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The Current of DB / 2014/2015 COMMUNITY GUIDE Page 17

By R.J. LIBERATORE Jr.


Staff Writer
There is one main reason why Margate con-
tinues to thrive as a premium city for both its
residents and business, according to Margate
Business Association President Ed Berger.
All of our member businesses believe that
a strong business community means a strong
community, said Berger, who has been MBA
president for about four years. A strong com-
munity needs a strong business community.
And that is where the challenge lies for the
Margate Business Associations 101 members.
Its a challenge when you have to make
your business year in the 99 days of summer,
Berger said. You really need to pull it all to-
gether.
Margate businesses face marketing compe-
tition from Atlantic City to the north and Ocean
City to the south.
Atlantic City is by far one of the worlds larg-
est tourist resorts, he said, and Ocean City is
one of the largest family resorts.
Both cities have larger public relations and
marketing operations and budgets to promote
their image throughout the region and beyond.
Together, the two cities put a squeeze on the
smaller resorts of Ventnor, Margate and Long-
port, which lie between them.
In Margate, it takes a lot of cooperation,
Berger said. It takes cooperation between the
city leaders and the business community. And
I couldnt ask for any more cooperation than
what we receive from the city.
After all, he said, Margate is primarily a res-
idential community where only about one-third
of the homeowners live in the city year-round.
Margates seasonal residents either come
down for a few weeks during the summer, or
spend the weekends here.
Thats why we are looking to expand our
summer by making our shoulder season
strong, Berger said.
For any seasonal business, increasing prot
comes from increasing the shoulder season,
Berger said.
Its the part of the year up until June and the
part of the year that comes after Labor Day, he
said. We need to give our residents a reason
to keep their homes open and stay down here
longer.
Berger said he liked what the MBA had been
doing with its Tour de Margate and Fall Funfest.
However, he said those events could be devel-
oped, expanded and enjoyed by more people.
We worked with the other Downbeach com-
munities and expanded the bicycle tour and
turned it into a Tour de Downbeach, he said.
We went from 100 riders to more than 400 this
year. It has become a great family event.
Similarly, the Fall Funfest has grown from
a single-day event to a two-day extravaganza
that can draw anywhere between 30,000 and
40,000 people with good weather, Berger esti-
mated. This years Margate Fall Funfest by the
Bay takes place 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, Sept.
27 and noon-5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 28.
The Margate Business Associations big-
gest event is the Fall Funfest, he said. Its a
great family event and one of the largest juried
craft shows. Theres gourmet food and nonstop
entertainment, Berger said.
Besides the fun, the Funfest serves Margate
in a much-needed way, he said.
The city needed to have a large event that
gave us something to showcase Margate, he
said. The spirit of the people who live here
make it the city that it is.
The MBA strives to use its events as a way
to give Margates seasonal residents a reason
to stay a few weeks longer or to come back on
weekends.
We always have to nd ways to bring peo-
ple back, Berger said. Margate never closes.
Only three of our member businesses shut
down for the winter. The rest of our businesses
are open all year round.
Berger and the MBA wouldnt have it any
other way.
Other members are Rob Hammerschlag,
vice president (Downbeach Deli); Randy
Young, secretary (Heritage Surf and Sport);
Leon Riggins, treasurer (Cape Bank); Anna
Maria Blescia, executive director; Glenn Dar-
by, professional services representatives (R.E.
Darby Insurance Agency); Paula Hartman, real
estate services reporesentatives (Hartman
Home Team of Berkshire Hathaway Home Ser-
vices); Christopher Gualtieri, restaurant rep-
resentative (Barrels Restaurant); Ara Mazer,
retain services representative (Avant Girl Blow
Dry and Style Bar), Cookie Till, trustee, (Steve
and Cookies By the Bay); Karen Sherman,
trustee (Tomatoes Restaurant), Lisa Walker,
trustie (Jewish Family Services of Atlantic and
Cape May Counties); and Maria De Philipo,
trustie (Nix Salon and Spa).
MBA looking to make
Margate shoulder season stronger
Calling all mothers. The Mar-
gate Mothers Association is a
group of mothers that plan and
present numerous activities for the
community and the communitys
children throughout the year.
In addition to the annual Memo-
rial Day parade and the Fourth of
July reworks display, MMA orga-
nizes events throughout the year
including a Halloween party and
parade, holiday cookie exchange,
breakfast with Santa, and spring
egg hunt, among others.
The Margate Mothers Associa-
tion is looking to expand its mem-
bership and roster of activities for
local children and the community.
Local moms are invited to join
them and share their ideas.
Meetings are held the rst
Wednesday of each month from
7 to 8 p.m. at the Martin Bloom
Community Pavilion, behind the
Margate Library.
If you are interested in sponsor-
ing the Margate Mothers annual
Fourth of July reworks display,
contact them by email. Without the
generosity and support of spon-
sors and residents, this spectac-
ular event would not be possible.
For more information email
margatemothers@gmail.com.
Margate Mothers Association
holds events all year
The Jan-Ai Scholarship
Fund was established to help
people age 13 to 30 follow
their dreams in the arts. It was
created to honor the memory
of Ventnor native Jennifer
Cakert (1980-2006), a writ-
er, poet and photographer. It
was her love of the arts that
inspired organizers to create
the scholarship.
Since April 2007 the fund
has given out $110,440
in scholarships and cash
awards to 94 recipients in
the community and beyond.
Students who have received
the awards can reapply after
a year.
The organization will be
participating in the Boscovs
Friends Helping Friends
Tuesday, Oct. 21 and has $5
discount passes available.
Its new goal is to give out
$150,000 by its 10th anniver-
sary in 2016.
See www.jan-aischolar.
org for photographs of past
events, scholarship recipients
or to make a donation via
PayPal. Checks can be sent
to PO Box 8068, Atlantic City,
NJ 08404.
For information call Cynthia
Walker at 609-442-4992.
Jan-Ai Scholarship Fund
The Current of DB / 2014/2015 COMMUNITY GUIDE Page 21
Fast Facts
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the
city has a total area of 3.522 square miles,
consisting of 1.951 square miles of land and
1.571 square miles of water.
The citys population is 10,650, according to
the 2010 U.S. Census.
Located on Absecon Island, Ventnor is
bounded by Atlantic City to the northeast and
Margate to the southwest.
It is in the 2nd Congressional District and is
part of New Jerseys 2nd Legislative District.
The city operates under the commission
form of municipal government, regulated by
New Jersey law under the Walsh Act. Resi-
dents elect three commissioners to a four-year
term, who then vote among themselves who
will be assigned the ofce of mayor by resolu-
tion. The commissioners serve as department
heads in addition to their legislative duties.
Ventnor City Commission
www.ventnorcity.org
City Commission regular meetings are
held 6 p.m. the third Thursday of each month.
Workshop meetings, where no action is taken,
are held 4 p.m. the second Thursday.
Mayor: Mike Bagnell, commissioner of pub-
lic safety
Frank Sarno, commissioner of nance
Theresa Kelly, commissioner of public works
and recreation
Ventnor City Hall
6201 Atlantic Ave. 609-823-7900
Unless stated otherwise, department hours
are 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Ventnor City
City Clerk: Janice Callaghan, 609-823-
7904
Code Enforcement: Jimmie Agnesino, 609-
823-7987
Municipal Administrator: Thomas Russo,
609-823-7964
Municipal Court Administrator: Kathleen
Robbins, 609-823-7974
Planning Board Chairman: Jay Cooke 609-
823-7987. Planning Board meetings are held
6:30 p.m. the second Wednesday of each
month.
Public Works Director: Dave Smith, 609-
823-7935. Public Works Department hours
are 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Recreation Director: Jerry Thomas, 609-
823-7950. Recreation Board meetings are
held 6:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each
month.
Tax Assessor: Diane Kelly, 609-823-7911
Tax Collector: Julie Harron, 609-823-7971
Water and Sewer Billing: 609-823-7912
Zoning Board Secretary: James Pacanows-
ki II, 609-823-7997. Zoning Board meetings
are held 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of
each month; call 609-823-7987 for more in-
formation.
Police Department
City Hall, 6201 Atlantic Ave.
Police nonemergency: Chief Michael Miller,
609-822-2101
Police records: 609-822-7968. Hours are
8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Fire Department
Fire Headquarters, 20 N. New Haven Ave.
Fire Station No. 2, Little Rock and Welling-
ton avenues, Ventnor Heights
Fire nonemergency: Chief John Hazlett,
609-823-7942
Trash and Recycling
Trash and recycling are collected in ve
zones:
Monday Jackson to Surrey (beach block
to bay) and Suffolk to Fredericksburg (beach
block only); Tuesday Suffolk to Troy (North
Atlantic to bay); Wednesday, Ventnor Heights;
Thursday, Richards to Melbourne (North Atlan-
tic to bay); Friday Baltimore to Fredericks-
burg (North Atlantic to bay) and Ventnor West
and Ventnor Gardens Plaza.
All trash must be placed at the curb by 7
a.m. on collection day.
One bulk item per week (furniture, TVs,
electronics, carpeting, etc.) may be placed
curbside for collection with trash. No construc-
tion waste is permitted. Appliances must have
Freon and CFCs removed.
Yard waste is collected every Monday from
June through September, and every other
Monday from October through May (see www.
ventnorcity.org/publicworks.asp). All yard
waste must be placed in kraft bags or properly
marked containers; plastic bags are not per-
mitted. Branches must be tied in bundles less
than 4 feet in length and 8 inches in diameter
and not exceeding 50 pounds. All yard waste
must be placed at the curb by 7 a.m. on col-
lection day.
Recycling collection is provided by the At-
lantic County Utilities Authority on the same
day as trash pickup. Recycling must be placed
at the curb by 7 a.m. on collection day at least
10 feet apart from trash. Paper, plastic and
metal recyclables do not need to be separated
for pickup. Do not include Styrofoam or plas-
tic bags. To request recycling buckets, see a
list of recyclable items, or for hazardous waste
disposal, see www.acua.com or call 609-272-
6950.
Longport
Fast Facts
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the bor-
ough has a total area of 1.56 square miles, consist-
ing of 0.385 square miles of land and 1.175 square
miles of water.
The population is 895, according to the 2010
U.S. Census.
Located on the southwest tip of Absecon Island,
Longport is bounded by Margate to the northeast.
Longport is in the 2nd Congressional District
and is part of New Jerseys 2nd Legislative District.
The borough operates under the commission
form of municipal government, regulated by New
Jersey law under the Walsh Act. Residents elect
three commissioners to a four-year term, who then
vote among themselves who will be assigned the
ofce of mayor by resolution. The commissioners
serve as department heads in addition to their leg-
islative duties.
Borough of Longport Commission
www.longportnj.gov
The commission meets 4:30 p.m. on the third
Wednesday of each month and other times as
announced. Workshop meetings are the second
Thursday of each month and other times as an-
nounced.
Mayor: Nicholas Russo, commissioner of public
affairs and public safety
James P. Leeds, commissioner of revenue, -
nance, parks and public property
Daniel Lawler, commissioner of public works
and human resources
Longport Borough Hall
2305 Atlantic Ave. 609-823-2731
Unless stated otherwise, department hours are
9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday.
Municipal Clerk: Emilia Strawder, ext. 100
Municipal Court Administrator: Andrea Brady,
ext. 112 or 113
Municipal Engineer: Richard Carter, ext. 121
Public Works Supervisor: Bill Trinkle, ext. 120.
Public Works garage hours are 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Registrar: Jenna Kelly, ext. 117
Tax Assessor: Jeffrey Hesley, ext. 103. Ofce
hours are 5-8 p.m. Wednesdays.
Tax/Utility Collector: Thomas Hiltner, ext. 111
Zoning Ofce: ext. 114
Police Department
Borough Hall, 2305 Atlantic Ave.
Police Nonemergency: Chief Vincent Pacentrilli,
609-822-2141
Police Records Custodian: Karen McGlauin,
609-822-2141. Hours are 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
Fire Department
2301 Atlantic Ave.
Fire Nonemergency: 609-822-9578
Trash and Recycling
Trash is collected every Monday by the Atlantic
County Utilities Authority.
Yard waste is collected every Tuesday in May-
Sept. and every other Tuesday the rest of the
months by Longport Public Works. Call 609-822-
5759.
Recycling is collected by the ACUA every Mon-
day mid-May through mid-September and every
other Monday during the rest of the year. Paper,
plastic and metal recyclables do not need to be
separated for pickup. Do not include Styrofoam or
plastic bags. To request recycling buckets, see a
list of recyclable items or for hazardous waste dis-
posal, see www.acua.com or call 609-272-6950.
The Current of DB / 2014/2015 COMMUNITY GUIDE Page 23
Margate City
Fast Facts
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the
city has a total area of 1.6 square miles, com-
prised of 1.4 square miles of land and 0.2
square miles of water.
The citys population is 6,354, according to
the 2010 U.S. Census.
Located on Absecon Island, Margate is
bounded by Ventnor to the northeast and
Longport to the southwest.
It is in the 2nd Congressional District and is
part of New Jerseys 2nd Legislative District.
The city operates under the commission
form of municipal government, regulated by
New Jersey law under the Walsh Act. Resi-
dents elect three commissioners to a four-year
term, who then vote among themselves who
will be assigned the ofce of mayor by resolu-
tion. The commissioners serve as department
heads in addition to their legislative duties.
Margate City Commission
www.margate-nj.com
City Commission regular meetings are held
in Commission Chambers every rst and third
Thursday. A work session with possible action
taken is held the second Thursday of each
month. Agendas are posted on the city web-
site.
Mayor: Michael Becker, commissioner of
public safety
Maury Blumberg, commissioner of revenue
and nance
Brenda Taube, commissioner of public
works
Margate City Municipal Building
9001 Winchester Ave. 609-822-2605
Unless stated otherwise, department hours
are 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday through Friday.
City Clerk: Thomas D. Hiltner, 609-822-
2605
Code Enforcement: Stephen Schwartz,
609-822-4310
Municipal Court Administrator: Maureen
Larkin, 609-822-1998
Planning and Zoning Board Administrator:
Johanna Casey, 609-822-0424
Public Works Director: Frank Ricciotti,
609-822-5038
Registrars Office: Tara Mazza, 609-822-
0424. Registrars Office hours are 9 a.m.-4
p.m. Monday through Friday.
Tax Assessor: James Manghan, 609-822-
1950
Tax Collector: Thomas D. Hiltner, 609-
822-2508
Water & Sewer Billing: Sandy Miller, 609-
822-2921
Zoning Department hours are 9 a.m.-4
p.m. Tuesday through Thursday.
Zoning Officer: Roger Rubin, 609-822-
5438
Police Department
111 N. Decatur Ave.
Police Nonemergency: Chief David
Wolfson, 609-822-1151
Police Records: 609-822-5063
Fire Department
Municipal Building, 1 S. Washington Ave.
Fire Non-emergency: Chief Anthony Ta-
basso, 609-822-5562
Trash and Recycling
Trash is collected in four zones: Monday,
Coolidge Avenue to Wilson Avenue including
condos); Tuesday, Vendome Avenue to Je-
rome Avenue; Wednesday, Jasper Avenue
to Exeter Avenue excluding Exeter Court);
Thursday, Essex Avenue to Fredericksburg
Avenue including Bayshore Drive, Exeter
Court, 7800 Marshall and 7800 Burk).
All trash must be placed at the curb no
earlier than 6 p.m. the night before collection
and no later than 7 a.m. the day of collection.
Empty trash containers must be removed
from the curb on the same day as collection.
Yard waste is collected on the same day
as trash in a separate pickup, and must be
separated from household trash. Shrubs,
branches and tree clippings must be secure-
ly tied in bundles less than 4 feet in length
and not exceeding 50 pounds. Grass and
leaves must be placed in biodegradable pa-
per bags.
Recycling collection is provided by the At-
lantic County Utilities Authority every other
Thursday. Paper, plastic and metal recycla-
bles do not need to be separated for pickup.
Do not include Styrofoam or plastic bags. To
request recycling buckets, see a list of recy-
clable items, or for hazardous waste dispos-
al, see www.acua.com or call 609-272-6950.
The City Public Works Department pro-
vides separate pickup service on Tuesdays
for electronic waste, including computers,
TVs, VCRs, DVDs and video game systems;
and pickup of white goods large applianc-
es-and scrap metal on Wednesdays. Resi-
dents must call Public Works in advance at
609-822-5038 to arrange for pickup.
Street Sweepers
Margate operates two full-time street
sweepers in five zones. Vehicles should be
parked off the road the night before sweep-
ing. The zones are: Monday, Bayshore Drive
area; Tuesday, Coolidge Avenue to Union
Avenue; Wednesday, Thurlow Avenue to Je-
rome Avenue; Thursday, Jasper Avenue to
Gladstone Avenue; Friday, Frontenac Ave-
nue to Fredericksburg Avenue.
Submitted by Joy Kanter, Assistant
Director, Margate Recreation
The Margate Community Education and
Recreation Department offers a variety of
programs for the Fall 2014 season for all
ages.
Scheduled adult workshops include Long
Term Care and Estate Taxes and Mac Com-
puter Survival.
Parents with college-bound children can
check out College and Scholarship Search.
Feel like moving? Join the Soul Line Danc-
ers on Friday nights or take part in aerobics
classes, which run Monday, Wednesday and
Friday in the morning. Adult mens basketball
leagues begin the rst week of October.
Start your preschooler off in the world of
soccer with Tot Soccer Clinics. Margate
Recreation also has a popular soccer league
for students grades kindergarten through
eight.
Other youth activities include karate, gym-
nastics, chess, painting, clay, pottery, piano,
guitar, and cooking, with new classes always
popping up.
Please visit us at the Margate Fall Funfest
Sept. 28 and 29 where we are scheduling the
entertainment for the kids stage near Steve
and Cookies Restaurant.
Plan on a full weekend of fun with the
variety of performance acts including Brain
Wash Trivia Show with Eric Dasher, Magic
Show with Joe Holiday, Leslies Dance Stu-
dio, Blakes Gymnastics and Bright Stars
Gymnastics, Melissa March Miss Majorette
of New Jersey, Group Fitness Workout with
Big Sarge, Margate Players Theatre Group,
students of Suzie Neustadter, Runditioning
with Coach Mindy Solkin, and a visit from
Miss New Jersey, Cierra Kaler-Jones.
The 17th annual Punt, Pass and Kick com-
petition, scheduled for Saturday, Nov. 15, is
sponsored with the Margate City Police De-
partment.
And if you want to journey out of town, join
us for our annual bus trip to the Big Apple
Saturday, Dec. 6.
Please contact us for more details at 609-
823-6658 or check out our new website at
www.margate-nj.com.
Fun for all ages with Margate Community
Education and Recreation
The Current of DB / 2014/2015 COMMUNITY GUIDE Page 25
By BILL LeCONEY
Staff Writer
The trafc and hot beach
weather may be behind us, but
there are still plenty of avenues
for local sports and recreation in
the Downbeach communities of
Ventnor, Margate and Longport.
This time of year, the action
moves away from the beaches
to the volleyball and basketball
courts, swimming pools, and
playing elds.
Margates Eugene A. Tighe
Middle School has grown into a
eld hockey power, with its girls
dominating the Atlantic Cape Ju-
nior Athletic League, under the
guidance of coach Tracy Jones.
I think the key to our suc-
cess has been in teaching ea-
ger learners the basics at a very
young age, and to get the best
athletes out for the team, said
Jones. And, most of all, mak-
ing sure that they are having fun
while learning the game. Teach-
ing the kids responsibility, how to
be good teammates, and the joys
of being a part of a team are top
priorities.
Jones also runs the Down-
beach Dribblers eld hockey
camp, which has grown to 60-80
girls each summer ages 6-14.
Many former Tighe players have
gone on to success at the high
school level, as well as local club
teams, colleges, even the U.S.
National team.
Positive role models, coaches
and mentors like Jones make a
huge difference in youth sports.
The Ventnor Little League had a
heartwarming success story this
past summer when a group of
boys under the age of 10 were
left without a coach for the All-
Star Team. League President
Michael Cahill stepped in and
signed up to be the boys head
coach, along with two parents as
his assistants, and guided the
team to several huge victories,
including the championship of
the Galloway Tournament.
There are many other oppor-
tunities to participate in sports
and recreation. One that offers
a full schedule of activities for lo-
cal youth and active adults is the
Ventnor Department of Commu-
nity Recreation and Education.
The Ventnor Recreation Bas-
ketball League gives junior
high and high school athletes a
chance to play structured, com-
petitive basketball in a friend-
ly, informal environment. Held
Wednesday nights at the Lafay-
ette Avenue Educational Com-
plex, the league has four teams
and about 40 players in the junior
league (also known as the Hutch
League), and eight teams with
70-80 players in the high school
league.
For more information on the
Ventnor Department of Commu-
nity Recreation, see http://www.
ventnorcity.org/recreation.asp.
The Margate Community
Education and Recreation De-
partment offers a host of pro-
gramming for all ages, including
Tot Soccer clinics, morning t-
ness classes, mens basketball
leagues, youth soccer, eld hock-
ey and basketball leagues, pick-
le ball, platform tennis, karate
classes, gymnastic classes, and
much more.
For more information, see
http://www.margate-nj.com/rec-
reation.
Margate Recreation will hold
its 17th annual Punt, Pass and
Kick Competition Saturday, Nov.
15, for ages kindergarten through
eighth grades.
Heading into its seventh sea-
son, the Hoops for All Basket-
ball Clinic at the Tighe School
is for boys and girls in Atlantic
and Cape May counties ages 5
through 16 who are physically or
cognitively challenged. For infor-
mation or to become a sponsor
call director Marianne Christian
at the Martin Bloom Community
Pavilion, 609-822-2285.
The Milton and Betty Katz
Jewish Community Center, locat-
ed at 501 N. Jerome Avenue in
Margate, is a place for children
to play and learn, and a place
where health and wellness are a
priority.
The JCCs Early Childhood
Education Center provides
swim classes in the indoor pool,
planned activities in a full-size
gym, and outdoor recreation fa-
With the cooler weather,
Downbeach sports and recreation heat up
cility. The Lenny Krayzelburg
Swim Academy teaches a com-
prehensive, results-driven swim
method, survival curriculum that
stresses water safety, and an
award system that engages and
motivates children. Call 609-822-
1167 or see www.jccatlantic.org.
The JCC Margate Shark com-
petitive swim team recently
became a USA Swim team for
swimmers ages 5-18 years old.
The team will compete in dual
meets and USA Swimming meets
during the season. For more in-
formation, contact Alicia Fimple
at 609-822-1167, ext. 133.
The arrival of autumn ramps
up the competition between area
shing enthusiasts, as the Atlan-
tic County Surf Derby presents
one of the regions most unique
annual tournaments. Unlike
many shing competitions, this
one is a land-based tournament
that prohibits the use of any wa-
tercraft, from boats to surfboards.
The derby starts on Sept. 24
and runs through Nov. 4. There
is a $25 entry fee, and proceeds
benet the Police Benevolent
Associations for the participat-
ing municipalities of Brigantine,
Atlantic City, Margate, Ventnor
and Longport. Complete details
are available at local sportsmen
shops.
Starting Oct. 1 and continuing
until April 1, anglers take to the
Kennedy Bridge into Longport
in search of stripers, porgy and
other cooler-water sh. Fishing
hours are limited to between
6 p.m. and 6 a.m. daily during
those seven months. Died-in-the-
wool shermen will tell you that
given the location, its proximity
to the Inlet and the current that
ows underneath, theres hardly
a better place to drop your line.
In what a parent called a true-life Bad News Bears story, Vent-
nor reghter Mike Cahill took over the towns underdog 9-10 Little
League team and helped it rally for a championship at the Gallo-
way tournament. After losing their last two games of the Absecon
tournament, the Ventnor squad rebounded to beat Ocean City, EHT,
Chelsea and South Cumberland in the Galloway tournament. Then
they beat host Galloway, 10-9, in an exciting championship game.