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MIDDLE SCHOOL DIRECTORY

School

Address

Phone

Fax

Ballenger Creek

5525 Ballenger Creek Pike


Frederick, MD 21703

240-236-5700

240-236-5701

Brunswick

301 Cummings Drive


Brunswick, MD 21716

240-236-5400

240-236-5401

Crestwood

7100 Foxcroft Drive


Frederick, MD 21703

240-566-9000

240-566-9001

Governor Thomas Johnson

1799 Schifferstadt Boulevard


Frederick, MD 21701

240-236-4900

240-236-4901

Heather Ridge

1445 Taney Avenue


Frederick, MD 21702

240-236-8000

240-236-8001

Middletown

100 Martha Mason Street


Middletown, MD 21769

240-236-4200

240-236-4250

Monocacy

8009 Opossumtown Pike


Frederick, MD 21702

240-236-4700

240-236-4701

Monocacy Valley
Montessori Charter

217 Dill Avenue


Frederick, MD 21701

301-668-5013

301-668-5015

New Market

125 West Main Street


New Market, MD 21774

240-236-4600

240-236-4650

Oakdale

9840 Old National Pike


Ijamsville, MD 21754

240-236-5500

240-236-5501

Thurmont

408 East Main Street


Thurmont, MD 21788

240-236-5100

240-236-5101

Urbana

3511 Pontius Court


Ijamsville, MD 21754

240-566-9200

240-566-9201

Walkersville

55 Frederick Street
Walkersville, MD 21793

240-236-4400

240-236-4401

West Frederick

515 West Patrick Street


Frederick, MD 21701

240-236-4000

240-236-4050

Windsor Knolls

11150 Windsor Road


Ijamsville, MD 21754

240-236-5000

240-236-5001

The 21st Century Middle School


Grades 6, 7, and 8 are directly in the middle of
the pre-kindergarten through 12th grade learning
continuum. Frederick Countys middle school
program reflects and celebrates this age group with
unique development and education experiences. It is
designed to be academically excellent, culturally and
developmentally responsive, and socially equitable
in order to prepare students for learning for the 21st
century, by providing:
Courses that are academically challenging and
allow students to explore topics outside the core
subject areas
A schedule that is consistent in all middle
schools for the core areas yet allows schools
the flexibility to create strong, individualized
programs for students
Academic supports for students not meeting
grade-level standards
Extensions to challenge students beyond the
curriculum
Differentiated instruction to meet the needs of
all learners
Time and opportunity during the school day
to focus on the social and emotional needs of
students
In addition to the core subjects of language arts,

math, science, and social studies, the middle


school curriculum incorporates 21st century
interdisciplinary themes and skills, such as:
global awareness
financial, economic, business, and entrepreneurial
literacy
civic literacy
environmental literacy
health literacy
learning and innovation skills
information, media, and technology skills
life and career skills
Personal Financial Literacy New Requirement
for 2012-13
Students enrolled in grades 6-8 access the personal
financial literacy curriculum through the following
courses:



Life Skills
History of the Ancient World
History of the Medieval World
American Studies I

FCPS has a 0.5 Personal Financial Literacy


requirement for students entering high school as
freshmen in the Fall of 2012.

Contents
Middle School Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover
Moving Up to Middle School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Curriculum and Courses: Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
6th Grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
7th Grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
8th Grade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Procedures, Programs and Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Parents as Partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
What Next? High School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Central Office Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 1

MOVING UP TO MIDDLE SCHOOL


Frederick Countys middle and elementary school administrators, teachers and counselors within each feeder area work together
to ease students transition to the next level of their public education experience. The following activities provide consistency
throughout the county and promote clear communications among teachers, students and parents.

Elementary and Middle School Staffs Collaborate


1. Share operational and organizational patterns of the 6th grade

2. Review 5th grade instructional objectives and learning strategies

3. Review and share middle school scheduling procedures

4. Evaluate placement recommendations and resolve concerns

Middle School Meeting for Parents


1. Provides information about the placement process for middle school

2. Informs parents that they will receive placement letters

3. Explains options parents have in placement decisions

5th Grade Students Visit Middle Schools


1. Tour their new school building and meet staff

2. Learn about expectations for middle school academic work and behavior

3. Introduces the middle school facility, philosophy and staff

4. Discusses and clarifies instructional program expectations

Back-to-School Night for All


1. Welcomes parents of all 6th, 7th and 8th graders

2. Provides specific information about the middle school program and scheduling

3. Answers parent questions related to the middle school

4. Introduces the staff

2 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

Curriculum and Courses


The FCPS middle school curriculum combines application of
knowledge with basic skills. Classes promote the discovery and
exploration of students talents and personal interests.
Through the study of languages, social studies, technology, life
skills, art, music, mathematics, science, technology, health, and
physical education, students:

With prior approval, students who take courses required for


high school graduation during their middle school years may
earn high school credit provided they pass the course and pass
the final exam. The grade and the credit will be part of the high
school transcript.
Middle school students work with counselors and teachers to:

Increase their ability to listen, speak, read, write, observe,


and problem solve

Select courses that are aligned with the students goals and
build on learning from year to year

Gain an appreciation for the contributions of others in our


multicultural society

Prepare for high schools requirements and choices

Learn to gather and use information more easily and


analyze ideas more critically

6th Grade
Required Courses

Identify interests and complete foundation studies related


to a variety of career and post-secondary options
Parents and guardians are encouraged to take an active role in
this process.

COURSE OVERVIEW
7th Grade
Required Courses

8th Grade
Required Courses

Language Arts
Mathematics
Physical Education
Science
Social Studies
Integrated Studies
Life Skills

Language Arts
Mathematics
Physical Education/Health
Science
Social Studies
Creative Arts
Invention and Innovation

Language Arts
Mathematics
Physical Education/Health
Science
Social Studies

Band
Beginning Band
Chorus
Music Performance Lab
Orchestra
Technology Exposition
Theatre Arts
Visual Arts
World Language Exploratory

Band
Chorus
Communication Techniques
French 1
German 1
Latin 1
Life Skills in the Family
Music Performance Lab
Orchestra
Spanish 1
Theatre Arts
Visual Arts
World Language Exploratory

Band
Chorus
French 1 and 2
German 1 and 2
Latin 1 and 2
Life Skills in Society
Music Performance Lab
Orchestra
Problem-Solving Skills
Spanish 1 and 2
Theatre Arts
Visual Arts
World Language Exploratory

Other Available Courses

Students take all required courses.


World Language Exploratory in grades 6, 7, and 8 is the
same course and may be taken only once.
Some non-required courses may not be offered if there is
insufficient enrollment and/or staffing.

Students who require tutoring or supplementary instruction in a required subject(s) and/or in reading may be
scheduled to receive that support during an elective or
exploratory class or during co-curricular time.

20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 3

6TH GRADE COURSES


ARTS: VISUAL AND PERFORMING
6503 BAND
This course is for students who have successfully completed
prior instrumental instruction at the elementary-school level.
Students continue to develop the basic skills and knowledge
necessary to perform music (on instruments commonly
found in bands) in unison and in an ensemble. Each student
is responsible for obtaining his/her instrument before school
starts; in addition, each student must obtain required music
books and supplies as announced by the director. Students are
required to attend and participate in school programs. The
band practices, rehearses, and performs a variety of Grade I
band music. In addition to developing high levels of performance quality, students experience balanced instruction that
includes studying music from the historical, aesthetic, and
critical perspectives.
Students with no prior instruction in instrumental music should
enroll in Beginning Band (6506) if that course is available; they may
enroll in Band (6503) if Beginning Band is not available.

6506 BAND: BEGINNING


This course is offered to students who want to begin studying
instrumental music, perhaps after some exploration at the
elementary school. The band director guides each student in
selecting an appropriate instrument. Students are responsible
for obtaining the instrument before school begins; in addition,
each student must obtain required music books and supplies
as announced by the director. Besides ensuring that a student
knows about techniques needed to perform music accurately
and effectively, the band director helps each student to develop
the specific skills required to play music on a woodwind, brass,
or percussion instrument. All students are required to practice
daily so that they can master the 6th-grade essential curriculum for instrumental music. They are required to attend and
participate in school programs. In addition to developing high
levels of performance quality, students experience balanced
instruction that includes studying music from the historical,
aesthetic, and critical perspectives.
6505 CHORUS
This course is available to students who have successful prior
experience with vocal music from their elementary school
music instruction, as well as students who are interested in
beginning vocal music instruction. Students develop the basic
skills and knowledge necessary to perform music in unison
and in an ensemble; they focus on proper breathing, posture,
enunciation, intonation, and expression. They also concentrate on two-part singing, simple sight-reading, and rhythm
reading. Each student is responsible for obtaining required
music books, supplies, and items necessary for concert dress
4 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

as announced by the director. Students are required to attend


and participate in school programs. The chorus practices,
rehearses, and performs a variety of choral music and styles,
including classical, jazz, spiritual, and pop. In addition to
developing high levels of performance quality, students experience balanced instruction that includes studying music from
the historical, aesthetic, and critical perspectives.
6508 MUSIC PERFORMANCE LABORATORY
This yearlong elective course covers the elements of music
and applies this information through the use of hands-on
experiences with a variety of classroom instruments. These
instruments may include guitar, electronic keyboards, hand
bells, recorders, Orff instruments (i.e., xylophone, marimba),
computers, and other musical media. Performance quality is
reinforced through balanced instruction that includes studying
music from a historical, aesthetic, and critical perspective.
6504 ORCHESTRA
This course is available to students who have successful prior
experience with string instruments from their elementary
school music instruction, as well as students who are interested
in beginning string instruction. Students develop the basic
skills and knowledge necessary to perform music (on string
instruments commonly found in orchestras) in unison and
in an ensemble. Each student is responsible for obtaining his/
her instrument before the opening of school; in addition,
each student must obtain required music books and supplies
as announced by the director. Students are required to attend
and participate in school programs. The orchestra practices,
rehearses, and performs a variety of Grade I orchestral music.
In addition to developing high levels of performance quality, students experience balanced instruction that includes
studying music from the historical, aesthetic, and critical
perspectives.
6520 Theatre ARTS
Students experience a variety of the performing arts. They
are expected to participate in a number of activities that may
include singing, dancing, acting, announcing, stage crafts,
improvisation, mime, and scenes. Students may be expected to
participate in one or more productions that integrate all of the
material learned during the course.
6530 VISUAL ARTS
Students create and explore art techniques, styles, cultures, and
visual qualities of two- and three-dimensional artworks. Students develop fundamental art skills in areas such as drawing,
painting, printmaking, graphics, crafts, sculpture, and architecture. Projects may allow students to integrate visual art skills
with academic themes. Originality, effective communications,

problem solving, critical thinking, social cooperation, selfdiscipline, and community/environmental issues are involved
in lessons. In this course students develop personal expression
through their enjoyment of art.

CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION


6921 LIFE SKILLS
Life Skills is the first of several Family and Consumer Sciences
course offerings. It helps students develop critical thinking skills
in order to make wise decisions in financial literacy to promote
personal wellness, growth, and positive self-esteem. Students
are introduced to cooking and hand- and machine-sewing skills
with emphasis on reading to perform a task. Opportunities are
provided for students to practice decision-making strategies in
the areas of nutrition, and substance abuse education. Hands-on
activities allow students to build on individual strengths as they
become responsible citizens in the home, school, and community. This course provides opportunities for 6th grade students to
practice skills that will last a life time.

and the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages


English as a Second Language Standards.

INTERMEDIATE
1640 ELL English 1
These classes build on the English language skills acquired in
beginning ELL classes. They focus on developing the students
cognitive academic language proficiency; these language
skills are crucial for success in other academic classes. They
are aligned with the FCPS mainstream curriculum and the
Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages English as
a Second Language Standards.

ADVANCED
1840 ELL English 2
These classes prepare students for transition and complete
immersion into mainstream academic classes. They are aligned
with the essential curricula in related areas and TESOLs
Standards. Special attention to state-mandated assessments is
emphasized.

6941 INTEGRATED STUDIES


This course presents students with a wide range of 21st century
skills including critical thinking, problem-solving skills, communication, and computer and technology skills. It provides
the technological foundation for 6th graders as they make
the transition to middle school, enabling students to become
independent learners. Specific topics include digital citizenship (safe and legal use of digital media), the application of
technology to gather and communicate information, and keyboarding. Students will be expected to use home row keys to
increase speed and accuracy. Utilized skills are integrated with
and support the other middle school courses, so students can
apply their technological skills in all areas of study.
6971 TECHNOLOGY EXPOSITION
This activity based course explores technology systems. Students foster problem solving skills through design briefs while
integrating math and science. Unit topic and possible projects
include; communications MS Office and 3-D modeling, manufacturing assembly line projects, transportation gravity racer
and rockets, construction toothpick bridge design, and energy
and power balloon sled.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER (ELL)


BEGINNER/ADVANCED BEGINNER
1440 ELL English Language I
This course is offered to all middle school students with little
or no proficiency in English based upon state-mandated
language proficiency assessments. These classes offer intensive
instruction in oral and written English language and reading
skills. They are aligned with the FCPS mainstream curriculum

LANGUAGE ARTS
6011 LANGUAGE ARTS (HONORS)
6012 LANGUAGE ARTS (MERIT)
Emphasis is on increasing student facility with strategic reading processes to promote reading comprehension skills when
students read for information and for literary experience.
Students also focus on improving writing and language skills
through completion of multiple compositions in a variety of
genres and for a multitude of purposes (with an emphasis
on narrative and informative writing). Grammar, spelling,
vocabulary, research, speaking, and listening skills are also
taught and practiced throughout the course. Students read and
write daily, with a balance of brief and extended texts read and
composed.

MATHEMATICS
6331 MATH: INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA AND
GEOMETRY PART 1 (HONORS)
This course emphasizes the full range of skills and concepts
essential for a firm foundation in higher level mathematics.
Topics include patterns and functions, algebraic expressions
and inequalities, linear relationships, properties of geometry,
data interpretation and analysis, and the processes of mathematics such as reasoning, explanation, and justification in
problem solving.
6332 MATH (MERIT)
Fundamental skills in mathematical computation and reasoning are emphasized to prepare students for study in advanced
20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 5

mathematics. Topics include number computation, fractions


and decimals; study of linear equations; the application and use
of formulas, applications with geometric relationships; and the
processes of mathematics such as reasoning, explanation, and
justification in problem solving.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH
6801 PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Students learn how to develop an acceptable level of fitness
through an understanding of the components of fitness and
an appreciation of the lifelong value of fitness. Students are
involved in active, positive learning experiences with a focus
on goals that are challenging but attainable. They develop
physical skills and acquire a knowledge of and an appreciation
for efficient and creative movement through participation in a
sequential program of varied activities.
Activities are designed to improve individual fitness levels, and
students are tested quarterly according to Frederick County
fitness standards. Students gain an understanding of physical
fitness benefits and values. In addition, they learn, practice,
and execute basic skills specific to a wide range of individual
and team sports. The students also learn rules and strategies of
sports and fitness activities.
Physical education classes emphasize and expect students to
demonstrate good sportsmanship, self-control, and respect for
others. Students set goals, apply fitness concepts to daily lives,
and solve tasks through independent thinking. Students also
have the opportunity to receive Family Life instruction during this course. Participation in the Family Life component
requires parental permission.

SCIENCE
6207 SCIENCE
Students study life, earth, and physical sciences with an integrated approach. This is experienced in three modules of study:
Water, Human Body, and Interdependence. In the Water Module, students identify and explore various properties of water
and recognize the importance of water resources. The Human
Body Module focuses on how body systems interact and maintain a state of balance. The Interdependence Module examines
patterns, relationships, and the dynamic nature of ecosystems.
The curriculum includes field-based experiences facilitated
through the Outdoor School Program where classroom investigations are applied to real-world settings.

6 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

SOCIAL STUDIES
6107 HISTORY OF THE ANCIENT WORLD (TO FALL OF
ROME 476 C.E.)
This course is structured chronologically from the Neolithic
Period to the Roman Empire and includes units on Mesopotamia, Ancient Egypt, India, China, Greece, and Rome. Students
explore the social, political, economic, and cultural structures
made by societies during each of these time periods, as well as
their accomplishments, impact over time, and contributions to
the history of our world. Geography concepts taught include
types of maps, elements of maps, landforms, regions, etc. Skills
infused throughout the course include constructing time lines;
interpreting maps, charts, and graphs; analyzing forms and the
roles institutions play in culture; analyzing settlement patterns;
summarizing issues; evaluating viewpoints; drawing conclusions; and using cause and effect, sequence, and correlation as
tools for examining historic events.

WORLD LANGUAGE
6650 WORLD LANGUAGE EXPLORATORY
This course provides students the opportunity to explore, on a
limited basis, the four world languages that are offered in high
school. During the course, students (a) acquire an understanding of how to be a successful world language student, (b) learn
to communicate in each language on a very minimal level, (c)
learn some important cultural information about the people
who speak/spoke each language, (d) discuss how their own
language developed and how each of the four world languages
studied has influenced English, and (e) explore some basic elements of sign language. Throughout the course, students also
have the opportunity to complete a project pertaining to each
language studied.

7TH GRADE COURSES


ARTS: VISUAL AND PERFORMING
7503 BAND
This course is available to students who have successfully
completed prior instrumental instruction at the 6th-grade
level. Students continue to develop an increased range of
musical skills and knowledge, concentrate on individual part
playing, and continue to develop refined solo and ensemble
performance skills. Each student is responsible for obtaining
his/her instrument before the opening of school; in addition,
each student must obtain required music books and supplies as
announced by the director. Students are required to attend and
participate in school programs. The band practices, rehearses,
and perform a variety of Grade II band music. In addition to
developing high levels of performance quality, students experience balanced instruction that includes studying music from
the historical, aesthetic, and critical perspectives.
NOTE: Students with no prior instruction in instrumental music
may enroll in Band only if they have the prior, written permission of
the band director.

music books, supplies, and items necessary for concert dress


as announced by the director. Students are required to attend
and participate in school programs. The chorus practices,
rehearses, and performs a variety of choral music and styles
(typically at Grades I and II), including classical, jazz, spiritual,
and pop. In addition to developing high levels of performance
quality, students experience balanced instruction that includes
studying music from the historical, aesthetic, and critical
perspectives.
7508 MUSIC PERFORMANCE LABORATORY
This yearlong elective course covers the elements of music
and applies this information through the use of hands-on
experiences with a variety of classroom instruments. These
instruments may include guitar, electronic keyboards, hand
bells, recorders, Orff instruments (i.e., xylophone, marimba),
computers, and other musical media. The course reinforces
performance quality through balanced instruction that
includes studying music from historical, aesthetic, and critical
perspectives.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential with other 6th or
8th grade courses.

7504 ORCHESTRA
This course is available to students who have successfully completed prior orchestral instruction at the 6th-grade level. Students continue to develop an increased range of musical skills
and knowledge, concentrate on individual part playing, and
continue to develop refined solo and ensemble performance
skills. Each student is responsible for obtaining his/her instrument before the opening of school; in addition, each student
must obtain required music books and supplies as announced
by the director. Students are required to attend and participate
in school programs. The orchestra practices, rehearses, and
performs a variety of Grade II orchestral music. In addition to
developing high levels of performance quality, students experience balanced instruction that includes studying music from
the historical, aesthetic, and critical perspectives.
Students with no prior instruction in orchestra may enroll in
Orchestra only if they have the prior, written permission of the
orchestra director.

7505 CHORUS
This course is available to students who have successfully completed prior instruction in chorus in the 6th grade, as well as
students who are interested in beginning vocal music instruction and have prior, written approval from the choral director.
Students continue to develop a full range of vocal skills including proper breathing, posture, enunciation, intonation, and
expression. They also concentrate on three-part singing, more
complex sight-reading, and advanced rhythm and melody
reading. Each student is responsible for obtaining required

7520 THEATRE ARTS


Students experience a variety of performing arts and are
expected to participate in a number of activities that may
include improvisations, mime, and scenes, and they study
careers in the arts. This course may require participation in one
or more productions that integrate all of the material learned.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential.

7530 VISUAL ART


Students create independent and challenging projects including drawing, painting, graphics, crafts, ceramics, sculpture, and
architecture. While developing their own sense of artistic style,
students also learn about design terms and art criticism. Originality, effective communications, problem solving, integration,
critical thinking, social cooperation, self-discipline, and community/environmental issues are involved in the lessons. Students
participate in portfolio and communication assessments and
develop personal expression through their enjoyment of art.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential.

7905 CREATIVE ARTS


In this required 18-week exploratory course, 7th grade students explore the four major art forms: visual art, music, theatre, and dance. They develop an understanding of the creative
arts as important parts of history, culture, and the human
experience. They learn how people of all cultures use the arts
to express themselves and to communicate about themselves
20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 7

to others. Using several historical and multicultural strands to


integrate material and experiences from the four art forms, the
curriculum provides students the opportunity to identify and
nurture their individual creative potential. This course emphasizes learning and using core knowledge through a balanced
instructional approach. Some traditional reading, writing and
research strategies, using print and audiovisual sources as well
as the full range of available technology, are balanced with a
variety of integrated production and performance experiences
in one or more of the four art forms.

CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION


7020 COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES
21st Century communication skills are explored throughout
the course. Exploration includes web 2.0 tools, 3-D modeling,
podcasting, and digital photography. Active involvement provides students the opportunity to interact with the latest tools
(including computer application) used to transmit ideas and
support academic concepts.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential with other 6th or
8th grade courses.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER (ELL)


BEGINNER/ADVANCED BEGINNER
1440 ELL English Language I
This course is offered to all middle school students with little
or no proficiency in English based upon state-mandated language proficiency assessments. These classes offer intensive
instruction in oral and written English language and reading
skills. They are aligned with the FCPS mainstream curriculum
and the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages
English as a Second Language Standards.

INTERMEDIATE
1640 ELL English 1
These classes build on the English language skills acquired in
beginning ELL classes. They focus on developing the students
cognitive academic language proficiency; these language
skills are crucial for success in other academic classes. They
are aligned with the FCPS mainstream curriculum and the
Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages English as
a Second Language Standards.

ADVANCED
7221 LIFE SKILLS IN THE FAMILY
This course is activity based, applying academics to real-life
situations. Students explore Family and Consumer Science
topics such as financial literacy, family, child development,
living environments, nutrition, food preparation, clothing,
and textiles. They use a variety of technologies including the
construction of a machine-sewn textile project. Planning
and implementing projects as a team using problem-solving
skills for family and living environments to promote critical-
thinking skills. This class is recommended for all students,
regardless of educational or career goals, because all indi
viduals are faced with the challenges of managing their
personal, home, family, and work lives.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential with other 6th or
8th grade courses.

7972 Invention and Innovation


Students apply the design process in the invention or innovation of a new product, process, or system. Students study the
history of inventions and innovations, including their impacts
on society. Students learn the core concepts of technology
and practice various approaches to solving problems. They
participate in engineering design activities to understand how
criteria, constraints, and processes affect designs. Students also
develop skills in researching and communicating design information and reporting results.

8 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

1840 ELL English 2


These classes prepare students for transition and complete
immersion into mainstream academic classes. They are aligned
with the essential curricula in related areas and Teachers of
English to Speakers of Other Languages Standards. Special
attention to state-mandated assessments is emphasized.

LANGUAGE ARTS
7011 LANGUAGE ARTS (HONORS)
7012 LANGUAGE ARTS (MERIT)
Emphasis is on increasing critical reading comprehension skills
when students read for information and for literary experience. Students also focus on improving writing and language
skills through completion of multiple compositions in a variety
of genres and for a multitude of purposes (with an emphasis
on informative and persuasive writing). Grammar, spelling,
vocabulary, research, speaking and listening skills are also
taught and practiced throughout the course. Students read and
write daily, with a balance of brief and extended texts read and
composed.

MATHEMATICS
7311 MATH: ALGEBRA 1 WITH DATA ANALYSIS
(ACCELERATED)
Prerequisite: High achievement in Introduction to Algebra and
Geometry, Part 1 and other criteria. Placement in this accelerated
course is by school recommendation only.

The language of higher mathematics is introduced through


the study of algebraic notation, symbolism, and methods of
solving problems. Topics include simplifying expressions,
solving linear equations, distributive factoring, working with
linear and non-linear functions, inequalities, systems of linear
equations, and data analysis.
Students who pass this course and the final exam may receive high
school credit. Passing the Algebra HSA and receiving high school
credit for this course are Maryland graduation requirements.

7331 MATH: INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA AND


GEOMETRY PART 2 (HONORS)
This course extends the skills and concepts presented in the
Introduction to Algebra and Geometry Part 1 course taken in
the 6th grade. Topics include the study of patterns and functions, solving equations and inequalities, analysis of geometric
relationships, data interpretation, data analysis and theoretical
and experimental probability, and the processes of mathematics such as reasoning, explanation, and justification in problem
solving. Students successfully completing this course with a
C or better will be considered for 8th grade Algebra 1 with
Data Analysis (Honors).
7332 MATH (MERIT)
A strong academic foundation in problem solving and application of mathematical process is given in this course. Topics
include the study of patterns and functions, algebraic expressions and inequalities, linear relationships, properties of
geometry, data interpretation and analysis, and the processes of
mathematics such as reasoning, explanation, and justification
in problem solving.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH
7801 PHYSICAL EDUCATION

demonstrate good sportsmanship, self-control, and respect for


others. Students will apply fitness concepts to daily lives and
solve tasks through independent thinking.
7802 HEALTH EDUCATION
This course encourages students to develop knowledge, skills,
attitudes, and behaviors that enable them to make responsible
decisions about health. In addition to learning about personal
and consumer health, students learn how personal issues, others, culture, media, and other factors influence their decisions
and the consequences that these decisions may have. Students
study the physical and psychological effects and potential
dangers of medicine misuse, tobacco, alcohol, and marijuana
along with ways to resist and refuse peer pressure. During the
family life sexually transmitted infections (STI) prevention
unit (parental permission required), students learn about the
changes that occur in adolescence (including human reproduction), that can occur at different times, and that are normal and
experienced by everyone. Students identify abstinence as the
surest way to prevent pregnancy and STIs, and become aware
of the existence of birth control. Through this course students
will understand sexual harassment and sexual assault, including prevention skills, appropriate intervention, and be able to
demonstrate effective advocacy skills. All family life curricular
materials are reviewed by a Family Life Advisory Committee.

SCIENCE
7207 SCIENCE
This course continues the integrated study of life, Earth, and
physical sciences. Each of the three 7th grade modules builds
upon and extends the concepts developed in the 6th-grade
modules. In the Resource Management Module, students
continue to explore resource management through the investigation of various management practices including agriculture,
forestry, mining, and man-made natural recycling processes.
The Dynamic Earth Module examines the physical aspects
of the dynamic interactions between the land and oceans on
Earth. The Vulnerability Module explores interactions between
organisms and environments that influence populations. As a
part of this module, students may explore the environmental
issues related to the Chesapeake Bay. All three modules of
study emphasize the understanding and application of classroom concepts to real world settings.

Students learn how to develop an acceptable level of fitness


through an understanding of the components of fitness and
an appreciation of the lifelong value of fitness. Students are
involved in regular activities designed to improve and challenge individual fitness levels. These levels are tested quarterly
in accordance with Frederick County fitness standards. In
addition, students learn, practice, and execute basic skills specific to a wide range of individual and team sports. Students
also learn rules and strategies of sports and fitness activities.
Physical education classes emphasize and expect students to
20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 9

SOCIAL STUDIES
7107 HISTORY OF THE MEDIEVAL WORLD
(476-1453 C.E.)
Seventh-grade social studies is a survey course beginning with
the events leading up to the fall of the Roman Empire. The
content is not strictly chronological. The period of medieval
history of the world is studied in the following areas: the rise
of the Byzantine Empire; the conflict between Western Europe
and the Byzantine Empire; Europe during the Middle Ages;
the medieval Arabian Peninsula; the decline of Feudalism;
the kingdoms and societies of early West Africa; the medieval
Asian world; and the medieval Americas. Students explore the
social, political, economic, and cultural structures. The accomplishments, impact over time, and contributions of these major
societies as well as the outcome of cross culture contact are also
studied. Infused skills include constructing time lines; interpreting maps, charts, and graphs; analyzing forms and roles
that institutions play in cultures; analyzing settlement patterns;
summarizing issues; evaluating viewpoints; drawing conclusions; and using cause and effect, sequence, and correlation as
tools for examining historic events.

WORLD LANGUAGES
7650 WORLD LANGUAGE EXPLORATORY
This course provides students the opportunity to explore, on a
limited basis, the four world languages that are offered in high
school. During the course, students (a) acquire an understanding of how to be a successful world language student, (b) learn
to communicate in each language on a very minimal level, (c)
learn some important cultural information about the people
who speak/spoke each language, (d) discuss how their own
language developed and how each of the four world languages
studied has influenced English, and (e) explore some basic elements of sign language. Throughout the course, students also
have the opportunity to complete a project pertaining to each
language studied.
Students who took World Language Exploratory in 6th grade are not
eligible to take this course.

The following courses are the same courses offered in high


school. Students should expect a rigorous academic class
with daily homework. They should also be aware that their
final course grade will appear on their high school transcript
and will be figured into their cumulative grade point average.
It is recommended that all students have at least one world
language experience during middle school.
7632 FRENCH 1
7633 GERMAN 1
7631 SPANISH 1
These courses begin the development of the skills needed
for proficiency in the target language. The target language is
the principal means of communication between teacher and
students. Language skills are taught within the context of the
culture of the people who speak the target language. Students
acquire a better understanding of their own language and
have the opportunity to apply some of what they have learned
in their world language class to other subjects. The goal of a
multi-year world language program is to prepare students to
communicate and interact in the target language.
Students completing the course with a passing final course grade and
a passing grade on the end-of-year CRES assessment are awarded
high school credit.
With sufficient enrollment and adequate staffing, schools may offer
Level 2 World Language classes in the 8th grade.

7634 LATIN 1
Latin 1 familiarizes students with the beginning elements of
Latin vocabulary and grammar, enabling them to develop the
ability to read short passages in Latin, to write simple sentences
in Latin, and to translate brief selected passages from Latin
into English. Time is devoted to increasing students English
vocabulary through the study of English derivatives from Latin
words and through their exposure to Latin expressions and
abbreviations used in English. Mythology as well as Greek and
Roman culture and civilization are also important components
of the curriculum.
Students who complete the course with a passing final course grade
and earn a passing grade on the end-of-year CRES assessment
receive high school credit.
With sufficient enrollment and adequate staffing, schools may offer
Latin 2 classes in the 8th grade.

10 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

8TH GRADE COURSES


ARTS: VISUAL AND PERFORMING
8503 BAND
This course is open to students who have successfully completed prior instrumental instruction at the 7th-grade level.
Students continue to develop an increased range of comprehensive musical skills and knowledge. Each student is responsible for obtaining his/her instrument before the opening of
school; in addition, each student must obtain required music
books and supplies as announced by the director. Students are
required to attend and participate in school programs. The
band practices, rehearses, and performs a variety of grade II
and III band music. In addition to developing high levels of
performance quality, students experience balanced instruction
that includes studying music from the historical, aesthetic, and
critical perspectives.
Students with no prior instruction in instrumental music may
participate with written permission of the band director.

8504 ORCHESTRA
This course is open to students who have successfully completed prior orchestral instruction at the 7th-grade level. Students continue to develop an increased range of comprehensive
musical skills and knowledge. Each student is responsible for
obtaining his/her instrument before the opening of school; in
addition, each student must obtain required music books and
supplies as announced by the director. Students are required
to attend and participate in school programs. The orchestra
practices, rehearses, and performs a variety of Grade II and III
orchestral music. In addition to developing high levels of performance quality, students also experience balanced instruction that includes studying music from the historical, aesthetic,
and critical perspectives.
Note: Students with no prior instruction in orchestra may enroll with
written permission of the orchestra director.

8505 CHORUS
This course is open to students who have successfully completed prior instruction in chorus in the 7th grade, as well as
students who are interested in beginning vocal music instruction and have written approval from the choral director.
Students continue to develop a full range of vocal skills including proper breathing, posture, enunciation, intonation, and
expression. They also concentrate on three-part and four-part
singing, more complex sight-reading, and advanced rhythm
and melody reading. Each student is responsible for obtaining
required music books, supplies, and items necessary for concert dress as announced by the director. Students are required
to attend and participate in school programs. The chorus
practices, rehearses, and performs a variety of choral music

and styles (typically at Grades II and III), including classical,


jazz, spiritual, and pop. In addition to developing high levels of
performance quality, students experience balanced instruction
that includes studying music from historical, aesthetic, and
critical perspectives.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential.

8508 MUSIC PERFORMANCE LABORATORY


This yearlong elective course covers the elements of music and
applies this information through the use of hands-on experiences with a variety of classroom instruments. These instruments may include guitar, electronic keyboards, hand bells,
recorders, Orff instruments (i.e., xylophone, marimba), computers, and other musical media. The course reinforces performance
quality through balanced instruction that includes studying
music from historical, aesthetic and critical perspectives.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential.

8520 THEATRE ARTS


Students experience a variety of performing arts and are
expected to participate in a number of activities that may
include improvisations, mime, and scenes, and they study
careers in the arts. This course may require participation in one
or more productions that integrate all of the material learned
in the course.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential.

8530 VISUAL ART


Students focus on advancement of their art skills, develop
personal expression through their enjoyment of art, and learn
to develop and refine their own sense of style, originality, and
application of problem-solving skills in the art production and
criticism process. The course also emphasizes effective verbal/
written communication skills, critical thinking, integration,
social cooperation, self-discipline, and community/environmental issues. Students who achieve a high level of technical
skill, originality, aesthetics, and variety are recognized through
the Goal 1 portfolio evaluation process at the end of the year.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential.

CAREER AND TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION


8922 LIFE SKILLS IN SOCIETY
This is a hands-on class to develop leadership and inter
personal skills for working with and for others. Projects that
benefit the community are planned with an emphasis on
preparation, action, and reflection. Students use a variety of
technologies to complete realistic projects that will empower

20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 11

them with the skills and knowledge to live in a competitive


and rapidly changing society. Topics include financial literacy,
consumer education, money management, clothing and textiles, construction of a machine-sewn project, nutrition, and
food preparation. This elective helps students apply academic
knowledge and skills to real life. Students at select schools
work toward the American Red Cross Babysitters Training
Certificate.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential.

8931 PROBLEM-SOLVING SKILLS


Hands on application of computers, tools, materials, and
processes are used throughout this course to define and solve
problems. Projects integrate science, technology, engineering
and mathematics to challenge students to be inventive and
apply their ingenuity. Web 2.0 tools and 3-D modeling are used
as students solve design briefs ranging from straw bridge and
hovercraft to aeronautics.
This is a stand-alone course and is not sequential.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNER (ELL)


BEGINNER/ADVANCED BEGINNER
1440 ELL English Language I
This course is offered to all middle school students with little
or no proficiency in English based upon state-mandated language proficiency assessments. These classes offer intensive
instruction in oral and written English language and reading
skills. They are aligned with the FCPS mainstream curriculum
and the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages
English as a Second Language Standards.

INTERMEDIATE
1640 ELL English 1
These classes build on the English language skills acquired in
beginning ELL classes. They focus on developing the students
cognitive academic language proficiency; these language
skills are crucial for success in other academic classes. They
are aligned with the FCPS mainstream curriculum and the
Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages English as
a Second Language Standards.

ADVANCED
1840 ELL English 2
These classes prepare students for transition and complete
immersion into mainstream academic classes. They are aligned
with the essential curricula in related areas and the Teachers
of English to Speakers of Other Languages Standards. Special
attention to state-mandated assessments is emphasized.

12 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

LANGUAGE ARTS
8011 LANGUAGE ARTS (HONORS)
8012 LANGUAGE ARTS (MERIT)
Emphasis is on increasing critical reading comprehension skills
when students read for information and for literary experience.
Students also focus on improving writing and language skills
through completion of multiple compositions in a variety of
genres and for a multitude of purposes. Students focus on how
professional and student authors use literary elements and
rhetorical devices to craft effective texts. Grammar, spelling,
vocabulary, research, speaking, and listening skills are also
taught and practiced throughout the course. Students read and
write daily, with a balance of brief and extended texts read and
composed.

MATHEMATICS
8301 MATH: ALGEBRA 1 WITH DATA ANALYSIS
(HONORS)
Prerequisite: High achievement in Introduction to Algebra and
Geometry, Part 2 and other criteria.

The language of higher mathematics is introduced through


the study of algebraic notation, symbolism, and methods of
solving problems. Topics include simplifying expressions,
solving linear equations, distributive factoring, working with
linear and non-linear functions, inequalities, systems of linear
equations, and data analysis.
Students who pass this course and the final exam may receive high
school credit. Passing the Algebra HSA and receiving high school
credit for this course are Maryland graduation requirements.

8302 MATH: PRE-ALGEBRA (MERIT)


The topics of this yearlong course include the study of patterns
and functions, solving equations and inequalities, analysis
of geometric relationships, data interpretation, data analysis,
theoretical and experimental probability, and the processes of
mathematics such as reasoning, explanation, and justification
in problem solving.
Students who complete this course continue study of mathematics
with Algebra 1 in 9th grade.

8311 MATH: GEOMETRY WITH REASONING


(ACCELERATED)
Prerequisites: High achievement in Introduction to Algebra
and Geometry Part 1 and 7th grade Algebra. Placement in this
accelerated course is by school recommendation only.

This course is a full-year study of basic geometry concepts as


well as logic and reasoning skills through the use of deductive
and inductive reasoning. Topics include deductive reasoning,
lines and angles, basic postulates and theorems, congruent

triangles, transformations, inequalities, parallel lines, coordinate geometry, quadrilaterals, area, similarity, right triangles,
circles, regular polygons, and the circle and geometric solids.
Advanced topics include transformational geometry. Students
use graphing calculators. This course is second in the sequence
of high school mathematics courses.
Students who pass this course and the final exam may receive
high school credit. Receiving high school credit for this course is a
graduation requirement.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION/HEALTH
8801 PHYSICAL EDUCATION
Students learn how to develop an acceptable level of fitness
through an understanding of the components of fitness and
an appreciation of the lifelong value of fitness. Students are
involved in regular activities designed to improve and challenge individual fitness. These levels are tested quarterly in
accordance with Frederick County fitness standards. In addition, students learn, practice, and execute basic skills specific
to a wide range of individual and team sports. They also learn
rules and strategies of sports and fitness activities. Physical
education classes emphasize and expect students to demonstrate good sportsmanship, self-control, and respect for others.
Students will apply fitness concepts to daily lives and solve
tasks through independent thinking.
8802 HEALTH EDUCATION
The class focus is on the prevention of major adolescent health
problems of depression and suicide, body image, eating disorders, and family life components. Students will learn to apply
the components of personal well-being to develop lifelong
wellness skills and strategies. Students will demonstrate the
ability to apply prevention and treatment knowledge, skills,
and strategies to reduce susceptibility and manage disease.
Students will develop the ability to use nutrition and fitness
knowledge, skills, and strategies to promote a healthy lifestyle.
Students will exhibit the ability to use drug knowledge, decision-making skills, and health enhancing strategies to address
the non-use, use, and abuse of drugs including steroids, as well
the classification of drugs. During the Family Life/STI Prevention Unit (parental permission required) students will evaluate
the components of healthy relationships, identify abstinence
as the surest way to prevent pregnancy and STIs, and describe
methods of contraception, including their effectiveness. Students will identify techniques to avoid being sexually harassed/
assaulted, the consequences of sexually harassing/assaulting
others, and understand the responsibilities of a witness to
sexual assault/harassment. All family life curricular materials
are reviewed by a Family Life Advisory Committee.

SCIENCE
8207 SCIENCE
This course concludes the middle school integrated science
study of life, Earth, and physical sciences. The concepts learned
in earlier grades are extended through module study. The
Energy Module continues the study of resource management
by investigating the development, use, and choice of energy
resource. The Variations Module expands the study of the
diversity of life, as students explore variations in their world
and investigate how the genetic code transmits information
and impacts populations. In the Space Module, students take
an imaginary trip through the universe examining the nature
and dynamics of the system, as well as recognizing the life
support necessary for space travel. In each module of study,
emphasis is placed on applying classroom concepts to real
world settings.

SOCIAL STUDIES
8108 AMERICAN STUDIES 1
This chronological approach to United States history examines
the social, economic, and political forces that shaped America
from the colonial period through the late 1800s. The foundation of government and the related struggle to maintain the
nation are emphasized. Topics include geography/exploration,
colonization, the American Revolution, Federal Period, Westward Expansion, Civil War, Reconstruction, and the settlement
of the West. Students learn about the Native American experience, the growth of slavery and efforts of African Americans
and others to end it, the changing role of women, and the Constitutional rights and responsibilities of citizens.

WORLD LANGUAGES
8650 WORLD LANGUAGE EXPLORATORY
This course provides students the opportunity to explore, on a
limited basis, the four world languages that are offered sequentially for high-school credit starting in 7th and 8th grades:
French, German, Latin, and Spanish. Students (a) acquire
an understanding of how to be a successful world language
student, (b) learn to communicate in each language on a very
minimal level, (c) learn some important cultural information about the people who speak/spoke each language, (d)
discuss how their own language developed and how each of
the four world languages studied has influenced English, and
(e) explore some basic elements of sign language. Students also
have the opportunity to complete a project pertaining to each
language studied.
Students who took World Language Exploratory in 6th or 7th grade
are not eligible to take this course.

continued
20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 13

The following courses are the same courses offered in high


school. Students should expect a rigorous academic class
with daily homework. They should also be aware that their
final course grade will appear on their high school transcript
and will be figured into their cumulative grade point average.
It is recommended that all students have at least one world
language experience during middle school.
8632 FRENCH 1
8635 FRENCH 2
8633 GERMAN 1
8636 GERMAN 2
8631 SPANISH 1
8637 SPANISH 2
These courses begin and extend the development of the skills
needed for proficiency in the target language. The target
language is the principal means of communication between
teacher and students. Language skills are taught within the
context of the culture of the peoples who speak the target
language. Students acquire a better understanding of their own
language and have the opportunity to apply some of what they
have learned in their world language class to other subjects.
The goal of a multi-year world language program is to prepare
students to communicate and interact in the target language.
Students completing the course with a passing final course grade and
a passing grade on the end-of-year CRES assessment are awarded
high-school credit. Students wishing to be successful in Level 2 should
earn a minimum grade of C on the CRES and a C as a final course
grade preferably a B for both.

14 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

8634 LATIN 1
8638 LATIN 2
These courses acquaint students with the beginning elements
of Latin vocabulary and grammar and help them develop the
ability to read short passages, write simple sentences, and
translate brief selected Latin passages into English. Time is
devoted to increasing students English vocabulary through
the study of English derivatives from Latin words and through
their exposure to Latin expressions and abbreviations used in
English. Mythology, as well as Greek and Roman culture and
civilization, are also important components of the curriculum.
Students completing the course with a passing final course grade and
a passing grade on the end-of-year CRES assessment are awarded
high school credit. Students wishing to be successful in Level 2 should
earn a minimum grade of C on the CRES and a C as a final course
grade preferably a B for both.

PROCEDURES, PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


ACADEMIC PLACEMENT AND GROUPING
Students are placed in language arts and math classes based on
ability. Science and social studies are heterogeneous (mixedlevel) classes. However, students who are not performing at
grade level receive extra assistance to achieve at grade level in
social studies and science material.
Academic placements are determined through a collaborative
process that involves teachers, counselors, administrators,
and parents. Criteria include work habits, predicted language
arts and math placement at the end of the school year, term
grades in core subjects, and performance on the Maryland
School Assessment. Teachers in all classes support and extend
learning to meet students varying learning needs (called
differentiation).
EDUCATION THAT IS MULTICULTURAL
Equity is a key component of FCPS commitment to educational excellence at all levels. The Education That Is Multicultural initiative promotes the understanding and appreciation
of our countrys diverse cultures. It prepares students to live,
learn, and participate productively in our increasingly diverse
society.

and the curriculum is closely aligned with the mainstream


curricula and the National K-12 Teachers of English to
Speakers of Other Languages Standards. Students attend West
Frederick Middle School, an ELL magnet center, or Monocacy
Middle School.
ENRICHMENT
Middle schools provide enrichment opportunities through
daily instruction that is targeted to the individual learner and
through the schoolwide enrichment program, which provides
students opportunities to enrich and extend their regular classroom studies. All interested middle school students may participate in this program through a variety of learning activities,
guest speaker programs, field trips, and exploratory activities
designed to stimulate interests and develop thinking skills.
Middle school students who demonstrate advanced performance in a particular subject, or who wish to explore a special
area of interest, may meet with the enrichment specialist to
plan and conduct individual or small group investigations.
These research-based investigations provide students with
opportunities for intensive problem solving and exploration,
while requiring a strong commitment to independent work
and following through to a completed product.

The initiative is a continuous, integrated, multi-ethnic, multidisciplinary process for educating all students about diversity
and commonality. Diversity factors include, but are not limited
to race, ethnicity, region, religion, gender, language, socio
economic status, age, and disabilities.

Schools offer a variety of classroom visitations and orientation


programs to familiarize students with the options available.
For additional information, contact the schools enrichment
specialist.

A primary goal is to promote student achievement through


multicultural resources and culturally responsive classroom
practices. Education That Is Multicultural strives to provide all
students access to quality instruction and challenging curricular programs.

FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE
Students or parents/guardians may contact the school principal
if assistance is needed in paying for supplies or materials or
paying fees associated with any class offered at a Frederick
County public school.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNING

GRADES and PROMOTION

The English Language Learner (ELL) program is designed


to help students with a primary home language other than
English learn to speak, understand, read, and write English.
Goals are to help children learn English as quickly as possible,
participate successfully in mainstream classes, and achieve
success on state-mandated assessments.

Student achievement and academic performance determine


promotion to the next grade. Recognizing that all children do
not learn or develop at the same rate, FCPS offers supplemental
and accelerated instruction. Parents are to be notified when a
child is having trouble mastering certain skills and may not be
promoted despite intervention or when a child who demonstrates exceptional achievement may benefit from advanced
coursework. Parents are encouraged to direct questions about
these matters to the school principal.

ELL students are placed in one of five language proficiency


groups: low and high beginning, low and high intermediate,
and advanced. The appropriate school counselor, ELL teachers,
and the ELL registrar from the International Office (located
at Rock Creek School) make the placements with the aid of
language and math proficiency assessments.
Students spend a minimum of one period a day improving
their skills in the English language and various content areas.
The ELL class may replace the language arts class initially,

The middle school student who passes all subjects or fails only
one of the four core (major) subjects for the year is promoted.
A child who fails two core subjects must satisfactorily complete
one of the failed courses during summer school in order to be
promoted. Failure of three core subjects requires successful
completion of two of the courses in summer school. A student
20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 15

who fails all four major subjects for the year will not be promoted. Promotion recommendations for students who receive
passing grades only in the major subjects are based on careful
review of student records.

HomeworkGuidelines for Frequency


and Duration
Grade 6

Grades Online
FCPS uses an online software program called Pinnacle to
give parents and students access to grades from any Internetconnected computer. After grading tests and assignments,
teachers enter the grades in their electronic grade books. Missing assignments are also noted. Pinnacle organizes the data
for convenient online viewing anytime, day or night. Grades
are available online for all middle and high school students.
Contact the school to obtain your childs student identification
number and PIN.
HEALTH SERVICES
The middle school health services program is intended to help
children stay healthy and in school. The Frederick County
Health Department hires and supervises the school health
services team.
A registered nurse who works in more than one school performs health assessments, assists families in finding medical
or other needed services, and serves as a resource to school
personnel regarding health concerns. The nurse also serves on
a multidisciplinary school team whose purpose is to promote
a healthy environment, health instruction, improved nutrition,
and early identification and intervention for special needs.
Under the direction of the nurse, a school-based health technician provides emergency treatment of accidents and illnesses,
administers medications, and performs selected treatments.
There is no charge for school health services.

Grades 7 & 8
Weekends/
Holidays

60 minutes m
aximum per evening for all
subjects combined
75 minutes maximum per evening for all
subjects combined
1-2 long-term projects per term with the
bulk of research completed in school
Assignments at teachers discretion

HONOR ROLL
The honor roll recognizes students who have demonstrated
outstanding academic achievements in credited courses. To be
included on the schools academic honor roll, the student must:
Have at least a B average
Not have earned an Incomplete or below a C
Have earned no more than one C
Balance any C with an A, course for course
The honor roll has two categories:
First Honors - Grade Point Average of 4.0
Second Honors - Grade Point Average of 3.0-3.9
INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAMS

School personnel and parents are encouraged to talk with the


school health staff about student health concerns.

Frederick County middle schools are organized by interdisciplinary, grade-level teams. Teams have time during the school
day to create learning experiences that integrate skills and
content disciplines, and to collaborate with counselors, school
support, and special education teachers, and administrators to
plan strategies that address individual student needs.

HOMEWORK

INTERVENTIONS FOR READING AND MATH

Homeworkfosters positive attitudes and good habits about


learning and also enables students to acquire and deepen
knowledge. The four general categories of homework are:

In addition to the essential curriculum for language arts and


mathematics, FCPS offers an extensive array of research-based
interventions for students who are struggling in these subject
areas. Students may be enrolled in separate courses of study
or may receive support during co-curricular time or before or
after school. Most students enrolled in intervention courses
take one or more of the following as part of their Individualized Learning Plan (ILP):

Practice Helps students refine and strengthen skills


taught in class through drill of simple applications,reading, andwriting.
Preparation Makes the next days lesson more
meaningful and easier to master. Reading and familiarization with facts and ideas characterize this type of
homework.
Extension Applies skills and concepts to more complicated situations. Requireshigher level thinking and use of
abstract ideas.Examples are short essays and reports.
Integration Requires coordinating and combining
several skills and concepts, more time, and a greater variety
of resources. Research papers and projects are examples.

16 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

Learning/Language Support courses offer structured,


sequential, multi-sensory phonics instruction.
Read/Write Workshop courses focus on text structure,
writing about reading, fluency, vocabulary, and reading
comprehension skill development.
Read Naturally course focuses on building essential
aspects of reading fluency for students with fluency goals
on their IEPs.

Corrective Reading course offers Direct Instruction of


decoding and fluency for students who have IEP reading
goals.
Math Intervention courses in 6th and 7th grades
emphasize critical skills and content in three core areas:
(1) number reasoning and data; (2) fractions, decimals,
percents, and probability; and (3) geometry, measurement,
and graphing. In 8th grade, in addition to these three core
areas, students learn other skills needed to successfully
prepare for Algebra 1.
LIBRARY MEDIA CENTER
All students are welcome to use the library media center for
classroom assignments and to find reading materials for enjoyment. Students should see their library media specialist to
find out what hours their media center is open and the proper
procedures for visiting. Most students come on a regular
basis with their teacher for book selection. The library media
specialist teaches classes how to use the media center and its
resources. The library media specialist can also recommend
high-quality, age-appropriate materials for students.
Each library media center provides online research databases
that students may use from home through their school website,
www.fcps.org or http://acad.fcps.org/portals/ms.htm. Their
library media specialist will provide logins and passwords for
home use. The online public access catalog to library materials
is also online and may be accessed through the same websites.
The library media specialist also provides books clubs, reading
incentives, summer reading programs, and integration with the
Frederick County Public Libraries programming.
The library media program is designed to assist students in
finding the information they need to be successful in the
classroom. The program provides integrated instruction with
classroom curricula centered on information literacy, independent learning, and socially responsible use of information and
information technology. The program provides instruction,
resources, and services to foster critical thinking, problem
solving, and deep understanding.
LITERACY SPECIALISTS
Literacy specialists have advanced training in reading and
assist teachers, students, and parents with promoting that skill.
Under the guidance of the curriculum specialist for secondary
English/language arts and the school principal, they:
Coordinate, organize, and facilitate school-wide reading
achievement
Provide reading-related staff development
Test for reading interventions, including Learning/Language Support programs
Work on a short-term basis with targeted students
Assist in the development of IEP and ILP goals in reading
Serve as reading expert and liaison throughout each
school community

MATHEMATICS SPECIALIST
Middle School Mathematics Specialists have advanced training and significant experience understanding the teaching and
student learning of mathematics at the middle school level.
Under the guidance of the curriculum specialist for Secondary
Mathematics and the school principal, they:
Coordinate, organize, and facilitate school-wide mathematics achievement
Provide mathematics-related staff development
Coordinate testing and analysis of testing results for
mathematics
Work on a short-term basis with targeted students
Serve as the mathematics expert and as the liaison
between the school and the central office as well as
between the school and the school community
Assist in the development of IEP and ILP goals in
mathematics
High SCHOOL CREDIT Earned in Middle School
The Maryland State Board of Education allows local boards of
education to grant graduation credit to middle school students
who take high school courses in middle school. These courses
must have the same expectations, curriculum and final exams
as the equivalent courses taught in high school.
The following FCPS middle school courses have been identified for high school credit:
Algebra 1
Geometry
German 1, 2
Spanish 1, 2
Latin 1, 2
French 1, 2
Students who pass these courses and the final exam will automatically be granted high school credit. No action is necessary
by a student for high school credit to be issued. While these
courses do count for high school credit, the student will want
to discuss with their counselor his/her overall academic plan in
order to meet graduation and college requirements.
A student whose middle school course achievement is low may
wish to repeat the course in high school. This is a decision that
the student and parent, along with the teacher and school counselor, should make when selecting courses for the school year.
Report Cards
Report cards are issued four times during the year to
communicate students term grades and other classroom
achievement information. Interim reports may be issued
between report cards and at any time throughout the year
to notify students and parents about a significant decline or
improvement in performance or to indicate a unique problem
20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 17

that may require attention. Parents or guardians must sign and


return interim reports of unsatisfactory or declining performance within five days.
SCHEDULE
Students attend all of the classes in their schedules over two
days, called A Day and B Day. Language arts and math classes
meet for about 45 minutes on one of those days and 90 minutes on the other. Social studies and science are semester-long
courses that meet every school day for approximately 90
minutes. Physical education and health are taught together for
about 90 minutes every other day. The remaining days offer
time for electives, such as art, music, or world language.
School Counselors
Middle school counselors assist students with course selection and academic planning as well as in recognizing and
fully using their talents and capabilities academically and
interpersonally.
Throughout the middle school years, students participate
in classroom and small group units designed to help them
develop their academic, interpersonal, and decision-making
skills. Each student meets at least once a year with his or her
counselor for a brief, but comprehensive, review of progress.
The highlights of this meeting are recorded and given to the
student to share with parents.
In working with middle school students, counselors draw on
state-of-the-art education and career planning tools such as
the BRIDGES computer program, which allows students to
search for a career, explore appropriate post-secondary educational opportunities, and develop a four-year plan of study for
high school. The four-year plan prepares students for the next
steps following high school graduation. (See the Whats Next?
section of this guide for more about high school graduation
requirements, completers, and career pathways.)
Counselors assess the need for, refer to, and coordinate the services of school system and community intervention specialists.
Students who need in-depth career or aptitude assessments
and/or psychological cognitive evaluations are referred to
appropriate providers.
For students who demonstrate serious coping difficulties,
counselors perform crisis intervention and coordinate services with community agencies. These could include the early
intercession of Community Agency School Services (CASS),
Department of Rehabilitation Services, the Developmental
Disabilities Administration, the Department of Social Services,
Mental Health, Juvenile Services, special education, private
service providers, and others. Counselors always work closely
with, and take the lead from, the family in providing special
services for students, and encourage parents to contact them
about any concerns.

18 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

SPECIAL EDUCATION
Special Education is instruction designed to meet the unique
needs of a student with a disability, including instruction
conducted in the classroom, in the home, in hospitals or
institutions. Special education may encompass related services
needed to complete the students individualized program, such
as speech/ language pathology services, occupational therapy,
physical therapy, career and technology education, and adaptive physical education.
Through the Child Find process, every child suspected of having an educational disability that requires special education
and related services is entitled by law to an educational evaluation. Each area of suspected disability is assessed by a qualified
examiner.
Every Frederick County public school has an Individualized
Education Program (IEP) team. The team includes a school
administrator, the students parent or guardian, the special
education teacher, general classroom teacher, related service
provider(s), and other individuals who have knowledge or
special expertise regarding the student. The student may also
attend team meetings, as appropriate. A child may be referred
to the team by a parent or guardian, a school administrator, an
educator, or a health professional. A screening meeting determines if assessments are needed. After the parent or guardian
has given consent for an initial evaluation, the school has 60
days from the date of consent to complete the evaluation and
reconvene. If the team determines that a child is eligible for
special education services, the team develops an IEP.
The IEP contains annual goals and short-term instructional
objectives for the students special education program. It also
describes the students continued participation in the general
education curriculum. The IEP is reviewed at least annually at
an IEP team meeting.
Beginning when a student is 14, or younger if appropriate, and
updated annually, the IEP must include a Transition Plan that
focuses on the students post-secondary goals, transition activities, and interagency linkages.
STUDENT SERVICE LEARNING (SSL)
Student Service Learning a Maryland graduation requirement enriches learning by engaging students in meaningful
service to their communities. It also reinforces the values of
caring, responsibility, and good citizenship and is compatible
with the Character Counts! initiative. SSL comprises preparation, action, and reflection and may include direct service (face
to face), indirect service (channeling resources), or advocacy
(lending support for a cause). In Frederick County, SSL is
integrated into both the middle and high school core academic
curriculum (language arts, math, social studies, and science).

Middle School Courses with


Infused Service Learning Activities

Frederick Countys middle schools also provide opportunities


for students to fulfill service-learning requirements by incorporating activities into the following courses.
Course
#

Course Title

Grade
Taken

6011

Language Arts (Honors)

6012

Language Arts (Merit)

6331

Math: Introduction to Algebra & Geometry


Part 1 (Honors)

6332

Math (Merit)

6207

Science (Outdoor School)

6107

History of the Ancient World

1440

ELL English Language 1

6-8

1640

ELL English 1

6-8
6-8

1840

ELL English 2

7011

Language Arts (Honors)

7012

Language Arts (Merit)

7331

Math: Introduction to Algebra & Geometry


Part 2 (Honors)

7311

Math: Algebra 1 with Data Analysis


(Accelerated)

7332

Math (Merit)

7107

History of the Medieval World

8011

Language Arts (Honors)

8012

Language Arts (Merit)

8301

Math: Algebra 1 with Data Analysis


(Honors)

8311

Math: Geometry with Reasoning


(Accelerated)

8302

Math: Pre-Algebra (Merit)

8108

American Studies 1

FCPS recognizes meritorious service for individual student


service that takes place beyond the traditional school day.
A middle school student who performs 25 hours of service
outside the classroom prior to leaving 8th grade may earn
a meritorious service certificate. Additionally, these hours
transfer to high school and are credited toward the 75 hour
high school meritorious service award. Each middle school has
a Student Service Learning contact person who facilitates the
meritorious service program.
STUDENT SUPPORT Services
School support services are provided in all middle schools
based on the needs of individual students. School support
services are provided by either a school support teacher or
through the students school counselor. These services are
provided to a relatively small number of students who need

daily intervention to experience success in school. The school


partners with the family and student to outline goals and
develop a plan for achieving them.
TECHNOLOGY INSTRUCTION
Understanding the role of technology and how to use technology effectively are critical 21st-century skills. FCPS offers
technology instruction and practice from kindergarten
through 12th grade to help students meet Marylands Technology Literacy Standards. Study emphasizes acquiring keyboarding skills, using the Internet to gather relevant and appropriate
research data, understanding cyber-ethics, and developing
effective means to organize and present data.
TESTING PROGRAMS
The following testing programs in combination with class
work, quizzes, and homework performance help teachers
evaluate student progress:
Criterion-Referenced Evaluation System (CRES)
FCPS uses CRES tests to determine how well students
have mastered the essential curriculum through daily
instruction. The assessments consist of selected-response
(multiple-choice) andconstructed-response (essay and
short-answer) items. CRES results are used to ascertain
students and schools progress toward meeting accepted
standards for student performance and to establish the
steps necessary to improve instruction and performance.
Maryland School Assessments (MSA)
The statestesting program is designed to meet requirements of the federal No Child Left Behind Act. The MSA
includes multiple-choice and constructed-response items.
Students receive individual test results. In March, students
in grades 3 through 8 take the reading and math MSA. In
late April, 5th through 8th graders take the science MSA.
High School Assessments (HSA)
These state-required, end-of-course exams are aimed at
raising academic standards and preparing graduates to
compete in the workplace and post-secondary education.
Middle and high school students enrolled in Algebra/Data
Analysis, English 10, and Biology must take the exams at
the completion of each course and are required to pass the
exams in order to graduate. (Note: Middle School students
who take Algebra take the HSA.)
TUTORING
All middle schools have allotted time during the school week
to tutor students. Teachers, or the school adult tutor, work with
individuals or in small groups for additional special instruction. Students who receive such attention may either have need
for reteaching for better understanding or have some other
need that cannot be accommodated during regular class time.

20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 19

PARENTS AS PARTNERS
Parent involvement is as important in the middle school years
as it was in elementary school. The most important way to be
involved is to emphasize the importance of education and take
an active interest in what your child is doing in school. To succeed in school, your child needs your support. Some ways to
show your support are:
1.

See that your child attends school every day, being


absent only when absolutely necessary.

2.

Encourage your child to do his or her best every day,


follow school rules, and respect and respond to teachers.

3.

Provide a time and place for your child to complete


homework assignments and ask to see assignment
sheets and completed homework assignments.

4.

Stay in contact with the school by telephone, note, or


email.

5.

Review progress reports from the school carefully with


your child and, if necessary, help your child establish
goals for improvement.

6.

Call the school to arrange for a parent conference when


needed.

7.

Attend open houses and parent conferences.

8.

Join the PTA.

9.

Become involved in the adult volunteer program.

10.

Adult volunteers come from every walk of life and a variety of


age groups and backgrounds. They all have one thing in common the desire to help a child receive a quality education.
Each schools volunteer program is unique, developed in
response to needs determined by teachers, administrators, and
support staff. Some volunteers work directly with students to
reinforce the curriculum being taught by a teacher, serving as
tutors, guest speakers, and resource persons. Others help out
in lunch rooms, school offices, libraries, and on playgrounds
and field trips. They may also help out with a club or school
activity or serve on an advisory committee.

Serve on the School Improvement Team (SIT) or other


decision-making group.

5 WAYS TO BE INVOLVED IN YOUR CHILDS EDUCATION

CLICK
WWW.FCPS.ORG

VISIT
SCHOOL

20 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

TALK WITH
TEACHERS

ENCOURAGE
LEARNING

VOLUNTEER

Whats next?

high school

20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 21

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS
To receive a Maryland High School Diploma, FCPS students must earn 25 credits
and fulfill the state and local graduation requirements outlined on this page. Students
generally earn their graduation credits over a four-year period. Under special
circumstances, a student may complete the requirements sooner; please see the school
counselor for details. Note: Course availability depends on class enrollment and
staffing.
Subject Area

CREDITS

COURSES

English

1English 9
1English 10
1English 11
1English 12 or AP

Mathematics

1Algebra
1Geometry
2Other courses

Science

1Biology
2Other lab courses

Social Studies

1Government
1Modern World History
1American Studies 2

Health

0.5

Health

Physical Education

0.5

Fitness for Life

Fine Arts

See courses marked with an asterisk [*] in Arts: Visual & Performing section

Technology Education

Foundations of Technology or Introduction to Engineering Design (WHS, LHS)

Career Pathways

Personal Financial Literacy (.5 credit must be inclusive of these credits)


Complete these credits in courses that match your career interest (See Step 3)

20

SUBTOTAL

Fulfill the additional five (5) course credits required for graduation via one of the following options:
Option 1

Option 2

World Language/American Sign


Language2 credits in the same
language
Plus three elective credits

SUBTOTAL
TOTAL

Advanced Technology2 credits in the


same area
Architectural Engineering Design
OR
Pre-Engineering (OHS, THS)
Plus three elective credits

Option 3

Career & Technology Program (state


approved) 4 credits (minimum)
Plus one elective credit

5
25

Environmental literacy

Meet the state requirement (infused into the FCPS curriculum). (See Step 5)

High School Assessments

Pass all 3 exams (English, Algebra and Biology) or meet the minimum combined
score or complete approved alternative assessment. (See Step 4)

Student Service Learning

Meet the state requirement of 75 hours (infused into the FCPS curriculum).
(See Step 5)

20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 23

FCPS COMPLETER PROGRAMS


In high school, you will choose and follow one of these three completer programs to
help prepare for further study, career and a rewarding life after high school.

USM UNIVERSITY SYSTEM OF MARYLAND COMPLETER


Graduate with the course credits that the University System of Maryland (a consortium of Maryland
colleges and universities) deems essential for entering college:
1 credit in Mathematics at the Algebra 2 level or beyond and
2 credits in the same World Language
(Completion does not automatically qualify students for acceptance at the University of Maryland.)

CTE Career and Technology Education Completer


Gain work-ready skills in a concentrated career or technical area by completing:
The required number of credits in an approved CTE Completer program.
Talk with your counselor about the options outlined in the CTE Program Completer Requirement List.

USM + CTE Completer


Increase your options for success after high school by successfully completing the credit requirements
for both of the above programs:
The required number of credits in an approved CTE Completer program and
1 credit in Mathematics at the Algebra 2 level or beyond and
2 credits in the same World Language

24 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

CAREER PATHWAYS
Understanding the credits required to graduate and the completer options is just the
beginning of an exciting journey to get ready for the challenges of the demanding world
of work and the rapid changes of the 21st century. Even as a middle school student, you
will want to think about how your interests, skills and talents relate to a career and which
academic and technical electives you should take in high school to pave the way toward a
successful future.
FCPS offers the following six Career Pathways and four focus options within each.
ARTS AND COMMUNICATIONS

Communications Technology

Art and Design

Humanities

Performing Arts

HUMAN SERVICES

Education

Tourism and Consumer Services

Government and Legal Services

Social Sciences

BUSINESS MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS



Finance and Accounting

Business Administration

Office Technologies

Marketing and Retail

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING AND TECHNOLOGY



Information Technology

Manufacturing

Engineering and Technical

Construction and Technical Maintenance

HEALTH SERVICES

Diagnostic Services

Therapeutic Services

Environmental Services

Information Services

NATURAL RESOURCES AND AGRICULTURE



Environment and Natural Resources

Food Science and Safety

Agricultural Industries

Biotechnology

Personal Financial Literacy New Requirement for 2012-13


FCPS has a 0.5 Personal Financial Literacy requirement. Students entering high school as freshmen in the Fall
of 2012 must fulfill the requirement through enrollment in one or more courses from the following menu:







Academy of Finance 538021/530031


Career Research Development II 494510
Economics and Personal Financial Literacy 164370
Independent Living 362020
Introduction to Business 331010
Management & Entrepreneurship 333090
Managing your Personal Finance 336040
Microsoft Certification I (Word, Excel) 335111

Online options:

Career Research and Development II 494510

Mathematics of Finance 33606V

Personal Finance 33605V

*Check availability at your local high school
20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 25

HIGH SCHOOL ASSESSMENTS


Maryland requires that students who entered 9th grade in the fall of 2005 and later
including students in special education, English language learners andthose with 504
plans must pass the end-of-course High School Assessments in order to graduate.
Students who take high school courses while in middle school will take the tests as well.
Ways to Meet the HSA Passage
Requirement
Earn a passing score oneach of the 3 HSAs:
Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 400
Algebra/Data Analysis . . . . . . . . . 412
English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 396
Earn a combined score of 1208 on the three HSAs.
This option allows students to offset a lower score
on one HSA with a higher score on another HSA.
Use the Bridge Plan for Academic Validation, an
alternative for students who have passed the HSArelated course but have not passed an HSA after
two or more attempts.
Earn a state-approved score on certain Advanced
Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate
(IB) tests as an alternative to taking the HSA in the
related subject.
6th 8th grade students have the opportunity to
improve or remediate skills in a course taken during
the school year. Students who have passed an HSA
course (Algebra I with Data Analysis, Biology,
English) but have either not taken or not passed
the HSA will have the opportunity to retake the
assessment at a later date.
Summer school is open only to currently enrolled
FCPS students.

26 20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide

Results
Scores are mailed toFCPS 6 weeks after the test
is taken.FCPS then sends the individual student
scores to the schools. The schools are responsible
for sending students scores to parents/guardians.
Contact your school if you do not receive HSA
scores in a timely manner.
Students with Accommodations
A student with disabilities is entitled to receive
both instructional and testing accommodations as
outlined in his/her Individualized Education Plan
(IEP). A student with an IEP who has taken and
failed the HSA once may have the opportunity to
take the Modified HSA with approval from the
school. Contact the teacher, IEP team or counselor
for more information about accommodations for an
HSA or Mod-HSA.
2012-2013 HSA Testing Information
www.fcps.org > academics >
high schools >
high school assessments
Or click on this link:
www.fcps.org/HSA

Central Office Directory 191 South East Street, Frederick, MD 21701


Secondary School Improvement, Instruction & Administration

Associate Superintendent: Ann Bonitatibus


High School Director: Larkin Hohnke
Middle School Director: Tracey Lucas

Phone 301-696-6805
Phone 301-696-6810
Phone 301-696-6810

Fax 301-696-6801
Fax 301-696-6801
Fax 301-696-6801

Phone 301-644-5220

Fax 301-644-5020

Phone 301-696-6832

Fax 301-696-6801

Phone 301-696-6891

Fax 301-696-6954

Phone 301-696-6810

Fax 301-696-6801

Phone 301-696-6880

Fax 301-696-5304

Phone 301-696-6805
Phone 301-644-5264
Phone 301-644-5200
Phone 301-644-5200
Phone 301-644-5200
Phone 301-644-5265
Phone 301-644-5267
Phone 301-644-5257
Phone 301-644-5267
Phone 301-644-5265
Phone 301-644-5261

Fax 301-696-6801
Fax 301-644-5241
Fax 301-644-5119
Fax 301-644-5119
Fax 301-644-5119
Fax 301-644-5241
Fax 301-644-4139
Fax 301-644-5241
Fax 301-644-4139
Fax 301-644-5241
Fax 301-644-5241

Phone 301-644-5281

Fax 301-644-5303

Phone 301-644-5238

Fax 301-644-5020

Counseling & Student Support

Coordinator: Janet Shipman


English Language Learning

Supervisor: Larry Steinly


Education That is Multicultural

Coordinator: Maria Whittemore


Gifted & Talented

Coordinator: Meg Lee


Professional Development

Director: Tracey Lucas


Psychological Services

Supervisor: Ann Hammond


Secondary Curriculum

Associate Superintendent: Ann Bonitatibus


Arts (Visual & Performing): Russell Beaton
Career & Technology Education: Victoria Clark
Career & Technology Education: Elizabeth Duffy
Career & Technology Education: Kristine Pearl
English/Language Arts: Sue Ann Nogle
Mathematics: Peter Cincotta
Physical Education & Health: Brett Stark
Science: Dr. Stacey Adamiak
Social Studies: Michael Bunitsky
World Languages: T. DeWayne Cash
Special Education

Director: Dan Martz


Student Services

Supervisor: Kathleen Hartsock

BOARD OF EDUCATION
191 South East Street, Frederick, MD 21701 Phone 301-696-6850 Fax 301-696-6950

Donna J. Crook
Angie L. Fish

Kathryn B. Groth
James Reeder
Brad Young
April Miller
Jean A. Smith
Brandon Wharton, Student Member
Dr. Theresa R. Alban, Superintendent & Secretary-Treasurer
Judith Ricketts, Administrative Director

www.fcps.org

The Frederick County public school system does not discriminate in admissions, access, treatment or employment in its programs and activities
on the basis of race, color, gender, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation or disability.
Published 1/12

20122013 Frederick County Public Schools middle School Course Guide 27