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Theory and Ear TrainingTOGETHER!

I use Sound Advice with my students because it is simply the BEST.


I appreciate the gradual introduction of new material, the breakdowns
that make diffcult concepts understandable and memorable,
and the ear training which is so vitaland so much fun!
Ann Baker Mendenhall, piano and theory teacher, Glenora, British Columbia
Brenda Braaten and Crystal Wiksyk
edited by
Laura Beauchamp-Williamson
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Integration of Theory and
Aural Skills
In the Sound Advice program, musical
sounds are related to their symbols
through the combination of written and
aural theory. Each level incorporates
theory, ear training, and sight reading
to develop music literacy. Numerous
dictation, playback, and sight-singing
exercises are included throughout
to address intervals, scales, chords,
rhythms, cadences, and melodies.
Organization
Each of the twenty-four lessons in the
workbook consists of the following
components:
the Learning Guide introduces new
concepts
the Theory Worksheet provides
practice and review for new and
previously learned concepts
the Ear-Training Worksheet helps
to build strong aural skills
the Ear-Training Answer Key
allows students to check their
own work
Examination Preparation
This series serves as effective
preparation for the ear-training
and theory components of major
examination systems, including
RCM Examinations, National Music
Certifcate Program, and Victoria
Conservatory of Music.
The ultimate goal of Sound Advice is
to ensure that students not only succeed
at their examinations, but become well-
rounded musicians. Students working
with the series will be prepared above
and beyond the requirements for the
ear-training portion of examinations
offered by RCM Examinations and
National Music Certifcate Program.
The structure of Sound Advice
encourages continual review and
strengthening of skillsmaking it easy
for teachers and students to avoid last-
minute examination preparation.
Sound Advice coordinates with the curriculum of RCM Examinations and National Music Certifcate Program
Sound Advice
Level
Teaching Level
RCM Examinations or
National Music Certicate Program
Practical
Theory
1 Elementary 1
Preliminary Rudiments Basic Rudiments
2 Late Elementary 2
3 Early Intermediate 3
4 Early Intermediate 4
5 Intermediate 5
6 Intermediate 6 Grade 1 Rudiments Intermediate Rudiments
7 Late Intermediate 7 Grade 2 Rudiments Advanced Rudiments
8 Early Advanced 8 Introductory Harmony Introductory Harmony
Sound Advice offers an innovative approach to integrating
ear training and theory into music study. By working with
Sound Advice books and recordings both at home and during
lessons, students will gain an enriched understanding and
appreciation of music that will last a lifetime. Teachers will fnd
these materials ideal for use in studio and classroom settings for
students of all instruments as well as singers and choristers.
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Levels 1 8 now available
LISTENING ROOM
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Online Access to Audio Tracks
All of the listening exercises referred to throughout the series can be downloaded
from the Sound Advice website at www.soundadvicedirect.com. This unique
feature allows students to work with the materials in the way that best suits
their needs: they can listen to the tracks while at the computer, copy the
tracks to a CD, or import the tracks to a digital music player. Access to
the audio tracks is included with purchase of the Sound Advice books.
The Professor
is a character who
appears throughout the
Sound Advice series to
introduce new concepts
and offer guidance
to students.
L E V E L O N E
4
The Learning Guide
explains and illustrates
new concepts. Students
should study the
Learning Guide before
completing the Theory
Worksheet and the Ear-
Training Worksheet for
each lesson.
A key feature of Sound
Advice is its progressive,
well-rounded curriculum.
New theory and ear-
training concepts are
introduced and integrated
throughout each lesson
rather than presented as
separate units of study.
New Concepts
Introduced:
Intervals
4 maj 2, min 2, maj 3, P5, P4, P8
4 Naming Intervals
4 Interval Singing Drill
Rhythm
4 Beat and Tempo
4 Note Values:

q
,
h
,
e
,
h
. , w
4 Rest Values:

,



4 Rhythmic Units:

4 Time Signatures:
2
4
,
3
4
,
4
4
4 Bar Lines and Measures
4 Rhythmic Dictation
Scales
4 C major, F major, G major
Reading and Theory
4 Accidentals (
#
,
b
,
n
) and Key
Signatures
4 Clefs (
&
,
?
) and Landmarks
4 Naming Notes on the Grand Staff
4 The Keyboard and The Music
Alphabet
4 Line Notes, Space Notes, and
Ledger Lines
4 Stem Direction
4 Pitch
4 Legato, Staccato, and Slur
4 Half Steps and Whole Steps
4 Terms and Symbols
4 Sight Singing
L E V E L T W O
5
New Concepts
Introduced:
Intervals
4 min 3, descending P4
4 Song Clues for Intervals
Rhythm
4 Rhythmic Units: , ,

4 Sixteenth Notes
4 Circling the Beat
Scales, Triads, Arpeggios
4 D major
4 Scale Degree Names: Tonic and
Leading Note
4 Writing Scales with Accidentals
4 Major and Minor Triads
4 Arpeggios
Reading and Theory
4 Accents and Accent Patterns
4 The Phrase
4 Chromatic Notes
4 Enharmonic Equivalents
4 Texture in Music (Polyphonic and
Homophonic Texture)
4 D.C. al Fine
4 Dynamic Markings
4 Fermata
4 Improvisation
4 Creating Your Own Melodies
4 Melodic Imitation
4 More Terms and Symbols: Repeat
Sign; M.M.
Musical Style
4 An Introduction to Musical Style
4 Baroque Period: Style,
Instruments, Composers
Theory Worksheets and
Ear-Training Worksheets
may be completed by the
students at home to free
up valuable lesson time.
The Theory Worksheets
contain written exercises
for both new and review
concepts.
The Ear-Training
Worksheets include such
activities as:
melody and rhythm
singing
interval identifcation
melody singbacks/
clapbacks
rhythm singbacks/
clapbacks
dictation
Guided rhythmic and
melodic improvisation
activities are included
in each level to provide
a creative outlet for
theoretical skills.
To complete the Ear-Training Worksheets, students will need to access
the audio fles online at www.soundadvicedirect.com
The track numbers for each exercise are identifed by an icon in the margin.
L E V E L T H R E E
6
New Concepts
Introduced:
Intervals
4 Descending maj 2 and P5; maj 6,
maj 7
4 Naming Intervals
Rhythm
4 Rhythmic Units: ,

e
,

and

4 Incomplete Measures: Upbeats


4 Rhythmic Imitation
Scales, Triads, Arpeggios
4 B
b
major
4 Scale Degree Names: Dominant
4 Writing Scales with Key
Signatures
4 Major Triads: Root, Third, Fifth
4 Two-Octave Arpeggio
Reading and Theory
4 Consonance and Dissonance
4 Dynamic Markings: Crescendo,
Decrescendo, Diminuendo
4 Homophonic Texture: Alberti Bass
4 Cadences
4 Chromatic Notes
Musical Style
4 Classical Period: Style,
Composers
4 The Orchestra: Baroque, Classical
Students can mark these
assignments themselves,
using the Ear-Training
Answer Key at the back
of each book.
Students can use the Ear-
Training Answer Key for
extra practice in singing
melodies and rhythms.
Each volume includes
helpful Suggestions
for Daily Ear-Training
Practice, offering students
additional opportunities
for improving their aural
skills.
Dictation and singback/
clapback exercises
relate what the student
hears to the theoretical
concepts.
L E V E L F O U R
7
New Concepts
Introduced:
Intervals
4 Descending maj 3 and min 3; P8,
min 6
4 Enharmonic Notes and Intervals
Rhythm
4 The Dotted Quarter-Note Beat
4 Rhythmic Units:
.
,


4 Simple and Compound Time
4 Tempo Markings
Scales, Triads, Arpeggios
4 D minor, G minor, E minor,
B minor
4 Writing Minor Scales with a Key
Signature or with Accidentals
4 How to Identify Relative Major
and Minor Scales
4 Tonic and Dominant Triads
Reading and Theory
4 Key Signature Shortcuts:
Preparation for Circle of 5ths
4 Learning a New Piece: What to
Look for First
4 Mad Music: Minor Key
Signatures
4 Major and Minor Relatives
4 Melodic Inversion
4 Minor Key Signatures with Flats
and with Sharps
4 The Key of a Melody: Major vs.
Minor
Musical Style
4 Romantic Period: Style,
Composers, the Orchestra,
the Piano
Additional components
such as reference charts,
games, and practice tests
are included in each book
to reinforce both writing
and ear-training activities
and enhance the learning
experience.
Charts:
Note-Value Comparison
Drawing Symbols
Rhythm Jumble
Song Clue
Games:
Mad Music
Rhythm Jumble Reading
Rhythm Jumble Solitaire
Rhythm Jumble
Composer
L E V E L F I V E
New Concepts
Introduced:
Intervals
4 Descending maj 2, maj 6
Rhythm
4 Cut Time
4 Triplets
4 Time Signature:
4 Circling the Dotted Quarter-Note
Beat
4 Adding Rests in Simple Time
4 Incomplete Measures in
Compound Time
4 Rhythmic Unit:
Scales, Triads, Arpeggios
4 Scales up to Four Sharps and Four
Flats
4 Harmonic and Melodic Minor
Scales
4 Scale Degree Names:
Subdominant and Subtonic
4 Subdominant Triads
4 Diatonic and Chromatic Half
Steps
Reading and Theory
4 Transposing a Melody Up or
Down an Octave
4 Mad Music: Name the 2nds
and 3rds
Musical Style
4 Common Practice Period
After completing Level 5
of Sound Advice,
students will be ready to
complete their Preliminary
Rudiments (Basic
Rudiments) examination
for RCM Examinations or
National Music Certifcate
Program.
Level 5 is an excellent entry
point for older beginners
and adult students to start
using Sound Advice.
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L E V E L S I X
New Concepts
Introduced:
Intervals
4 Augmented and Diminished
4 Inversions
4 Consonant and Dissonant
4 min 7
Rhythm
4 Irregular Divisions of the Beat
4 Adding Rests in Compound Time
4 Double Dots
4 Syncopation
4 Rhythmic Units: , , ,
Scales, Chords, Cadences
4 Tonic Minor Scales
4 Chromatic, Whole Tone, Blues,
Pentatonic, and Octatonic Scales
4 Triad Inversions and Figured Bass
4 Close and Open Position Triads
4 Triad Qualities: Major and Minor
4 IV Chord Progressions
4 Common-Tone Voicing
4 Passing Notes and Neighbor Notes
4 Dominant 7th Chords
4 Harmonizing with I, IV, and V
4 Perfect and Plagal Cadences
4 Popular Chord Symbols
Reading and Theory
4 Double Sharps and Flats
4 Tendency Tones
4 The Circle of 5ths
4 Transposition by Interval and Key
4 Keyboard Accompaniment Styles
4 Naming Chords in Various Styles
Musical Style
4 Early 20th-Century Musical Style
4 Impressionism
4 Jazz and Blues
Discussions of musical
style are related to
concepts covered in the
lesson. In this example,
the introduction of jazz
and blues helps students
to understand swing
eighths and the blues
scale.
9
L E V E L S E V E N
New Concepts
Introduced:
Intervals
4 Writing an Interval Below a Given
Note
4 Compound Intervals
4 Enharmonic Intervals
Rhythm
4 Rhythmic Unit: Breve
4 Non-Traditional Time Signatures
4 Hybrid Time
4 Adding Rests in Hybrid Time
Scales, Chords, Cadences
4 Modes
4 Augmented and Diminished Triads
4 Identifying Triads in Four-Part
Texture
4 Dominant 7th Chord Inversions
4 Imperfect Cadences
4 Diminished 7th Chords
4 Writing Chords and Cadences in
Chorale Style
4 Non-Traditional Chord Structures
Reading and Theory
4 Monophonic Texture
4 Transposition of Modes
4 C Clefs
4 Writing Melodies in Minor Keys
4 Transposing in Minor Keys
4 Instruments of the Orchestra
4 Score Types: Open and Short
4 Orchestral, String Quartet, and
Vocal Scores
Musical Style
4 Middle Ages and Renaissance
Style
4 20th-Century Musical Style
4 Dissonance and Atonality
A Theory Examination
follows the fnal lesson in
each book to summarize
the concepts presented
in the levela perfect
opportunity for review
and examination
preparation.
10
L E V E L E I G H T
New Concepts
Introduced:
Introductory Harmony
4 Chord Inversions and Figured
Bass Symbols
4 Tritone Resolutions
4 Identifying Diatonic Triads
in Major, Natural Minor, and
Harmonic Minor Scales
4 Non-Chord Tones: Passing Notes,
Neighbor Notes, Appoggiaturas,
and Suspensions
4 Creating an Accompaniment
for a Melody
4 Improvising a Melody Over a
Given Accompaniment
4 Chord Function and Progression
in Tonal Music
4 Chord Expansion
4 Four-Part Writing and Voice-
Leading
4 Four-Part Writing using I, ii, IV,
V, V
7
, vi, and vii
o6
4 Parallel 8ves and 5ths
4 Resolutions of the Dominant 7th
4 Two-Part Writing
4 Implied Harmony in Two-part
Textures
4 Cadential Six-Four Chords
4 Identifying Form and Modulation
in Baroque Dances
Reading and Theory
4 SATB Vocal Ranges
4 An Introduction to Song Writing
4 Setting Words to Music
4 Two-part Singing and Dictation
Musical Style
4 The Baroque Dance Suite:
Allemande, Courante, Sarabande,
Gigue
4 Optional Dances in the Baroque
Suite: Minuet, Bourre, Gavotte
Ear-training activities in
Levels 58 include sight
singing, rhythmic reading,
melodic and harmonic
dictation, identifcation
of intervals, scale
degrees, chords and
chord progressions,
cadences, meters,
textures and styles and
improvisation.
11
Level 8 provides a
perfect introduction
to the fundamentals
of harmonic language.
After completing Level
8, students will be
prepared to complete
the Introductory Harmony
examination offered
by RCM Examinations
and National Music
Certifcate Program.
Students will also be
well prepared for the
ear-training requirements
for Grade 8 practical
examinations and the
Junior Musicianship
examination.
The Frederick Harris Music Co., Limited
Canada
Unit 1, 5865 McLaughlin Rd.
Mississauga ON L5R 1B8
USA
Suite 882, 60 Industrial Parkway
Cheektowaga NY 14227
1-800-387-4013
www.frederickharrismusic.com
Brenda Braaten teaches theory
and musicianship at the Victoria
Conservatory of Music in British
Columbia. She is a theory and ear-
training clinician and for over twenty
years has taught theory, harmony,
history, and musicianship in her own
studio. She is actively involved in the
Cowichan Valley music community,
having coordinated events,
fundraisers, and a performing arts
summer school.
Crystal Wiksyk is the theory
coordinator at the Victoria
Conservatory of Music in British
Columbia, where she teaches
harmony, history, theory, and ear
training. She is an active theory
and musicianship clinician and
developed the Victoria Conservatory
of Music Theory Summer School,
which includes a teacher-training
program in theory and musicianship.
Series Editor
Laura Beauchamp-Williamson
has been an editor and workshop
clinician for Frederick Harris Music
since 1993. Nationally recognized
as a progressive piano educator,
she is in frequent demand as a
teacher, performer, adjudicator, and
workshop clinician. She maintains an
independent studio in her home.
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The Authors