items or services is essential, you should contact
your Supervisor without delay. You will need to be prepared to fully justify your
request for funds. He/she will then explain the formalities of the requisition system,
and make the necessary arrangements. Funding is not guaranteed

You must keep a detailed record of all expenditure on your project, since your report
may need to contain a section on costing.



DO NOT INCUR ANY UNAUTHORISED EXPENDITURE





































ENGPG007-Rev1
16 March 2010
3 Project Execution


3.1 Liaison with Supervisor

Your project will have arisen from a commercial/industrial source or research
requirement, and the outcomes of the project will have been quite closely defined.

It is essential that your Supervisor is adequately informed of the status and progress
of your project during the period of its development. This will require periodic contact
with your supervisor at appropriate intervals dependent on the nature of your
investigations. It is your responsibility to ensure that such contacts take place.
Remember that Supervisors will have a limit on the time available for supervision.


You should have a minimum of 16 hours of supervisory contact time during
your Project period. Contact time is made up of face-to-face meeting times,
email contact times, telephone call times etc.


You should make sure that you keep notes of meetings. The structure of the meetings
will vary, but it is worth arriving with the following provisional agenda:

Progress since the last meeting, and against the plan;
Intended work before the next meeting;
Difficulties experienced or help required.

You should keep a project diary in a bound notebook (not a loose leaf folder),
or use appropriate software in which you record all the day-to-day details of progress.
These include: references (not every word, but the essentials), ideas, notes of
meetings with supervisor, equipment details and settings, raw data, costs... even
phone numbers. Over the project period, it is very easy to forget some important
detail unless it was written down. Do not trust your memory for reconstructing details
of activities carried out months ago.

This diary will form the basis of information to be presented in your project.

Your Supervisor and the External Examiner may wish to see your diary. It may also
be required when you apply for Chartered Engineer status.


3.2 Technician Support in the School of Engineering

Projects which have a practical content and which may require the use of laboratory
facilities can be allocated some technician support.

Students will be informed of a particular technician who will be their first point of
contact with such support.

The technicians of the School form a very significant resource and have considerable
experience and skills.

The School technician resource is limited, and may only be available if justified. Like
supervisors, technicians have many other responsibilities and are unlikely to be
instantly on-call. Make sure that your Supervisor is fully aware of any work that they




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may be expected to undertake, and that such work is sensibly planned to avoid last
minute overloads.

3.3 Safety

The Schools safety policy and the University's safety policy are displayed on the notice
boards.

Students should also refer to the Schools Student Health & Safety Booklet. The
current version is located in the Postgraduate Support Module in CampusMoodle.


IT IS THE RESPONSIBILITY OF ALL STUDENTS TO MAKE SURE THAT THEY ARE
FULLY AWARE OF, AND COMPLY WITH THE SAFETY POLICY.


In the School of Engineering, when working in laboratories (excluding IT laboratory
areas):

you must wear protective clothing;
you must wear protective boots;
you must wear protective glasses if the work demands them;
you may not operate powered equipment outwith normal hours (i.e. 0900 to 1700);
you must check with the technician responsible for the laboratory before using any
equipment.

If you are working in company premises, you should discuss health and safety policies
and procedures with a company representative.







































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4 Project Preparation


4.1 Purposes of the Project Report

The main point of your Project report is to convey clearly and accurately the
importance of your work to another reader.

While you write your report, always consider the point of view of the reader. You have
to persuade the reader that you have done work at Masters Level and that this work is
worthy of a good grade.

Do not expect the reader to make guesses at what you have said. It must all be clear
in the text.

So in summary, your Project Report should exist to contain a combination of some or
all of the following:

To present information;
To report findings;
To critically assess theoretical approaches to a topic;
To evaluate the success of one or more methods of investigation;
To consider applications and practical implications of your work;
To consider possible future developments.

Because of these goals the Project Report should demonstrate:

Clear, logical and analytically rigorous presentation of information;
Evidence of serious and critical thought based upon, although not limited to,
the data you have collected.

4.2 Aim of Individual Engineering Research Investigation

This exercise is a means to develop skills in the investigation and analysis of
engineering problems and creativity in devising effective solutions, through the
detailed research of one selected topic.

On completion of this exercise, students should be able to:

Integrate material from the different areas of the course within the project work
area.
Analyse, plan, execute and critically review a major project based on a brief
drawn from the context of the course.
Report in writing and orally on the work undertaken and the approach adopted.


4.3 Project Report Types

Project activities are likely to fail into one of the following categories:
(a) experimental investigations;
(b) design, build and test projects of a component or simple system;

(c) extended design exercises, without construction of a prototype.



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The type of project activity will dictate, to a certain extent, the nature and format of
the project report. The content of typical report types are given below.

(a) A Report for an Experimental Investigation:

A clear statement of the objectives and the initial specification;
An introduction and summary of previous work already done;
A statement of applicable theory;
A description, with sketches or drawings of apparatus;
Tables and/or graphs of recorded data;
Tables and/or graphs of derived values;
Discussions of results, trends, sources of error;
Conclusions based on evidence produced;
Specifications for future work.

(b) A Report for a Design Build and Test Project:

A clear statement of the objectives and the initial specification;
The formulation of the particular design solution, with appropriate technical
analysis;
Working drawings of the design solution;
Aspects of manufacture of the design solution;
Performance values of solution on test;
Critical appraisal of the solution with respect to initial specification (conclusions);
Specifications for future design or development.

(c) A Report for an Extended Design Exercise (without Manufacture and
Test of Prototype):

A clear statement of the objectives and the establishment of the initial
specification;
The synthesis of possible design solutions with sketches;
The evaluation of alternative solutions and the selection of an optimum solution;
The detail design of the particular optimum solution, with appropriate technical
analysis, material selection and manufacture considerations;
General arrangement and detailed drawings of the design solution;
Critical appraisal of solution with respect to initial specification;
Indications for future extensions of the design exercise.


4.4 Project Length

A typical project will be approximately 6000 10,000 words in length. This limit
excludes diagrams, charts, tables, appendices.


4.5 Type Size, Font and Margins

Reports should be typed in one-and-a-half or double spacing on good quality A4 size
paper, with the text printed on one side only. There must be a margin at the left side
of 40mm and at the right of 25mm. Top and bottom margins must be 25mm. The
type face should be clear e.g. Verdana or Arial (Size 11 font) and of adequate density.
(Draft quality on a dot-matrix printer is not acceptable.)






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4.6 General Guidelines for Project Planning

The following checklist of requirements is helpful in the preparing the project:

The objectives of the work should be clearly stated and their background and
significance explained;

There should be an appropriately scaled review of the literature and any
previous work relevant to the project;

The review should be restricted to relevant material only;

Do not rewrite textbook material, and keep the review as short as possible;

The methods employed (experimental, analytical, conceptual modelling etc)
should be adequately explained and their use justified;

The planning and execution of the project must be clearly set out;

Your own contribution must be identifiable, and any contributions made by
others must be acknowledged;

References in the text should be identified and listed in the standard form at
the end of the report;

The discussion and conclusion must be suitably handled, including an objective
assessment of what has been achieved and specifications for any further work;

The report must clearly show evidence of:

o a clear insight into the problems involved and ability to select the most
suitable methods of attack;
o the ability to reason analytically, to weigh evidence and to draw
appropriate conclusions;
o appropriate judgement in making decisions, handling the programme of
work and managing the project;
o a proper scientific attitude i.e. providing adequate evidence for
statements made, avoiding unsupported assertions;
o the ability to work independently and to develop novel/original ideas
and approaches.

After having completed the plan it should be discussed with your supervisor.

Appendix 8 contains a project check list.


4.7 Writing the Project

In your report, you should aim to produce a piece of work which is your masterpiece.
The quality of the presentation should be the same as that as a paper published in a
reputable journal.

This section offers some advice on the writing of the project. It should be read in
conjunction with the next sections which stipulates the requirements for the
presentation and arrangement of the project.




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i. Title: the title must be short and indicate what your project is about, keeping to
about five words, although you may want to add a sub-title;

ii. General Introduction: one of the most important sections. A good introduction
will do some or all of the following:

a. Define the topic/issue and indicate broadly its extent, nature and significance
by reviewing existing knowledge in the field;
b. State clearly the aims of the project and your research objectives;
c. Provide background information which the reader will need (this includes
defining technical terms or words which are to be used in a special sense);
d. Indicate the arrangement of the main sections of the project.


Make the Introduction as interesting as possibleremember that the readers
response to the whole project is often disproportionately determined by the
Introduction.

iii. Main Sections: concentrate on writing one section at a time. In each section it
may be necessary to do all or some of the following:

a. State the evidence (indicating sources);
b. Analyse and evaluate the evidence;
c. State any conclusions or recommendations from the analysis.

If statistical material is included, ensure that it is presented in the most concise
way possible using clear tables and/or charts. Do not confuse the reader with
pages of statistics: supplementary data can be included in appendices at the
end of the project.

iv. Abstract: this should be a brief summary. It should do all or some of the
following:

a. Describe the hypotheses tested and indicate their theoretical importance;
b. Explain how the hypotheses were tested;
c. Summarise the main features of the results;
d. Summarise the discussion and key implications of the findings;
e. Summarise practical implications etc. based on (b);
f. Highlight any important conceptual development or theoretical insight;
g. Summarise briefly wider considerations or implications, including strengths and
weaknesses of your data and methods.

The Abstract should never introduce new material which is not already
contained in the body of the report.


4.8 Supplementary Advice on Report Writing

Students should refer to the Schools Technical Report Writing Guide. The current
version is located in the Postgraduate Support Module in CampusMoodle.

In summary:

Take care with English - use short, simple, meaningful sentences;
Use references to:
add authority;


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avoid unnecessary background, derivations and proofs, etc.;
refer to work;
Cite references properly;
List references properly;
Acknowledge all sources including figures at point of use.

On completion use the following processes:

Spell/grammar check;
Proof read and amend as necessary;
Spell/grammar check again;
Proof read again!
This process can easily take a full day!


4.9 Arrangement of Project Sections

A project will normally contain the following sections (in order):

Project Front Cover
Caption Page
Title page
Confidentiality statement, if any
Declaration
Abstract
Dedication (optional)
Acknowledgments
Table of contents include page numbers;
List of figures, if any
List of tables, if any
Lists of symbols, abbreviations, nomenclature, conversion factors (if any)
Main Text
References all references must be cited in text
Bibliography, useful material not cited in text, if any
Appendices background and/or supporting material, if any
Project Back Cover


4.10 Caption Page

The caption page (the first page behind the cover) must contain the following
information:

the name of the University and of the School at the top of the page, thus

The Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen

School of Engineering

in the window position, the course name, the title of the project, the name of
the author, and the month and the year of the course e.g.

MSc Oil and Gas Engineering
Predicting Sand Production Problems
R J Brown
August 2006




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4.11 Title Page

The title page (the second page) must contain the following information:
Title of the project
Full name of the author, followed, if desired, by any academic or professional
qualifications or distinctions

The month and year of submission.

At the foot of the page, you should include the statement:

This report is submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the
degree of Master of Science in Drilling and Well Engineering * at The
Robert Gordon University, Aberdeen.

( * these words should be modified to suit your degree title)


4.12 Confidentiality Statement

If the work is of a confidential nature, and the project is not to be placed in the public
domain, the formal confidentiality statement (Appendix 3) should be included.

4.13 Declaration

The Declaration, a signed statement from you saying that your project is your own
original work is required. A template can be found in Appendix 5.

4.14 ODL Employer Supervi sor Confirmation

Applicable to Distance Learners only, this confirmation should be signed by a
supervisor of the student at his/her place of employment. It serves to verify that the
work of the project is exclusively that of the students. An example can be found in
Appendix 11.

4.15 Abstract

The abstract should be no more than 300 words on a single page.

The abstract should enable the reader to assess the background, methodologies,
achievements and conclusions of the project easily and quickly. You should examine
the Abstracts of papers in the Journals in the Library for examples.

One additional copy of the abstract should be provided in loose form when the project
report is submitted. This abstract will be used by External Examiners and for recording
purposes within the School. These should be headed with your name, the title of
project, the course and the session year of submission at the top.

4.16 Dedication (optional)

Do not number this page.
If used, text should be brief and centred on page.
The dedication does not appear in the table of contents.




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4.17 Acknowledgements

An acknowledgement is a brief statement of appreciation for, or in recognition of, any
special assistance. You should acknowledge the help and support of individuals,
companies and organisations who provided assistance and support.

Give this page a Page Number (Use lower case Roman numerals i.e. i, ii,iii,iv
etc)
Leave two blank lines. Begin typing the text.
Type the heading ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS in bold text centred at the top of
the page

A simple acknowledgement might read I am grateful to my Supervisor, Dr xxxxxxx in
the School of Engineering for his guidance and help.


4.18 Table of Contents

A sample Contents Page is shown in Appendix 5.

Type TABLE OF CONTENTS bold centred at the top of the page.

Give this page a Page Number (Use lower case Roman numerals i.e. i, ii,iii,iv
etc)
Leave one blank line. Type listings and page numbers.
The title of the chapters and sections should be listed and worded exactly as
they appear in the body of the project/report.
All materials that assemble the project must be listed in table of contents (see
Assembling the project order)


4.19 List of Figures

Type LIST OF FIGURES bold centred at the top of the page.

Give this page a Page Number (Use lower case Roman numerals i.e. i, ii,iii,iv
etc)
Leave one blank line and type the listings.
The List of Figures uses the captions as they appear below the figures in the
text.

4.20 List of Tables

Type LIST OF TABLES bold centred at the top of the page.

Give this page a Page Number (Use lower case Roman numerals i.e. i, ii,iii,iv
etc).
Leave one blank line and type the listings.
The List of Tables uses the captions as they appear above the tables in the
text.


4.21 List of Symbols, Abbreviations, Nomenclature

Type LIST OF SYMBOLS or ABBREVIATIONS bold centred at the top of the page.




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Abbreviations and acronyms should be defined the first time they are used in the text
and can be set out in the nomenclature.

Give this page a Page Number (Use lower case Roman numerals i.e. i, ii,iii,iv
etc).


4.22 Main Text

The body of the project is the substance of the project/report. All pages within the
body should be numbered consecutively with Arabic numerals. Page numbers should
be positioned centrally at the bottom of the page and 20mm above the edge of the
page.

Chapters are customarily divided into subsections with sub-headings.

Each chapter should begin on a new page. Chapter and section numbering should be
clear and appropriate to the narrative. For example:

1 General heading or title
1.1 Sub heading or title
1.2 Sub heading or title
1.3 Sub heading or title
1.3.1 Sub heading or title of the sub heading or title of 1.3


In general, good technical reports do not have to resort to any more than two
sub-divisions after the major section or chapter number.

On the first page of each chapter, type Chapter X in bold text centred at the top of
the page.

Leave a blank line and type the name of the chapter (e.g. INTRODUCTION
bold centred at the top of the page)
Leave one blank line and begin typing the text.
Begin numbering with Arabic numerals, starting with Page 1.


1.1 SECONDARY HEADINGS SHOULD BE FLUSH LEFT BOLD
The numbering for sections should be in Arabic numerals.
Text of the secondary heading should be in upper case.

1.1.1 Third Level Headings should be Flush Left Bold
The numbering for sections should be in Arabic numerals.
The first letter in each word of the third level heading should be capitalized.


4.23 Equations (positioning, numbering and referencing)

Positioning: Left justified.
In text, the citation of equations should be enclosed in parentheses (1.1).
Numbering should be sequential by chapter and number, right justified.

Example:

X = AB
2
(4.1)


Equation parameters should be defined the first time they are used in the text.




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4.24 Diagrams

Diagrams should, if possible, be reduced to A4 size with the same margins.

Diagrams can be positioned either within the text to which they relate (if the diagram
is referred to once only) or at the end of the report (if the diagram is referred to a
number of times). Diagrams from another source should be properly acknowledged
next to the diagram.

4.25 Numbering of Figures, Tables and Captions

Figures should be centred between the left and right margin with their captions
centred below the figure single spaced. Figures should be consecutively numbered per
chapter e.g. Figure 1.1, Figure 1.2, Figure 2.1, Figure 2.2, etc.

Tables should be centred between the left and right margin with their captions centred
above the table single spaced. Tables should be consecutively numbered within a
chapter e.g. Table 1.1, Table 1.2, Table 2.1, Table 2.2, etc.

The figures and tables in the appendices must be numbered.

If any table continues to subsequent pages, the caption is not repeated but the top
page line should read: Table 1.1 (continued).

If photographs are used, they must be of a high enough resolution to ensure that the
relevant detail is clearly seen.

Diagrams, drawing, figures, etc. must be sufficiently clear, sharp and large to be easily
readable.

The page on which the table/figure appears is numbered consecutively with the main
text.
This page number is used in the LIST OF TABLES OR LIST OF FIGURES. The captions
as they appear on the figure and table must be identical in every way with their listing
in the LIST OF FIGURES OR TABLES.


4.26 Units and Abbreviations

The international of System of units (SI units) should preferably be used in the
project. If other units such as Field units are used then conversion factors should be
given.

Unit symbols should be used with measured quantities, i.e. 1mm, but unit names are
used in the text without quantities, .i.e. a few millimetres.


4.27 References and Bi bliography

Any report that makes use of other works either in direct quotation or by reference
must contain a reference listing of these sources. The use of documented earlier work
is a standard feature of reports, so long as you properly assimilate and reorganise the
information which you incorporate into your own report. (See section on Plagiarism).








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Definitions:

BIBLIOGRAPHY is the list of sources you have used (normally books and
reports).

REFERENCE is the detailed description of the item from which you have
obtained your information.

The purpose of cataloguing items in sections of References and Bibliography is to
acknowledge the work of other writers, to demonstrate the body of knowledge on
which you have based your work, to enable other researchers to trace your sources
and to lead them on to further information.

There are a number of systems for referencing. The Harvard System is used in The
Robert Gordon University. The Harvard system has advantages of flexibility, simplicity,
clarity and ease of use both for author and reader.

Students should refer to the various Guides in the Study Skills Section located in the
Postgraduate Support Module in CampusMoodle.

4.28 Appendices

There may be information that is important to your project report for completeness
and/or reference, but which does not fit naturally into the main body of the report and
is not essential for proper understanding. For example, if you are using a special
software tool or experimental equipment/procedure you might wish to provide the
reader with a brief description of this tool and equipment/procedure. This description
is probably best placed in an appendix, and the reader directed to the appendix at the
appropriate point in the main text of your report. Another appendix could usefully
contain all the detailed tabulated results from testing your system.

These are only suggestions what goes into the appendices is very dependent on the
specific project you are undertaking. You need to exercise your own judgement.
Be aware that project assessors are not obliged to read any part of any appendix.
Appendices are there for the reader to use if they feel they need them. Material that
forms an essential part of your project and that you feel is essential that an assessor
reads should not be relegated to an appendix.

Not all reports will need to have appendices. Appendices are added to contain data
and text that is supportive and/or too lengthy for inclusion in the text. They should not
be listed as chapters in the project.

In your appendices, you should:

Count and number page(s);
Continue numbering all pages consecutively;
Divide the appendices into APPENDIX 1, APPENDIX 2, etc. depending on
type and amount of material used;
Have a cover sheet for each appendix. For each cover sheet, type APPENDIX
1, APPENDIX 2, etc., centred at the top of the page;
Leave three blank lines and type the title of the material;
List each appendix and its title separately in the Table of Contents;
Ensure appendices meet paper and margin guidelines;
Number, caption, and list tables and figures in the appendices in the List of
Tables and List of Figures.




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4.29 Further Reading on Project Writing

There are a number of books which have been written about projects and reports in
the Universitys Library. If you use one, make sure that it is relevant to engineering
projects in University courses. Although many of the general principles are the same,
certain subject or discipline areas have many different detailed requirements.

Example textbooks are:

Writing at University A Guide for Students, 2
nd
Edition
By P Creme and M Lea
Open University Press 2003
ISBN 0335 21325-1

Technical Writing and Professional Communication for Non-native Speakers of
English
by T Huckin and L Olsen
McGraw-Hill 1991
ISBN 0-07-030825-X

Writing and Presenting Scientific Papers, 2
nd
Edition
By B Malmfors, P Garnsworthy and M Grossman
Nottingham University Press 2003
ISBN 1-897676-12-3

Communication for Engineering Students
By J Davies
Addison Wesley Longman 1996
ISBN 0-582-25648-8

A Guide to Writing as an Engineer, 3
rd
Edition
By D Beer and D McMurrey
Wiley 2009
ISBN 978-0-470-41701-0




4.30 Important Dates

All the deadlines for the various tasks, including the deadline for submitting the
project, will be communicated to you by the Projects Manager or by the Projects
Coordinator.




















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5 Poster and Presentation



5.1 Project Poster

MSc students are required to produce a poster display about their project activity.
A poster should be of A3 size, and laminated and should show diagrams, photographs,
text and data which would be of interest to other engineers. Complex displays should
be avoided. The poster should aim to have an immediate appeal to non-technical
visitors to the School, but should also provide some content for those with more
specialised interests.

The posters are intended to be a means of improving your skills in the presentation of
information. This will prove to be useful at conferences, business presentations, and
seminars after graduation and is an important skill in industry, commerce and
academe. The posters are also intended to give visitors to the School a clear idea of
project activities.

There are many examples of posters in the laboratories and corridors of the School,
and students can also get advice from Supervisors. Appropriate posters will be
retained on permanent or semi-permanent display.


5.2 Poster Design

The Ideal Poster is designed to...

provide a brief overview of your research work;
initiate discussion;
attract attention;
give you something useful to point to as you discuss your work;
stand alone when you're not there to provide an explanation;
let people know of your particular expertise.

The poster could contain the following features (brief summary):

Title, Author, supervisor, Institutional Affiliation - the major required element is
the Title, Author/s and Institution section. This section is found at the top of
the poster. Affiliation may be listed near the bottom right of the poster if you
do not wish to take the space at the top of the poster.
An "Introduction" to the project (rationale, background, clear statements about
what you have set out to do (e.g. problem you intend to solve, reasons why
you chose to study this problem, proofs you are trying to establish). these
should then lead to declarations of the project aim(s) and objectives.
An "Applicable Theory" or "Methodology" or "Experimental" section to explain
the basis of the techniques, procedures and data collection you are using
including any assumptions made (to put your results into context).
A "Results and Discussion" section A summary of the most important results
to explain what you have done so far and what it tells you (your
interpretation). Implications of the findings.
A "Conclusion & Further Work" section summarising your findings to date and
thoughts about how the work will progress from this point. Did your study raise
questions?







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5.3 Poster Layout

Determine what three or four key points you want to make. You want your poster to
cover the key points of your work - not all the details.

Before you begin work in PowerPoint, design and lay out the poster ahead of time. You
may use one piece of paper to mock up the poster. Add the headings; roughly scratch
the text layout and graphics. Tape or pin the sheets to a wall and rearrange them until
you like the arrangement, all the while remembering to keep within your space
allocation. This will determine how your final poster will look. The process of designing
your poster by laying it out is called storyboarding.

Numbered lists and lists of "bullets" are good ways to communicate concisely.

The flow of your poster should be from the top left to the bottom right. The movement
(pathway) of the eye over the poster should be natural - down the columns or along
the rows. Use arrows, pointing hands, numbers, or letters to help clarify the sequence
or flow of the poster, if necessary. Some presenters prefer to number the sections in
sequence to guide the reader through the poster.

Examples of past good posters are placed on the department walls of the Energy
Centre (4
th
floor corridor, Schoolhill Campus). You will need to submit ONE x A3
poster. You need a PowerPoint programme to create a poster. Template Poster is
attached in Appendix 9.


5.4 Project Presentation

Planning and creating a PowerPoint presentation needn't be difficult or stressful. Use
these guidelines to improve the quality of your presentation in terms of:

Content of your presentation;
Planning and creating a PowerPoint presentation.

The Quality of the Research:

The topic should be thoroughly researched. Make sure that you know the specifics on
each slide (who? what? when? where? how?).

Slides Organisation:

There should be a logical flow from beginning to end, like in written work. The main
concepts of the presentation are to plan, focus and practice.

Plan the layout of your presentation. Strongly consider drawing up an outline before
you begin assembling the actual slides.

Focus on the main point(s) you want to make. "WHAT YOU HAVE DONE", WHY and
YOUR CONTRIBUTION

Practice your presentation with your supervisor or colleagues at least once before you
present it to your audience.






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In order to strengthen the visual part of your presentation you should:

Keep unity of slide design. Use one type of design;
Use a maximum of five points per slide and five words per point;
Preview your presentation ahead of time. The presentation slides on your
computer screen appears differently when projected onto a wall;
Make sure that your audience can read your slides. Print out a slide containing
text, then try to read the slide. If possible, preview your presentation in the room
you'll be using;
Avoid animated texts and sounds. These can distract your audience from the
main points you are making;
Avoid switching between programs (such as calling up a Web page). This takes
extra time and can make it difficult for your audience to remain focused on your
presentation;
Monitor timing. Use two slides per minute as a maximum.

MSc students are required to give a 20-minute presentation (a short lecture) about
their project activity. For the presentation:
Make sure you arrive at least 30 minutes before the time of your presentation.
Prepare two hard copies for your presentation, in case of PC or disc failure.
Prepare overhead viewgraphs for your presentation in case of PC or disc failure.
Prepare backup slides ready for potential viva questions.
There will be presentation facilities available in the room.

Go through your presentation with your supervisor beforehand, if you feel it is
necessary.
The slides should be minimal in number (for 20 minutes), to the point and they should
be convey to the audience "WHAT YOU HAVE DONE" and YOUR CONTRIBUTION.


Presentation Guidelines example slide list:
Project title and your name (1 slide)
Introduction (why it is important to do this project) (1 slide)
Objectives (1 slide)
Methodology (1 slide)
Case study (field background) (1 slide)
Analysis & results (7 slides - depends on your work)
Conclusions & recommendations (2 slides)
A total of approximately 10-14 slides will be enough for 20 minutes presentation
(maximum) time. Remember that each slide should contain only a few words. Use
bullet points to provide summary information.

After the presentation, there will be a short period (10 minutes) for you to answer
any questions from the audience.


Do not read from your slides. Face the audience and talk directly to them.










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6 Submission & Assessment of Component Parts of the MSc Project


6.1 Submission of the Project

What is required?

Two copies of the completed final Project Report must be submitted comb-bound
(for Aberdeen-based students - machine situated in room C317 Clarke Building,
Schoolhill)
an electronic copy on CD
the A3 laminated Project Poster
copy of the Turnitin Originality Report

All must be sent in one package and sent/submitted in person to the MSc Project
Coordinator in the Energy Centre (4
th
Floor Clarke Building, Schoolhill, Aberdeen, AB10
1FR) on or before the designated submission date and time.

Front covers (pre-printed) and back covers can be obtained from the School in room
C404 or by sending an email request to have them posted to you. You should not
provide your own covers. The pre-printed front covers have a pre-cut window, within
which certain information must be visible. Thus, the caption page (the first page) of
the report must contain that information in the appropriate space.

Your industrial contact may also require a copy (or copies).

6.2 Deadlines and Extensi ons

Deadlines, penalties for failing to meet deadlines and procedures for applying for
extensions are described in the Programme Regulations and published in the Student
Handbook.

You are expected to manage and organise your coursework assignments in a way
which anticipates that events will not always run smoothly.

It is important that you keep an academic member of staff fully informed of any
difficulties at the time at which they occur.

How do I request a Project Extension?

You must complete the relevant section of the Extenuating Circumstances form.
Forms are available either from the Postgraduate Support module in CampusMoodle or
from the Universitys website, below.

http://www4.rgu.ac.uk/academicaffairs/quality_assurance/page.cfm?pge
=
44250


Complete and return the form no later than five days following the
submission date.

Return the completed form to your Projects Co-ordinator by hand or recorded delivery.
Do not delay submitting your form if you are waiting for your evidence from a third
party. Remember that it is your own responsibility to ensure that your independent
supporting evidence is given to your School or Department and that forms without
supporting evidence may not be considered.



ENGPG007-Rev1
33 March 2010

Please be aware that the Universitys Academic Regulation A3, paragraph 6.1 relating
to Non-Academic Misconduct, might be applied should there be any doubts about the
authenticity of the claim.

In what circumstances might a Project extension be granted?

The following are circumstances which would usually be considered:

Serious or significant medical conditions or illness (including both physical and
mental health problems).
Exceptional personal circumstances (e.g. serious illness or death of an
immediate family member or close friend, including participation in funeral and
associated rites; being a victim of significant crime).
Exceptional travel circumstances beyond your control.
Ailments such as very severe colds, migraines, stomach upsets, etc., ONLY
where the ailment was so severe it was impossible for you to attend to hand in
your work.

Supporting evidence

When you submit a Project Extension Request you must provide independent
supporting evidence from an appropriate third party. Requests without such evidence
will not normally be considered. It is your own responsibility to organise and
provide supporting evidence which confirms to your Module Coordinator that
your request has a valid reason.

Note GPs (general practitioners/medical doctors) do not normally issue medical
certificates for illnesses which are not related to absence from paid employment and
they are entitled to charge for letters written to confirm periods of illness.

In what circumstances would a Project extension NOT be granted?

The following are examples of circumstances NOT normally considered for Project
extensions:

Minor ailments such as colds, headaches, hangovers, etc.
Inability to prioritise and schedule the completion of several pieces of work
over a period of time.
Problems caused by English not being your principal language. You should seek
advice in good time from the Study Support Centre or the English Language
Tutor.
Poor time management or personal organisation (e.g. failure to plan for
foreseeable last-minute emergencies such as computer crashes, printing
problems or travel problems resulting in late submission of Project).
Circumstances within your control (e.g. a holiday; paid employment if you are
a full time student; something considered more important).
Requests made after the published deadline for their receipt, i.e. by the Project
submission date except where you were unable to meet the submission date
for exceptional reasons which can be validated.
Requests without independent supporting evidence.
Requests which do not state clearly how your inability to hand in your
assessment on time was caused.

What happens to my Project Extension Request?





ENGPG007-Rev1
34 March 2010
Requests will be considered by the Projects Team and their decision communicated to
you by the Projects Co-ordinator. Requests are treated as confidential documents;
only those members of staff who are involved with the decision making process will
see your request form.

6.3 Penalties for Late Submission or Failure of the Project

The University regulations are specific in relation to late submissions.

(i) Project material (project, poster) submitted after the specified date shall
only be accepted if there is an acceptable valid reason. A late
submission, accepted because of extenuating circumstances, shall be
assessed in the normal way.
(ii) Projects received late without valid reason shall not be accepted and
shall receive no grade, and shall count as an assessment opportunity.
Hence, you have now missed an assessment opportunity. This was your
first attempt and you have one further attempt.

The actual grade obtained for a re-assessed module, including the attempt at which this
is achieved, will be recorded on your transcript. For this purpose, the re-assessed
project module aggregate shall be given the maximum of a threshold pass of a D
mark.

For the MSc, the grade awarded for the project work contributes to the determination of
distinction.

More information on the determination of distinction and regulations on classes of
degrees awarded, please refer to the University Regulations A4.8.2.

6.4 Plagiarism & Turnitin

Students should also refer to the Plagiarism Guide. The current version is located in
the Postgraduate Support Module in CampusMoodle.

Plagiarism (a form of academic misconduct) is the practice of presenting the thoughts,
writings or output of other people as if it were your own without acknowledgement of
their source(s). Typically this takes the form of:

A cut-and-paste of text, data, diagrams, images from another persons

-Project;
-Internet site;
-Research paper;
-Company document etc.

The use of someone elses software code

Academic misconduct is unacceptable and will result in a full investigation with
appropriate penalties imposed if you are found guilty. The University wants you to
avoid any accusations of academic misconduct and strongly encourages you to take
note of the following information and guidance.

All material used to support a piece of work, whether a printed publication or from
electronic media, should be appropriately identified and referenced and should not
normally be copied directly unless as an acknowledged quote. Text translated into the
words of the individual student should in all cases acknowledge the source. To avoid
accusations of plagiarism, it is essential that you properly reference your work.



ENGPG007-Rev1
35 March 2010
C
o
u
r
s
e
w
o
r
k

(
C
1
)


Please also refer to the various Guides to the Turnitin Plagiarism Detection Service on
CampusMoodle, as students will need to refer to these when submitting their Project
to Turnitin.



THERE ARE SERIOUS PENALTIES FOR PLAGIARISM




6.5 Calculation of Final Project Mark

Please also refer to the current Module Descriptor for the MSc Project ENM214 which
can be located in the University Module database:
http://www4.rgu.ac.uk/prospectus/modules/disp_modulesearch.cfm?

An excellent project will demonstrate that the candidate has:
made excellent progress against objectives (i.e. worked hard);
made a major contribution in organising, executing & managing the project;
provided a clear evidence of application of knowledge, skills, approach and
critical faculties from the rest of the course and used those to benefit the project;
written an excellent review of any background materials which sets the context
for the project;
produced a deliverable (report) of a good quality and full presentation of results;
displayed good communication skills, both in making their group presentation
and in producing their individual project report.

The calculation of the overall grade for the module is based on minor (C1) and
major (C2) coursework components as shown in the grid below:

Coursework C2



6
6
A
5
B
4
B
3
C
2
D
1
F
5 A B C C D F
4 B B C D E F
3 B C C D E F
2 C C D D E F
1 F F F F F F

A grade of NS for either component will result in an overall grade of NS for the
module.


Component
Type of
Assessment
Brief Description of Assessment

C1 Coursework
Presentation and poster (result given
as rounded average of two numeric
grades 6..1 as per assessment grids)

C2 Coursework
Project report (result given as a grade
6..1 as per assessment grids)







ENGPG007-Rev1
36 March 2010
6.6 Assessment of Project

Supervisors and Second Markers are responsible, in the first instance, for assessing
your project and allocating a mark. They will take into account many factors,
including your interest and enthusiasm as well as your competence and the quality of
your Project Report, Poster and Presentation.
Implementation and Evaluation: the academic supervisor and the second marker will
award this element of the assessment based on the content and presentation of the
MSc Project. The assessment will take account of:

evaluation and critical appraisal of design approaches;
justification of chosen design and implementation, identifying
requirements/critical factors influencing final choices;
innovation of design and implementation choices;
clear description of implementation/solution and detailed explanation of solution
structure;
critical evaluation of outcomes, measuring results/performance;
balanced reflection on project achievement, evaluating extent to which project
aims have been achieved, commenting on efficacy of early project decisions,
referring to project plan and project future developments;
clarity, structure and style of written presentation and illustrations.

The individual grades awarded are determined using grading forms that meet the
requirements of the University grading scheme. These are given in Appendix 10.

The overall assessment process is as follows:

The Supervisor ....

examines his/her records and notes relating to your research and planning in
preparation for the project
monitors your performance during the execution of the project work
reads the project and produces a grade mark for this
will attend the Presentation (and grade it) and study the Poster (and grade it).


The Second Marker ...

reads the project
produces a grade mark for this.
will attend the Presentation (and grade it) and study the Poster (and grade it).


A Project Moderation Board...

receives the grade marking forms from each supervisor and second marker
reviews the grades
reconciles any variations in grade allocations
decides on the final grades to be submitted to the Assessment Board

The Assessment Board ...

receives grade marks for all students (taught modules/project)
receives evidence relating to special circumstances
makes final decisions with the approval of the External Examiners





ENGPG007-Rev1
37 March 2010
A student who fails to make a project submission by the deadline given, submits late
or fails the project is allowed one further opportunity for resubmission.


6.7 Role of External Examiners

External Examiners are specialist experienced academics from other universities and
industries appointed by the University to ensure that adequate standards are being
met on courses.

They are involved with all aspects of assessment (examinations, coursework and
project work). In the area of MSc project operation, they have specific roles in
assuring themselves that the standard of project work is at a Masters level and that all
students are being set Masters level challenges.


6.8 Assessment Board Decisions

In the case of postgraduate projects, the Assessment Board can make a number of
decisions:

i) Pass;

ii) Re-assess (re-submission of the project or preparation of a poster or give
a presentation) before a fixed date. (This decision is made if, for example,
the report is badly structured or is deemed to misrepresent your effort
during the project period);

iii) Fail - No further submission allowed.


6.9 Publicising your Work

Many student projects make significant advances in their field of application. In this
case you should consider preparing a paper for publication in one of the learned
journals or at a conference. Your supervisor will be able to give general advice on
this.

Remember that there may be confidentiality issues to consider.

Students are encouraged to take advantage of the many national competitions
operated by IMechE, SPE and others. These often offer substantial prizes and
opportunities. Students can count on the support of the School in entering these
competitions.



















ENGPG007-Rev1
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Appendix 1: Exemplar MSc Project Specification


Exemplar MSc Project Specification


MSc Course title xxxxxxxxx
Student name: xxxxxxxxx
Student Matriculation No: xxxxxxxxx
Supervisor name: LEAVE BLANK


Contact details of any other
person(s) working with the project
xxxxxxxxx


Project title Modelling and Control of an Underwater Robot
Vehicle


Rationale A number of small underwater Remotely Operat
Vehicles (ROV) are currently being developed. A
previous MSc student (Gregor xxxx MSc 2001-
2002) demonstrated the possibilities of controlli
the ROV from a PC. To improve the control syst
a greater understanding of the dynamics of the
is needed.

Accurate modelling of the ROV is likely to be
extremely difficult because of its small size and
evolving design, but a number of empirical
calculations can be made.

Depth control is of the ROV is of particular inter
and ways and means of modifying the control
parameters to cope with varying conditions are
needed.


Contribution to theory or practice The challenge comes from the approach to the
development of the controller and the analysis o
results. Implementation of a controller should b
readily achievable but production of a well-
reasoned comparison of techniques and results
require well-designed, flexible and modular
software.

Methodology and/or plan Aims:
1. Review of ROV technology
2. Propose possible control solutions
3. Implement one of the control solutions.

Literature search to investigate the theoret
and practical performance of the ROV as fa



ENGPG007-Rev1
39 March 2010
the theoretical and experimental condition
allow
Design and write software to monitor and
control the vertical movement of an ROV.

Project description The specific objectives are :

1. Carry out a general review of ROV technolo
2. Review the fundamentals of traditional (
PID) and AI control and seek out applicat
in the literature of a similar nature to
current problem.
3. Review the work of Gregor xxxx and
ide from his conclusions
the problems optimising a control
system for the ROV.
4. Identify rigorous or empirical design equat
that are appropriate to the dynamics of
given the complexity of the problem and
difficulty of obtaining accurate measurem
from the material supplied and from litera
searches.
5. Propose possible control solutions that
give improved control performance.
6. Implement one of the control solutions.


Threats and Opportunities
Identify any problems anticipated and
identify any means of support or informa
that will help.
Access to relevant simulation software will be
required.


Confidentiality issues Write None or give brief details or tick box if a
confidentiality agreement is in place.

None

Tick if Confidentiality Form is attached.


Ethics issues Write None or give brief details or tick box if th
ethics issues have been addressed.

None

Tick if Ethics Form is attached.

Details of any risk associated with th Write None or give details.
project work.
None

Tick if Risk Analysis Form is attached

Signed (Supervisor) ..................... Date ............
Signed (Student) ..................... Date ...........
I have included a Gantt Chart .............................







ENGPG007-Rev1
40 March 2010
Appendix 2: Project Risk Assessment Form

Please see link
http://www.rgu.ac.uk/hr/healthsafety/page.cfm?pge=20307

RISK ASSESSMENT SUMMARY & INFORMATION

Date:
Document Ref:

School/ Department:

Area/Location:

Process/Activity:
Main Findings (including risk levels):













I have read and fully understood the main findings detailed above
Safe System of Work:














I have read and fully understood the safe systems of work
detailed above. I understand that failure to observe this safe
working practice can be a disciplinary offence. (Signed)
Date next review due (max interval 1 year):
Manager:

Assessor:












ENGPG007-Rev1
41 March 2010
Appendix 3: Confidentiality Statement




C O N F I D E N T I A L I T Y S T A T E M E N T






This Project Report is to be considered a confidential document. All investigations,
findings, results, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations are the property of the
Client, the Student involved, and The Robert Gordon University (RGU).


The work will not be published in the open literature or otherwise released to third parties in any
form whatsoever except by mutual consent.


It is understood that the report will be available for inspection by External Examiners and by
nominated staff of RGU for assessment purposes.


It is further understood that the report will be available for use by the Client in the solution of
the problem cited in the objectives of the work. The ownership of any Patents is to be agreed
between the parties involved where appropriate.


* * *


Signed (not typed):




...........................................Client Date ....................




...........................................RGU Student Date ....................




.......................................... Supervisor Date .....................













ENGPG007-Rev1
42 March 2010
Appendix 4: Ethics Forms




Ethics Forms


If there are ethical issues raised in the project specification, the specification
must be ethically-assessed.

The University Research Ethics Policy and Research Governance Policy can be
found online at
http://www4.rgu.ac.uk/research/activity/page.cfm?pge=11627


The students Supervisor is responsible for advising the student on appropriate
professional judgement in this review.

The ethics checklist is given in this Appendix.

The form is to be completed by the Supervisor if in his/her professional
judgement, there are ethical issues (as defined in the Ethical checklist of the
form) that need to be addressed.

The completed form should then be sent to the Projects Co-ordinator at
The Energy Centre.








































ENGPG007-Rev1
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THE ROBERT GORDON UNIVERSITY STUDENT
PROJECT ETHICAL REVIEW (SPER) APPLICABLE FOR
ALL HONOURS AND TAUGHT MASTERS PROJECTS
Section A: TO BE COMPLETED BY STUDENT

Before completing this section, please refer to the Research Ethics Policy and Research
Governance Policy which can be found online at
http://www4.rgu.ac.uk/research/activity/page.cfm?pge=11627

The students supervisor is responsible for advising the student on appropriate professional
judgement in this review.

Please ensure that the statements in Section C are completed by the student and supervisor
prior to submission to the Head of School/Centre.

Project Title:
Student:
Matriculation No:
School/Centre:
Supervisor:

Section B: Ethics Review checklist - PART 1
To be completed by student


1. Is approval from an external Research Ethics Commi
required/being sought?
2. Is the research solely literature-based?
Yes No

If you answered YES to 1 and/or 2 please go to the Form E1 -
Ethics Review Checklist - Part 2
3. Does the research involve the use of any dangerous substance
4. Does the research involve ionising or other type of dange
radiation?
5. Could conflicts of interest arise between the source of funding
the potential outcomes of the research?

6. Is it likely that the research will put any of the following at risk
(i) living creatures?
(ii) stakeholders?
(iii) the environment?
(iv) the economy?
7. Does the research involve experimentation on any of
following?
(i) animals?
(ii) animal tissues?
(iii) human tissues (including blood, fluid, skin, cell lines)?

8. Will the research involve prolonged or repetitive testing,
or collection of audio or video materials?
9. Could the research induce psychological stress or anxiety, c
harm or have negative consequences for the participants (bey



ENGPG007-Rev1
44 March 2010
the risks encountered in their normal lifestyles)?


10. Will financial inducements be offered?

11. Will deception of participants be necessary during the research

12. Are there problems with the participants right to
re anonymous?
13. Will there be a need at anytime to withhold the right to withd
from the research?
14. Does the research involve participants who may be
particu vulnerable (such as children or adults with
severe lear difficulties)?


Section B: Ethics Review checklist - PART 2
To be completed by student

Please give a summary of the ethical issues and any action that will be taken to address the
issue(s). If you believe there to be no ethical issues please enter NONE into the box.







Section C: statement by student

I believe that the information I have given in this form on ethical issues is correct.


Signature: Date:


AFFIRMATION BY SUPERVISOR

I have read this Ethical Review Checklist and I can confirm that, to the best of my
understanding, the information presented by the student is correct and appropriate to
allow an informed judgement on whether further ethical approval is required.


Signature: Date:

Section D: SUPERVISOR RECOMMENDATION ON THE PROJECTS ETHICAL
STATUS

Having satisfied myself of the accuracy of the project ethical statement, I believe that the
appropriate action is:

The project proceeds in its present form

The project specification needs further assessment under the School Ethics
procedure*
The project needs to be returned to the student for modification prior to furth
action*

* The School is reminded that it is their responsibility to ensure that no project proceeds without
appropriate assessment of ethical issues. In extreme cases, this can require processing by the Universitys
Research Ethics Sub-Committee or by external bodies.

Please send signed copy to the Projects Co-ordinator for consideration by the Head
of School.





ENGPG007-Rev1
45 March 2010
Appendix 5: Specialist Software Request Form


Energy Centre
School of Engineering


This form is to be completed by the Student and the Supervisor who requires use of specialist
Software for a research Project. This form should be submitted together with the Project
Proposal to the Project Administrator. Please read Guidelines for Use of Educational
Licensed Software (available under Topic 10, ENS000 Postgraduate Study Support Module in
Moodle) for further information.

Section 1: To be completed by the Student


Terms and Conditions of Use

1. No commercial work is permitted under the Educational Software License Agreement.
2. Files generated and saved using the software should be kept on RGU's network storage
facility only, and not on or transfer to the user's own computer or storage facilities.
3. The name of the Student, email address, and data files generated using the Software will
be provided to the software vendor if required, at the end of the project.
4. No direct contact between students and software provider under any circumstances.
5. No access during the academic term time when the Software is timetabled for teaching
and coursework.
6. Delays caused by learning of the software or technical problems should not be used as an
excuse for extension of the Project deadline.
7. Upon the completion of project (or by the end of one calendar year for PhD students), an
electronic copy of the Project Report or a Technical Paper should be submitted to the
ODL office.

Please complete the form below to accept these Terms and Conditions.


Surname

Forenames

Matriculation
Number

Email


Course Title

Project
Deadline


Project Title


Collaboration
Company (if any)


* If a collaboration company is identified, please also complete Section 3.

Software
Required



Plan of Use
Please write here how you would like to use the software in the project:

Learning Support

Yes (Introduction/Manual/Technical) / No



ENGPG007-Rev1
46 March 2010

Estimated
Duration
Start
Date

End
Date




Section 2: To be completed by the Students Academic Supervisor.



Surname

Forenames


Telephone

Email

Supporting
Statement


Acknowledgement

The use of software in this Project has no commercial impact.

Technical Support
Please appoint a technical support contact.



* Section 3: To be completed by the students Mentor in the Collaboration Company,
Only If the Project has a Collaboration Company or is related to the Students
employment.



Surname

Forenames


Job Title


Company


Address


Telephone

Email


Supporting
Statement




Acknowledgement

1. The company has no licence of the required Software to support the
student's research.

2. The use of software in this Project has no commercial impact.

3. All Terms and Conditions in Section 1 are accepted.













ENGPG007-Rev1
47 March 2010

-------------------------------------------- For Project Administrator Use Only: -----------------------------

-----------

Date Received By



--------------------------------------------------- For ODL Office Use Only: ----------------------------------

-----------

Access to
software:

Is (are)

granted
From To


At EC Lab: Or Thin Client Remote Access

Access to
software:

Is denied
because:

Approved by Date:

















































ENGPG007-Rev1
48 March 2010
Appendix 6: Declaration




Declaration


This project is submitted to The Robert Gordon University in accordance with the
requirements of the degree of Master of Science in Name of Course, in the School of
Engineering. I confirm that the material presented in this report is my own work.
Where this is not the case, the source of material has been acknowledged.




Student Name (in capital letters) ..............................................................




Signed: (not typed)

Signed ..............................................................
Date ..............................................................









































ENGPG007-Rev1
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Appendix 7: Sample Contents Page

Sample Contents Page


TITLE



TITLE PAGE
Page

i

CONFIDENTIALITY STATEMENT
DECLARATION
ABSTRACT
ii
iii
iv

DEDICATION
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
TABLE OF CONTENTS
v
vi
vii

LIST OF FIGURES

LIST OF TABLES
viii

ix

NOMENCLATURE x
CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION


1.1 BACKGROUND 1

1.2 PROJECT OBJECTIVES 4

1.2.1 Experimental Programme 6

1.3 PROJECT METHODOLOGY 9
CHAPTER 2 REVIEW HP-HT DRILLING FLUIDS FILTRATION


2.1 HP-HT DRILLING FLUIDS 13

2.1.1 High Temperature Wells Related Problems 15

2.2 FORMATION AND MUD CHEMISTRY 21
CHAPTER 3 THE EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES


3.1 MATERIAL PREPARATION 22



CHAPTER 4
3.2 TESTING

RESULTS
31

4.1 EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION 47
CHAPTER 5 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 53

REFERENCES 57

APPENDIX 60





ENGPG007-Rev1
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Appendix 8: Project Checklist


Project - First Draft Checks


(a) Is the purpose of the report clear? The places to look for this are the title, the
introduction, the summary, synopsis or abstract.

(b) Is the report suitable for its intended readers?
It is important to be aware of your audience.
How will they use the information?
Will they accept its assumptions, explicit or implied?
Will they find the explanations adequate?
Will they find the technical level appropriate?
Will they find the non-technical language appropriate?

(c) Is the report effective?
Does it achieve its intended purpose?
Are the conclusions clear and emphatic?

(d) Comprehensive
Is everything necessary included?
Does the title clearly describe the work?

(e) Relevance
Is everything unnecessary excluded?
Is the degree of relevance maintained?

(f) Development
Is the subject developed in an appropriate logical order?
Is the reader informed of the proposed development?

(g) Balance
Are the sections given appropriate space?

(h) Arrangement
Is it easy for the reader to see the structure of the report?
Is it easy for the reader to refer back?
Do your headings agree with the table of contents and plan announced in the
introduction?
Do the headings help to explain the information listed beneath them?

(i) Introduction
Does it explain the status and scope of the report?
Does it define the limits?
Does it indicate the proposed development?
(NB Too much historical background before the purpose is made clear only
annoys the reader)
Is it independent of the report?

(j) Summary, Synopsis or Abstract
Does it summarise?
Is it concise?
Informative?
Is it independent of the report?

(k) Discussion
Does it give an interpretation of the results?






ENGPG007-Rev1
51 March 2010
(l) Conclusion
Is it clearly and cogently expressed?
Is it independent of the report?

(m) Appendices
Are they necessary and appropriate?
Are they mentioned in the text?

(n) Diagrams
Does each convey its message clearly?
Is the association between text and illustration as clear and close as possible?
Do the illustrations contain the necessary minimum of explanatory wording?
Are the headings precise and informative? (Common errors: captions and numbers not
assigned to figures, figures not mentioned in text, figure references appearing too late to
be of any help.)

(o) References
Are they adequate?
Clearly made?
Referred to in the report?

(p) Format and Layout
Are they attractive and pleasant to the eye?

(q) Symbols
Are they conventional when necessary?
Well chosen and defined when otherwise?

(r) Mathematics
Is it necessary?
Is it desirable?
Is it appropriate for the intended reader?

(s) Vocabulary
Is it simple or too obscure?
Is it too full of meaningless phrases?
Are the sentences of reasonable length?


Final checklist ......


Project objectives clearly stated
Discussion covers analysis of project work
Own contribution fully explained
Suitable structure for report
Tables and Diagrams properly numbered
References correctly identified
Equations numbered
Checked for spelling and grammar
Sections and sub-sections numbered correctly
Pages numbered
First page in correct format
Abstract provided
Cover page provided
Binding completed








ENGPG007-Rev1
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R
e
t
u
r
n

p
e
r
m
e
a
b
i
l
i
t
y
%




Appendix 9: Template Poster

Student Name:
Supervisor:
School of Engineering



Title of the Project

Introduction Methodology Discussions/Analysis













Objectives Table/graph

W B M O B M
1
Conclusions and ideas for new research

0 .8

0 .6

0 .4

0 .2

0
0 2 0 0 4 0 0 6 0 0 8 0 0 1 0 0 0
P re s s u re (ps i )

Fig1








ENGPG007-Rev1 53
March 2010

Student Name .................................................................. Matriculation No ................................................



Appendix 10: Assessment Forms - Grading Grid for Assessing Project

GRADE
6/A
5/B 4/C 3/D 2/E 1/F NS


DEFINITION
EXCELLENT
Outstanding Performan
COMMENDABLE
Meritorious Performan
GOOD
Highly Competent Perfor
SATISFACTORY
Competent Performan
BORDERLINE FAIL
(Open To Compensati
FAIL
(Unsatisfactory)
NON
SUBMISSION
(WEIGHTING)
SOURCES OF
ASSESSMENT CRIT



Has effectively chosen (al
all the facts and principles



Has included most of the
anticipated facts/ principle



Has included at least two
of the anticipated facts/



Has included half of the
anticipated facts/ principle



Has included as many
marginal/incorrect as corr



Has included almost none
the anticipated facts/princi



N/ A
(20)
relevant to the given task/

perhaps with one

principles, perhaps with se several marginal/incorrect

but still some correct

IDENTIFICATION
FACTS/ PRINCIPL
question/exercise and with marginal/incorrect.
erroneous inclusions.
marginal/ incorrect.
A greater number of corre
identified facts can offset
greater incidence of incorr
facts/principles identified.

Referencing clear, relevan Referencing relevant and

Minor inconsistencies and

Referencing present but h

Very limited referencing

Referencing inaccurate or

N/A
(15)
REFERENCING
consistently accurate.
Appropriate number, all
relevant.
mostly accurate. Appropri
number, most relevant
inaccuracies in referencin
Some shortfall in number,
relevant
inconsistencies and
inaccuracies. Some shortf
number, more than half re
including some inconsiste
and inaccuracies.
absent.

(15)

Clarity of expression exce
consistently accurate use

Thoughts and ideas clearl
expressed. Grammar and

Language mainly fluent.
Grammar and spelling ma

Meaning apparent in most
instances, but language n

Often ambiguous, leading
meaning being barely app

Purpose and meaning of
assignment unclear. Lang

N/A
COMMUNICATIO grammar and spelling with spelling accurate and lang accurate. Communication always fluent, grammar an Language, grammar and grammar and spelling poo
& PRESENTATIO fluent professional/ acade
writing/ speaking style.
fluent. thoughts and ideas beginn spelling poor/moderate.
be affected.
spelling poor.

(25)


Has effectively/ correctly

Has applied these mostly

Has applied these

Has applied these

Has applied these correctl

Has shown little/no eviden

N/A
APPLICATION OF FA
applied these facts/princip

PRINCIPLES
correctly/ effectively, perh
occasional errors.
correctly/effectively in the
majority of instances.
correctly/effectively in the
majority of instances (i.e.
than half)
some cases ability to apply these corre
effectively.

(25)


Critical thought,

Good clear evidence of cr

Critical thought,

Some attempt at critical

Very limited attempt at crit

No attempt at critical

N/A
CRITICAL EVALUAT
evaluation/analysis within
assignment rigorous and
appropriate.
thought, evaluation/ analy
carried out within assignm
evaluation/analysis reaso
well carried out.
thought, evaluation/ analy
within assignment.
thought, evaluation/analys
within assignment.
thought/evaluation or anal
within assignment.





Comments.........

Signature ....................................... Date





ENGPG007-Rev1 March 2010
Student Name .................................................................. Matriculation No ................................................

Grading Grid for Assessing Presentation



GRADE 6/A 5/B 4/C 3/D 2/E 1/F N/S


DEFINITION
EXCELLENT
(Outstanding Performance)
COMMENDABLE
(Meritori ous Performance)
GOOD
(Highl y Competent Perform
SATISFACTORY
(Competent Performanc
BORDERLINE FAI
(Open To Compensat
FAIL
(Unsatisfactory NON-SUBMISSIO
(WEIGHTING)
SOURCES OF ASSESSM
CRITERIA



Extremel y well structured presentati




Clear l ogical structure and clear




Clear l ogical structure. Cont




Essential points put across i Presentati on is lacki ng




Very disorganized,

Content is written cl earl y and conci s devel opment of materi al. Content clear. Presentation i ncludes reasonabl y structured fashi several key elements. disj oi nted, unprepar
N/A
with a logi cal progressi on of i deas a written with a l ogical progression materi al required to gai n an Presentati on incl uded half o Moderatel y over or und Poor timekeepi ng.
supporti ng i nformati on. Content cov ideas and supporting i nformation. understanding of the materi antici pated facts/pri nci pl es. time l imit.
Does not meet mi ni

(25) all the facts and princi ples. Content Presentati on incl udes material req Presented withi n speci fied ti Presented withi n speci fied ti
standard.

STRUCTURE/CONTEN sources are always identified.
Presentati on incl udes addi ti onal mat
required to support advanced
understanding of the topi c.
Presente within specified time limi t.
to gain a comfortabl e understandi
the material . Presented withi n spe
time l imit.
limit. limit or sl ightl y over.

Clear, confident speaker. Information Thoughts and i deas clearl y expres Clear exposition. Good


Essential facts/pri ncipl es pu


Diffi cult to identi fy ess


Unable to i dentify

presented i n l ogical, i nteresti ng sequ Information i s presented i n l ogical integrati on of talk and vi sual across reasonabl y cl earl y. facts/pri nci pl es. Poor u essential facts/princ
N/A
that promotes meaningful sequence that promotes Graphics/effects that genera Speech cl ear and satisfactor visual ai ds. Di ffi cul t to No use of visual ai d
(50)
DELIVERY AND CLARIT
PRESENTATION
comprehensi on. Excell ent i ntegrati o
tal k and vi sual ai ds. Layout and disp
strongl y supports presentati on.
Presentati on shows considerable
comprehensi on. Layout and displ
generall y support presentation.
Presentati on shows some origi nal
The content and i deas are present
support text and presentati o
Layout and di spl ay adequat
Presentati on shows an attem
origi nalit y.
of visual aids. foll ow presentation.
Does not meet mini
standard.
origi nalit y. The content and i deas are an i nteresti ng way.
presented i n a uni que and i nteresti n
way.

Demonstrates full knowl edge, i n exc


Commendable depth and breadth


Clear, logical expl anati ons g


Essential facts/pri ncipl es pu


Poor grasp of informat


Uncomfortabl e wi th

of requirements, by answering all knowl edge evident from the mater in presentati on or when across reasonabl y knowledg demonstrated. Unclear information and una
N/A
(25)

parti ci pant questi ons and elaborati o presented and questions answere answeri ng questions. Able to answer questi on facts. Does not engage to answer questi ons
INTERACTION WITH AUDI

Acti vel y engages course partici pants Engages course parti ci pants i n reasonabl y well . course participants in
Does not meet mi ni

AND
RESPONSE TO QUESTI
acti ve refl ecti on, good use of eye co
speech clear and critical discussi on,
resul ti ng in deep l earning and enhan
understanding.
reflecti on, good use of eye contac
critical di scussion.
discussi on or acti ve
reflecti on.
standard.



Comments.........

Signature ....................................... Date





ENGPG007-Rev1 55
March 2010

Student Name .................................................................. Matriculation No ................................................




Grading Grid for Assessing Poster





GRADE 6/A 5/B 4/C 3/D 2/E 1/F
N/S


DEFINITION
EXCELLENT
(Outstanding Performance
COMMENDABLE
(Meritorious Performance)
GOOD
(Highly Competent Performan
SATISFACTORY
(Competent Performance)
BORDERLINE FAIL
(Open To Compensation)
FAIL
(Unsatisfactory) NON-SUBMISSIO
(WEIGHTING)
SOURCES OF ASSESSM
CRITERIA

(40)
REQUIRED
CONTENT/ELEMENT



The poster includes all required
contents as well as additional
information.



Has included all required conten Has included most of
required contents.



Has included two thirds of the
required contents.



Several required elements were
missing, but still some correct
contents identified. Labels are to
small to view.



Does not meet mi nim
standard.



N/A

(30)
ATTRACTIVENESS

The poster is exceptionally attra
in terms of design, layout and
neatness.

The poster is quite attractive in t
of design, layout and neatness.

The poster is attractive. The poster is acceptable The poster is very poorly design
is not attractive.

Does not meet mi nim
standard.

N/A



(30)
GRAPHICS/DIAGRAM

All graphics/diagrams are relate
the topic and make it easier to
understand. All diagrams are lin
the relevant text. Source of all
graphics are noted.

All graphics/diagrams are mostl
related to the topic and make it
to understand. All diagrams are
to the relevant text. Source of m
graphics are noted.

All graphics/diagrams are relate
the topic. Most of the diagrams
linked to the relevant text. Sourc
two thirds of the graphics are no

More than half of the
graphics/diagrams are related to
topic. Two thirds of diagrams ar
linked to the relevant text. Sourc
more than half the graphics are
noted.

Diagrams are not linked to the te Does not meet mi nim
standard.

N/A




Comments.........



Signature ....................................... Date









ENGPG007-Rev1 56
March 2010









































































ENGPG007-Rev1
57 March 2010