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1) CONTENTS

1) Contents......1
2) Description of the Company.....4

2.1 Company name..............................................................................................4
2.2 Company location...........................................................................................4
2.3 Part of the Factory at Which the Summer Practice Done..............................4
2.4 Organization structure of the company ....4
2.5 Brief introuction a!out "#B$"%&'S%() ........4
2.6 Personal Specifications of "#B$"%&'S%()...................................................*
2.7 Duties of engineers.........................................................................................+
2.7.1 Duties of ,echanical )ngineers...............................................................+
2.7.2 Duties of )lectrical )lectronic )ngineers..................................................-
2.7.3 Duties of ,etallurgical )ngineers.............................................................-
2.7.4 Duties of $nustrial )ngineers...................................................................-
2.7.5 Duties of %erospace )ngineers................................................................-
3) $ntrouction.............................................................................. ................................
4) ,anufacturing )ngineering ,achineshop.............................................................1/
4.1 Chip'"ype ,achining Facility.........................................................................1/
4.1.1 "urning.................................................................................................11
4.1.2 ,illing..................................................................................................10
4.1.3 Drilling..................................................................................................14
4.1.4 Boring...................................................................................................11
4.1.5 "apping................................................................................................11
4.1.6 Sa2ing.................................................................................................1*
4.1.7 (rining...............................................................................................1*
4.1.8 ,anual De!urring................................................................................1*
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4.2 Press an Weling Facility.....1*
4.2.1 Bening.......1+
4.2.2 Flo2 Forming..1-
4.2.3 (as ,etal %rc Weling.....1-
4.2.4 Spot Weling.........................................................................................1.
4.2.5 (as "ungsten %rc Weling....................................................................3/
5) ,achines in the ,achineshop...31
5.1 Chip'type ,achining ,achines......31
5.2 Weling ,achines.......33
5.3 Press ,achines........33
5.4 4on'traitional ,achining ,achines..30
5.5 Spinning ,achine.30
6) Sample Wor5 Pieces...30
6.1 /1/'1./313....30
6.2 $nterface................................................................................................34
6.3 Con6ulsi6e "ip &ey.......................................................................................34
6.4 Bac5pusher......................................................................31
6.5 "ransfer %rm................................................................................................3*

7) Cost %nalysis........3*
7.1 Con6ulsi6e "ip &ey...3*
7.2 Bac5pusher ...3+
8) Conclusion.3-
2
9) %ppeni70/
9.1 %ppeni7'% Organizational Structure of S%().....................0/
9.2 %ppeni7'B 8oughly Dra2n Plan of ,achineshop.....01
9.3 %ppeni7'C "echnical $nformations of the ,achines.. ..01
9.4 %ppeni7'D Dra2ing of /1/'1./313...................0-
9.7 %ppeni7') Dra2ing of $nterface.... ....................................................0.
9.8 %ppeni7'F Dra2ing of Con6ulsi6e "ip &ey................................................4/
9.9 %ppeni7'( Dra2ing of Bac5pusher...............................41
9.10 %ppeni7'9 Dra2ing of "ransfer %rm..........43
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2) DESCRIPTION OF THE COMPANY
2.1 Company Name
"#B$"%&'S%() :"he Scientific an "echnological 8esearch Council of
"ur5ey Defense $nustries 8esearch an De6elopment $nstitute;
2.2 Company Location
"#B$"%&'S%() is acti6e in three locations<
=,)"# (uiance Control >a!oratory
=%n5ara Su!sonic Win "unnel an
=>alahan Site :the part of the company that internship one;
2.3 Part of the Factory at hich the !"mmer Practice #one
,anufacturing )ngineering #nit
2.4 $r%ani&ationa' !tr"ct"re of the Company
(i6en in %ppeni7'%
2.5 (rief intro)"ction a*o"t +,(-+./0!.12
Defense $nustries 8esearch an De6elopment $nstitute ' S%()? 2as esta!lishe
in 1.+3? an is acti6e in three locations ' ,)"# (uiance Control >a!oratory?
%n5ara Su!sonic Win "unnel an >alahan Site 2hich is 0/ 5m. a2ay from the city
center of %n5ara. "he $nstitute is a part of "#B@"%& ' "he Scientific an
"echnological 8esearch Council of "ur5ey an specializes in the fiel of efense
inustry.
"he main function of S%() is to perform research an e6elopment acti6ities for
efense systems incluing engineering an prototype prouction? starting 2ith their
funamental research an conceptual esign. ,ost of the proAects are performe in
coorination 2ith relate efense institutions.
S%() !elie6es international cooperation is as important as national partnerships
an 2ishes to e7change 5no2lege 2ith 6arious partners from allie countries.
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"he range of acti6ities that "BB@"%& ' S%() performs can !e liste as
follo2sC
' (uie an un'guie ammunition systems D su!systems<
e7ecute e6elopment proAects?
perform technology e6elopment stuies?
'accumulate 5no2'ho2? form infrastructure an specialize 2or5 force?
' Prouce strategic system an su!systems?
' Perform soft2are e6elopment acti6ities in areas of specialization :fire comman
an control? flight simulations? etc.;?
' Offer inspection an measurement ser6ices?
' Offer consultancy ser6ices.
Pro3ect4
'Stan'off ,issile :SO,; ProAect
' Smart Wing %apter &it:&(&;
' Smart Wing %apter &it:&(&;
' Bun5er Buster :4)B;
' 9(& (uiance &it
' "O8OS 30/ ,eium 8ange %rtillery 8oc5et
' "O8OS 3*/ >ong 8ange %rtillery 8oc5et
' %nti'"an5 8oc5ets an ,issiles
' >ight %ssault 8oc5et
' Short 8ange an ,eium 8ange %rtillery 8oc5et Systems
' ,ine Clearing 8oc5ets
' ,ortar %mmunition
' %rtillery %mmunition
' (PS %ie $nertial 4a6igation Systems
' Design Soft2are
' %ir to Surface %mmunitionD8oc5etD,issile Systems
F-2L#! $F -N+252!+
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0 $nternal Ballistics :8oc5et ,otors? "ur!oAet ,otors? (un Propulsion;
0 )7ternal Ballistics :%rtillery Shell? 8oc5et ' ,issile %eroynamics;
0 Flight ,achanics :8oc5ets? ,issiles? %rtillery Shells;
0 Structural ,echanics? Structural Dynamics an %eroelasticity
0 ,echatronics an Dynamics of ,achinery
0 Computational Flui Dynamics
0 Finite )lement ,ethos
0 ,aterial "echnologies
0 (uiance E Control
0 Soft2are De6elopment
0 Composite Soli 8oc5et ,otor Propellants an $gniters
0 Fuzes an Warheas
0 ,anufacturing )ngineering
0 Chemical? ,echanical an )lectrical Design
0 ProAect ,anagement
0 Systems )ngineering
2.6 Per4ona' !pecification4 of +,(-+./0!.12
S%() employs in >alahan site a total 0/1 personnel of 2hom 3*- are
engineers. "he !ranches of engineers an other employees of S%() are liste asC
N"m*er an) #"tie4 of 2n%ineer4 2mp'oye)6
2n%ineer4
'Computer )ngineeringC *
')lectric an )lectronic )ngineeringC *4
'$nustrial )ngineeringC 13
'Physics an Physics )ngineeringC 1/
'%erospace )ngineeringC 3.
'Ci6il )ngineeringC 0
'Chemistry an Chemistry )ngineeringC 00
'Control )ngineeringC 1
',echanical )ngineeringC ./
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',etallurgical an ,aterials )ngineeringC 1+
' 4uclear )nergy )ngineeringC 1
'%eronautics an %stronauticsC 1
',ining )ngineeringC 1
!ome $ther #epartment4
'StatisticsC 3
'"he Faculty of )conomic an %ministrati6e SciencesC 3-
',athematics an ,athematics'ComputerC 3
'>i!rarianshipC 1
' (uiance an Psychological CounselingC 1
$ther 2mp'oyee46 89
N"m*er of +ota' 2mp'oyee46 305

2.7 #,+-2! $F 2N1-N225!
2.7.10 #"tie4 of 7echanica' 2n%ineer4
Since the main 2or5ing area of the company is relate 2ith the mechanical
engineering? it is easy to see mechanical engineers in many uties in the company an
the num!er of mechanical engineers can !e sho2n as a proof of this statement.
,echanical )ngineering starts 2ith esign parts of proAects implying most of the proAect
chiefs of the proAects are mostly mechanical engineers. ,echanical )ngineers are also
ta5es place in many epartments e7cept specific ones such as electronic epartment.
One of the main 2or5ing area of mechanical engineers in the company is manufacturing
engineering. ,anufacturing engineering etermines ho2 parts of a prouct are going to
!e mae. $n aition? process engineers chec5s the manufactura!ility of the parts.
,anufacturing engineers are also responsi!le for initializing the proucing process.
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2.7.20 #"tie4 of 2'ectrica' an) 2'ectronic4 2n%ineer4
,icroelectronics e6ices an electronic circuits are the main 2or5ing area of
electrical an electronics engineers. Since electrical an electronics engineers are
responsi!le for the 2hole esign of the microchips an circuits? prouction planning?
selling an purchasing acti6ities can !e accepte as their responsi!ility to increase
effecti6eness of the circuit an microchip prouction.
2.7.30 #"tie4 of 7eta''"r%ica' 2n%ineer4
,aterial choice an sometimes proucing the neee material for part
proucing is the main uty of metallurgical engineers in S%(). ,aterial properties
such as yiel strength? moulus of elasticityetc. an alterations of these properties
!y heating or cooling must !e supplie !y metallurgical engineers to esigners of
parts. 9eat treatment is another responsi!ility of metallurgical engineers. Since heat
treatment can change properties of materials? metallurgical engineers must inform the
esigners of parts a!out harmful effects of heat treatment.
2.7.40#"tie4 of -n)"4tria' 2n%ineer4
$nustrial engineers mostly ta5e part in none7clusi6e parts in the company an
they 2or5 !y targeting the efficiency increase of S%(). $nustrial engineers often are
responsi!le for proucti6ity impro6ements? supply chain optimization? proAect
management? feasi!ility stuies for ne2 technologies an applications? lean an Aust'
in'time implementation? health care management an logistics? an systems
integration an engineering. 9o2e6er? the ultimate aim is controlling an lo2ering
costs.
2.7.50#"tie4 of .ero4pace 2n%ineer4
Because one of the main proAect area of S%() is missiles an roc5ets?
contri!ution of aerospace engineering to proAects increases. %erospace engineers
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mostly stuy on aeroynamics of roc5ets an missiles. %ccoring to this? aerospace
engineers ecies the outer shapes of roc5ets an missiles.
3) INTRODUCTION
"he stanar of li6ing in any society is etermine? primarily? !y the goos
an the ser6ices that are a6aila!le to its people. $n this respect prouction ta5es an
important role? 2hich reinforces the importance of goo engineering eucation. $n
orer to impro6e engineering eucation Fuality so as to impro6e stanars of li6ing ?
engineering eucation must !e enriche !y applications of theoretical 5no2lege
on practical ones.
$n this respect? ,) 0// Summer Practice is aime to impro6e an reinforce?
the practical an theoretical 5no2lege a!out prouction techniFues acFuire in ,)
3// ,echanical )ngineering Orientation ? ,) 3/3 ,anufacturing "echnologies
course an ,) 110'114 )ngineering Dra2ing courses. "his summer practice also
helps to impro6e 5no2lege a!out material sciences 2hich 2as learne at ,)")
33+'33-.
)ngineering stuents all gi6en more theoretical 5no2lege a!out mechanical
engineering. "he summer practice is mae to see 2here this theoretical !ac5groun
is use in practice. $t aime to gi6e the practical 5no2lege so that the theory an
the practice can !e put together easier. %lso ? another purpose 2as to help the
mechanical engineering stuents to imagine ho2 the machines 2or5 ? ho2 the
programs are 2ritten ? 2here the prouction techniFues are use shortly ho2 the
theory is in reality.
"herefore? this report 2ill inclue the prouction techniFues? technical
information a!out the machines? prouction stages of some components? cost
analysis of fe2 parts as an introuction to engineering economics an engineering
ra2ings of the components 2hich are at the stage of Aust !efore prouction. Prior to
these? a !rief information a!out "#B$"%& S%() is presente.
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4) MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING
MACHINESHOP
"his 2or5shop is a 5in of prototype 2or5shop 2here the prototypes of
mechanic systems that neee in esign step are manufacture. "he impro6ement
of efficiency of these mechanic systems an the necessary e6elopments are one
uner the influence of the tests an e7periments. %lso some repairing processes
2hich can not !e one !y relate units ue to lac5 of tools or s5ille la!our or not
to interrupt flo2 shop manufacturing? are one in this 2or5shop .
,ost of the la!our is highly s5ille ue to nees of iscontinuity of 2or5 flo2.
,anufacturing system of this 2or5shop can !e classifie as Go! Shop
,anufacturing. Fe2 num!ers of proucts ha6ing a 2ie 6ariety in spectrum are
manufacture in most economical 2ay. 9o2e6er? rarely? some mass prouction is
one such that the parts 2hich can not !e foun from outsie mar5et an neee
immeiately in small Fuantities for flo2 shop manufacturing units.
"he manuacturing proceure is follo2e in these 2aysC First of all? the
unmachine 2or5piece or the ro2 material is gi6en the esire shape in chip'type
machining facility. "hen? if reFuire? to assem!ly the machine 2or5pieces? press
an 2eling facility ta5es part in manufacturing. %fter all a!o6e one? Fuality control
facility comes to 2or5 to chec5 out the esire specialities 2hich are inicate !y
engineers on mechanical ra2ings of manufacture parts. For special cases? Fuality
control facility tests the ro2 materialsH harness !efore chip'type processes.

4.1 Chip0+ype 7achinin% Faci'ity
"his facility emolishes the epenency of S%() in the meaning of
manufacturing !y the help of its moernly esigne 2or5ing area an high'tech
machines. %ll machining operations< turning? milling? rilling? !oring? tapping?
5nurling? sa2ing processes< can !e successi6ely carrie out in chip'type machining
facility. "he importance of highly's5ille la!or can not !e ignore for this success.
For metal remo6al processes< there are fi6e lathes? a C4C lathe? a uni6ersal
milling machine? three C4C milling machines? a raial rilling machine? t2o press
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rilling machines? a grining machine? a sa2ing machine an a 2ire electroischarge
machine.
%ll lathes ha6e numerical control units an all ha6e high prouction capacity.
"hree of lathes are use for relati6ely small imensione 2or5 pieces such as
scre2s an !olt< the rest of the lathes are esigne for relati6ely large an long 2or5
pieces.
C4C milling machines use for relati6ely high precision 2or5 pieces. On the
other han uni6ersal milling machine is not use for etaile parts 2hich nee high
accuracy. $t has 2orth to note that only one C4C milling machine can create angle
surfaces !y its special mo6ement.
Press rilling machines are manually controlle. "hese are not use for 2or5
pieces that nee high accuracy. For critical parts? raial rilling machin is preferre.
"he grining machine is generally use for sharpening the cutting eges of the
cutting tools.
%fter a !rief introuction to chip'type machining facility? etaile information
a!out machining operations is gi6en !elo2.
4.1.1 +"rnin%6 "urning is one of the !asic machining processes. $nformation in this
section is organize accoring to the su!category lin5s in the menu !ar to the left.
"urning prouces solis of re6olution 2hich can !e tightly tolerance
!ecause of the specialize nature of the operation. "urning is performe on a
machine calle a lathe in 2hich the tool is stationary an the part is rotate. "he
figure !elo2 illustrates an engine lathe. >athes are esigne solely for turning
operations? so that precise control of the cutting results in tight tolerances. "he 2or5
piece is mounte on the chuc5?2hich rotates relati6e to the stationary tool.
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"urning refers to cutting as sho2n !elo2.
"he term IfacingI is use to escri!e remo6al of material from the flat en of a
cylinrical part? as sho2n !elo2. Facing is often use to impro6e the finish of
surfaces that ha6e !een parte.
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4.1.2 7i''in%6 ,illing is as funamental as rilling among po2ere metal cutting
processes.
,illing is 6ersatile for a !asic machining process? !ut !ecause the milling set
up has so many egrees of freeom? milling is usually less accurate than turning or
grining unless especially rigi fi7turing is implemente.
For manual machining? milling is essential to fa!ricate any o!Aect that is not
a7ially symmetric. "here is a 2ie range of ifferent milling machines? ranging from
manual light'uty BrigeportsJ to huge C4C machines for milling parts hunres of
feet long. Belo2 is illustrate the process at the cutting area.
7i''in%6 Co'"mn0an)0/nee 7an"a' 7i''
Below is illustrated a typical column-and-knee type manual mill. Such
manual mills are common in job shops that specialize in parts that are low
volume and quickly fabricated. Such job shops are often termed "model shops"
because of the prototyping nature of the work.
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"he 5nee mo6es up an o2n the column on guie2ays in the column. "he
ta!le can mo6e in 7 an y on the 5nee? an the milling hea can mo6e up an o2n.
4.1.3 #ri''in%C Drille holes are characterize !y their sharp ege on the entrance
sie an the presence of !urrs on the e7it sie :unless they ha6e !een remo6e;.
%lso? the insie of the hole usually has helical fee mar5s. Drilling may affect the
mechanical properties of the 2or5piece !y creating lo2 resiual stresses aroun the
hole opening an a 6ery thin layer of highly stresse an istur!e material on the
ne2ly forme surface. "his causes the 2or5piece to !ecome more suscepti!le
to corrosion at the stresse surface.
For flute rill !its? any chips are remo6e 6ia the flutes. Chips may !e long
spirals or small fla5es? epening on the material? an process parameters. "he type
of chips forme can !e an inicator of the machina!ility of the material? 2ith long
gummy chips reucing machina!ility.
Surface finish in rilling may range from 03 to 1// microinches. Finish cuts 2ill
generate surfaces near 03 microinches? an roughing 2ill !e near 1// microinches.
Cutting flui is commonly use to cool the rill !it? increase tool life? increase spees
an fees? increase the surface finish? an ai in eAecting chips. %pplication of these
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fluis is usually one !y flooing the 2or5piece or !y applying a spray mist. $n
eciing 2hich rill:s; to use it is important to consier the tas5 at han an e6aluate
2hich rill 2oul !est accomplish the tas5. "here are a 6ariety of rill styles that
each ser6e a ifferent purpose. "he su!lan rill is capa!le of rilling more than one
iameter. "he spae rill is use to rill larger hole sizes. "he ine7a!le rill is useful
in managing chips. Center rilling eep hole rilling? gun rilling an trepanning are
the !asic rilling techniFues.
4.1.4 (orin%6 Boring al2ays in6ol6es the enlarging of an e7isting hole? 2hich may
ha6e !een mae !y a rill or may !e the result of a core in a casting. Concentricity is
an important attri!ute of !ore holes. %n so another important purpose of !oring may
!e to ma5e the hole concentric 2ith the a7is of rotation of the 2or5 piece an thus
correct any eccentricity that may ha6e resulte from the rillHs ha6ing rifte off the
center line.
Boring can !e mae on horizontal? 6ertical or angular machines as long as the
machine esign pro6ies the inherent rigiity an accuracy to prouce the tolerances
reFuire. Consiera!le !oring is one on the 6arious types of lathes an also
performe on some rilling machines. %pplications of !oring can !e i6ie into hea6y
cutting an precision operations. 9ea6y !oring is generally one on large horizontal
an 6ertical !oring machines. Precision !oring is performe on machines specially
esigne for this purpose. "hese machines generally ta5e relati6ely light cuts? maintain
close tolerances an often capa!le of high prouction rates. Operations often
performe 2ith precision !oring in the same cycle inclue facing? turning an groo6ing.
,achines are sometimes arrange for accurate milling operations.
When !oring is one in a lathe? the 2or5 usually is hel in a chuc5 or on a faceplate.
9oles may !e !ore straight? tapere? or to irregular contours. Boring is essentially
internal turning 2hile feeing the tool parallel to the rotation a7is of the 2or5 piece.
4.1.5 +appin%6 $nternal threas in 2or5 pieces can !e prouce !y tapping. % tap is
a !asically a threaing tool 2ith multiple cutting teeth. "aps are generally a6aila!le
2ith three or four flutes. Chip remo6al can !e a significant pro!lem uring tapping
!ecause of the small clearances in6ol6e. $f chips are not remo6e properly? the
resulting e7cessi6e forces can !rea5 the tap.
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4.1.6 !a8in%6 Sa2ing is a cutting operation in 2hich the cutting tool is a !lae ha6ing
a series of small teeth? 2ith each tooth remo6ing a small amount of material. "his
process is use for all metallic an non'metallic materials that are machina!le !y other
cutting processes an is capa!le of proucing 6arious shapes. Because sections of
consiera!le size can !e se6ere from the 2or5 piece 2ith the remo6al of only small
amount of the material in the form of chips? sa2ing is pro!a!ly the most economical of
the !asic machining processes 2ith respect to the 2aste of material an po2er
consumption? an in many cases 2ith respect to la!our.
4.1.7 1rin)in%6 (rining is a chip remo6al process an the cutting tool is an ini6iual
a!rasi6e grain. "he maAor ifferences !et2een grain an single'point cutting tool
actions are that ini6iual grains ha6e irregular shapes an are space ranomly along
the periphery of the 2heel. )ach a!rasi6e grain remo6es a small chip. "hese chips are
much smaller than those o!taine in metal cutting operations in general. Furthermore?
!ecause of eformation? the actual chip 2ill !e shorter an thic5er than the calculate
6alues. "he a6erage ra5e angle of the grains is highly negati6e. Because of small
imensions in6ol6e? forces in grining are much smaller than those in cutting
operations. (rining forces shoul !e 5ept lo2 in orer to a6oi istortion an to
maintain imensional accuracy of the 2or5 piece.
4.1.8 7an"a' #e*"rrin%6 $t is an operation in 2hich a hanle e!urring tool is use
or in 2hich a hanle part is place against a fi7ture tool. %6antages of han
e!urring inclue the 6ersatility of the process an minimal capital in6estment an so
han e!urring is still use e7tensi6ely e6en though it is slo2? la!or intensi6e an
costly an often pro6ies less consistent results than esire.
4.2 Pre44 an) e')in% Faci'ity
Bening? cutting? 2eling? flo2 forming an press 2or5 operations are carrie
out in this facility.
Bening processes in this facility is accomplishe !y a !ening press an t2o
manually controlle !ening !ra5es.
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For press 2or5 operations< a pneumatic press machine? a hyraulic press
machine? a ie sin5ing electro ischarge machine an a flo2 forming machine are
use in this facility. Wie 6ariety of ie sets are a6aila!le for press 2or5 processes.
$n this facility? cutting operations are one !oth !y han an !y the help of machines.
For relati6ely thic5er 2or5 pieces plasma cutting machines are use? 2here han
sa2s are use for thinner ones.
Weling processes are freFuently use in this 2or5shop. For connecting or
repairing purposes shiele metal arc 2eling? gas tungsten arc 2eling an spot
2eling are use. Spot 2eling is use especially for connecting sheet metals 2here
gas tungsten arc 2eling is commonly use ue to its high Fuality 2eling.
4.2.1 (en)in%6 Bening is the plastic eformation of the metals a!out a linear a7is
2ith little or no change in the surface area !y stressing the metal a!o6e its yiel
strength !ut not larger than its ultimate tensile stress. When multiple !ens are mae
simultaneously 2ith the use of a ie? the process is sometimes calle forming. "he
6arious !en a7es can !e at angles to each other? !ut each a7is must !e linear an
inepenent of the others for the process to !e classifie as a true !ening
operation. $f the a7es of eformation are not linear or are not inepenent? the
process !ecomes one of ra2ing anDor stretching? not !ening. Characteristic of
this process is stretching :tensile elongation; impose on the outer surface an
compression on the inner surface. Since the yiel strength of metals in compression
is some2hat higher than the yiel strength in tension? the metal on the outer sie
yiels first? an the neutral a7is is isplace from the center of the t2o surfaces.
Concerning the inner sie of the !en? it is possi!le for the compressi6e
forces to introuce upsetting? 2hich 2oul cause the material to !ecome longer in
the irection parallel to the !en a7is. "his effect can !ecome Fuite pronounce in
the !ening of thic5? narro2 pieces.
Still another conseFuence of the conition of com!ine tension an
compression is the tenency of the metal to un!en some2hat after forming? a
phenomenon 5no2n as spring !ac5. "o form a esire angle? metals must !e
o6er!ent in such a 2ay that upon spring !ac5? the material assumes the esire
shape of the prouct.
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4.2.2 F'o8 Formin%6 Flo2 forming is a chipless col forming metho 2hich is use
to manufacture high'precise?roun seamless components. $n flo2 forming< a hollo2
a7is symmetric preform is fitte to manrel. %fter preform an manrel starts to
rotate? rollers that are controlle !y C4C apply compressi6e forces to the outsie
iameter of the 2or5 piece. "he material is compresse a!o6e its yiel strength?
plastically eforme an mae to flo2. "he esire geometry of the 2or5piece is
achie6e 2hen the outer iameter an the 2all of the 2or5 piece are ecrease an
the a6aila!le material 6olume fle2 o6er the manrel. "he insie surface of the
prouct has a Fuality as 2ell as the outsie surface Fuality of the manrel. Flo2
forming process has t2o typical types.
First type is forward flow forming 2hich uses 2or5 pieces ha6ing a close
sie. $n for2ar flo2 forming? 2or5piece elongates at the same irection 2ith the
mo6ement of the rollers an a tailstoc5 is use to fi7 the 2or5piece.
Secon type of flo2 forming is backward flow forming an it is use to form
preforms 2ith a continuous hole insie. $n !ac52ar flo2 forming? as the opposite to
for2ar flo2 forming? the preform elongates at the opposite irection to the
mo6ement of the rollers.
For precision long flo2 forming operations? three rollers place 2ith 13/K are
use.

Forward Flow Forming Backward Flow Forming
4.2.3 1a4 7eta' .rc e')in%6 (as metal arc 2eling :(,%W;? formerly 5no2n as
,$( 2eling :for metal inert'gas;? 2as a logical outgro2th of gas tungsten arc 2eling.
"he process is similar? !ut the arc is no2 maintaine !et2een the 2or5 piece an an
automatically fe? consuma!le 2ire electroe.
18
%rgon? helium? an mi7tures of the t2o can !e use for 2eling 6irtually any
metal< they are use primarily 2ith the nonferrous metals. $n 2eling steel? some
o7ygen :O3 or car!on io7ie :CO3; is usually ae to impro6e the arc sta!ility an
reuce 2el spatter. "he cheaper CO3 can !e use alone in 2eling steel? pro6ie
that a eo7iizing electroe 2ire is employe.
(as metal arc 2eling is fast an economical !ecause there is no freFuent
changing of electroes? as 2ith stic5'type electroes. $n aition? there is no slag
forme o6er the 2el? the process can !e reaily automate? an? if one manually? the
2eling hea is relati6ely light an compact. % re6erse'polarity DC arc is generally
use !ecause of its eep penetrate? spray transfer? an smooth 2els 2ith goo
profile. Process 6aria!les inclue type of current? current magnitue? shieling gas?
type of metal transfer? electroe iameter? electroe composition? electroe stic5 out
:e7tension !eyon the gun;? 2eling spee? 2eling 6oltage? an arc length.
"he specific shieling gases can ha6e consiera!le effect on the nature of metal
transfer from the electroe to the 2or5 an also affect the heat transfer !eha6iour?
penetration? an tenency for unercutting :2el pool e7tening laterally !eneath the
surface of the !ase metal;. Se6eral types of electronic controls can !e use to alter the
2a6eform of the current. "his ma5es it possi!le to control the mechanism of metal
transfer? from rops? to spray? to short'circuiting rops. Some of these 6ariations
inclue pulse arc 2eling :(,%W'P;? short'circuiting arc 2eling :(,%W'S;? an
spray transfer 2eling :(,%W'S";. Burie arc 2eling :(,%W'B; is another 6ariation
in 2hich car!on io7ie'rich gas is use an the arc is !urie in its o2n crater.
% num!er of inustrial ro!ots are no2 a6aila!le to perform gas metal arc
2eling. "o function properly? ho2e6er? the computer electronics of these ro!ots must
!e shiele from the high'freFuency interference of the 2eling process.
4.2.4 !pot e')in%6 Spot 2eling is one of the olest 2eling processes. $t has a
2ie range of using area !ut especially use for the assem!ly of sheet stee5 6ehicle
!oies. "his is a type of resistance 2eling 2here the spot 2els are mae at regular
inter6als on o6erlapping sheets of metals. "he parts that ha6e at most 0 mm thic5ness
can !e 2ele !y this metho. "hic5ness of the parts to !e 2ele shoul !e eFual or
has a ratio 0C1 in thic5ness. Spot 2el iameters 6aries !et2een 0'13.1 mm. "he
epth an size of the 2el nugget are controlle !y the amperage? time? an type of
shieling gas.
19
"he material !et2een the electroes is
sFueeze together. $t then melts? estroying
the interface !et2een the parts. "he current is
s2itche off an the InuggetI of molten
materials soliifies forming the Aoint.
4.2.5 1a4 +"n%4ten .rc e')in%6 (as tungsten arc 2eling is an electric arc 2eling
process that prouces an arc !et2een a nonconsuma!le electroe an the 2or5 to !e
2ele. "he 2el is shiele from the atmosphere !y a shieling gas that forms an
en6elope aroun the 2el area. ("%W is a 6ersatile an can !e use on ferrous an
nonferrous metals an? epening on the !ase metal? in all 2eling positions. "he
process can !e use to 2el thin or thic5 materials 2ith or 2ithout a filler material.
When 2eling thinner materials? ege Aoints an flange? filler metals are not use. For
thic5er materials? an e7ternally fe filler 2ire is generally use. "he type of filler metal
2ire to !e use is !ase on the chemical analysis of the !ase metal. "he size of the
filler metal 2ire epens on the thic5ness of the !ase metal? 2hich usually ictates the
2eling current. "he methos of operation ("%W can !e manual or automatic.
Weling 6aria!les are selecte after the !ase metal? filler metal? an Aoint configuration
ha6e !een selecte. "he fi7e 2eling 6aria!les inclue the type of filler metal?
electroe type an size? the type of current? an the type of shieling gas. "he
aAusta!le 6aria!les control the shape of the 2el !y affecting things such as !ea
height? !ea 2ith? penetration? an 2el integrity. "he primary aAusta!le 6aria!les for
("%W are 2eling current? arc length? an tra6el spee. "he seconary 6aria!les
inclue 2or5 an tra6el angle an the istance the electroe e7tens !eyon the en
of the cup. "he material for ("%W is mae from a tungsten alloy. "ungsten has 041/
egrees Celsius that is one of the highest melting temperatures of any metal. >arger
electroes reFuire higher currents to !e use. Smaller iameter electroes may !e
use for 2eling thinner materials.
20
5) MACHINES IN THE MACHINESHOP
Important Not! $n this section there are only e7planations of machines 2hose
ta!les clou not !een reache. "a!les of the machines are situate in %ppeni7'C.
5.1 Chip0type 7achinin% 7achine4
1) !pinner +C110L07C9 CNC 7i''in% 7achine:2007)6
2) +o4 +rencin Lathe6 "his Czech prouct supplies all tlathe operations. $t has its
o2n numerical control aAustment system. 9o2e6er? Sage uses it as an orinary
uni6ersal lathe !ecause S%() has more e6elope C4C machines. $n aition ? it
has a Fuic5change tool post on its carriage.
3) !cha"*'in 53N ,ni;er4a' 7i''in% 7achine6
4) <arnamo ,ni;er4a' 7i''in% 7achine6
5) ,&ay 320 !a8in% 7achine6
6) +ren4 !N50C Lathe :!'o;a=ia> 2003)
7) +"rnin% 7achine :+"r=ey> 2003)6 %lthough there is not much reache
information a!out this machine? it can !e sai that it is a Ao! shop turning machine.
%utomatic fee is a6aila!le . Drilling ? !oring? reaming? 5nurling an turning can !e
one. %lthough its properties are similar 2ith Schau!lin 131? this machine is use for
more rough 2or5s.
8) !cha"*'in 125 0 ?ori&onta' +"rnin% 7achine6
21
9) L"44an 7701 <ertica' #ri''in% machine6 "his machine lets to ma5e holes
6ertically as most rilling machines. $ts ta!le oes not mo6e .
10) Foreman .5750 5a)ia' #ri''in% 7achine6 11) +$! <ertica' #ri''in% 7achine6
"his machine lets to ma5e holes 6ertically. its "a!le can mo6e 6ertically an can
rotate. ,oreo6er? the machine can ma5e automatic rilling :applies rilling force on
its o2n;
12) #ec=e' 7aho #7, 60 7ono ('oc= CNC 7i''in% 7achine6
13) !pinner 7<C1100 CNC 7i''in% 7achine6
14) !pinner +C65 CNC Lathe6
15) +a=4an +7C 500< CNC 7i''in% 7achine
5.2 e')in% 7achine4
1) 7-1 e')in% 7achine:.'"mini"m)6 "he machine is use to apply sensiti6e 2els.
$t uses %rgon gas in orer to
2) 7-1 e')in% 7achine:!tee')6 )6en though this machine gi6es high strength to its
2els? its sensiti6ity is lo2er than the %luminium 2els. $t uses a mi7ture of o7ygen?
car!on io7ie an argon gas.
3) +-1 e')in% 7achine6 "his is the most efficient an most e7pensi6e 2eling
machine of S%(). $t gi6es !est sensiti6ity. $ts utilization techniFue is ifferent than ,$(
2eling. % 2ire :%l? steel? stainless steel etc.; is melte !et2een 2or5pieces !y a arc
2hich occurs !et2een tungsten an 2or5piece.
4) !pot e')in% 7achine6 "he parts that ha6e at most 0 mm thic5ness can !e
2ele !y this machine. $t is a typical spot 2eling machine.
5.3 Pre44 7achine4
1) .)a 7a=ina ?y)ra"'ic Pre44 7achine6 1/ ton is the ma7imum loa that this press
machine can apply. Desire shapes can !e gi6en to sheet metal !y this stron machine.
22
2) (ay=a' C//01260 (en)in% (ra=e6 "his !ening !ra5e is one of the olest ones in
the machineshop. $t is use for Fuite large parts an it is controlle manually.
"herefore? it oes not gi6e accurate imensions.
3) (ay=a' 1"i''otine6
5.4 Non0tra)itiona' machinin% machine4
1) F"r=an /ompa=1 050.0 #ie !in=in% 2#76 "his machine is not commonly use
in S%()? !ut it has crucial importance for processes that can not !e one !y any
other process. On this machine? electrically charge electroe ha6ing a special
geometry on it !urns its geometry into the metal 2or5piece. )ach stri5e cause
erosion on the surface of the metal. %s a result? the reFuire shape is forme
negati6ely in the metal !y a three'imensional electroe.
2) 1a';anotechni= 70198 1rin)in% 7achine6
3) 5o*ofi' 440!LP ire 2'ectro)i4char%e 7achine6
4) +e'8in 2nterpri4e P'a4ma 160 ?F C"ttin% 7achine6
5.5 !pinnin% 7achine
1) 5ep=on 5!F7 F402 F'o8 Formin% 7achine6
") SAMP#E $OR% PIECES
6.1 0500019252 :not a''o8e) for name)
')ngineers ecie to prouce it on uni6ersal lathe.
'Before machining processes material 2as chosen as S%) 1/3/ steel cyliner !ar?
3. mm in iameter an cut !y sa2 1-/ mm in length from long steel !ar.
'Since rough esign of the 2or5piece is cylinrical? a turning machine 2as chosen
for machining.
'First of all? !ar 2as fi7e to the chuc5 !y Aa2s then lathe 2as s2itche on.
'Facing operation 2as applie to circular face.
23
'"he iameter 2as ecrease to 31./1 mm iameter in 1 steps.
'4e7t step 2as the rilling operation. $n orer to initialize it? the center 2as mar5e
!y center rill. "hen? 1/.0 mm in iameter an 3/ mm in epth a hole 2as opene.
"o o!tain esire measurement? the hole 2as enlarge to 1+.1 mm iameter.
'"he 2or5piece 2as tappe until 11 mm insie of hole .
'%s the operations 2hich can !e one !y turning machine 2as finishe? the
2or5piece 2as cut off 1+/ mm in length.
'$n orer to create 5ey seat? the 2or5piece 2as fi7e to a milling machine
horizontally. "hen? 5eyseat 2as constitute !y sla!'milling from the sie ha6ing no
hole.
6.2 -nterface
0)ngineers ecie to prouce it on uni6ersal lathe.
0 Before machining processes material 2as chosen as S%)1/4/ steel cyliner !ar?
+1 mm in iameter an -/ mm in length.
0Bar 2as fi7e to the chuc5 !y Aa2s then lathe 2as s2itche on.
'Facing operation 2as applie to circular face.
'"he iameter 2as ecrease to +/ mm iameter in * steps.
' 4e7t step 2as the rilling operation. $n orer to initialize it? the center 2as mar5e
!y center rill. "hen? 3* mm in iameter an 0/ mm in epth a hole 2as opene.
'"he 2ro5piece 2as tappe to 31 in epth !y ,0/ tapping machine.
'"he part 2as cut off +/ mm in length !y cutter.
'$n orer to open other holes? the 2or5piece mar5e from 3 points 2hich are 33.1
mm far from the central a7is of the cyliner on unprocesse face.
'"2o holes opene 13 mm in iameter an 3+ mm in epth.
'"he holes are tappe !y ,13 tapping machine.
6.3 Con;"'4i;e +ip /ey
')ngineers eice to prouce it !y C'a7is C4C turning machine.
' Before machining processes material 2as chosen as )4 %W'+/+1 %l in 14 mm
ia. Belo2 operations 2ere mae !y soft2are of the machine.
' Facing operation 2as applie.
24
'Outer surface shape e7cept 5eyseat.
'&eyseat 2as opene !y c'a7is.: use of turret as milling machine;
'Outer surface 2as finishe.
'Center rill 2as opene.
'4 mm hole 2as opene in 3/ mm in epth
'$nner surface 2as shape !y hole cutter.
'Wor5piece 2as cut off 14 mm in length.
'Cut surface is cleane as facing operation in uni6ersal turning machine.
'"apping 2as mae !y han.
6.4 (ac= P"4her
')ngineers ecie to prouce it !y C4C ,illing ,achine.
' Before machining processes material 2as chosen as %%1+14 4-70-71* mm cut
!loc5.
'$n orer to fi7 part !y 6ise 2ithout clearance? facing operations are applie to the
1*70- mm surfaces.
'Part is fi7e horizontally to the 6ise sFueezing 4 mm height of the part from the
!ottom.
'"ools 2ere offset !y its offset apparatus.
'"he processes !elo2 are installe to the 4L*./ #nigraphics C%, 6ersion of the
program an operations 2ere mae !y C4C milling machine.
'8ough machining !y 13 milling cutter.
'Finishing !y 6 milling cutter.
',illing the raial surface !y 0 milling cutter.
'Center rilling.
'rilling !y 3.3 rill.
'Cur6e surfaces 2ere mille !y 0 special cutter.
'%fter upper surface operations one? part is fi7e to the 6ise in re6erse. "hen?
facing 2as mae as height of the part stays 1/ mm.
25
6.5 +ran4fer .rm
')ngineers ecie to prouce it in )D, 2ire machine.
- Before machining processes material was chosen as S%) 1/41? 30/71/74* mm steel
!loc5.
'Since the machine is C4C controlle? 3'D s5etch is uploae to system of the
machine.
'%fter process 2as one? part is mar5e from 4 points for rilling operation.
'4 holes 2ere rille !y . mm rill an tappe as ,1/.

&) COST ANA#YSIS
"O"%> COS"M OP)8%"O8 COS" N ,%C9$4%8O COS"N,%")8$%>
COS"NP#%>$"O CO4"8O>N)4($4))8$4( COS":if C%, program is neee;
)ngineering CostM "ime for prouction 7 Salary per hour
)mployee Cost M"ime for prouction 7 Salary per hour
,aterial Cost M,ass 7 Price per 5ilogram
,achinery CostM"ime for prouction 7 machinery cost per hour
Puality Control CostM $t changes accoring to machines that use for Fuality control
so total cost of Fuality control is gi6en.
$n S%()
)ngineering cost per hour C 1+.1 ">
Salary per hour of operator C 0/ ">
,achinery cost per hour C 0/ ">
Puality'control cost per hour C 3/">

7.1 Con;"'4i;e +ip /ey
7ateria' Co4t6
/.-5g of )4 %W'+/+1 material is use to prouce 4 con6ulsi6e tip
5eys.
Price per 5gM 3/ ">
26
,aterial CostM /.-=3/M 1* ">
7achinery Co4t6
1.1 hours operator 2or5
,aterial CostM 1.1= 0/M 1*1 ">
$perator Co4t6
1.1 hour operator 2or5
Operator CostM 1.1=0/M 1*1 ">
@"a'ity0Contro' Co4t6
3 hours for Fuality control
Puality'Control Cost M 3/= 3M4/ ">
+ota' Co4t6
"otal cost of 4 con6ulsi6e tip 5eysM 1*N1*1N1*1N4/M0-*
Cost of one con6ulsi6e tip 5eyM .*.1 ">
7.2 (ac=p"4her
7ateria' Co4t6
/.1 5g of %%1+14 is use to prouce 3/ !ac5pushers.
Price per 5gM 1+.+/ ">
,aterial CostM1+.+/ = /.1M -.-1 ">
2n%ineerin% Co4t6
3 hours 2ere spent for C%, programming
)ngineering CostM 1+.1 = 3 M01 ">
7achinery Co4t6
11 hours operator 2or5
,achinery CostM 01 = 11M 41/ ">
27
$perator Co4t6
11 hours 2as spent !y operator
Operator CostM 0/= 11M 41/ ">
@"a'ity0Contro' Co4t6
- hours for Fuality control
Puality'control CostM -=3// 1*/ ">
+ota' Co4t6
"otal Cost of 3/ !ac5pushersM -.-1 N 01 N 131 N +1/M .44 ">
Cost of one !ac5pusherM 4+.13">
') CONC#USION
$n ,) 0// summer practice? many e7periences 2ere gaine !y the
mechanical engineering stuents for their future engineering career. $mportant of
all ? the functions performe !y the engineers an the !eha6iors of the mechanical
engineers 2ere o!ser6e. %lso the relation !et2een a mechanical engineer an a
technician? ho2 they 2or5 together to perform a tas5 an the fiel of their
responsi!ilities 2ere o!ser6e. %pplication of the prouction techniFues? 2hich ha
!een learne in ,) 3/3? 2ere practice. "heir similarities an issimilarities?
a6antages an isa6antages 2ere e7amine. "he machines an the machine
tools? lu!rication techniFues? an the numerical control units use in these machines
2ere stuie. %lso prouction stages of 2or5 pieces in milling? turning? rilling?
!ening? 2eling etc. 2ere closely o!ser6e. >earning ho2 to ra2 a technical
ra2ing? ho2 an 2hy the tolerances are utilize 2ere the other topics uner the
scope of the summer practice. >astly? important aspects of a C4C machine 2ere
stuie carefully.
$t is o!6ious that atmosphere an 2or5ing conitions of a factory are 6ery
important for an engineering stuent in orer to ha6e an efficient summer practice
28
2hich 2ill impro6e his or her engineering s5ill. $n this respect "#B$"%& S%()
stating 8esearch an De6elopment acti6ities as the main principle of the company <
is a goo place for an efficient summer practice 2hich 2ill effect the engineering
carrier of the ,)0// stuents.
S%() has also some eficiencies an those can !e estroye !y some
inno6ations. First of all? although they ha6e high s5ille Fuality control machines
2hich !elongs to Fuality'control epartment? sometimes prouction epartment has
to ma5e the 2or5 of Fuality control epartment such as fining the center of gra6ity
of any 2or5piece. Seconly? salaries of employees are lo2er than other efense
inustry companies such as %S)>S%4 or "%$. Because of this reason? S%() loses
its employees ay !y ay an the time to finish proAects are !ecoming longer. "o
sol6e those pro!lems? S%() can i6ie clearly the Ao!s of epartments an increase
salaries. $n conclusion? pro!lems of the company are mostly !ecause of
management. On the other han? S%() has high Fuality engineering facilities an
oes not ha6e much eficiencies a!out it.
"o conclue? summer practice is one of the most important chance for
learning ho2 to hanle the pro!lems on prouction an machining systems. $t is a
6ery useful e7perience for engineering stuents since it impro6es theoretical an
practical 5no2lege as 2ell as engineering s5ills an responsi!ility feeling of the
stuents. $t is certain that summer practice 2ill help the stuents as 6isualizing the
lectures an 2ill affect their careers in a 6ery goo 2ay.
29
APPENDI()A
$r%ani&ationa' !tr"ct"re of the Company

30
Appn*+,)-
ROUGH#Y DRA$N P#AN OF MACHINESHOP
.INC#UDES ON#Y CHIP)TYPE MACHINES)
APPENDI()C
TECHNICA# INFORMATIONS OF THE MACHINES
C/+p)T0p ma1/+n2
1)Spinner TC110L-MCY CNC Milling Machine (2007)
Suppl !oltage 3"400 !
#urrent 63-80 $
%re&uenc 50-60 '(
3)Schaublin 53N Univeral Milling Machine
)a*le +ength " ,i-th 1100"305 mm
+ongitu-inal tra.el /0-a"is1 700 mm
31
)rans.ersal tra.el /2-a"is1 250 mm
!ertical )ra.el /3-a"is1 490 mm
Spin-le Spee-s 38-1510 rpm
)aper in Spin-le 40 4S5
%ee-s Steps 18
!api" Travere
+ongitu-inal 365 m7min
)rans.ersal 365 m7min
!ertical 167 m7min
,eight 2100 8g
9otor 5utput 565 ':
)otal :ower ;e&uire- 765 ':
9achine +ength " ,i-th " 'eight 1800"1600"1800 mm
#) $arna%& U-3MM La'he (S(e"en)
Suppl !oltage 380 !
%re&uenc 50 '(
#ontrol #ircuit !oltage 110 !
;ate- #urrent 40 $
5) U)a* 320 Sa(ing Machine
Sawing #apacit 280 < 250"280 mm
Saw +ength 25"069"3660 mm
Sawing Spee-s 21-84 mm7min
9ain 9otor :ower 161 8,
'-raulic 9otor :ower 0618 8,
:enetration 9otor :ower 0618 8,
#ooling :ump 0612 8,
=imensions 1900"1350"1200 mm
,eight 500 8g
Tren SN50C La'he (Sl&va+ia, 2003)
Suppl !oltage 380 !
#urrent 11 $
%re&uenc 50 '(
:ower 666 8!$
#ontrol #ircuit !oltage 110 !
32
8) !cha"*'in 125 ?ori&onta' +"rnin% 7achine
Sawing #apacit 280 < 250"280 mm
Saw +ength 25"069"3660 mm
Sawing Spee-s 21-84 mm7min
9ain 9otor :ower 161 8,
'-raulic 9otor :ower 0618 8,
:enetration 9otor :ower 0618 8,
#ooling :ump 0612 8,
=imensions 1900"1350"1200 mm
,eight 500 8g
10) -&re%an .!M50 !a"ial /rilling Machine
9a"6 +ength of ,or8piece 1600 mm
=rilling #apacit 50 mm
9a"imum spacing 1600 mm
12) /ec+el Mah& /MU 00 M&n& 1l&c+ CNC Milling Machine
2&r+ing .rea
0-a"is 500 mm
2-a"is 400 mm
3-a"is 400 mm
Main /rive
Spee- range up to 4500 rpm
:ower 41 8!$
#urrent 63 $
%re&uenc 50 '(
.3ial /rive
%ee- ;ange 5000 mm7min
;api- )ra.erse 07273 5 mm7min
#ontrol )># 1247 )># 310
13) !pinner 7<C1100 CNC 7i''in% 7achine
0 a"is stro8e mm 1100
2 a"is stro8e mm 610
3 a"is stro8e mm 610
33
%ee-
;api- fee- 07273 m7min 24724720
:ositioning accurac
:ma" accor-ing to !=47=?@ 3441 mm 0<01
Spin-le /stan-ar-1
;ational-spee- range< ma" min-1 106000
:ower /40A1 B, 18<5
)or&ue /40A1 >m 177
)ool location /option1 SB 40 7 B) 40
)ool maga(ine 7 changer /-ou*le arm1
>um*er of tools 24
/32 optional1
9a"6 tool -iameter mm 70
9a"6 tool -iameter
when a-Cacent tool stations are not occupie- mm 135
9a"6 tool length mm 250
)a*le surface with ) slots mm 1200"600
)a*le capacit /mounting weight1 8g
14) Spinner TC05 CNC La'he
)pe 'ori(ontal
#># #ontrol Siemens7%anuc
>um*er of $"es 273
#utting %ee- 149860
Swing 425 9m
)urning =iameter 310 9m
)urning length 600 mm
+ength 2743 mm
,i-th 1448 mm
>et ,eight 4200 8g
#ountr of 5rigin ?erman
2&r+ S'a'i&n 1
>o of 'ea-stoc8s 1
Spin-le :ower 18649 8w
Spin-le :er 'ea- 1
Bar #apacit 65 mm
Spin-le >ose =4>550267$8
34
Spin-le Spee- 4500 rpm
#huc8 Si(e 2547305 mm
#ollet )pe 185D mm
;otar $"es # /optional1
;otar 9a" $ngle 3606000 -eg
T&&l Changer 1
)pe )urret
)ool Stations 12
=ri.en Stations 6
S&uare 20 mm
;oun- 32 mm
;otar 16 mm
=ri.en )ool Spee- 4000 rpm
=ri.en )ool :ower 3673 8w
$"is 0 /Stan-ar-1
0 )ra.el 230 mm
0 ;api- 15 mm7min
$"is 3 /Stan-ar-1
3 )ra.el 640 mm
3 ;api- 2265 mm7min
Tail'&c+ /Stan-ar-1
)ailstoc8 @uill =iameter 80 mm
)ailstoc8 @uill )ra.el 120 mm
)ailstoc8 @uill )aper 9)E4 7
)ailstoc8 Bo- )ra.el 475 mm
15) +a=4an +7C 500< CNC 7i''in% 7achine
Spin-le :ower 10 8w
Spin-le Spee- 6000 rpm
9a"6 ,or8piece +ength 550 mm
Sensiti.it 06001 mm
>um*er of )urrets 12
P52!! 7.C?-N2!
1a*+al 4uill&'ine
9a"6 Sheet )hic8ness 3 mm
,or8 +ength 1040 mm
)a*le =imensions 600"1300 mm
Support 0-600 mm
35
'eight 1500 mm
,i-th 1000 mm
+ength 1300 mm
,eight 500 8g
Non0tra)itiona' 7achinin% 7achine4
2) 4alvan&'echni+ M-156 4rin"ing Machine
Suppl !oltage 220-380 !
#urrent 3 $
:ower 900 ,
%re&uenc 50 '(
9a"6 =iameter 200 9m
3) !&b&7il ##0SL8 2ire 9le'r&"icharge Machine
0<2<3 )ra.el 550"350"400 9m
9a"6 ,or8piece =imensionsF 1200"700"400 9m
9a"6 ,or8piece ,eight 1500 Bg
9a"6 )aper G45H7400 /stan-ar- 30H1
HDmm
,ire =iameters $.aila*le 061-063 9m
#utting Spee- 300 9mI7min
9in6 %inishing 0622 Jm ;a
9easurement ;esolution 0605 Jm
)pe of #># :# 9ultiprocessors ,in-ows
0:< )ouch Screen
#) Tel(in 9n'erprie 8la%a 100 :- Cu''ing Machine
;e&uire- !oltage 380 !
9a"6 :ower 25 8w
#urrent 15-180 $
;e&uire- :ressure 475 *ar
=imensions 870"590"860 mm
#utting #apacit 45 mm
,eight 120 8g
!pinnin% 7achine4
1) 5ep=on 5!F7 F402 F'o8 Formin% 7achine
36
9a"6 =iameter 350 9m
9a"6 ,or8piece )hic8ness 9 9m
;a-ial )ra.el / 01< 021 180 9m
$"ial )ra.el / 311 710 9m
$"ial %orce / 31< ma"61 100 8>
;a-ial %orce / 01< 02< ma"61 100 8>
DCector %orce 50 8>
5pposing %orce 50 8>
#11 Spin-le :ower 36 8,
Dngine :ower /011 263 8,
Dngine :ower /021 263 8,
Dngine :ower /311 263 8,
+ength " ,i-th " 'eight 4500"2300"1850 9m
37