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Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 1

Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.


The objectives for this module are shown here. Please take a moment to read them.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 2
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
UQM is a separately licensed product with its own enabler, which is installed or uninstalled by the
normal Non Disruptive Upgrade (NDU) process. It is loaded into the CLARiiON driver stack, in the
same way as the CLARiiON Replication Software.
Unisphere Quality of Service Manager measures, monitors and controls application performance on
the CLARiiON storage system. The monitoring feature is an excellent first step when attempting to
improve performance of high-priority applications because it gives users a more logical view of system
performance, both for the entire storage system and for specific applications. This can be a powerful
method of evaluating the storage system to determine the current service levels and to provide
guidance on what service levels are possible, given the specific environment.
UQM may be managed by Unisphere GUI, Navisphere Secure CLI or Unisphere Off-Array Analyzer.
UQM supports CLARiiON CX-series (FLARE release 24 or later) , CX3, and CX4-series.
Because UQM is CLARiiON resident; there is no host component to load, and no performance impact
on the host.
UQM controls CLARiiON performance by allocating resources to user-defined classes of I/O. This
resource allocation allows the specified I/O classes to meet pre-defined performance goals. Other I/O
classes may see decreased performance as a result of the resource assignment.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 3
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
UQM addresses performance challenges by permitting users to define and achieve application
performance goals by first determining application service levels and then creating policies to enforce
these levels.
UQM allows you to allocate performance where and when it is needed. Customers choose how to
allocate array performance by defining:
Who (Users)
What (Application)
Where (Application/LUN level)
When (Scheduler)
Why (Business Objectives)
Reducing the need for over provisioning improves customer Return On Investment (ROI) and Total
Cost of Ownership (TCO).
UQM is highly adaptive to changing workloads and will work to maintain performance policies even
in highly bursty application environments.
UQM extends the Information Lifecycle Management (ILM) strategy to include tier application
performance within a storage system. Service levels can now be tiered at the application level.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 4
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
A CLARiiON running without UQM handles I/O on a first come, first served basis. I/O requests sent
by the host are handled in the order of which they are received with no attempt made to prioritize
them.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 5
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
With UQM enabled, several components are active. (Yellow boxes )
An application I/O profile allows the user to choose the LUNs and I/O sizes that need to be controlled.
A service goal then allows the user to configure the desired performance level, specified as bandwidth,
throughput, or response time.
That information is supplied to the core piece of UQM, the control engine. It creates a separate queue
on the CLARiiON for each application I/O profile, independent of host or front end queues. UQM then
manipulates the queue depth for each application and adjusts its performance. (The queue depth is a
measure of the number of I/Os currently being serviced).
Important: Directly changing the queue depth of any profile will affect the applications performance.
Host I/O arriving at the array is serviced as before. UQM measures certain attributes of each I/O that
allow it to calculate throughput, bandwidth and average response time for each application profile.
This information is sent to the UQM control engine.
The control engine compares the user-specified service goal and the performance measurements, and
determines how to manipulate the queue depth for the application profile to enforce the service goal.
This process is performed on a continuous basis; UQM uses this closed-loop feedback to adapt to
changes in workload. The process continues as long as UQM is active.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 6
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
The first control method is called Limits. It does exactly what the name implies, it limits the
performance of an I/O class to a certain level. For example, it may limit an OLTP application to a
maximum throughput of 3000 IOPs. The control method not only tries to stay below the limit, it tries
to stay as close to the limit as possible without exceeding it. It can thereby maximize the performance
within its limit. The operation of this control method does not depend on the presence of resource
contention, multiple applications attempting to use the same limited resource.
An example of the use of the Limits control method is Service Level Agreements or SLAs e.g. where
the bandwidth usage of a certain application must be limited.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 7
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
The two UQM charts in the slide illustrate the Limit control method in action. One chart shows
bandwidth, and the other shows throughput. The scenario involves two applications that are part of an
SLA; their performance must be restricted to a certain limit. Their impact on other more critical
applications must also be reduced. Note that the Archive application is generating high bandwidth
numbers, and the OLTP application is generating high throughput. All the other applications are part of
the background class; remember that anything not part of defined I/O classes becomes part of the
background class.
In order to enforce the SLA, both the Archive and OLTP applications must be limited. The Archive
application is limited by bandwidth and the OLTP application by throughput. Once the policy is run,
UQM immediately tries to enforce the service goals. It manipulates those queue depths and actively
change the performance of the applications, as seen here. Within a few minutes of running the policy,
the limits are in force.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 8
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
Another control method is Cruise Control. This method tries to achieve a user-specified goal within a
certain tolerance. While it is trying to achieve this goal, the control method attempts to give all other
applications the best possible performance. Whereas the Limits method is typically used to set a
service goal which is lower than the current performance, the Cruise Control can achieve a service goal
that is higher than the current performance.
This control method adapts very well to work load changes such as peaks and long bursts. The goal is
specified in either response time, throughput or bandwidth, along with a tolerance specified as a
percentage.
The following scenario illustrates a possible use of the Cruise Control method: a backup must finish in
a certain time window, but other applications prevent this from happening because they share the same
resources. An appropriate service goal is assigned to the backup I/O class, and UQM is run.
Use case: Many applications contending for the same resource, but only one or two mission critical
applications need to be able to maintain a certain service level.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 9
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
This slide shows only the throughput chart. In this scenario, performance of a mission-critical
filesystem is being significantly impacted by other applications. Its performance must be raised to a
certain level. The blue line is the file system which initially does about 900 IOPS. All other
applications together (shown as the background class) are doing about 2300 IOPS. Filesystem
performance must be improved to about 1500 IOPS. That level is shown on the chart as the goal.
Once UQM starts, the control method enters a sampling and learning phase for a couple of minutes.
Once this completes, it will be effective and stay within the goal.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 10
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
Controlling the queue depth directly may reduce performance if it is attempted without a proper
understanding of CLARiiON performance. As a result, this control method is aimed at experts only
and will not be discussed further.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 11
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
UQM can be directly managed through the Control Panel (part of Unisphere), or can be managed
through the Policy Builder Wizard.
The Policy Builder follows the same basic structure as the Unisphere Taskbar, and is designed to
increase ease of use for the customer. Charts may be customized in much the same manner as Analyzer
charts.
The CLI allows easy scripting, and the use of external scheduling if required.
The UQM integrated scheduler allows easy scheduling of multiple policies, over daily or weekly
periods. Policies may be suspended and resumed at a later stage. A fallback policy lets the user choose
an alternate policy which runs if the selected policy is suspended.
A new file type, the UQM archive, (.naz ) is used with UQM. These archives may be retrieved, viewed,
and dumped in a similar manner to that used for Analyzer archive files.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 12
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
When creating an I/O class or modifying an I/O class, snapshots are supported as a target. This is
useful for backups to limit the impact on production or accelerate backups to meet a backup window.
Another case can be made for Eseutil, using Snapshots lessons the impact on exchange production
servers.
UQM can be turned off completely by selecting the Off tab under the QOS Manager sub-menu
provided the UQM enabler is installed. The Off switch can be used to stop UQM if it is running,
disable failback policy if enabled, and suspend all scheduled tasks in operation. When UQM is idle, no
failback policy or no schedules tasks, the menu item will be disabled. A new CLI command UQM off
has been added as well.
UQM integrates with the Needs Attention feature for better error monitoring.
Archiving has been increased from previous revisions from 7 to 30 days. Off array GUI supports the
opening of archives without an array connection. The Archive menu under Tools will always be
enabled, even without array connection.
UQM supports the monitoring of target LUN types such as thick LUNs, LUN migration and LUN
compression with FLARE 30.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 13
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
Here are some of the UQM operational considerations. First, remember that UQM does NOT boost
overall array performance. Performance is a zero sum system. If more performance resources are given
to one application, they will be taken away from other applications. Instead, UQM optimally allocates
performance resources among applications.
Another factor about Cruise Control is that it may take some time to stabilize, requiring a learning
period, as shown in a previous table. This learning period may add quite some time when trying to
achieve goals. The UQM feature, called solution persistence, allows it to remember the last solution
found and apply it again whenever the same policy is run. This way the learning period will not be
present each time the policy is run.
Something more obvious is the level of workload on the hosts. If the goals are higher than the
workload produced, the goals will not be reached. Also, if goals are too aggressive, UQM might not be
able to achieve them.
There are several policy restrictions to consider. Only one policy can be active at any time, though
many policies may be defined. Control methods cannot be mixed within a policy. A policy which
includes one class with a limit and another class using cruise control, for example, is not supported at
this time.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 14
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
The UQM Control Panel is the single point of management. Tabs along the top of the dialog allow the
user to monitor performance and create or modify I/O classes and policies. Two additional tabs allow
control of the integrated scheduler, and configuration of UQM settings. These include the level of
detail to be logged, and the selection of a fallback policy.
The chart area displays up to three charts, Response Time, Bandwidth and Throughput for the I/O
classes. The legend area below the charts explains the classes and limits that are displayed on the chart.
The status panel at the bottom of the dialog shows the policy name and the current policy status.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 15
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
The UQM Policy Builder guides you through the steps you must follow to create or modify a policy.
Between each step you can measure your policy's performance via a chart. The chart shows
information about the policy's I/O classes and their goals, depending on what parts of the policy you
already defined at a certain step. Finally, you can run the newly created or modified policy and observe
the I/O classes' performance in the context of the current policy.
The Policy Builder consists of two major components, including a Performance Chart panel and an
Ordered Task pane.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 16
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
An I/O class can be characterized by one or more LUNs, an I/O size range, and an I/O type
(read/write). You typically specify a goal for the I/O class to indicate the performance level you want
the I/O class to achieve.
Unlike the I/O classes that you define, you do not directly define the background class. Rather, the
background class automatically encompasses the I/O requests that you do not define.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 17
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
Goals are the performance level for a specific, user-defined I/O class. Your goal varies with the control
method by which you choose to achieve your goal. Based on the control method you choose, your goal
will be specified and measured by units of either in MB/s, IO/s, ms, or queue depth.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 18
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
UQM can be customized for each user. These customizations affect cosmetic changes, such as
changing the color and shape of the lines and data points on the charts.
The Open Archive on Retrieve checkbox specifies whether or not you want to automatically open an
archive file. If you do not select this checkbox, you must manually open an archive file by selecting
Open Archive from the Tools menu.
The Open, Retrieve and Dump menu options operate in the same way as their Analyzer equivalents.
The UQM archive may be retrieved from the CLARiiON and saved to a local file, viewed by the user,
and dumped to an alternate file format.
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 19
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.
These are the key points covered in this module. Please take a moment to review them
Module 11 Unisphere Quality of Service Manager (UQM) - 20
Copyright 2010 EMC Corporation. Do not Copy - All Rights Reserved.