Sie sind auf Seite 1von 13

THEPI

ZZABI
BLE

Contents
Respect the Craft

The Master Class


Gearing Up 4
Master Class Shopping List
Part One: Theory
Ingredients 11

Part Two: Practice


Day One 21
Day Two 26
Day Three 29

21

Regional American
Master Dough with Starter 44
Tiga and Poolish Starters 46
Master Dough Without Starter 48
New Yorker 51
New YorkNew Jersey Tomato Sauce
Sweet Fennel Sausage 54
Calabrese Honey Sausage 55
Casing Sausage 56
New Haven with Clams 59
New Jersey Tomato Pie 61
Detroit Red Top 63
St. Louis 66

53

Chicago

California Style

Global

Chicago Deep-Dish Dough 74


Chicago Stuffed Dough 76
Deep-Dish Tomato Sauce 77
Chicago Deep-Dish with Calabrese and

Fennel Sausages 78
Chicago Deep Dish with Spinach and Ricotta
Fully Stuffed 87
Cast-Iron Skillet 93
Cracker-Thin Dough 97
Cracker-Thin with Fennel Sausage 98
Cracker-Thin Tomato Sauce 99
Frank Nitti 101
Italian Stallion 104
Italian Beef 106
Italian Beef Sandwich 109
Chicago-Inspired Cocktails 111

Cal-Italia 149
Multigrain Dough 151
Honey Pie 153
Eddie Muenster 157
Guanciale and Quail Egg 159
Campari 163
Organic Three Cheese 165
Eggplant and Olive 168
Fig, Almond, and Monterey Jack
Organic Dough 173
Khorasan Dough 176
Einkorn Dough 178
Sprouted Wheat Dough 180

Barcelona 237
Mnchen 241
Dubliner 245
Parisian 249
Greco 251

Sicilian
Sicilian Dough with Starter 118
Sicilian Dough Without Starter 120
Parbaking Sicilian Dough 122
The Brooklyn 125
Sicilian Tomato Sauce 126
Pepperoni and Sausage 127
Burratina di Margherita 129
Purple Potato and Pancetta 133
La Regina 135
Grandma 139
Early Girl Tomato Sauce 141
Quattro Forni 143

81

Napoletana
Napoletana Dough 187
Napoletana Tomato Sauce 189
Handmade Mozzarella 190
Wood-Fired Pizza Basics 194
Wood-Fired Oven Baking 197
Home-Oven Broiler Method 202
Margherita 205
Margherita Extra 207
Marinara 208
Mastunicola 211

Regional Italian
Lucca 217
Rimini 219
Calabrese Diavola 222
Quattro Anchovy 224
Sardinia 226
Pizza Romana 227
Romana Dough 232

Grilled
171

Dough for Grilling 257


Grilled Pizza Master Recipe 258
Steak Lovers 260
Insalata 263
St-Germain BBQ Chicken 265

Wrapped and Rolled


Calzone with Meatballs or Spinach 272
Mortadella and Cheese Calzonewich 274
The Bow Tie 276
Pepperoli 278
Sausage Rol 281
Two Cool Things to Do with Leftover Dough
Meatballs 287

283

Focaccia and Bread


Focaccia 294
Focaccina 297
Ciabatta 298
After-School Ciabatta Pizza

300

Bakers Percentages Chart

302

Measurement Conversion Charts


Sources

304

Acknowledgments
Index

307

306

303

Contents
Respect the Craft

The Master Class


Gearing Up 4
Master Class Shopping List
Part One: Theory
Ingredients 11

Part Two: Practice


Day One 21
Day Two 26
Day Three 29

21

Regional American
Master Dough with Starter 44
Tiga and Poolish Starters 46
Master Dough Without Starter 48
New Yorker 51
New YorkNew Jersey Tomato Sauce
Sweet Fennel Sausage 54
Calabrese Honey Sausage 55
Casing Sausage 56
New Haven with Clams 59
New Jersey Tomato Pie 61
Detroit Red Top 63
St. Louis 66

53

Chicago

California Style

Global

Chicago Deep-Dish Dough 74


Chicago Stuffed Dough 76
Deep-Dish Tomato Sauce 77
Chicago Deep-Dish with Calabrese and

Fennel Sausages 78
Chicago Deep Dish with Spinach and Ricotta
Fully Stuffed 87
Cast-Iron Skillet 93
Cracker-Thin Dough 97
Cracker-Thin with Fennel Sausage 98
Cracker-Thin Tomato Sauce 99
Frank Nitti 101
Italian Stallion 104
Italian Beef 106
Italian Beef Sandwich 109
Chicago-Inspired Cocktails 111

Cal-Italia 149
Multigrain Dough 151
Honey Pie 153
Eddie Muenster 157
Guanciale and Quail Egg 159
Campari 163
Organic Three Cheese 165
Eggplant and Olive 168
Fig, Almond, and Monterey Jack
Organic Dough 173
Khorasan Dough 176
Einkorn Dough 178
Sprouted Wheat Dough 180

Barcelona 237
Mnchen 241
Dubliner 245
Parisian 249
Greco 251

Sicilian
Sicilian Dough with Starter 118
Sicilian Dough Without Starter 120
Parbaking Sicilian Dough 122
The Brooklyn 125
Sicilian Tomato Sauce 126
Pepperoni and Sausage 127
Burratina di Margherita 129
Purple Potato and Pancetta 133
La Regina 135
Grandma 139
Early Girl Tomato Sauce 141
Quattro Forni 143

81

Napoletana
Napoletana Dough 187
Napoletana Tomato Sauce 189
Handmade Mozzarella 190
Wood-Fired Pizza Basics 194
Wood-Fired Oven Baking 197
Home-Oven Broiler Method 202
Margherita 205
Margherita Extra 207
Marinara 208
Mastunicola 211

Regional Italian
Lucca 217
Rimini 219
Calabrese Diavola 222
Quattro Anchovy 224
Sardinia 226
Pizza Romana 227
Romana Dough 232

Grilled
171

Dough for Grilling 257


Grilled Pizza Master Recipe 258
Steak Lovers 260
Insalata 263
St-Germain BBQ Chicken 265

Wrapped and Rolled


Calzone with Meatballs or Spinach 272
Mortadella and Cheese Calzonewich 274
The Bow Tie 276
Pepperoli 278
Sausage Rol 281
Two Cool Things to Do with Leftover Dough
Meatballs 287

283

Focaccia and Bread


Focaccia 294
Focaccina 297
Ciabatta 298
After-School Ciabatta Pizza

300

Bakers Percentages Chart

302

Measurement Conversion Charts


Sources

304

Acknowledgments
Index

307

306

303

Chicago Deep Dish with


Spinach and Ricotta
Along with sausage, spinach and ricotta is the other classic Chicago pizza combo. Youll
find some recipesand some pizzeriasthat use raw spinach. I start with raw spinach
but I saut it lightly in a little olive oil until it is just wilted and still green. Then I drain it
in a colander or strainer, pressing it gently to help remove what liquid hasnt already
cooked off. This approach makes a huge difference because it intensifies the spinach
flavor and reduces the moisture that would result in a wet filling and a soggy crust. I like
to reserve some of the spinach and ricotta to add as a garnish.
1 (27-ounce/765-gram) ball Chicago
Deep-Dish Dough (page 74)
Medium-grind cornmeal, for dusting
2 teaspoons (9 grams) unsalted butter,
at room temperature
9 ounces (255 grams) part-skim
mozzarella cheese, thinly sliced
(13 slices)
1 1/2 cups (285 grams) well-drained
Sauted Spinach (page 83), at room
temperature
Grated Pecorino Romano cheese,
for dusting
1 teaspoon (3 grams) finely
chopped garlic
4.5 ounces (120 grams/1/2 cup)
whole-milk ricotta cheese, preferably
New Yorkstyle Polly-O or Ricotta
Cream, page 91, at room temperature

Remove the dough ball from the refrigerator and leave wrapped at room
temperature until the dough warms to 55F to 60F. Meanwhile, set up
the oven with two pizza stones or baking steels and preheat to 500F for
1 hour (see Getting Started, page 29).
Generously butter the bottom and sides of a 12 by 2-inch or 13 by 2-inch
round deep-dish pizza pan.
Dust the work surface with a generous amount of cornmeal, then transfer
the dough to the surface (see Transferring the Dough to the Work Surface,
page 30). Coat both sides of the dough round with the cornmeal and roll
out the dough into a 17-inch round (see Rolling Pizza Dough, page 103).
Working quickly but carefully, lift the dough and lower it into the center
of the prepared pan. Lift the edges of the dough to ease the dough into
the corners. The dough will overhang the rim of the pan (see photo ,
page 79). Press around the edge of the dough to secure it to the pan rim
. Set aside to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
Arrange the mozzarella slices in the bottom and slightly up the sides
of the pan , overlapping the slices as necessary. Reserve 1/2 cup
(95 grams) of the spinach and scatter the remaining spinach evenly
over the mozzarella.

continued
81

chicago

Makes one 13-inch deep round pizza; 6 large slices

Chicago Deep Dish with


Spinach and Ricotta
Along with sausage, spinach and ricotta is the other classic Chicago pizza combo. Youll
find some recipesand some pizzeriasthat use raw spinach. I start with raw spinach
but I saut it lightly in a little olive oil until it is just wilted and still green. Then I drain it
in a colander or strainer, pressing it gently to help remove what liquid hasnt already
cooked off. This approach makes a huge difference because it intensifies the spinach
flavor and reduces the moisture that would result in a wet filling and a soggy crust. I like
to reserve some of the spinach and ricotta to add as a garnish.
1 (27-ounce/765-gram) ball Chicago
Deep-Dish Dough (page 74)
Medium-grind cornmeal, for dusting
2 teaspoons (9 grams) unsalted butter,
at room temperature
9 ounces (255 grams) part-skim
mozzarella cheese, thinly sliced
(13 slices)
1 1/2 cups (285 grams) well-drained
Sauted Spinach (page 83), at room
temperature
Grated Pecorino Romano cheese,
for dusting
1 teaspoon (3 grams) finely
chopped garlic
4.5 ounces (120 grams/1/2 cup)
whole-milk ricotta cheese, preferably
New Yorkstyle Polly-O or Ricotta
Cream, page 91, at room temperature

Remove the dough ball from the refrigerator and leave wrapped at room
temperature until the dough warms to 55F to 60F. Meanwhile, set up
the oven with two pizza stones or baking steels and preheat to 500F for
1 hour (see Getting Started, page 29).
Generously butter the bottom and sides of a 12 by 2-inch or 13 by 2-inch
round deep-dish pizza pan.
Dust the work surface with a generous amount of cornmeal, then transfer
the dough to the surface (see Transferring the Dough to the Work Surface,
page 30). Coat both sides of the dough round with the cornmeal and roll
out the dough into a 17-inch round (see Rolling Pizza Dough, page 103).
Working quickly but carefully, lift the dough and lower it into the center
of the prepared pan. Lift the edges of the dough to ease the dough into
the corners. The dough will overhang the rim of the pan (see photo ,
page 79). Press around the edge of the dough to secure it to the pan rim
. Set aside to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
Arrange the mozzarella slices in the bottom and slightly up the sides
of the pan , overlapping the slices as necessary. Reserve 1/2 cup
(95 grams) of the spinach and scatter the remaining spinach evenly
over the mozzarella.

continued
81

chicago

Makes one 13-inch deep round pizza; 6 large slices

Chicago Deep Dish with Spinach and Ricotta, continued

9 ounces (255 grams) provolone


cheese, thinly sliced (13 slices)

2 cups (455 grams) Deep-Dish


Tomato Sauce (page 77), warm
Dried oregano, for dusting
Garlic Oil (page 29), for drizzling

Place the pan on the bottom stone. Bake for 15 minutes, rotate the
pan 180 degrees, and continue to bake for another 12 minutes, until the
cheese is melted and the crust is a rich golden brown.
Meanwhile, put the ricotta in a pastry bag with a 1/4-inch opening or
plain tip.
If the reserved spinach is cold, warm it in a pan or in the microwave.
Take the pan out of the oven and sprinkle the shredded mozzarella over
the top of the pizza. Place on the top stone for 2 minutes to melt the
shredded cheese.
Remove from the oven and run a long metal spatula around the inside of
the pan to loosen the pizza from the pan. Then, using the spatula, lift an
edge and check the bottom of the crust. It should be browned and crisp.
If it needs more time, return the pan to the bottom stone for 1 minute.
Using the spatula, and being careful not to pierce the bottom of the
crust, lift the pizza from the pan and transfer it to a cutting board. Using
a rocking cutter or a serrated knife, cut the pizza into 6 large wedges,
leaving them in place. Spoon the sauce over the top and spread it to the
edges with a small offset spatula. Pipe quarter-size dollops of ricotta onto
the pizza and garnish with the reserved spinach. Finish with a dusting of
pecorino and of oregano and a drizzle of garlic oil.

Makes 1 1/2 cup (285 grams)

Olive oil, for sauting


1 pound (455 grams) baby spinach
Fine sea salt and freshly ground
black pepper

Heat a generous film of oil in your largest skillet over medium-high heat.
Shake any excess water from the spinach and add several handfuls to the
skillet, leaving enough room to turn the spinach. Sprinkle with a pinch
each of salt and pepper. As the spinach wilts and room is made, turn the
spinach and add more to the skillet. When you have cooked about half of
the spinach, transfer it to a strainer or colander.
Discard the liquid in the skillet, wipe it dry, and heat another generous
film of oil over medium-high heat. Saut the remaining spinach the same
way and add to the strainer. Drain the spinach well, squeezing it gently
between your hands.
The spinach can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for
up to 1 day.

Pizza Pans
For pizzas baked in pans, my choice is always black
steel, not stainless or aluminum, which dont promote
thorough, even browning. Ive given more specific pan
recommendations throughout the book in chapters
with pan pizza recipes.
Treat any steel pan just like you would a cast-iron
skillet. If its not preseasoned, wipe it with a thin
coating of vegetable oil and heat it in a 500F oven
for about 1 hour.
Clean steel pans by first lightly scraping with a plastic
dough cutter and then wiping with a paper towel.

82

Avoid using water or soap. If a pan rusts, pour about


1/4 cup of salt into it and heat it in a 500F oven for
about 30 minutes. Remove it from the oven and let it
sit until its cool enough to handle, then use paper
towels to scour the pan, with the salt still in it, until
there are no traces of rust.
If you find that the pizza sticks to the pan when youre
baking it, reseason the pan as follows: scrape it clean
and wipe a thin film of oil over the surface. Put the pan
back in the still-warm oven and let it sit until the oven
is cool.

83

chicago

5 ounces (140 grams) part-skim


mozzarella cheese, shredded
(11/4 cups)

Sauted Spinach

Sprinkle with a light dusting of pecorino and the garlic. Arrange the
provolone slices over the top. Run the rolling pin over the lip of the pan
to cut away the excess dough. If the dough shrinks back, use your fingers
to press the dough around the inside of the pan, extending it to the lip.

Chicago Deep-Dish Dough


Makes 27 ounces (770 grams), enough for 1 deep-dish pizza

Some Chicago pizzas use cooked potato or semolina in the dough and no cornmeal,
but my flour-and-cornmeal dough is my favorite way to go. Its made without a starter,
and, unlike most pizza doughs, its flavor and texture come more from fat than from
yeast, making it a bit like a cross between a pizza dough and a pie crust. Ive found that
equal parts butter and lard make for the best flavor and texture. Note that this dough
needs to proof for at least 24 hours; it will be even better if left for up to 48 hours.
4.5 grams (1 1/2 teaspoons) active
dry yeast
70 grams (1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon)
warm water (80F to 85F)
430 grams (3 1/2 cups) all-purpose
flour with 12 percent protein,
preferably Ceresota
23 grams (2 1/2 tablespoons)
medium-grind cornmeal
9 grams (1 tablespoon) diastatic malt

Put the yeast in a small bowl, add the warm water, and whisk vigorously
for 30 seconds. The yeast should dissolve in the water and the mixture
should foam. If it doesnt and the yeast granules float, the yeast is dead
and the mixture should be discarded. Begin again with a fresh amount
of yeast and water.

18 grams (1 tablespoon plus


1 teaspoon) European-style unsalted
butter, preferably 82 percent
butterfat, cut into small pieces,
at room temperature
202 grams (3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoon)
ice water, plus more as needed
9 grams (2 teaspoons) fine sea salt
For bakers percentages, see page 302.

Continue to mix the dough at the lowest speed for about 1 minute, until
most of the dough comes together around the hook. Stop the mixer. Use
your fingers to pull away any dough that clings to the hook, and scrape
the sides and bottom of the bowl with a bowl scraper or rubber spatula.
Add the salt and mix on the lowest speed for 1 minute to combine.
Check the bottom of the bowl for any unincorporated flour. Turn the dough
over and press it into the bottom of the bowl to pick up any stray pieces.
Stop the mixer, pull the dough off the hook, and scrape down the sides
and bottom of the bowl. If there is still unincorporated flour at the
bottom of the bowl, sprinkle with a very small amount of water and mix
for 1 minute.
Use a bowl scraper to transfer the dough to an unfloured work surface,
then knead it for 2 to 3 minutes, until smooth (see Kneading the Dough,
page 24). Cover the dough with a damp dish towel and let it rest at room
temperature for 1 hour.
Use a dough cutter to loosen the dough and move it to the scale. You will
need 27 ounces (770 grams) of dough. You may have a little extra dough.
Form the dough into a ball (see Balling the Dough, page 26) and set it on
a half sheet pan. Wrap the pan airtight with a double layer of plastic wrap,
sealing the wrap well under the pan. Put the pan in a level spot in the
refrigerator and refrigerate for 24 to 48 hours.
Note on Making Vegetarian Deep-Dish Dough: You can substitute 18 grams
vegetable shortening for the lard.

Combine the flour, cornmeal, and malt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted
with the dough hook. With the mixer running on the lowest speed, add
the lard and butter and mix for 1 minute.
Pour in most of the ice water, reserving about 2 tablespoons, followed
by the yeast-water mixture. Pour the reserved water into the yeast bowl,
swirl it around to dislodge any bits of yeast stuck to the bowl, and add
to the mixer.

74

75

chicago

I make all of my Chicago doughs with Ceresota flour, an unbleached, unbromated


all-purpose flour made from hard red winter wheat. (It is branded Ceresota in Illinois
and elsewhere but is sold under the brand name Heckers in the Northeast; see Sources,
page 304). Its a relatively low-gluten flour in the 12 percent range that is the traditional
choice of Chicago pizzerias. Its also the flour I specify when training and certifying
pizzaiolos in Chicago pizza at my school. If you cant find it, substitute another goodquality unbleached all-purpose flour for Chicago doughs.

18 grams (1 tablespoon plus


1 teaspoon) lard, cut into small pieces,
at room temperature

Chicago Deep-Dish Dough


Makes 27 ounces (770 grams), enough for 1 deep-dish pizza

Some Chicago pizzas use cooked potato or semolina in the dough and no cornmeal,
but my flour-and-cornmeal dough is my favorite way to go. Its made without a starter,
and, unlike most pizza doughs, its flavor and texture come more from fat than from
yeast, making it a bit like a cross between a pizza dough and a pie crust. Ive found that
equal parts butter and lard make for the best flavor and texture. Note that this dough
needs to proof for at least 24 hours; it will be even better if left for up to 48 hours.
4.5 grams (1 1/2 teaspoons) active
dry yeast
70 grams (1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon)
warm water (80F to 85F)
430 grams (3 1/2 cups) all-purpose
flour with 12 percent protein,
preferably Ceresota
23 grams (2 1/2 tablespoons)
medium-grind cornmeal
9 grams (1 tablespoon) diastatic malt

Put the yeast in a small bowl, add the warm water, and whisk vigorously
for 30 seconds. The yeast should dissolve in the water and the mixture
should foam. If it doesnt and the yeast granules float, the yeast is dead
and the mixture should be discarded. Begin again with a fresh amount
of yeast and water.

18 grams (1 tablespoon plus


1 teaspoon) European-style unsalted
butter, preferably 82 percent
butterfat, cut into small pieces,
at room temperature
202 grams (3/4 cup plus 2 tablespoon)
ice water, plus more as needed
9 grams (2 teaspoons) fine sea salt
For bakers percentages, see page 302.

Continue to mix the dough at the lowest speed for about 1 minute, until
most of the dough comes together around the hook. Stop the mixer. Use
your fingers to pull away any dough that clings to the hook, and scrape
the sides and bottom of the bowl with a bowl scraper or rubber spatula.
Add the salt and mix on the lowest speed for 1 minute to combine.
Check the bottom of the bowl for any unincorporated flour. Turn the dough
over and press it into the bottom of the bowl to pick up any stray pieces.
Stop the mixer, pull the dough off the hook, and scrape down the sides
and bottom of the bowl. If there is still unincorporated flour at the
bottom of the bowl, sprinkle with a very small amount of water and mix
for 1 minute.
Use a bowl scraper to transfer the dough to an unfloured work surface,
then knead it for 2 to 3 minutes, until smooth (see Kneading the Dough,
page 24). Cover the dough with a damp dish towel and let it rest at room
temperature for 1 hour.
Use a dough cutter to loosen the dough and move it to the scale. You will
need 27 ounces (770 grams) of dough. You may have a little extra dough.
Form the dough into a ball (see Balling the Dough, page 26) and set it on
a half sheet pan. Wrap the pan airtight with a double layer of plastic wrap,
sealing the wrap well under the pan. Put the pan in a level spot in the
refrigerator and refrigerate for 24 to 48 hours.
Note on Making Vegetarian Deep-Dish Dough: You can substitute 18 grams
vegetable shortening for the lard.

Combine the flour, cornmeal, and malt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted
with the dough hook. With the mixer running on the lowest speed, add
the lard and butter and mix for 1 minute.
Pour in most of the ice water, reserving about 2 tablespoons, followed
by the yeast-water mixture. Pour the reserved water into the yeast bowl,
swirl it around to dislodge any bits of yeast stuck to the bowl, and add
to the mixer.

74

75

chicago

I make all of my Chicago doughs with Ceresota flour, an unbleached, unbromated


all-purpose flour made from hard red winter wheat. (It is branded Ceresota in Illinois
and elsewhere but is sold under the brand name Heckers in the Northeast; see Sources,
page 304). Its a relatively low-gluten flour in the 12 percent range that is the traditional
choice of Chicago pizzerias. Its also the flour I specify when training and certifying
pizzaiolos in Chicago pizza at my school. If you cant find it, substitute another goodquality unbleached all-purpose flour for Chicago doughs.

18 grams (1 tablespoon plus


1 teaspoon) lard, cut into small pieces,
at room temperature

Deep-Dish Tomato Sauce

Makes 41 ounces (1174 grams), enough for 1 Fully Stuffed pizza

Makes 2 1/4 cups (510 grams)

This dough is the same one I use for deep-dish pizza, but Ive given you the proportions
youll need to make one and a half times as much of it, so you will have enough for both
the bottom and the top crust.

Its best to make this uncooked sauce when you make your dough and then refrigerate it
overnight so the flavors can come together.

6.8 grams (2 1/4 teaspoons) active


dry yeast
92 grams (1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons)
warm water (80F to 85F)
645 grams (5 1/3 cups) all-purpose
flour with 12 percent protein,
preferably Ceresota
34 grams (1/4 cup) medium-grind
cornmeal
13.5 grams (1 1/2 tablespoons)
diastatic malt

Make the dough as directed for Chicago Deep-Dish Dough (page 74)
up to the point where you have kneaded the dough. Then weigh out one
27-ounce (765-gram) piece of dough and one 14-ounce (400-gram) piece
of dough. Cover both pieces with a damp dish towel and let rest at room
temperature for 1 hour.
Form the pieces into balls (see Balling the Dough, page 26), set the balls
3 inches apart on a half sheet pan, and wrap the pan and refrigerate as
directed for Chicago Deep-Dish Dough.
Note on Making Vegetarian Deep-Dish Dough: You can substitute 18 grams
vegetable shortening for the lard.

6 ounces (170 grams/2/3 cup) tomato


paste, preferably Saporito Super Heavy
Pizza Sauce

Combine the tomato paste, ground tomatoes, oregano, salt, and oil in a
deep bowl or other deep container and puree with an immersion
blender. Stir in the crushed tomatoes.

3 ounces (85 grams/1/4 cup plus


2 tablespoons) ground tomatoes,
preferably 7/11 or DiNapoli

The sauce can be covered and refrigerated for up to 3 days before using.

3/4 teaspoon (.5 grams) dried oregano


Pinch of fine sea salt

1/2 teaspoon (2.5 grams) extra virgin


olive oil

9 ounces (255 grams/1 1/3 cups)


hand-crushed tomatoes (see page 28)

27 grams (2 tablespoons) lard, cut into


small pieces, at room temperature
27 grams (2 tablespoons) Europeanstyle unsalted butter, preferably
82 percent butterfat, cut into small
pieces, at room temperature
316 grams (1 1/3 cups) ice water,
plus more as needed
13.5 grams (2 3/4 teaspoons)
fine sea salt
For bakers percentages, see page 302.

76

77

chicago

Chicago Stuffed Dough

Chicago Deep Dish with Spinach and Ricotta, continued

9 ounces (255 grams) provolone


cheese, thinly sliced (13 slices)

2 cups (455 grams) Deep-Dish


Tomato Sauce (page 77), warm
Dried oregano, for dusting
Garlic Oil (page 29), for drizzling

Place the pan on the bottom stone. Bake for 15 minutes, rotate the
pan 180 degrees, and continue to bake for another 12 minutes, until the
cheese is melted and the crust is a rich golden brown.
Meanwhile, put the ricotta in a pastry bag with a 1/4-inch opening or
plain tip.
If the reserved spinach is cold, warm it in a pan or in the microwave.
Take the pan out of the oven and sprinkle the shredded mozzarella over
the top of the pizza. Place on the top stone for 2 minutes to melt the
shredded cheese.
Remove from the oven and run a long metal spatula around the inside of
the pan to loosen the pizza from the pan. Then, using the spatula, lift an
edge and check the bottom of the crust. It should be browned and crisp.
If it needs more time, return the pan to the bottom stone for 1 minute.
Using the spatula, and being careful not to pierce the bottom of the
crust, lift the pizza from the pan and transfer it to a cutting board. Using
a rocking cutter or a serrated knife, cut the pizza into 6 large wedges,
leaving them in place. Spoon the sauce over the top and spread it to the
edges with a small offset spatula. Pipe quarter-size dollops of ricotta onto
the pizza and garnish with the reserved spinach. Finish with a dusting of
pecorino and of oregano and a drizzle of garlic oil.

Makes 1 1/2 cup (285 grams)

Olive oil, for sauting


1 pound (455 grams) baby spinach
Fine sea salt and freshly ground
black pepper

Heat a generous film of oil in your largest skillet over medium-high heat.
Shake any excess water from the spinach and add several handfuls to the
skillet, leaving enough room to turn the spinach. Sprinkle with a pinch
each of salt and pepper. As the spinach wilts and room is made, turn the
spinach and add more to the skillet. When you have cooked about half of
the spinach, transfer it to a strainer or colander.
Discard the liquid in the skillet, wipe it dry, and heat another generous
film of oil over medium-high heat. Saut the remaining spinach the same
way and add to the strainer. Drain the spinach well, squeezing it gently
between your hands.
The spinach can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for
up to 1 day.

Pizza Pans
For pizzas baked in pans, my choice is always black
steel, not stainless or aluminum, which dont promote
thorough, even browning. Ive given more specific pan
recommendations throughout the book in chapters
with pan pizza recipes.
Treat any steel pan just like you would a cast-iron
skillet. If its not preseasoned, wipe it with a thin
coating of vegetable oil and heat it in a 500F oven
for about 1 hour.
Clean steel pans by first lightly scraping with a plastic
dough cutter and then wiping with a paper towel.

82

Avoid using water or soap. If a pan rusts, pour about


1/4 cup of salt into it and heat it in a 500F oven for
about 30 minutes. Remove it from the oven and let it
sit until its cool enough to handle, then use paper
towels to scour the pan, with the salt still in it, until
there are no traces of rust.
If you find that the pizza sticks to the pan when youre
baking it, reseason the pan as follows: scrape it clean
and wipe a thin film of oil over the surface. Put the pan
back in the still-warm oven and let it sit until the oven
is cool.

83

chicago

5 ounces (140 grams) part-skim


mozzarella cheese, shredded
(11/4 cups)

Sauted Spinach

Sprinkle with a light dusting of pecorino and the garlic. Arrange the
provolone slices over the top. Run the rolling pin over the lip of the pan
to cut away the excess dough. If the dough shrinks back, use your fingers
to press the dough around the inside of the pan, extending it to the lip.

Sausage, continued
Italian Stallion, 1045
La Regina, 13537
Meatball Calzone, 27273
Meatball Gigante, 289
Meatballs, 28788
Mortadella and Cheese Calzonewich, 27475
New Yorker, 5152
Pepperoni and Sausage, 127
Pizza Romana, 22729
St. Louis, 6667
Sausage Pizza, 30
Sausage Roll, 28182
suggestions for, 57
Sweet Fennel Sausage, 54
See also Pepperoni
Sewell, Ike, 67
Sicilian pizza
The Brooklyn, 125
Burratina di Margherita, 12931
definition of, 116
Grandma, 13940
history of, 11516
La Regina, 13537
making, 116
parbaking dough for, 12224
Pepperoni and Sausage, 127
Purple Potato and Pancetta, 13334
Quattro Forni, 14345
Sicilian Dough without Starter, 120
Sicilian Dough with Starter, 11819
Sicilian Tomato Sauce, 126
tips for, 117
Simple Syrup, 67
Smokevitch, Jeff, 63
Spinach
Chicago Deep Dish with Spinach and Ricotta,
8183
Frank Nitti, 1012
Sauted Spinach, 83
Spinach Calzone, 27273
Squash
Greco, 25152
Starters
Bran Starter, 175
handling, 47
making, 13
Poolish, 47
Rye Poolish, 152
Tiga, 46
using, 13

Steak Lovers, 26061


Steels, 5
Stones
cleaning, 38
on the grill, 267
steels vs., 5
Stuffed pizza
Chicago Stuffed Dough, 76
Fully Stuffed, 8791
making, 8485
Syrups
Campari Syrup, 163
Simple Syrup, 67

T
Tiga, 46
Tomatoes, 1718
After-School Ciabatta Pizza, 300
Barcelona, 23739
The Brooklyn, 125
Burratina di Margherita, 12931
Calabrese Diavola, 22223
Cast-Iron Skillet, 9395
Chicago Deep Dish with Calabrese and
Fennel Sausages, 7879
Chicago Deep Dish with Spinach and Ricotta,
8183
Cracker-Thin Tomato Sauce, 99
Cracker-Thin with Fennel Sausage, 9899
Deep-Dish Tomato Sauce, 77
Detroit Red Top, 6364
Early Girl Tomato Sauce, 141
Focaccina, 297
Frank Nitti, 1012
Fully Stuffed, 8791
Grandma, 13940
hand-crushed, 28
La Regina, 13537
Lucca, 21718
Margherita, 2056
Margherita Extra, 207
Marinara, 208
Meatball Marinara, 290
Napoletana Tomato Sauce, 189
New Jersey Tomato Pie, 61
New Yorker, 5152
New YorkNew Jersey Tomato Sauce, 28, 53
Pepperoni and Sausage, 127
Pepperoni Pizza, 30
Pizza Romana, 22729
Prosciutto and Arugula Pizza, 38

310

Quattro Forni, 14345


St. Louis, 6667
St. Louis Tomato Sauce, 67
Sausage Pizza, 30
Sicilian Tomato Sauce, 126
Tomato Sauce, 64
wood fireroasted cherry, 206

Copyright 2014 by Tony Gemignani


Photographs copyright 2014 by Sara Remington

V
Vasconcelos, Thiago, 51
Veal
Fully Stuffed, 8791
Meatball Calzone, 27273
Meatball Gigante, 289
Meatballs, 28788
Vermouth
The Made Man, 111

All rights reserved.


Published in the United States by Ten Speed Press, an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of Random
House LLC, New York, a Penguin Random House Company.
www.crownpublishing.com
www.tenspeed.com

W
Water, 12
Watercress
Fig, Almond, and Monterey Jack, 17172
The Wise Guy, 112
Wood-fired pizza, 194201

Y
Yeast
activating, 23
types of, 1213

Z
Zucchini
Greco, 25152

Ten Speed Press and the Ten Speed Press colophon are registered trademarks of Random House LLC.

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data


Gemignani, Tony.
The pizza bible : the worlds favorite pizza styles, from Neapolitan, deep-dish, wood-fired, Sicilian, calzones and focaccia
to New York, New Haven, Detroit, and more / Tony Gemignani.
pages cm
1. Pizza. I. Title.
TX770.P58G45 2014
641.8248dc23
2014015999
Hardcover ISBN: 978-1-60774-605-8
eBook ISBN: 978-1-60774-606-5
Printed in China
Design by Janet Mumford
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
First Edition

THEPI
ZZABI
BLE