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PUBLISHED SINCE 1992

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INDEX 32079
BIWEEKLY
Now I'm an actress on the stage -
A famous one, of cowse!
Bm maybe all that talking would
Make me a little hoarse!
I'd be a ballet dancer with
A tutu oGpink'-i1et'!(
But - ooops! I get guile dizzy when
i do a pirouette!
Bill wants to be a pop star,
Singing on the stage,
\Vears a purple outfit
(For purple's all the rage),
Dazzling orange neck-tie,
And shoes that hurt his feet;
Claps his hands and bellows,
Shaking to the beat.
He may look like a pop star,
With his long-baiTed group:
The trouble is he sounds like
A broody hen with croup.
Or I could be a pop singer
Playipg on my guitar.
And if I practise every day,
Perhaps I'd be a star!
tutu - TIaflK3 (6Q/lepuHu)
net - naYJ'HHK3
to get dizz;y - qyBCTBOBaTb
fOJlOBOKpYA::elrne
pirouetle - rrnpy::rr
hoarse- oxpmnJ.IH:H:
I"rpe - nypnypHblii
ootil - 3KUIIlIpOBKa, KOCllOM
all the rage - llOCJleJJ;EIJrn: KpllK MO)]U
to daxlJe - IIOpa:+GlTb BeJIHKOJIeIIIieM,
rTpeJIhUl3Tb
to Iu1 - (3J) ""Tb, ~ m l h 6oJn,go
to bellow- 6yrneB,ub, rpeMeTh
to shal.:e to the beat - KaqaThCX BTaKT
broodyhen - KYPm:I;a-Hace)IlCa
croup - xpmIJIIDt KpHK
1994 N.4
What does the Interior of a Modern Theatre Look Like?
Its two main parts are the stage and the hall or auditorium. The hall is separated rom
the stage by the orchestra. At the sides of the stage are the wings. A curtain (when lowered
or drawn) covers the stage. An intricate system of lights (footlights and toplights)
illuminates the stage. The seats on the ground floor are known as 'stalls' (those nearer the
stage are 'orchestra stalls'). The passages between the rows of stalls are the aisles. The
raised back part of the ground floor is 'the pit, while the small compartments nearer the
stage are 'the boxes'. Then follow the dress circle, the balconies and, finally, rhegallery:
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stage - cu;eHa, 3CTpa,r:J;a, TeaTpaJIhHhIe IIqr:IJI{OCTKII
stage manager - orrepaTOp cu;eHbI
commissionaire - llIBeitr.J;ap
foyer = lobby - 1>o:tte
doakroom - rap.n;epo6
attendant - 06CJIY)KlIBaIOll{ee JIlII..{O
opera glasses - TeaTpaJIhIIUii 6lIHOIOTh
audience - ay;r:I;HTOpllil
stalls - rraprep
orchestra stalls - rrepBhIe pgJJpI rraprepa
lit - aM<prrTearp
the boxes - JIO:tKII
the dress circle - 6eJIh3T3.)K
the gaDery - rarrepe.Sl
the balcony - 6aJIKOH
standing rO<fll - CTO.SI'Iee MeCTO
rortain - 33HaBeC
prompt box - 6y,n;Ka cY<PJIepa
prompt boy - cyqmep
P GE 2
scenery - .n;eKopau;HII
ropes - BepeBKlI
wings - KYJllICbI
footlights - paMIIa
full house - rrOJIIill::t:t 3aJI
first night - rrpeMnepa
applause - 3IDIO)l;lICMeHThI
curtain call - BhI30B aKTepa Ha cu;eHY
aIDIO)l;lICMeIITaMII IIJIlI KpIIKaMII BOCXIllI..I;eIDISI
to be a success with the public =
to be popular with the JK.Iblic - HMeTh ycrrex y
ny6mIKH
encore - BhI30B Ha 6rrc
to give an encore - rrcrrOJIIIlITh 'ITO-HII6y;IJ;b Ha 6rrc
cast - COCTaB .n;eiicJBYlOIIJ;IIX JIIII.J;
to buy a progrannne to see who is in the cast
today - KYJIlITh JIIXlrpaMMJCY, 'IT05u rrocMOIpeTh,
KTO cero,rr;HSI B COCTaBe .n;eiiClBYIDI.I.J;HXJllIU;
A Visit to the Theatre
Mirhael Bond

I he Browns were all very excited. Mr Brown


had been given tickets for a box at the theatre. It was
the first night of a brand new play, and the leading
part was being played by the world famous actor, Sir
Scaly Bloom Even Paddington became infected with
the excitement. He made several journeys to his
friend, Mr Gruber, to have the theatre explained
him Mr Gruber thought he was very lucky to be
going to the first night of a new play. 'All sorts of
famous people will be there,' he said. .'1 don't suppose
many bears have that sort Dj opportunity a
lifetime'.
Paddington was pleased to find the theatre all
exactly as Mr GrubeI had described it to him, even
L who opened the door for
them and saluted as they entered tlie foyer.
Everything was painted red and gold and the theatre
had a nice, warm, friendly sort of smell. There was a
slight upset at the cloakroom when he found he had
to pay sixpence in order to leave his duffle coat and
suitcase. The woman behind the counter turned quite
nasty when Paddington asked for his things back.
She was still talking about it in a loud voice as the
attendant .led them along a passage towards their
seats.
Paddington saw a box in front of him
marked OPERA GLASSES. SIXPENCE. Eventually,
after a great deal of thought, he unlocked his suitcase
and from a secret compartment withdrew a sixpence.
"I don't think much oj these," he said, a moment
later, looking through them at the audience.
"Everyone rub smaller."
"You've got them the wrong way round, silly," said
Jonathan.
"Well, 1 still don't think much oj them, H said
Paddington, turning them round. "I mJuldn't have
bought them if Yd known. Still," he added, after a
moment's thought, "they might come in usejul next
time. "
Just as he began to speak the overture came to an
end and the curtain rose. The scene was the
living-room of a large house, and Sir Sealy Bloom
1994 N<>4
was pacing up and
down. There was a
round of applause from
the audience.
" You don't take them
home," whispered Judy.
"You have to put them
back when you leave. "
WHAT!' cried Paddington, in a loud voice.
Several calls of 'hush' came from the darkened
theatre as Sir Sealy Bloom paused and looked
pointedly in the direction of the Browns' box.
"Do you mean to say... " words failed Paddington
for the moment. " Six pence!" he said, bitterly. He
turne d his gaze on Sir Sealy Bloom.
Sir Sealy Bloom looked rather irritable. He didn't
like first nights, and this one in particular had
started badly. Being the first night of the play, he
wasn't at all sure of some of his lines. To make
matters worse, he had arrived at the theatre only to
discover that the prompt boy was missing and there
were no one else to take his place.
Paddington soon forgot about his wasted sixpence
and devoted all his attention to the plot. He decided
quite early on that he didn't like Sir Sealy Bloom and
he stared at him hard through his opera giasses. He
followed his every move and when, at the end of the
IJ..1'St"Mctj Sir Sealyjlio in the part otthe hard- hearte d
father, turned his daughter out into the world
without a penny, Paddington stood up on his chair
and waved his programme indignantly at the stage.
'Are you enjoying it, Paddington?" asked
Mr Brown.
"It's very interesting, H said Paddington. He had a
determined note to his voice and Mrs Brown looked
at him sharply. She was beginning to recognize that
tone and it worried her.
"Where are you going, dear?" she asked, as he
made for the door ofthe box.
"Oh, justjor a walk," said Paddington, vaguely.
"Well, don't be too long, H she called, as the door
closed behind him.
(continued on page 6)
plot - <lJa6y:rra, CIO)I{eT, 3aroBop, IIH11HITa
indignandy - C Hero)J;oBaHlIeM, B03MYJ.I.J;eHIIO
brand new - COBeprneHHO HOBhItt
duflle = duffel - rnepCDlHruI 6a:ttR:a
nasty - 3JI06Hhrtt, yrpo)l{ill():u..J;II11:
to come in - OKa3aThCH IIOJIe3HhIM
to think muchjwell. of smth - 6hITh BhICOKOro
MIreHHH
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1994 N24
A play lives a long life before it makes
its appearance on the stage before the
general pubUc.
If it is a roaJ piece of art its creation
calls for inspiration, talent and arti<;tic
ingenuity.
Only after lengthy discussions about its
merits and flaws does the theatre decide to

....fne producer instructs the theatre staff
on the general treatment of the play and
outlines the main points of its stage
presentation. The director chooses his cast
and begins to rehearse the scenes. The
setting designer draws the sketches of the
scenery and special shops get busy
preparing the sets, while the properly
department supplies the furnishings and
the dress department makes the necessary
costumes.
When everything is ready and the
rehearsals go off without a hitch, a dress
rehearsal is called. In some time the
curtain rises to a full house, the play Jaces
the theatre-going public on its fIrst night.
A playwright con-
ceives an idea and after
months and months of
hard work, disappoint-
ments and joys his ideas
develop into the script of
the play.
Useful Words and Expressions
odduc - OB!1!!J
. ector - pe:+mccep
actor - aJ...'Te'p
- aKrpIIca
(ia}wnght. - .n;paMaTypr
man - rprnfep
understudy - .ny6JIep
extra -
setting designer - :..:y):lO)KffiIK-):leKopaTop
property department - OT.n;eJI peKBI13IITa
(npedMemo86blJl/Q, UCflOJlb3}'eMbIX 8
meampMbHOM npeiicmoQlIfluu)
dressing room - apTlICTmleCKaH yGOpHaH
costumes = dresses - KOC11OMY
to produce a play = to sI-age a play - CfaBHfb
m.ecy
to play lhe partor= lo play the role of - HrpaTb
poJlb
stage presentation - cueBlftleClme BOIDlOlJ..{eHUe
rn.ecLl
scene - cueHa Kax QaCTb.IJ,p3Ma1lI'leCKoro aA'TII
dress rehearsal - reHepaJt1>lWI peneTIIIUDI
appearance - nomlJteHlIe
creation - TBopemte
to can for - rpe6oBan.
inspiration - &llOXHOBeHlIe
ingenuity - no;:yccmo
to conceive - nOHIIMan.
PAGE 4
disappointment - pa3CRapoBamle
script - cUeHapItli
lengthy -,WIHHHO
merit - 3ac.rryra
flaw -
to instruct - :fIII'Th
to rehearse - penempoB3Th
sketch - 3CKII3
set - KOM1D1ekT
to supply - CH3t1A::3Th
furnishing - MefumpoBK3
hitch - nOMexa
1994 N!!4
British Drama Theatre Today
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Shakespeare's Globe Playhouse, about which
yOll have already read, is being reconstructed on its
original site.
Many other cities and large towns have at least
one theatre.
There are many theatres and theatre
companies for young people: the National Youth
Theatre and the Youth Vie Company in London, the
Scottish Youth Theatre in Edinburgh.
The National Youth Theatre, which stages
clas<>ical plays mainly by Shakespeare and modem
plays about youth, was on tour in RUS'>ia in 1989.
The theatre-goers wannly received the
production of Thomas Steams Eliot's play "Mmler
in the Cathedral". Many famous English actors
started their careers in the National Youth Theatre.
Among them Timothy Dalton, the actor who did the
part of Rochester in "Jane Eyer" shown on TV in
our country.
fall - II3,.1:J;eHlIe
wandering minstrel - 6po)J;Sl'IlI1t IIeBeu;
amateur - JIK)6HTeJIh
to fall (feU, fallen) into debt - BJIe3Th B,n:OJITII
crude - ChIpOtt, HeroroBhIii:
"'I.-conventional YCJ:J;9BHhItt
restoration - BOCCTaHOBJIeHlIe, peCTaBpau;mI
-artificial- HCKYCClBeHHhItt
we - 06yCJIoIDIeHIIhIit
influence - npoIillKHoBeHlIe
to be kIDghted - 6hITh B03Be.n;eHHhIM B phII..J;apcKO<
.n;OCIOIIHCTBO
Britain is now one of the world's major
theatre centres. Many British actors and actresses
are known all over the world They are Dame Peggy
kherojt, Glenda Jaekson, Laurenee Olivier, John
Gielgud and others.
Drama is so popular with people of all ages that
there are several thousand amateur dramatic
societies.
Now Britain has about 300 professional
theatres. Some of them are privately owned The
tickets are not hard to get but they are very
expensive. Regular seasons of opera and ballet are
given at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, in
London. The National Theatre stages modem and
classical plays, the Royal Shakespeare Company
produces plays mainly by Shakespeare and his
contemporaries when it performs in
Stratford-an-Avon, and modem plays in its two
auditoria in the City's Barbican Centre.
The Art of Acting
FFrom the fall of the Roman Empire until the Da\id Garrick was one of the greatest actors
10th century, acting hardly existed as an art in known. But even at his time acting was not very
Western Europe; only the wandering minstrels gave popular.
entertainments in castles and at fairs. In England, Durtng the 19th century acting became more
the first real actors were amateurs who perfonned and more natmalistic. Like in Shakespesre's time,
Miracle and Morality plays which were religious in the best actors understood the importance of the
character. team work of the company. One of the most famous
In the Elizabethan age, the first profe.'&onal actors of that time was Henry lIving. He was the first
theatres were opened At the time of Shakespeare actor to be knighted
there were at least six companies of actors. By the 1920s naturalistic acting reached a peak
Shakespeare himself joined the Earl of Leisester's in the performance of Sir Gerald du Marrier. He
company, which under lames I became known as the hardly appeared to be acting at all.
"King's Men". There were also companies of boy At present most acting continues to be
actors. All the women's parts were played by boys. It naturalistic. Designers make the settings as realistic
was very difficuh fet" most actors to earn a living on as pos<>ible. Modem producers and directors like
the stage, even in a London company, arid many of Peter Hall, Peter Brook and others are trying out
them fell into debt. When Shakespeare arrived in new styles of acting. Some go back to Greek methods,
London in 1586, the acting was very crude and with a reuval of the chorus; others are making use of
conventional There were almost no scenery, and the the audience in helping to interpret the play.
actors were dressed in the costumes of their day. But
when "The Globe" was opened to the public in 1599,
it was the golden age of the theatre in England.
In the first half of the 17th century the influence
of the Puritans was bad fet" the popular theatre, and
it was not before the restoration of the monarchy in
1660 that theatre-going again became a popular
habit. The most popular plays were comedies. The
fIrst role played by an actress was that of
Desdemona. Nell Gwynn was the first English
actress.
By the beginning of the 18th cenfLmy the most _
popular type of play was the sentimental comedy.
The acting was artificial probably due to the
influence of French actors.
But later, under the influence of Daud Garrick,
and some other actors acting became much more
naturalistic.
PAGE 5
'Ladies and gentlemen,' he said, "thank you for your kind
applause. We are indeed rrwst grateful. But before you leave I would
like to introduce the youngest and most important member of our
oompany. A young.. er, bear, who came to our rescue... ' The rest of
Sir Sealy's speech was drowned in a buzz ofexcitement as he stepped
forward to the very front ofthe stage, where a small screen hid ahole
in the boards which was the prompt box.
He took hold of one of Paddington's paws and pulled.
Paddington's head appeared through the hole. In his other paw he
was grasping a copy ofthe script.
'Come along, Padrtington,' said Sir Sealy. 'Come and take your
bow..
'/ can 'f gasped Paddington. '/ think Fm stuck!'
bare- HerrpHKpameHHhIlt, rrpocTOlt
to boom - opaT!>, rpeMeTh, peBeTh
couch - KyllIeTKa, TaXTa
to growl- pDIqaTh, BOpqaTh,JKaJIOBaThCH
to gulp - 3aJU>IXaThCH, ,n;aBHThCH
torecsue - CIIaCaTh, oCBo6oJK,IJ;aTh, BhIpyqaTh
remarkably - y,n;HBHTeJIhHO, Heo6hIKHoBeHHo
urgent - CPOqHhIit
to spoil - IIOpTlITh
lines - CJIOBa pOJIH, peIIJIHKa
to cheer - aIIIIJIO)l,lIpOBaTh
to drown - TOHYTh, 3arJIynraTh
buzz - rYJI
to - 3aJKHMaTh (6pyKe)
come along! - IIOTopanmrBaitC5l! IIJJ:eM!
to take a bow - paCKJIaHHBaThCH (60meem Ha
anJIOaUCMeflmbl)
to stick -- 3aCTpHTh, 3aBH3HYTh
Gus: the Theatre Cat
rs. Elliot
Gus is the Cat at the Theatre Door.
His name, as I ought to have told yop. before,
Is really Asparagus. That's such afuss
To pronounce, thatweusuallycallhirnjust Gus.
'7 have played, " so he says, "every possible part,
And I used to know seventy speeches by heart.
I knew how to act with my back and my tail;
With an hour of rehearsal, I could neverfail. "
And he says: "Now, these kittens, they do not get troined
As we did in the days when Victoria reigned.
They never get drilled in a regular troupe,
And they think they are smart, just tojump through a hoop.
And he'll says, as he scratches himselfwith his claws,
"Well, the Theatre's certainly not what it was.
These modem productkms are very well,
But there's nothing to equal, from all that I hear tell,
That moment ofmistery
Men I made a history
As Firefrorefiddle, the Fiend of the Fell."
1993 No4
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_H_1_W_:_A __1
(continued from page 8)
6. CKonbKO BaM neT?
-,l:\o1ner.
-OT1L(09neT',
OT IOL(O 14ner,
- OT ISJJ,O 18 neT,
-OTI9L(030ner,
- or 30 L(O 40 ner,
- oo.nbwe 40 ner.
1. KTO BbI?
- Yl<eHHK KlIacca
(lCaICozo?)
WKQJlbl (OOlU,eoopa:JooameJlbIlOU
UJlU
- yl<HTeJlb B WKone
Ul/.U
)
- npeno.a:aBaTeJJ.b B Byae,
-
"--;:---;;-----,---:-:-:=
8. q'f'Q BaM HpaBH1'CR B raseTe?
9. q1'() He HpaBH1'CII?
11. HY1Kn,aerecb nH BbI:
B.a:onOnHHTe1IbHOH llHTepaType,
- B ay.a:HOKacceTax c 3anHCblO
TeKCTOB H3 ra3eTbI.
u. AJq>ec C OO'fTOBblM
HH.lJ,eI:COM:
13. lIJ.H.O. ,
PAGE 7
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1993 N!!4
ABit of HUMOUR
(Eric Morecambe andEmie Wise,
The Morecambe and Wiw Joke Book)
Eric: I'll never forget the fIrst words
I spoke in the theatre.
Ernie: What were they?
Ertc: 'This way, please!
P
I'
rogrammes...
- Hi, Johnny! This is
a small world! Where is
your seat?
- In ihe sialls, row C.
Ani where is yours?
- In iIle box, close to the stage.
do you think ofille play?
- The action develops slowly. Some scenes are dull.
The cast is not vel)' good, Do you share myopinion?
- Frankly speaking I do, That happens to be.a railler
poor performance. Have you been to this iIleatre before?
- Haven Chad a chance, you know. I am here for the
fIrst time. I like the hail. It ts beautifully decorated. The
chairs are comfortable and the chandelier is wonderful.
To put in a nutshell evel)'thlng here is vel)' magnillcent
but the performance.
- I advise you to see "Hamlet" by Shakespeare at this
theatre. You will be Impressed.
- I have been dreaming of seeing any play by
Shakespeare in thts
country, 1'11 do mybest
to see "Hamlet".
- I hope 1'11 enjoy/he
performance.
- We must be hurry to
the hall. In a minute the
curtain will be up.
- Be seeing you later.
This Is a Small World
HAillA
AHKETA
Ll.oportte 'OfTaTeJlH!
Mw p;mbl BCTpc'le C BaMll B
MOBQN 1994 roJJ;y. B BOSOM I'OJO'
Bac crano eme 6onbwe, H 3TO
CBIt.!l:eTeJJbCTBO TOro, lfTO Haw TPYll
"yZCH RaM, HaWK Aopome ,Il,eTH,
POARTe.I!H H Y'lHTeJ(jl. npHm.'IO
8pet.ur n03HakOMJf'TbClil no6.llH)ke.
nOJQ..,1yiicra, 3anonffilTe
npeA1laraeMytO aHlCery. BaWH
OTSeTW. BaWH npe.llJlO*CHMSI
n03BOJUIT HaM lleJIaTb HMeHHO Ty
ra3ery. kOTOpalil6YAer HeOOXOAHMa
B aOMe "3 Bac. MN *lI,eM
BamHx OTBeT'OS no a,ttpecy: 123J62
MOCK6lJ, al Jl 30, c nOMemtcOll
"AHlCema".
I. KaIC Bw Y3HaAH 0 ra3eTe?
yBl1JJ.eJlH B KHOCKe "Pocne'l3TH",
nopckOMeH.lJ,OB3./1H 3H3KOMhlC.
nopeKOMeH.Q,OBaJI y'lHTeJlb,
ySltJl.eJlH peKJI3My B ra3ne
(ICQa:oii?j,_=- _
2. Koru Sw cranK '1HTaTeJleM
"ameli ra3eTbI?
-cI992r..
c 1-0" nOJlOBHHbl1993 r.,
00 nOJlOBtlHhI 1993 r.,
cI994r.
3. KaK BN nOCTaere ra3eTy?
nOJly..aere no nOAunClee,
nOkynaeTC B kHOCKC,
6epeTe B 6HWutOTeKe,
6epeTe y 3H3KOMblX,
-;;:-::=::-;::::-===
s. KaJC n,OJlro B1>I XpaHHTe ra3eTy?
npo\lHTaB, 8h16paCbIB3eTC.
Bbl6paCblBaere \lCpe3 Kaltoe-TO
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XpaHHTe nOCTOIIHHO.
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4. Ct::O./lbkO 'lenoselC '1HTaeT
n,aHHbdi 3.l.3eNnJ1l1p ra3eTbl?
lfUTae-rc TOJlblCO Bw,
lfHTaeTe caM" If n.aere 3HakOMwM,
\lI1TaeTe caMH ., npHHOCHTe B
KJlacc.
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BblnyculOWHH peAaIl:T0P JI.A. CbI'Iyrosa.
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PAGE 8