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PROPOSED ROAD RE-CLASSIFICATION

Final Position Paper

Planning Service of DPWH and Project Development Services of DILG

May 2006

PROPOSED ROAD RE-CLASSIFICATION


Final Position Paper

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Executive Summary..i
1
Background..............................................................................................................................1
2
Recent Work on Re-Classification...........................................................................................4
3
New Classification Criteria......................................................................................................5
4
Urban Roads..........................................................................................................................11
5
Issues In Implementing A New Classification System..........................................................14
5.1
Current Legislation........................................................................................................14
5.2
Moratorium on Reclassification....................................................................................14
5.3
Funding..........................................................................................................................15
5.4
LGUs Readiness for New Road Network Planning and Maintenance Processes........16
5.5
Condition of Roads upon Transfer.................................................................................16
5.6
Road Right-of-Way Documentation..............................................................................17
5.7
Responsible Agencies for the Functional Classification...............................................17
6
Route Numbering...................................................................................................................17
6.1
Overview........................................................................................................................17
6.2
Route Numbering Criteria.............................................................................................19
6.2.1
General Policy.......................................................................................................19
6.2.2
Specific Policies for Administrative Classes.........................................................20
7
Action Plan............................................................................................................................22
Appendix A: Population Data by City (2000 census).....23
Appendix B: Major (Base) Ports, Major Ferry Terminals, Major Airports, and Tourist Service
Centers...25
Appendix C: Road Re-classification by Province, DPWH District Office, and Road Section
(with LRS Island Codes)...30
Appendix D: National Roads in Major Cities.60
Appendix E: Route Designation for National Arterial Roads75
Appendix F: PowerPoint Presentation and Regional and City Maps... .81

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
In April 2002, the Department recognized that in connection with the new Planning Process
under the Reform Agenda, there was an urgent need to review the current classification of the
road system (including bridges) in the country. At that time a Technical Working Group (TWG)
was established with permanent members from the Department of Public Works and Highways
(DPWH) and the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) and with ad hoc
members from the Department of Transportation and Communications, the Department of
Tourism, the Provincial Engineers Association of the Philippines (PEAP) and the Municipal
Engineers Association of the Philippines to advise on the topics of discussion from their
professional views.
The first comprehensive reference to a road classification system in the Philippines is found in
Republic Act No. 917, known as the Philippine Highway Act, enacted in 1953 and Executive
Order (EO) No. 113, Series of 1955, which became effective on January 1, 1955, Establishing
The Classification of Roads. EO No. 113 classified the roads into national primary and national
secondary classes as well as delineating the so-called national aid provincial and city roads of
sufficient importance for eventual reclassification at a later stage. EO No. 113 also laid down
criteria for classification of National Roads and for re-classification from local roads to National
Roads.
Executive Order No. 124, Series of 1987, stipulates that the Minister (now Secretary) of the
Ministry (now Department) of Public Works and Highways shall have the power to Classify
roads and highways into national, regional (interpreted as: routes of primary arterial roads),
provincial, city, municipal, and barangay roads and highways, based on objective criteria it
shall adopt; provide or authorize the conversion of roads and highways from one category to
another.
The classification system in EO No. 113 was administrative in nature and resulted in a national
primary and national secondary road system (16,175 km) and intended national aid provincial
and city roads (2,823 km), totaling 18,998 km, throughout the archipelago. However, out of the
designated national aid provincial and city roads only 1,595 km had been re-classified to
national status as of December 20, 2005; thus bringing the actual total of National Roads to
17,771 km or short of 1,227 km in the original total in EO No. 113. Thus, the original national
system of 17,771 km with amendments (about 10,900 km approved by Congress from time to
time from 1955 up to now) adds up to 28,664 km (excluding 407 km in the Autonomous Region
of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM)), as we know it today. These National Roads (i) connected
provincial capitals and other major urban areas of the country; or (ii) and/or were continuous in
extent and formed part of the main trunk-line system of the country; and/or led to national ports
and national airports.
Since the 1970s numerous studies have been carried out on Philippine road classification. The
Philippines Road Classification Study (PRCS) funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB)
and executed in 1991-1993, highlighted that the existing classification of roads in Philippines is
for administrative rather than functional purposes. It reflects policy to assign responsibility for
specific roads based on source of funding, minimum qualifying design standards, or official

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requests from varying levels of government. Over the years, without specific criteria to guide
highway planners, roads have been assigned to inappropriate classifications. Also, over time, the
function of many roads has changed, but the roads have never been re-classified.
The re-classification places emphasis on the functional aspect of a road. The essence of
functional classification is that it concentrates on the purpose of the road in a strategic and
interregional sense rather than its use in terms of traffic related to geometric features.
The TWG produced draft definitions and criteria for a new Functional Classification for all roads
in the Philippines. All members of the TWG have, in principle, agreed on these definitions and
criteria as shown below. This was confirmed when the TWG resumed meetings on June 16,
2004. Since then the TWG has advocated the criteria and the resulting network classification in
various meetings with NEDA, PEAP, DILG, seven pilot Regions, ten pilot cities and provinces,
the Executive Secretary of the League of Cities, and the Departments MANCOM.
New Functional Classification Criteria
National Roads
Primary Arterial- Connects Major Cities (at least around 100,000 people in Year 2000)*
* Cities within Metropolitan Areas are not covered by the criteria.

Secondary Arterial

- Connects Cities to Primary Arterial Roads, except in Metropolitan Areas


- Connects Major Ports and Ferry Terminals to Primary Arterial Roads
- Connects Major Airports to Primary Arterial Roads
- Connects Tourist Service Centers to Primary Arterial Roads or other Secondary
Arterial Roads
- Connects Cities (not included in the category of Major Cities) in Appendix A
- Connects Provincial Capitals within the same Region
- Connects Major National Government Infrastructure to Primary Arterial Roads
or other Secondary Arterial Roads

Provincial Roads (Local Roads)


- Connect Cities and Municipalities without traversing National Roads
- Connect National Roads to Barangays through rural areas
- Connect to Major Provincial Government Infrastructure

Municipal and City Roads (Local Roads)


- Roads within the Poblacion
Roads that connect to Provincial and National Roads
Roads that provide Inter-Barangay connections to Major Municipal and
City Infrastructure without traversing Provincial Roads

Barangay Roads (Local Roads)


- Other Public Roads (officially turned over) within the Barangay and not
covered in the above definitions

Expressways

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- Highways with limited access, normally with interchanges; may include


facilities for levying tolls for passage in an open or closed system

Toll Roads
-Roads where a toll for passage is levied in an open or closed system

The resulting proposed re-classification of the existing National Roads is shown below.
Proposed Re-classification of the Existing National Road Network
New Classification
Primary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
For Transfer to Local Government
Total

Length (Km)
5,872
12,557
10,117
28,546

An early example of such a transfer is the Memorandum of Understanding dated August 30,
2004 between DPWH and Mandaue City in Cebu followed up by EO No. 427 of May 16, 2005
where three National Road segments of 5.5 km were converted to city roads.
During February and March 2006, the DPWH carried out pilot studies of the new proposed road
classification system in: Regions NCR (Manila City and Quezon City), CAR (Benguet Province
and Baguio City), IV-A (Batangas Province and City), VI (Iloilo Province and City), VII (Cebu
Province and Cebu and Mandawe Cities), VIII (Leyte Province and Tacloban City, Northern,
Eastern, and Western Samar Provinces, and Calbayog City), and X (Misamis Occidental and
Oriental Provinces, and Cagayan del Oro City). The feedback was generally positive but all
participants (a total of 170) advocated a balance between the new proposed mandate and
budgetary and manpower resources provided at the LGU level through transfers from the
National Government.
One might argue that the roads proposed to be transferred back to the Local Government Units
(LGUs) would constitute local roads (as per new functional classification) for which the LGUs
would be fully responsible for maintenance and improvement. This would be in line with the
evolving delegation of responsibilities to the LGUs and the fact that DPWH over the years since
the reclassification of local roads to National Roads has built up a valuable asset base for those
roads. The tax base and actual collection percentage of the LGUs need to be analyzed as part of
any change of system to ensure that the LGUs have a sustainable tax base to fund local roads
(provincial, city, municipal, barangay). If the tax base is not sufficient, other alternatives should
be considered, such as a grandfather arrangement with a one-time compensation in the form of
a lump sum for the initial funding requirements from the National Government a one-time
block allocation for suitable improvement according to needs-based prioritization analysis. The
prerequisite condition for block allocation for improvement would be that the LGU concerned is
willing and able to fund future maintenance/asset preservation costs.
PEAPs argument that the National Governments annual budget for maintenance of all-weather
roads should be transferred to the LGUs concerned, would result in a recurrent amount (routine
maintenance) of around PhP 800 million in September 2005 prices (at PhP 75,000 per km for
paved roads and PhP 100,000 per km for gravel roads) for the all-weather roads to be transferred
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to LGUs. PEAPs second main argument that current National Roads proposed for transfer to
LGUs, which are not in an all-weather condition, should be deferred until such time when the
said roads are upgraded (by the National Government) to all-weather condition, would cost
around PhP 8 billion over a number of years in September 2005 prices (at PhP 5 billion for paved
roads and PhP 3 billion for gravel roads).
In considering National Government funding it should be a prerequisite that LGUs are classified
according to their income-generating ability.
The advantages of the new classification are:

LGUs will be mandated to look after all local roads within their jurisdiction in
accordance with the Governments decentralization policy;
DPWH can better focus on the core road network and match mandate with available
funding;
Needs-based allocation of scarce resources; and
Budgets are more equitably distributed.

The proposal also includes a National Road routing system for the country, according to which
primary National Roads would have a two-digit number (currently from N1 [Daang Maharlika
Highway] to N25 [Santa Josefa - Bislig City]) and secondary National Roads a three-digit
number (currently from N100 [Rosario-Baguio via Kennon Road Bontoc-Narvacan] to N610
[Samal City- Kaputia on Samal Island off Davao City]). N1 is also known as Asian Highway No.
26 (AH26). There are currently proposed to be 25 Primary and 134 Secondary Arterial National
Roads.

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Background

The first comprehensive reference to a road classification system in the Philippines is found in
Republic Act No. 917, known as the PHILIPPINE HIGHWAY ACT, enacted in 1953 and
Executive Order (EO) No. 113, Series of 1955, which became effective on January 1, 1955,
ESTABLISHING THE CLASSIFICATION OF ROADS. EO No. 113 classified the roads into
national primary and national secondary classes, as well as delineating so-called national aid
provincial and city roads of sufficient importance for eventual re-classification at a later stage.
Executive Order No. 124, Series of 1987, stipulates that the Minister (now Secretary) of the
Ministry (now Department) of Public Works and Highways shall have the power to Classify
roads and highways into national, regional (interpreted as: routes of primary arterial roads),
provincial, city, municipal, and barangay roads and highways, based on objective criteria it
shall adopt; provide or authorize the conversion of roads and highways from one category to
another.
The classification system in EO No. 113 was administrative in nature and resulted in a national
primary and national secondary road system (16,175 km) and intended national aid provincial
and city roads (2,823 km), totaling 18,998 km, throughout the archipelago. However, out of the
designated national aid provincial and city roads only 1,595 km had been re-classified to
national status as of December 20, 2005; thus bringing the actual total of National Roads to
17,771 km or short of 1,227 km in the original total in EO No. 113. Thus, the original national
system of 17,771 km with amendments (about 10,900 km approved by Congress from time to
time from 1955 up to now) adds up to 28,664 km (excluding 407 km in the Autonomous Region
of Muslim Mindanao (ARMM)), as we know it today. These National Roads (i) connected
provincial capitals and other major urban areas of the country; or (ii) and/or were continuous in
extent and formed part of the main trunk-line system of the country; and/or led to national ports
and national airports.
EO No. 113 also laid down the following additional criteria for classification of National Roads
and criteria for re-classification from local roads to National Roads:
1.

National Roads shall have a right-of-way of not less than 20 meters, provided that a
right-of-way of at least 60 meters shall be reserved for roads constructed through untitled
public land.

2.

For re-classification of local roads, EO No.113 implies that proof of acquisition of the
required road right-of-way shall be provided to the Department (such as Deed of
Donation or Sale duly notarized and indicating the lot number and area acquired, and
Real Property Tax Declaration Number and/or Certification from the concerned
Provincial Registry of Deeds and/or DENR in case of forested land).

3.

The National Roads forming the secondary trunk-line system shall exclude feeder
roads, defined as roads branching off the trunk-line system and not being in line with
the provisions in the second paragraph on this page.

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4.

Any local road proposed for conversion shall meet the original criteria for classification
of National Roads as described in the second paragraph on this page. This requires that a
proposal shall be accompanied by: (i) an endorsement by the Provincial and/or
Municipal Board to the Secretary of Public Works and Communications (now the
Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH)); and (ii) a location map indicating
kilometer stations at the start and end of the passable road and its relation to other road
networks in the area.

5.

The Secretary of the DPWH shall declare re-classification of local roads to National
Roads (reinforced by EO No. 124).

Since the 1970s numerous studies have been carried out on Philippine road classification. The
Philippines Road Classification Study (PRCS) funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB)
and executed in 1991-1993, highlighted that the existing classification of roads in Philippines is
for administrative rather than functional purposes. It reflects policy to assign responsibility for
specific roads based on source of funding, minimum qualifying design standards, or official
requests from varying levels of government.
Over the years, without specific criteria to guide highway planners, roads have been assigned to
inappropriate classifications. Also, over time, the function of many roads has changed, but the
roads have never been re-classified.
Functional classification is paramount for long-term planning and strategic prioritization in view
of anticipated limited resources, particularly public funds. The essence of functional
classification is that it concentrates on the purpose of the road in a strategic and interregional
sense rather than its use in terms of traffic related to geometric features. Earlier criteria for
selecting National Roads merely stated that they should connect centers of national importance,
regional and provincial capitals (there are no officially recognized regional capitals). Such
selection criteria are considered much too broad and at the same time ambiguous. Therefore,
objective classification criteria are called for. These criteria must be (i) rational, (ii) consistent
over the entire road network, and (iii) stable over a number of years to demonstrate the criterias
longevity.
The new planning process being implemented and institutionalized in the DPWH gives fresh
impetus to take a new look at the road network classification issues. The National Road network
has increased from 16,175 km in 1955, plus 1,595 km of re-classified national aid roads, to
28,664 km today. An analysis of this increase in a functional context shows that the original
17,771 km of National Roads, including later re-classification of national aid roads, are still
the basic backbone network today and almost anything added to that network from 1955 to the
present time is not within any criteria stipulating the boundaries of true National Roads.
According to the DPWH electronic road data repository there are National Roads without surface
type (tracks or trails or non-existing) and without any national function since they are short (a
few km) and leading off the main National Road to scarcely populated villages; these cases
should not have been registered under National Roads but should have remained as local roads.

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The new classification criteria should (i) reflect the level of service appropriate to the function,
(ii) contribute to needs-based allocation of scarce resources, (iii) enhance the planning processes,
and (iv) ensure that resources for asset preservation and network development projects are more
equitably distributed. The latter aspects would also necessitate continuous inventory updating
and re-classification of roads through areas served by new diversion roads, where the current de
facto practice has been to keep the old road at the higher level of the road hierarchy and the
new road at a medium level.
The road classification goals are established to ensure that (i) the concept is clearly understood,
acceptable and implementable by both Local and National Government Units, (ii) they are easily
adaptable to future amendments in the functionality of the road network, (iii) the road authorities
have clearly defined responsibilities, (iv) they take into account the effect of resource allocations,
and (v) the proposed criteria are tested through a pilot study. In 2003, a limited pilot study with
plotting of roads on maps (see sample under Chapter 3) according to the new criteria was carried
out in Batangas Province. That study showed that the new re-classification criteria were
appropriate and objective as shown in the resulting mapping of the roads, which gave due
consideration to location of important national infrastructure and tourist service centers while at
the same time assigning local roads to their correct function.
According to the Rural Roads Policy Development Framework Project of June 2003 (financed
by ADB) and DPWH statistics as of October 24, 2005, the Philippines Road Network constitutes
about 200,000 km, of which 28,664 km are National Roads, excluding those in the Autonomous
Region of Muslim Mindanao (407 km), and about 172,000 km local roads, of which Barangay or
village roads are 122,000 km (71 % of the total local road length). In any road classification
exercise utmost attention must be paid to the Local Government Code and the stipulations in the
DPWH Design Guidelines, Criteria and Standards, Volumes I and II, 1st Edition 1984 (also called
the Red Book).
The DPWH resumed work in late 2002 on devising new classification criteria that define the
function or purpose of each road (and bridge) in the Philippines. This methodology would
provide road planners with a standardized rational approach when assigning roads to a particular
administrative agency. Roads would be grouped into classes, or systems, according to the
principal type of service they provide and more appropriate funding mechanisms for road
transport, as a whole would be adopted.
It should also be kept in mind that the mere re-classification of a local road does not guarantee an
upgrading to a higher improvement level in times of severe budget constraints on the part of the
National Government. Thus, all National Roads, including planned roads such as diversion roads
and completion of missing links, will undergo a prioritization exercise, where the outcome is
determined upon economic viability, including traffic volumes and road and bridge condition
values, among others, in a Multi-Criteria Analysis (MCA). MCA allocates scores to three main
criteria: (i) project preparedness, economic evaluation (30 percent of total score only), and
environmental and social impact; (ii) road classification and strategic network analysis; and (iii)
social development criteria (State of the Nation Address [SONA] goals). According to these
criteria it is not worth the effort to propose re-classification of a local road with little traffic and
bad condition unless a feasibility study can justify improvement based on forecast traffic.

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Recent Work on Re-Classification

In 1998, the Department formed a Technical Working Group to re-classify the Philippines Road
Network based on the 1991-1993 PRCS study. Presentations and discussions were held with
Provincial, Municipal and City Engineers associations across the country. However, feedback
suggested that the proposed criteria were complex and difficult to apply in the field, and that they
could not be sustained without appropriate institutional reform.
In late 2002, with renewed impetus for reform and with the on-going Rural Roads Policy
Development Framework Project in the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG),
DPWH re-established a Technical Working Group (TWG) for Road Classification. This
comprised key staff in the DPWH Planning Service, representatives from DILGs Office of
Project Development Services, including staff from the Rural Roads Policy Development
Framework Project. A series of workshops and meetings was held in the TWG, also involving
staff from the Departments of Tourism, Transportation and Communications as well as officers
from the Provincial Engineers Association of the Philippines (PEAP) and the Municipal
Engineers Association of the Philippines (MEAP), when appropriate.
This working group produced draft definitions and criteria for a new Functional Classification
for all roads in the Philippines. All members of the TWG have, in principle, agreed on these
definitions and criteria as shown below. This was confirmed when the TWG resumed meetings
on June 16, 2004. At that meeting a Board Member (Re-classification Issues) of PEAP assured
that he would advocate the new classification concept to LGUs during June-August 2004 and
report back after the PEAP Consultative Workshop on Road Classification held on August 5,
2004 in Talisay City, Negros Occidental. The response of PEAP dated September 3, 2004 as
approved by its President follows:
Case 1: The LGUs may accept the National Roads (designated as all-weather roads) provided
that the allocated budget for maintenance of said National Roads will be transferred to the LGUs.
Currently, most LGUs are having a hard time maintaining their current provincial roads due to
insufficient funds especially now that the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) maybe further
reduced; Case 2: For National Roads which are not classified as all-weather roads yet, and
where LGUs will have to spend their own resources to maintain them, turn-over should be
deferred until such time when the said roads are classified as all-weather roads; Case 3: If the
transfer of National Roads to LGUs is really inevitable the Road Right of Ways of these roads
should be settled before the transfer. Case 4: LGUs would request to defer any transfer of roads
to the LGUs until there is no longer a fiscal crisis since the resources of the LGUs for the
maintenance of the roads would be affected as we have mentioned in Case 1.

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New Classification Criteria

The Table below illustrates the result of the very detailed deliberations over four years.
National Roads
Primary Arterial - Connects Major Cities (at least around 100,000 people in Year 2000)*
* Cities within Metropolitan Areas are not covered by the criteria.

Secondary Arterial - Connects Cities to Primary Arterial Roads, except in Metropolitan Areas
- Connects Major Ports and Ferry Terminals to Primary Arterial Roads
- Connects Major Airports to Primary Arterial Roads
- Connects Tourist Service Centers to Primary Arterial Roads or other Secondary
Arterial Roads
- Connects Cities (not included in the category of Major Cities) in Appendix A
- Connects Provincial Capitals within the same Region
- Connects Major National Government Infrastructure to Primary Arterial Roads or
other Secondary Arterial Roads

Provincial Roads (Local Roads)


- Connect Cities and Municipalities without traversing National Roads
- Connect National Roads to Barangays through rural areas
- Connect to Major Provincial Government Infrastructure

Municipal and City Roads (Local Roads)


- Roads within the Poblacion
Roads that connect to Provincial and National Roads
Roads that provide Inter-Barangay connections to Major
Municipal and
City Infrastructure without traversing Provincial Roads

Barangay Roads (Local Roads)


- Other Public Roads (officially turned over) within the Barangay and not
covered in the above definitions

Expressways
- Highways with limited access, normally with interchanges; may include
facilities for levying tolls for passage in an open or closed system

Toll Roads
-Roads where a toll for passage is levied in an open or closed system

Notes to the New Classification Criteria (in the order as they appear in the table above)

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A Major City is defined as having a population in Year 2000 of at least around 100,000 (see
listing of all cities in Appendix A, which shows that there were 63 cities in Year 2000 with that
population size). They are forms of government headed by a City Mayor and with a population
higher than municipalities. The cities also include Barangays within their jurisdiction.
A Province is defined in accordance with Legislation and administered in conformity with the
Local Government Code (1991).
A Provincial Capital is usually the seat of the provincial government.
Cities are other forms of government headed by City Mayors with a population level higher
than municipalities but with less than 100,000 people in Year 2000. These cities are administered
in conformity with the Local Government Code (1991) and also include Barangays within their
jurisdiction.
Metropolitan Areas are Metro Manila, Cebu and Davao Cities, which include cities or
contiguous municipalities and districts meeting the criteria for metropolitan integration.1
Major Ports are the 24 base ports managed by the Philippine Ports Authority or the Cebu Port
Authority. Listing of the major ports as defined by the Department of Transport and
Communications is in Appendix B.
Major Ferry Terminals are composed of 36 locations. Listing of the major ferry terminals as
defined by the Department of Transportation and Communications is in Appendix B.
Major Airports are the 25 airports with international or scheduled domestic commercial flights
carrying international and domestic traffic throughput (arrivals and departures) of at least 20,000
passengers a year. The passenger traffic volumes are the estimated base flows of an economically
viable airport with facilities to accommodate the envisaged aircraft types. Currently four airports
are classified as international (NAIA, Subic, Clark and Mactan-Cebu) and four as alternate
international (Laoag, Zamboanga, Davao and Tambler [General Santos City]). Listing of the
major airports as defined by the Department of Transportation and Communications is in
Appendix B.
Tourist Service Centers are staging areas for tourist destinations or spots. The Centers should
offer a variety of accommodation, restaurants, information centers, shopping and personal
services, airport or seaport or ferry terminal or land transport terminals, etc. The Centers should
also be strategically located and well integrated with an existing urbanized area such as a city or
town. Listing of the Tourist Service Centers (currently 80) as defined by the Department of
Tourism is in Appendix B.
Major National Government Infrastructure includes permanent military installations,2
national prisons and special economic zones managed by the Government. The military
1
2

The Subic Bay Metropolitan Area (SBMA) is not included under this definition.
This definition does not include camps, which are temporary in nature, and military and police training institutes.
Roads within the areas of Major National Government Infrastructure are not included as National Roads.

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installations serve a national requirement or support function designated by the Department of


National Defense. National prisons and special economic zones are designated by the concerned
National Government agencies. Access roads to hydropower, water-impounding and irrigation
dams and power plants and other related national infrastructure are the responsibility of the
respective organizations carrying out the operations (as also is the case in other countries). Once
the schemes are constructed, always including access roads, the maintenance becomes part of the
plant operation budget. Most of these schemes would be revenue generating.
A Municipality is an administrative unit governed by a Mayor and administered in accordance
with the Local Government Code (1991); it consists of Barangays within the municipal
jurisdiction.
A Barangay, the smallest administrative unit in the Philippines, is headed by a Punong Barangay
and consists of different smaller communities (sitios or villages).
Major Provincial, Municipal and City Government Infrastructure includes key Local
Government Unit (LGU) installations, including local municipal ports, prisons, city/town halls,
etc., managed by the respective LGUs.
Poblacion is the center of every municipality or city, where city/town hall, plaza, church, etc. are
usually located.
As of early 2005 there were 79 provinces, 115 cities and 1,495 municipalities in the country.
The criteria have been applied to the existing National Road Network as of March 2006 (the total
figure increases when local roads are classified as National Roads). The network includes roads
in the Autonomous Region of Muslim Mindanao [ARMM]. The new national road classification
would replace the existing broad classification based on strategic and geographical criteria:
North-South Backbone Arterial National Roads, East-West Laterals Arterial National Roads,
Other Roads of Strategic Importance, and Secondary National Roads.
The results of this exercise indicate that 10,117 km of roads could be re-classified out of the
National Road Network and transferred to the Local Government network (see Table below).
It is interesting to note that the total length of the new proposed primary and secondary arterial
National Roads of 18,429 km (including the National Roads in ARMM) fairly closely matches
the 17,771 km of National Primary and National Secondary Roads as stipulated in Executive
Order No. 113, Series of 1955 (see Chapter 1).
Proposed Reclassification of the Existing National Road Network
New Classification
Length (Km)
Primary Arterial
5,872
Secondary Arterial
12,557
For Transfer to Local Governmenta
10,117
Totalb c
28,546
a
Including 1,673 km of existing urban National Roads .
b
Including 407 km under ARMM jurisdiction (35 km could be transferred to LGUs).

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Slightly different from the official figure of 28,664 without ARMM data, particularly due to lack of inventory data on some minor roads (118 km).

Some of the Roads for Transfer to Local Government fall within the jurisdiction of National
Government Offices. In this context it is proposed that the respective Offices take over the
management of the concerned roads or this responsibility is delegated to DPWH against a budget
provided by the respective Offices. The roads in question are for example on Corregidor Island,
around National Hospitals (e.g., the Philippine General Hospital in Manila City), Parks (e.g.,
Paco Park in Manila City and PICC-FAT Road in Pasay City) and Sports Stadiums (e.g., Rizal
Stadium Parking Lot in Manila City), which should be under the Department of Tourism,
Department of Health and the Department of Education, respectively.
An early example of such a transfer is the Memorandum of Understanding dated August 30,
2004 between DPWH and Mandaue City in Cebu followed up by EO No. 427 of May 16, 2005
where three National Road segments of 5.5 km were converted to city roads.
The main road passing straight through each of the cities is maintained as an arterial National
Road (even if bypasses/diversion roads exists) such as South Super Highway from the southern
Luzon to Epifanio De Los Santos Avenue (EDSA) at Magallanes and along EDSA to MacArthur
Highway in Metro Manila; from Marcos Highway/Kennon Rd. via Gov. Pack Rd. and Session
Rd. #1 and Leonard Wood Rd. in Baguio to eastern Benguet; from Cebu North Rd. to Cebu
South Rd. via Gen. Maxilom Rd. and N. Bacalso Ave. in Cebu, and through-city roads in Davao
and Iloilo.
The advantages of the new classification are: (i) the LGUs will be mandated to look after all
secondary roads within their jurisdiction in accordance with the Governments decentralization
policy, (ii) DPWH can better focus on the core road network and match mandate with available
funding, (iii) needs-based allocation of scarce resources, and (iv) budget are more equitably
distributed. LGUs would be fully responsible for maintenance and improvement of those local
roads. If the tax base is not sufficient, other alternatives should be considered, such as an
arrangement with a one-time compensation in the form of a lump sum for the initial funding
requirements from the National Government.
The 10,117 km of transfer roads are made up of 1,262 km (12.5%) with asphalt, 4,042 km
(40.0%) with concrete, 186 km (1.8%) with earth, 4,067 km (40.2%) with gravel, and 559 km
(5.5%) with unrecorded surface type. The so-called transfer roads cover 1,985 road sections, of
which 638 or 32 percent are located within the Metro Manila Metropolitan area.
Some limited inventory and mapping data is available for Provincial Roads dating back to 1992.
However no attempt has been made yet to identify the impact on the existing Provincial Road
Network. Therefore, it is proposed that the DPWH in understanding with DILG pursue the
legislation or any other appropriate instrument for National Roads only.
The breakdown of the roads proposed for transfer to LGUs is attached in Appendix C in
summary form for each of the Provinces and DPWH District Offices and in detail for Road
Sections with Road Name. The Primary and Secondary Arterial National Roads are also listed by
Province and DPWH District Office (a listing of the Island Codes used by DPWH is attached

Proposed Road Re-Classification

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with the road lists). In connection with this report, the DPWH has produced color maps (color
coding for the new classification by Primary Arterial [red], Secondary Arterial [blue] and
existing National Roads proposed to be transferred to LGUs [green]) for the country as a whole,
each of the 16 Regions and ten metropolitan areas/cities (see Chapter 4), the latter comprising:
Metro Manila, Bacolod, Baguio, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu, Cotabato, Davao, Iloilo, Tacloban, and
Zamboanga.
The DPWH carried out selected consultations with LGUs (provinces and cities), and DILG and
DPWH Regional Offices on the new road classification system in the following Regions:

NCR (Manila City and Quezon City) on February 8, 2006 at DPWH Central Office;
IV-A (Batangas Province and City, and District Engineering Offices) on February 10,
2006 at DPWH 2nd DEO, Batangas City;
CAR (Benguet Province and Baguio City, and District Engineering Offices) on
February 14, 2006 at DPWH Regional Office, Baguio City;
VI (Iloilo Province and City, and District Engineering Offices) on February 16, 2006
at DPWH Regional Office, Iloilo City;
VIII (Leyte Province, Eastern, Northern and Western Samar Provinces, and Tacloban
and Calbayog Cities, and District Engineering Offices) on February 21, 2006 at
DPWH Regional Office, Tacloban City;
X (Misamis Oriental Province and Cagayan del Oro City, and District Engineering
Offices) on February 28, 2006 at DPWH Regional Office, Cagayan de Oro City; and
VII (Cebu Province and Cebu and Mandawe Cities, and District Engineering Offices)
on March 14, 2006 at DPWH Regional Office, Cebu City.
NCR (Regional and District Engineering staff) on April 7, 2006 at the NCR
Conference Room.

The summary of these consultations is as follows:

Generally positive attitude to changes regarding transfer of existing National Roads to


LGUs.
It was recognized that DPWH is not in a budgetary position to fund roads with low
priority (low traffic volume and not following the functionality initially formulated in
EO No. 113 and EO No. 124, and in accordance with to the new planning process in
the Department).
Such transfer should simultaneously be followed up with transfer of funds to needy
LGUs (provinces and cities) in a poor funding position regarding own revenue
generation; possibly through the Internal revenue Allocation system and/or the Road
Fund).
Concerns on LGU manpower capability, particularly in maintenance skills and
equipment ownership (response from DPWH Team: use outsourcing of services
(eliminating need for equipment, which tends to deteriorate), and keep a lean staffing
with upgraded skills at the LGU offices). DILG should carry out a study to assess the
capability of LGUs to maintain roads.

Proposed Road Re-Classification

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Concerns on the political process. Some participants believed that the transfer of
roads to LGUs would entail political prioritization of the maintenance and
development road projects, especially during election times.
Roads to be transferred should be maintainable.
Introduce a Moratorium to stop further up-classification of local roads.
Joint committee of DPWH and DILG should be established to deal with LGUs
regarding the gradual transfer of mandate and resources.
A number of District Engineers, particularly in NCR, voiced the opinion that because
of the so-called Length Criteria classification (National Road length per District
Engineering Office) their workforce at these offices would be reduced and even
abolished, and they would loose their jobs. DPWH Team response: various options
are open but normally in any re-engineering exercise the goal of streamlining the
organization goes ahead of more social concerns, which although not unimportant
are resolved through various compensation measures. Even in the current situation
rationalization efforts could be foreseen from time to time when the workload is
shifted and processes made more effective. The option immediately available, apart
from rotation within the Department and early retirement, would be transfer to the
LGU authority, since the road network composed of National Roads and Local Roads
in a specific geographical area would remain the same for years to come.
Some participants were of the opinion that legislation would be required to legalize
the changes proposed in view of the fact that the roads concerned were originally
approved by Congress, while others, referring to the provisions of EO No. 113 and
E.O. No. 124, thought that these provisions would suffice.
A number of LGUs argued that the proposed new criteria should not be applied to the
existing National Roads (freeze of current situation) but only to future proposals for
upgrading from local roads to National Roads.
Some LGUs mentioned that the transfer, when approved, would require 5-10 years of
gradual implementation by provinces and cities. There should be agreement between
the LGU concerned and DPWH/DILG on the timing of the transfer. DPWH Team
response: generally agreed with the statement.

An example of the maps (Province of Batangas) is shown below, while all 16 Regional and the
ten metropolitan/city maps are attached with the PowerPoint presentation used at the Regional
consultations meetings in Appendix F.

Proposed Road Re-Classification

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Province of Batangas
Legend
New Road Classification
Primary Arterial Road
Secondary Arterial Road
For Conversion to Local Road
Area Type
CITIES
MUNICIPALITIES

Urban Roads

It was early on in the new road classification exercise recognized that National Roads in major
urban areas ought to be split into: (i) urban metropolitan, (ii) urban non-metropolitan, and (iii)
urban roads outside the built-up areas (e.g., Davao City has a huge land area, the greater part of
which is outside the major urban area; and its character is rural).
According to the PRCS, urban areas are defined as areas throughout the country that have a
population of at least 10,000 people with a density of 500 people per square kilometer or more.
The DPWH has 1,901 km of urban National Roads in its register (as per DPWH Locational
Referencing System (LRS), March 2006). The DPWH-registered urban National Roads account
for 7 percent of all National Roads, excluding ARMM with about 407 km of National Roads.
Metro Manila, Cebu and Baguio combined account for 64 percent of all urban National Roads.
Metro Manila, Cebu and Baguio will potentially give planning problems because of many
secondary national streets (e.g., Mabini Street in Malate, City of Manila, the service roads along
the South Luzon Expressway (SLE), parallel urban national streets in Cebu and the multitude of
urban National Roads in Baguio, historically tracing their origins to the times when Baguio was
named the summer capital of the Philippines).

Proposed Road Re-Classification

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In most locations, urban National Roads are, in principle, included in the highway network
analyses, but with exceptions so far in metropolitan areas and major urban centers such as Metro
Manila, Cebu, Davao, Baguio, Iloilo, Bacolod, Cagayan de Oro, Cotabato and Zamboanga. The
National Roads in those urban areas are generally considered beyond the planning mandate of
the DPWH, which deals with network assessment and not the detailed analyses at project level
required for urban roads. Urban roads present in general complex transport systems, including
other modes than roads and route choices, requiring comprehensive urban transport modeling
and exhaustive data collection of transport data at household level and at roadside (origindestination surveys). These data would be processed through four transport models: trip
generation at zonal level, trip distribution between pairs of zones, modal split (private-public
transport by different modes) and trip assignment between pairs of zones to links of a
transportation network.
The delineation of the urban National Roads in major urban centers versus rural or sub-urban
National Roads is done through DPWHs electronic road database (Road and Bridge Information
Application). Those road lengths among the total length, which are in character rural or suburban National Roads (e.g., in Davao City), are included in the planning process. In the
metropolitan and major urban areas the inner urban zones are excluded from the planning
process from the point of an incoming National Road where traffic dispersal takes place along
streets, ring roads, diversion roads, etc. (see sketch below). It should also be pointed out that
existing and proposed tolled motorways/expressways are excluded from normal network
analysis, since the planning tasks involved require major pre-construction studies, including
financial evaluation of private sector initiatives.

Proposed Road Re-Classification

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This would reduce the excluded road length for planning purposes to 1,673 km leaving
228 km of urban Primary and Secondary Arterial National Roads for simple network
analysis. Short duration counts need to be undertaken on these 228 km of urban National
Roads to estimate Traffic Section volumes. Under the new proposed road reclassification, excluded urban National Roads (mostly in metropolitan areas) would be
classified as city roads and eventually turned over to the city administrations, which
should take on the responsibility for planning and funding of these roads. In this manner,
the entire city infrastructure would be under one administrative Local Government Unit
(LGU) to ensure more coordinated planning and better phasing of the investments as well
as matching responsibility for both the planning mandate and the available funding
resources from the LGUs own tax base (eventually supplemented with National funds) in
the medium to long term.
The splitting of urban National Roads into the new Primary and Secondary Arterial
National Roads, and roads to be transferred to LGUs, mostly in metropolitan areas, is as
follows (see also listing in Appendix D):
Urban National Roads (NR), March 2006 (km)
Major Urban
Area
Metro Manila
Cebu

Primary and
Secondary
Arterial NR
146
14

Existing NR to
be Transferred
to LGUs
876
98

Total
1,022
112

Baguio
Cagayan de Oro

4
5

76
76

80
80

Tacloban
Bacolod
Davao

5
14
22

63
56
234

68
70
256

Iloilo
Zamboanga

11
5

51
136

62
142

Cotabato

228

1,673

1,901

Total

Planning and programming functions for highway networks, expenditures and financing
responsibility in metropolitan areas and major urban centers should be transferred to the LGUs
concerned (to be added to the majority of the urban road network they are responsible for
anyway). The DPWH, through its PMO-URPRO, and staff of the National Center for
Transportation Studies of the University of the Philippines, could help facilitating in the
transition phase with special studies. Financing could also be gradually phased in with declining
National Government contributions; in the short term a separate National Government Urban
Road fund could be considered.

Proposed Road Re-Classification

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Issues In Implementing A New Classification System

A DPWH Technical Working Group (2003-2004) identified several issues that will need to be
addressed in the implementation of a new classification system.
5.1

Current Legislation

The current legislation dates back to Executive Order No.113, Series of 1955 as de facto
modified over subsequent years, including Executive Order No. 124, Series of 1987, which
stipulates that the Minister (now Secretary) of the Ministry (now Department) of Public Works
and Highways shall have the power to Classify roads and highways into national, regional
(interpreted as: routes and primary arterial roads), provincial, city, municipal, and barangay
roads and highways, based on objective criteria it shall adopt; provide or authorize the
conversion of roads and highways from one category to another. Executive Order No.113
basically refers to an administrative classification system and not a functional one. Functional
classification studies started in earnest only in the 1980s when a need for a more rational
structure for planning purposes was recognized by the administration.
The current practice for re-classification (basically upwards only) is to go through the
administrative way (DPWH) in accordance with criteria such as whether there is a road or not,
whether it connects centers of national importance and whether, if it is a road, it has a right-ofway of at least 20 meters classified as public land. The other way is through legislation in
Congress where DPWH can only provide comments on whether the proposal follows the laid
down criteria and therefore is justified or not. Thus, although there are re-classification criteria
and even if they are applied, they may get over-ridden in the final decision-making process.
Analysis of proposals in this regard shows that some regions of the country are more prone to
road reclassifications of local roads than others, indicating a tendency to an uneven distribution
of the national road network and scarce resources.
5.2

Moratorium on Reclassification

Once the new re-classification of National Roads is accepted by the appropriate authority and in
view of the abovementioned limited National Government funds for the road sector, a temporary
moratorium may need to be introduced through an Executive Order or any other appropriate
instrument to prevent any further up-classification of local roads to National Roads during the
time it takes to implement the new classification system (see also Chapter 1). The only exception
should be toll roads on a build-operate-transfer basis or the equivalent and where a feasibility
study demonstrates beyond reasonable doubt that a future diversion road or bridge would be a
viable option. The Moratorium is considered absolutely necessary to enable systematic and
comprehensive planning and management of a reasonably sized (in accordance with population
size) national road network as in other Asian countries such as India, Pakistan, Republic of
Korea, Sri Lanka, and Thailand.

Proposed Road Re-Classification

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5.3

Funding

The funding issue emerged at every consultation meeting since any change in functional
classification criteria implies a downward transfer of roads in the administrative hierarchy.
One might argue that the roads proposed to be transferred back to the LGUs would constitute
local roads (as per new functional classification) for which the LGUs would be fully responsible
for maintenance and further improvement. This would be in line with the evolving delegation of
responsibilities to the LGUs and the fact that DPWH over the years since reclassification of local
roads to National Roads has built up a valuable asset base for those roads. The tax base and
actual collection percentage of the LGUs need to be analyzed as part of any change of system to
ensure that the LGUs have a sustainable tax base to fund local roads (provincial, city, municipal,
barangay). If the tax base is not sufficient, other alternatives should be considered, such as a
grandfather arrangement with a one-time compensation in the form of a lump sum for the
initial funding requirements from the National Government a one-time block allocation for
suitable improvement according to needs-based prioritization analysis. The prerequisite
condition for block allocation for improvement would be that the LGU concerned is willing and
able (as demonstrated by evidence) to fund future maintenance/asset preservation costs.
In considering National Government funding it should be a prerequisite that LGUs are classified
according to their income-generating ability. Currently 20 provinces are rated as Economically
and Socially Underdeveloped/Depressed Areas and could be given preference for National
Government funding. These 20 provinces are (in alphabetical order):
1. Abra
2. Agusan del Sur
3. Antique
4. Apayao
5. Aurora
6. Basilan
7. Batanes
8. Benguet
9. Biliran
10. Eastern Samar

11. Ifugao
12. Guimaras
13. Kalinga
14. Masbate
15. Mt. Province
16. Romblon
17. Southern Leyte
18. Sulu
19. Surigao del Sur
20. Tawi-Tawi

In deciding on possible National Government compensation, the views of PEAP as expressed in


its Resolution No. 2004 002 (see extract in Chapter 2) should be seriously considered. PEAPs
Case 1, that the National Governments annual budget for maintenance of all-weather roads
should be transferred to the LGUs concerned, would result in a recurrent amount (routine
maintenance) of around PhP 800 million in September 2005 prices (at PhP 75,000 per km for
paved roads and PhP 100,000 per km for gravel roads) for the all-weather roads to be transferred
to LGUs. PEAPs Case 2, that current National Roads proposed for transfer to LGUs which are
not in an all-weather condition should be deferred until such time when the said roads are
upgraded (by the National Government) to all-weather condition, would cost around PhP 8
billion over a number of years in September 2005 prices (at PhP 5 billion for paved roads and
PhP 3 billion for gravel roads); see also Section 5.5.

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It is fundamental that these PEAP issues are addressed. If they are not addressed, then any new
criteria cannot be enforced, and the existing situation will prevail.
A main assumption is that the roads to be transferred have the required 20 meters (m) right-ofway (otherwise they should not have been transferred in the first place), see also Section 5.6.
It may be possible to seek financial assistance from international lending institutions in the form
of a program sector loan as well as from the Road Fund under Republic Act No. 8794 (Special
Local Road Fund).
5.4

LGUs Readiness for New Road Network Planning and Maintenance Processes

The Department of Interior and Local Government is advising LGUs on planning and
management aspects. In cities and most municipalities there is an engineering office with staff,
which in some cases needs some enhancement of skills. The provinces have provincial
engineering offices with more skilled personnel. With this organization in place, it should be
possible to implement some simple but appropriate planning process related to budget
availability. Analysis of the current planning structure at the local level (provincial, city,
municipality and barangay) is required to arrive at needs-based planning solutions, which may
not need to be elaborate and could be based on benchmark lifetime economic analysis (openingyear benchmark average daily traffic volume to ensure viability over the planning horizon; say,
10-15 years). LGUs should also increase their use of information technology to maintain an
accurate inventory of their road networks; however, this will require significant resources and
training.
The Metropolitan Areas (Metro Manila, Cebu and Davao Cities) already have unified planning
organizations in separate entities. However, these need to be enhanced to deal with urban
planning issues related to individual and public motorized traffic as well as non-motorized
traffic, mass-transit light rail traffic and traffic engineering management.
5.5

Condition of Roads upon Transfer

Some existing local roads for transfer to National Roads are not in maintainable condition, and
in fact some are not passable even by 4-wheel drive vehicles over specific sections. A number of
such roads have been transferred to the DPWH in recent times through legislation, and the
Department does not have the funding to upgrade or rehabilitate them. Indeed, in the DPWHs
new planning process, such roads would not be candidates for upgrading or rehabilitation since
they are not economically viable, except for some basic maintenance. LGUs would be reluctant
to inherit roads in such a condition (see Section 5.3).
A detailed inventory of the road condition, road right-of-way (RROW) and title aspects must be
undertaken jointly by DPWH field offices and the LGU concerned in the road transfer process
according to prior and easily implementable rules laid down and agreed to by both parties. The

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Page 16

DPWH has already an extensive inventory database for all National Roads, which would need to
be spot-checked for obtaining accurate information on the pavement type and condition.
5.6

Road Right-of-Way Documentation

Many roads, which historically have been transferred to DPWH and would now be transferred
back to the LGUs under the new classification scheme, do not have requisite documentation
concerning title of the RROW and the required minimum of 20 meters RROW for National
Roads. LGUs would be reluctant to inherit roads to which there is no proof of title. Therefore,
the title issue must be settled between DPWH and the concerned LGUs before any possible
compensation is paid to that LGU (see Section 5.3).
5.7

Responsible Agencies for the Functional Classification

A new functional classification should have DPWH and DILG as the main authors (like the
TWG) with input from and hearings with LGUs and involved parties. However, since the DPWH
has now a proper system for road and bridge inventory and other planning applications, it is
considered advisable to process the DPWHs new classification by legislation or issuing a new
Executive Order apart from that of DILG, although the TWG with DILG representatives has
agreed on the principle of functional criteria for re-classification of local roads as well. The
assignment of jurisdictional responsibility should be a part of the new classification exercise.
Also, procedures for monitoring of and changes in the classification should be part of any related
Legislation and Implementation Rules and Regulations (IRR) or Executive Order.

6
6.1

Route Numbering
Overview

In connection with a new functional classification there is also a need to create a unique route
numbering system, which would be easy to understand by the motorists. In times when the road
names are changed rather frequently and sometimes end up with duplicate or even triplicate road
names, permanent route numbers would be the constant factor in an otherwise changing system.
The Department of Tourism staff expressed their keen interest at the TWG meetings in
developing such a system for the benefit of tourists, who are not usually familiar with the road
system in areas they visit infrequently.
The route-numbering scheme for National Roads would complement the unique and established
DPWH Locational Referencing System (LRS) with Road Section identification (ID) including
island codes (e.g. S00149LZ for a road section in Luzon [Ilocos Sur] and S00282CB for a road
section in Cebu), and Road Name and Road ID and current Functional Classification (e.g.
R00001CB for Cebu South Road, which is classified as a North-South Backbone Arterial
National Road).

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The Road Name/Road ID is a grouping of associated Road Sections within a specific Road
Name or Road ID. The LRS also includes Nodes (crossings between roads and at Administrative
Boundaries such as DPWH Engineering Districts) and Locational Referencing Points using
existing permanent physical features (such as large buildings and marked electrical posts) or
kilometer (KM) posts as landmarks, irrespective of the accuracy of the distance between KM
posts.
The DPWH Bridge Management System has also introduced Bridge Identification and Name
including island codes, e.g., B00215MN for Bolton Bridge in Mindanao, Region XI.
In the past, several attempts were made to establish a route numbering system but without
success (the only one remembered is Highway 54, the present EDSA [Epifanio de los Santos
Avenue] in Metro Manila). In Metro Manila there is a system for circumferential roads (e.g., C-4
for EDSA) and radial roads (e.g., R-10 for the Manila North Harbor toward Navotas along
Manila Bay).
In addition to DPWH activities, the DILG also has a need for a uniform method of road and
route identification as well as location referencing for collection of road/bridge and traffic data
and for recording of road traffic accidents.
Route Name and Numbering would similarly be a grouping of associated Road Names/IDs
within the LRS.
Maintenance of data within DPWH and DILG is the responsibility of each individual agency, but
the capability to exchange data between the two agencies using a standard referencing system or
at least using systems that can easily be cross-referenced would be to the advantage of both
Departments. Since DPWH has a fully developed LRS with Geographic Information System
(GIS) features, it would be beneficial for DILG to adopt the same system layout and
conventions.
The basic purpose for having a route and road numbering system is to reduce or even eliminate
confusion and uncertainty regarding the location and characteristics of specific roads and to
provide the public with information about distance to the nearest city or town and direction while
traveling.
The application of route identification cannot be fully carried out until the new functional
classification is completed and implemented and the routes defined. However, the criteria and
procedures should be in place for assigning numbers as part of the final functional classification
package.
Until a full functional classification is in place, route numbering should be made for the Primary
and Secondary Arterial National Roads.
The procedures for route identification by road class should be undertaken separately by DPWH
and DILG/LGUs following the main principle that a designated route can only be under one
agency (either DPWH or DILG/LGUs). However, joint consultations should be carried out both

Proposed Road Re-Classification

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at the central level and at the local level between the two agencies field office staff to ensure that
this principle is adhered to.
6.2

Route Numbering Criteria

6.2.1 General Policy


Administrative Class
A separate route numbering scheme would be applied to each administrative class of road. On
database records and hardcopy printouts, a letter prefix would accompany the route number to
identify administrative responsibility. The route number and its prefix should also appear on
maps and road signs in the field regarding national and provincial roads (depending on the map
scale). Normally, only national and provincial route numbers would be posted in the field. In
urban areas, road or street names would be posted, as is currently the custom. For other roads,
particularly Barangay roads, the posting in the field would be optional. One of the following
prefixes would be used to indicate the administrative class of a road following a specific corridor
route:
N
PR
EX
T
a

= National Road
= Provincial Road
= Expressway
= Toll Road

O = Other Roada
U = City or Municipal Road
B = Barangay road

Private road used by the public (e.g. Ayala Avenue in Makati, Metro Manila).

The Route Numbering system proposed for local roads and expressways/toll roads in this
document would need to be confirmed with the Department of Interior and Local Government,
and the Department of Transportation and Communications.
Route Numbering
All road classes/routes would use four digit numbers from 1 to 9999. In the database a four-digit
field would be used. Where route numbers are posted in the field or displayed on maps, only the
significant digits would be displayed. The following convention for route numbers would apply
(revisions may take place once an inventory is carried out):
Routes along:
National Primary Arterial Road
National Arterial Secondary Road
Provincial Road
City/Municipal Road
Barangay Road
Other Road

N xx
N xxx
PR xxxx_XXX
U xxxx_YYYY
B xxxx_XXX
O xxxx_YYYY

(1-99)
(100-999)
(1000- )
(1000- )
(1000- )
(1000- )

Note: XXX denotes provincial suffix number and YYYY city/municipal suffix number.

Proposed Road Re-Classification

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The U prefix could also in Metropolitan Cities be replaced with C for circumferential road (e.g.,
C-3, Makati Av. R-10 via Mandaluyong, San Juan and Sta. Mesa) and R for radial road (e.g.,
R-10, North Harbor-Navotas) (with single number or double digit numbers) as is the current
custom in Metro Manila.
It is not recommended to use directional postings as prefix since the LRS for National Roads is
already directional.
Some roads offer alternate routes through or around urban areas. The main road typically leads
through the urban area and the bypass road allows motorists to go around the congested urban
area. Other roads provide a short connection, or spur, from the main road to a dead end (cul-desac), e.g., to a port or airport. To distinguish between through roads/bypasses or spur roads, a
directional sign (e.g. BYPASS ; POBLACION ; PORT ; or AIRPORT ) should be
posted at the bifurcation points of the roads with the same route number or a suffix character
could be applied; some countries use letters a and b to distinguish the bypass and the Poblacion
routes. No suffix character is recommended in this report.
6.2.2 Specific Policies for Administrative Classes
National Roads

The unique route number assigned to National Roads should be posted in the field in accordance
with DPWH traffic sign (information) design standards. Once a number is assigned it will not be
changed and not repeated on any other national road, except in case of bypass or spur roads.
The issue of zero km reference point in different islands is not dealt with in this Report but it
should be reviewed carefully in the context of convenience to motorists. Also, the distance to the
nearest city or town should be posted on designated signposts carrying the route number. This
makes traveling less cumbersome.
National route numbering will start at the far north-western end of the country and move straight
eastward and then southward throughout the entire country to its southern end (like moving a
paintbrush sideward and down on a wall with the right hand). Numbers will generally be
assigned in ascending order from West to East in a sweeping move along the north-to-south
traverse. As the western or northern terminus of a National Road is encountered on each island,
all National Roads in all provinces on that island will be numbered before proceeding to the next
island, e.g. all National Roads on Luzon would be numbered before those in Vizayas and on
Mindoro. If National Roads are encountered on offshore islands which are part of a province on
the main island, they should be treated according to the normal West-East sweep. However, the
National Road, which serves as the countrys backbone from North to South, would be carrying
route number N1 (the Daang Maharlika Highway). 3 This principle will also apply to other
important long routes either on the main islands or including several islands. A specific National
Route will have the same number from its start point to its terminus, even when crossing
provincial or regional boundaries. Termini would typically be major ports and airports, national
government infrastructure or tourist termini points. The initial spacing of numbers for National
3

N1 is also known as Asian Highway No. 26 (AH26).

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Page 20

Secondary Arterial roads should generally be with intervals of five to leave space for new
secondary roads in the future. The proposed listing of Primary and Secondary Arterial Roads
with Route Numbers is shown in Appendix E. The Routing Numbering results in 25 Primary and
134 Secondary Arterial National routes for the entire country.
Provincial, City/Municipal Roads, Barangay and Other Roads
The numbering of these roads will follow the conventions laid down under Section 6.2.1 on
general policy for Route Numbering and Section 6.2.2 regarding Route Numbering for National
Roads. Since more than one LGU can use the same road number, the province or
city/municipality number must be added as a suffix in the database. DILG in consultation with
the concerned LGUs will decide on the sequence norms for the local roads.
The Other Roads category was introduced to accommodate roads that need to be identified but
are not specifically assigned to a government unit. As earlier stated private roads being used by
the public fall into this category. Expressways and Toll Roads are also part of this group (they
may represent the same road); however, their numbering does not require a suffix. In this case
the numbering would be EX1- 99 or EXT1-99 (if tolls are levied) or T1-99 (if tolls are levied on
a road which is not an expressway).

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Page 21

Action Plan

An Action Plan for the work on Road Re-Classification was updated at every milestone of the
work. The latest update is shown below.
ROAD RE-CLASSIFICATION ACTION PLAN
Status as of May 31, 2006
Item

Description

Who

When

1.

Present overview and issues to Director, Planning Service,


DPWH

WG

April 2004
(done)

2.

Prepare draft criteria relating to National and Local Road


Network.
Note: No accurate map data for Provincial Road
Network.
Accurate Ports, Airports and Tourist Service
Center data obtained.

WG

May 2004
(done)

3.

Acquire more accurate and up-to-date mapping data for:


a) Ports
b) Airports
c) Tourist Service Centers

IPRSD

May 2004
(done)

4.

Finalize application of criteria with revised data

TWG
+LGU Reps

August 2004
(done)

5.

Start analyzing financial alternatives and consequences.


Present to TWG and PEAP

TWG
+LGU Reps

June-Dec 2004
(done)

6.

Present current results to DPWH MANCOM

WG/MANCOM

Oct 18, 2004


(done)

7.

Work on Road Numbering and Mapping

TWG

June 2004November
2005 (done)

8.

Briefings/advocacy of Government Departments and


institutions/organizations involved in Road Classification

TWG

August 2004May 2006


(done)

9.

Finalize Report and Department Order on Reclassification

TWG

March 2005
May 2006
(done)

DILG has prepared Rural Roads Policy Development Framework addressing funding and management aspects
(Final Report released in December 2003).
RSC RIMSS Steering Committee
TWG Technical Working Group for Road Classification (DPWH and DILG)
WG DPWH Working Group for Road Classification

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Page 22

Appendix A
POPULATION DATA BY CITY
(2000 Census; decreasing figures)

City
QUEZON CITY
MANILA CITY
KALOOKAN CITY
DAVAO CITY
CEBU CITY
ZAMBOANGA CITY
PASIG CITY
VALENZUELA CITY
LAS PIAS CITY
ANTIPOLO CITY
CAGAYAN DE ORO CITY
PARAAQUE CITY
MAKATI CITY
BACOLOD CITY
GEN. SANTOS CITY
MARIKINA CITY
MUNTINLUPA CITY
ILOILO CITY
PASAY CITY
MALABON CITY
SAN JOSE DEL MONTE CITY
ILIGAN CITY
CALAMBA CITY
MANDALUYONG CITY
BUTUAN CITY
ANGELES CITY
TARLAC CITY
MANDAUE CITY
BAGUIO CITY
BATANGAS CITY
CABANATUAN CITY
SAN FERNANDO CITY
LIPA CITY
LAPU-LAPU CITY
SAN PABLO CITY
LUCENA CITY
OLONGAPO CITY
TAGUM CITY
TACLOBAN CITY
PUERTO PRINCESA CITY
LEGAZPI CITY
ORMOC CITY

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Population
2,173,831
1,581,082
1,177,604
1,147,116
718,821
601,794
505,058
485,433
472,780
470,866
461,877
449,811
444,867
429,076
411,822
391,170
379,310
365,820
354,908
338,855
315,807
285,061
281,146
278,474
267,279
263,971
262,481
259,728
252,386
247,588
222,859
221,857
218,447
217,019
207,927
196,075
194,260
179,531
178,639
161,912
157,010
154,297

City
KORONADAL CITY
MARAWI CITY
DAGUPAN CITY
ROXAS CITY
DIGOS CITY
MALAYBALAY CITY
TUGUEGARAO CITY
SURIGAO CITY
SAN CARLOS CITY (P)
TANAUAN CITY
URDANETA CITY
SANTIAGO CITY
OZAMIS CITY
SAN JOSE CITY
SILAY CITY
TABACO CITY
CALAPAN CITY
CAUAYAN CITY
GINGOOG CITY
DUMAGUETE CITY
SAN FERNANDO CITY (P)
KIDAPAWAN CITY
DIPOLOG CITY
CAVITE CITY
DANAO CITY
BISLIG CITY
LAOAG CITY
SORSOGON CITY
LIGAO CITY
IRIGA CITY
ISLAND GARDEN OF SAMAL CITY

VICTORIAS CITY
TALISAY CITY
TAGBILARAN CITY
TACURONG CITY
ALAMINOS CITY
ISABELA CITY
MASBATE CITY
MAASIN CITY
BALANGA CITY
TANJAY CITY
PASSI CITY

Population
133,786
131,090
130,328
126,352
125,171
123,672
120,645
118,534
118,259
117,539
111,582
110,531
110,420
108,254
107,722
107,166
105,910
103,952
102,379
102,265
102,082
101,205
99,862
99,367
98,781
97,860
94,466
92,512
90,603
88,893
82,609
81,743
79,146
77,700
76,354
73,448
73,032
71,441
71,163
71,088
70,169
69,601

Page 23

City
SAN CARLOS CITY (NEGROS)
COTABATO CITY
KABANKALAN CITY
TALISAY CITY
VALENCIA CITY
CALBAYOG CITY
PAGADIAN CITY
CADIZ CITY
BAGO CITY
TOLEDO CITY
NAGA CITY
PANABO CITY

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Population
154,264
150,450
149,769
148,110
147,924
147,187
142,515
141,954
141,721
141,174
137,810
133,950

City
DAPITAN CITY
BAIS CITY
SCIENCE CITY OF MUOZ
OROQUIETA CITY
LA CARLOTA CITY
CANDON CITY
TANGUB CITY
CANLAON CITY
TAGAYTAY CITY
VIGAN CITY
TRECE MARTIRES CITY
PALAYAN CITY
SAGAY CITY

Population
68,178
68,115
65,586
59,843
56,408
50,564
49,695
46,548
45,287
45,143
41,653
31,253
11,140

Page 24

Appendix B
MAJOR (BASE) PORTS, MAJOR FERRY TERMINALS, MAJOR AIRPORTS, and
TOURIST SERVICE CENTERS

1.

MAJOR (BASE) PORTS MANAGED BY THE


PHILIPPINE PORTS AUTHORITY

(At Berth and Anchorage (PDO/PMO), Total Gross Registered Tonnage, Throughput in 2004)
Gross
Registered
No.
Tonnage
(mill)
1 Batangas
35.7
31.8
2 Cagayan de Oro
15.6
22.8
3 Calapan (Mindoro)
18.2
8.5
4 Cebu*
n.a.
n.a.
5 Cotabato (Polloc)
1.6
0.1
6 Davao
26.6
18.4
7 Dumaguete
25.7
7.6
8 General Santos
1.5
9.1
9 Iligan
14.3
8.9
10 Iloilo
20.6
21.9
11 Legazpi
15.6
7.1
12 Limay (Bataan)
11.4
14.4
13 Manila (North Harbor)
6.3
23.0
14 Manila (South Harbor)
10.1
33.6
15 Manila (MICT)
2.1
29.1
16 Nasipit (Butuan)
1.4
5.8
17 Ozamiz (Misamis Occ.)
15.7
9.3
18 Puerto Princesa
6.1
3.4
19 Pulupandan (Bacolod)
23.2
12.5
20 San Fernando (La Union)
1.3
2.6
21 Surigao
9.2
6.0
22 Tacloban
19.8
14.2
23 Tagbilaran
17.6
9.6
24 Zamboanga
21.6
11.6
Average per Port (without Cebu)
14.0
13.5
*Managed by the Cebu Port Authority (figures are not readily available).
Port
Management Office

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Ship Calls
(000)

Page 25

2.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36

Proposed Road Re-Classification

MAJOR FERRY TERMINALS


Batangas City (Luzon)
Lucena City (Luzon)
Legazpi City (Luzon)
Matnog (Sorsogon)
Calapan (Mindoro)
Roxas (Mindoro)
San Jose (Mindoro)
Balanacan (Marinduque)
Virac (Catanduanes)
Odiongan (Romblon)
Mobo (Masbate)
Iloilo City (Panay)
Kalibo (Panay)
Pulupandan (Negros)
Escalante (Negros)
San Carlos City (Negros)
Dumaguete City/Bais City (Negros)
Cebu City (Cebu)
Tuburan (Cebu)
Toledo City (Cebu)
Santander (Cebu)
Tagbilaran (Bohol)
Jagna (Bohol)
Tubigon (Bohol)
Ubay (Bohol)
Allen (Samar)
Ormoc City (Leyte)
Maasin (Leyte)
Liloan (Leyte)
Dapitan (Mindanao)
Ozamiz City (Mindanao)
Kolambugan (Lanao del Norte,
Mindanao)
Cagayan de Oro City (Mindanao)
Surigao City (Mindanao)
Zamboanga City (Mindanao)
Basilan (Mindanao)

Page 26

3.

MAJOR AIRPORTS WITH INTERNATIONAL OR


SCHEDULED DOMESTIC FLIGHTS
Carrying International and Domestic Passengers >20,000 P.A. a
(Total Passenger Traffic Throughput in 2003)

No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Airport
Laoag (Ilocos Norte)
Subic (Olongapo)
Clark (Pampanga)
NAIA (Manila)
Puerto Princesa (Palawan)
San Jose (Mindoro)
Legazpi (Albay)
Masbate
Naga (Camarines Sur)
Bacolod (Negros Occ.)
Caticlan (Aklan)
(transit to Boracay Island)
Iloilo (Panay)
Kalibo (Panay)
Roxas (Panay)
Dumaguete (Negros Or.)
Mactan-Cebu *
Tagbilaran (Bohol)
Tacloban (Leyte)
Dipolog (Zamboanga del Norte)
Zamboanga
Butuan (Mindanao)
Cagayan de Oro
Tambler (Gen. Santos)
Davao
Cotabato (Mindanao)

Classification
Alt. International
International
International
International
Trunkline
Trunkline
Trunkline
Secondary
Secondary
Trunkline

Traffic (int+dom)
94,999
51,030
n.a.
12,888,580
200,542
39,625
84,215
25,589
45,222
599,278

Feeder
Trunkline
Secondary
Trunkline
Trunkline
International
Secondary
Trunkline
Secondary
Alt. International
Trunkline
Trunkline
Alt. International
Alt. International
Trunkline

239,144
615,656
226,814
35,229
139,469
2,219,765
96,067
282,749
86,321
306,910
88,783
385,558
190,317
786,197
43,431
19,771,490

Total
a

Commercial flights only (excluding general aviation and military traffic).


* 2001 figures.

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Page 27

4. TOURIST SERVICE CENTERSc


(Classified by the Department of Tourism with Accommodation)
No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18a
18b
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44

Location
Baguio City
Kabayan (Benguet)
Bontoc (Mt. Province)
Sagada (Mt. Province)
Banaue (Ifugao)
Lagawe (Ifugao)
Tabuk (Kalinga)
Bangued (Abra)
Kabugao (Apayao)
Vigan City (Ilocos Sur)
Laoag City (Ilocos Norte)
San Fernando (La Union)
Dagupan City (Pangasinan)
Santiago City (Cagayan Valley)
Tuguegarao City (Aparri)
Batangas City
Tagaytay City
Los Baos (Laguna)
Pagsanjan (Laguna)
Lucena City (Quezon)
Antipolo City (Rizal)
Calapan City, Puerto Galera
San Jose (Mindoro)
Mamburao (Mindoro)
Boac (Marinduque)
Puerto Princesa City
El Nido (Palawan)
Naga City (Camarines Sur)
Masbate City (Masbate)
Daet (Camarines Norte)
Legazpi City (Albay)
Sorsogon City (Sorsogon)
Virac (Catanduanes)
Iloilo City (Panay)
Bacolod City (Negros Occ.)
San Carlos City (Negros Occ.)
Kalibo (Aklan, Panay)
Roxas City (Capiz, Panay)
San Jose (Antique, Panay)
Jordan (Guimaras, Panay)
Cebu City (Cebu)
Lapu-Lapu City (Mactan, Cebu)
Tagbilaran (Bohol)
Dumaguete (Negros Or.)
Siquijor (Negros Or.)

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Accommodation/Rooms (No.)d
88/3,339
2/10
15/12
15/112
23/312
4/30
7/84
5/58
2/15
6/106
6/436
2/84
5/244
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
145/1,114
23/1,000
7/71
23/205
16/244
10/66
20/170
85/5,939
n.a.
44/597
42/698
7/45

Page 28

45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
c
d

Tacloban City (Leyte)


Ormoc City (Leyte)
Calbayog City (Western Samar)
Maasin City (Leyte)
Borongan (Eastern Samar)
Catarman (Northern Samar)
Catbalogan (Western Samar)
Zamboanga City (Mindanao)
Dipolog City (Mindanao)
Dapitan City (Mindanao)
Pagadian City (Mindanao)
Isabela City (Basilan, Mindanao)
Cagayan de Oro (Mindanao)
Gingoog City (Mindanao)
Iligan City (Mindanao)
Malaybalay City, Bukidnon (MN)
Ozamiz City (Mindanao)
Tangub City (Mindanao)
Valencia City, Bukidnon (MN)
Camiguin Island (Mindanao)
Tubod, Lanao del Norte (MN)
Baliangao, Misamis Occ. (MN)
Claveria, Misamis Or. (Mindanao)
Davao City (Mindanao)
Tagum City, Davao del Norte (MN)
Digos City, Davao del Sur
Mati, Davao Or. (Mindanao)
Nabunturan, COMVAL (MN)
Cotabato City (Mindanao)
Koronadal City (Mindanao)
General Santos City (Mindanao)
Maasim, Sarangani (Mindanao)
Kidapawan City (Mindanao)
Isulan, Sultan Kudarat (Mindanao)
Tacurong City (Mindanao)
Bislig City (Mindanao)

20/n.a.
4/n.a.
n.a.
3/n.a.
2/n.a.
3/n.a.
3/n.a.
n.a./918
n.a./271
n.a./38
n.a./494
1/10
35/1,348
3/25
17/345
3/84
7/288
1/11
12/133
18/201
16/55
8/83
4/n.a.
56/2,978
n.a./848
n.a./178
n.a./175
n.a./111
15/343
4/101
20/799
13/98
3/45
2/39
9/93
n.a.

Excluding Tourist Service Subcenters.


Accredited.

Appendix C

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Page 29

LRS Island Codes


Island
Code Island Name
AB
BH
BL
BN
BR
BU
CA
CB
CD
CG
CN
CR
DG
GL
GR
IY
LB
LP
LT
LZ
MN

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Alabat
Bohol
Basilan
Batanes
Biliran
Burias
Cabra
Cebu
Corregidor
Camiguin
Catanduanes
Coron
Dinagat
Golo
Guimaras
Itbayat
Lubang
Lapu-Lapu
Leyte
Luzon
Mindanao

Islan
d
Code
MP
MQ
MR
MT
NR
PN
PW
RB
SA
SB
SD
SG
SJ
SK
SL
SM
ST
SY
TB
TC
TL
TW

Island Name
Mapon
Marinduque
Mindoro
Masbate
Negros
Panay
Palawan
Romblon
Sapa-Sapa
Secubong
Samal
Siargao
Siquijor
Sitangkai
Sulu
Samar
Sabtang
Sibuyan
Tandubas
Ticao
Tablas
Tawi-Tawi

Page 59

Appendix D

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Page 60

Appendix E
ROUTE DESIGNATION FOR NATIONAL ARTERIAL ROADS
National
Road No.
14

Island
Luzon

Luzon

1
1

SamarLeyte
Mindanao

Luzon

Luzon

4
5

Luzon
Luzon

6
7
8

Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

Luzon

10

Panay

11

Negros

12
14
15
16
17
18

Negros
Negros
Cebu
Cebu
Leyte
Leyte

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Cities/Towns Passed
Laoag City (C)Claveria-Tuguegarao C (Start of
Daan Maharlika Highway)
Tuguegarao CIlagan-Santiago C-Cabanatuan CGuiguinto (Malolos C)-Valenzuela C-Manila
(EDSA)-Muntinlupa C-Santa Rosa C-Calamba CSanto Thomas C-Lucena C-Gumaca-CalauagTagkawayan-Sipocot-Naga C-Daraga-SorsogonMatnog
Allen-Calbayog C-Catbalogan-Wright-San Juanico
Bridge-Tacloban C-Abuyog-Liloan
Surigao C-Ampayon-Prosperidad-Santa JosefaTagum C-Davao C (incl. Diversion Rd)-Digos CGen. Santos C-Koronadal C-Isulan-Cotabato CMalabang-Kabatagan-Aurora-Pagadian CZamboanga C (End of Daan Maharlika Highway)
Laoag C-Candon C-San Fernando (LU) C-DamortisRosario-Urdaneta C-Tarlac C-Angeles C-San
Fernando (P) C-Guiguinto (Manila North Road)
Rosario-Pugo-Baguio C (Marcos Highway) Bauang
(Naguilan Road)
Urdaneta C-Dagupan C
Damortis-San Fabian-San Jacinto-BinmaleyLingayan-Bugallon-Camiling-Tarlac C
Tarlac C-Zaragoza-Sta Rosa (Cagayan Valley)
Gapan C-San Fernando (P) C-Olongapo C
Magallanes Interchange-EDSA-Roxas Blvd-NAIA
Rd/Quirino Av-Zapote-Bacoor-Noveleta-Cavite C
Santo Thomas C-Tanauan C-Lipa C (bypass)-San
Jose-Batangas C (Jct inner bypass)
Iloilo C-Zarraga-Pototan-Passi C-Sigma-IvisanRoxas C, including Iloilo-Jaro Diversion Rd
Bacolod C-Sagay C-Escalante C-San Carlos C-Bais
C-Kabancalan C-Pulupandan-Bacolod C
Bais C-Dumaguete C
Bacolod C-Murcia-San Carlos C
Santander-Argao-Cebu C-Danao C
Naga-Toledo C
Ormoc C-Baybay-Maasin C
Baybay-Mahaplag

Road Classification
Secondary Arterial
Primary Arterial

Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial &
Secondary Arterial

Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial

Page 75

National
Road No.
19

Island
Mindanao

20
21
22

Mindanao
Mindanao
Mindanao

23

Mindanao

24

Mindanao

25
100

Mindanao
Luzon

105
110
115
120
121
125
130
135
140
141
145
150
155
160
165
170

Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

175
180
185

Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

190
200
205
210
215
220

Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Cities/Towns Passed
Dapitan C-Dipolog C-Katipunan-Aurora-Iligan CCagayan de Oro C-Binuangan-Gingoog C-Butuan CAmpayon (Jct N1)
Molave-Tambulig-Tangub C-Ozamis C
Iligan C-Marawi C-Malabang
Bugo (Jct N19)-Malaybalay C-Valencia C-MaramagDavao C (Sayre Highway)
Maramag-Kibawe-Carmen-Kabacan (Sayre
Highway/Jct N1)
Digos C-Kidapawan C-Kabacan-Cotabato C (Jct.
N1/A-6)
Santa Josefa (Jct N1)-Bislig C
Rosario (Jct N2)-Baguio C (Kennon Rd)-Bontoc
(Sagada)-Pasil-Narvacan (Jct N2)
Baguio C-Tuba
Baguio C-Itogan
Baguio C-Aritao
Agoo-Pugo
N2-San Fernando Port
Tagudin (Jct N2)-Cervantes-Sabangan
Bontoc-Banaue-Lagawe-Kiangan-Bagabag
Banaue-Mayoyao-Ramon
Pasil-Tabuk-Enrile-(Tuguegarao C)
Jct N140-Quezon
Tabuk-Tuao-Kabugao
Tuguegarao C-Solana-Tuao (Jct N145)
Gattaran (Jct N1)-Aparri
Lal-lo (Jct N155)-Santa Ana-San Vicente
Airport-San Nicolas-Dingras-Solsona
Solana-Enrile-Santa Maria-Mallig-Aurora
(Cabatuan)-Ramon-Santiago C
Jct N170 (Cabatuan)-Cauayan C
Santiago C-Aglipay-Maddela-Jct N185
Talavera (Cabanatuan C)-Pantabangan-Palayan CBaler-Casiguran
Cabanatuan C-Palayan C-Dingalan
Bugallon-Alaminos C-Iba-Olongaop C
Alaminos C-Bolinao
San Fabian-Dagupan C (coastal road)
Mangaldan-San Jacinto-Mapandan-Camiling-Paniqui
Binmaley-San Carlos C-Bayambang-Bautista-Sto.
Thomas-Carmen-Rosales-Sta Maria-Tayug-San
Nicolas

Road
Classification
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Primary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial

Page 76

National
Road No.
225
230
235
240
245
250

Island
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

251
252

Luzon
Luzon

253
255
260

Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

261
262
263
270
275

Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

277
280
281
285
286
287
288
290

Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

295
300
301
302
305
306
307
310

Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

311
312
315

Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Cities/Towns Passed
Mapandan-Manaoag-Binalonan-Asingan-Sta Maria
San Carlos-Malasiqui-Villasis
Rosales-Balungao-Umingan-San Jose C
Rosales-Guimba-Jct N1, near Talavera
Mabalacat-Magalang-Aryat
Angeles C-Dinalupihan-Limay (via Roman
Superhighway)-Mariveles Port complex
Pilar-Bagac-Morong
Bonifacio Monument-Samson Str-C4-R10-A. Bonifacio Dr-P. Burgos Str-Finance Str-Ayala Blvd-San
Marcelino Str/Romualdez Str-Quirino Av-South
Super Highway-Magallanes Interchange
C5 Bicutan-North EDSA
Marikina C-Sta. Maria (Infanta)
Cainta-Angono (bypass)-Binangonan (bypass)Cardona-Famy-Pagsanjan-Bay-Los Banos-CalambaC
Famy-Real-Infanta
Binangonan-Jala-Jala
Lumban-Cavinti
Pagsanjan-Cavinti-Lucban-Mauban
Bay/Masapang-Calauan-San Pablo C-LucbanTayabas-Lucena C
Tayabas-Mauban
Through Lipa C-Padre Garcia-Rosario-Ibaan-Jct N9
Tiaong-Padre Garcia
Batangas C-Lobo via Etijan (coastal route)
Batangas C-Lobo-Malabrigo (inland route)
Bauan-Mabini
Batangas C Div Rd (Banaba East-Sta Clara N)
Batangas C-Bauan-Taal/Lemery (routes through
towns & bypass)-Balayan-Jct N302
Sta Teresita-Cuenca-Banay-banay-Jct N9
Lemery-Tagaytay C (Diokno Highway)
Balayan-Tuy (bypass)-Pilapan-Nasugbu
Nasugbu Jct N301-Lian-Bilibago-Calatagan
Palico-TagaytayC-Silang (bypass)-Imus-Zapote
Tagaytay C (Rotonda)-Leynes (Taal Lake)
Tagaytay C-Ligaya Drive-Talisay (Taal Lake)
Amuyong-Magallanes-Maragondon-Ternate
(Resorts)
Ternate-Naic (bypass)-Tanza (bypass)-Noveleta
Tagaytay C-Alfonso-Indang-Naic
Indang-Trece Martires C-Tanza

Road
Classification
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial

Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial

Page 77

National
Road No.
320
325
330
335
336
337
340

Island
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon
Luzon

341
345

Luzon
Luzon

350

Catanduanes

351
355

Catanduanes

360

Marinduque

365

Romblon

370

Masbate

371
372
375

Masbate
Masbate
Panay

376
377
378
380

Panay
Panay
Panay
Panay

385
386
390

Panay
Panay
Guimaras

395
400
401
405

Guimaras
Negros
Negros
Negros

406
410

Negros
Negros

Mindoro

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Road
Classification
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial

Cities/Towns Passed
Binan-Carmona (bypass)-Trece MartiresC-Naic
Santa Rosa C-Balibago-Sta. Cruz-Lumil-Tagaytay C
Tanauan C-Talisay-Leynes (N306)
Jct N1 (Bondoc Peninsula)-Pitogo-Mulanay-San Fran
Gumaca-Pitogo
Mulanay-San Narciso
Sta Elena-Daet-Sipocot (Jct N1)-Cabusao-CalabangaNaga C
Pamplona-Pasacao (port)
Secondary Arterial
Pili (Jct N1)-Tigaon-Tiwi-Tabaco C-Legazpi CSecondary Arterial
Daraga
Catanduanes Circumferential (Virac-Bato-VigaSecondary Arterial
Pandan-Codon-Virac)
Viga-Milaviga (cross island link)
Secondary Arterial
Mindoro Circumferential (Calapan C-Puerto GaleraSecondary Arterial
Mamburao-San Jose-Roxas-Socorro-Calapan C)
Marinduque Circumferential (Boac-Mogpog-Santa
Secondary Arterial
Cruz-Torrijos-Gasan-Boac)
Romblon Circumferential (Odiongan-LoocSecondary Arterial
Lumirayan-Alcantara-Carmen-Odiongan)
Baleno-Aroroy-Milagros-Masbate C-Mobo-UsonSecondary Arterial
Cataingan-Placer
Jct N370-Mandaon
Secondary Arterial
Milagros-Balud
Secondary Arterial
Iloilo C-San Joaquin (Tiolas)-Villaver Jimenez-San
Secondary Arterial
Jose de Buenavista-Culasi-Pandan-Nabas-Kalibo/
New Washington-Banga-Sapian-Ivisan (Jct N10)
San Joaquin (Tiolas)-Aniniy Villaver Jimenez
Secondary Arterial
Pandan-Santander-Malay-Caticlan-Nabas
Secondary Arterial
Sapian-Mambusao-Sigma
Secondary Arterial
Culasi-Roxas C-Pontevedra-Bailan-Pilar-Panian
Secondary Arterial
-Sara-Ajuy-Barotac Nuevo-Zarraga
Bailan-Cuartero
Secondary Arterial
Sara-San Rafael-Passi C
Secondary Arterial
Guimaras Circumferential (Jordan-Nueva ValenciaSecondary Arterial
Igcawayan-Buenavista-Jordan)
San Miguel-Bugnay-Constancia-Igcawayan
Secondary Arterial
Sagay C-Salvador Benedicto, Jct N11-Escalante C
Secondary Arterial
Jct N400-Calatrava
Secondary Arterial
Bagawines (Vallehermosa)-Canlaon C-La Castellana- Secondary Arterial
La Carlota C-San Enrique
La Castellana-Isabela-Hinigaran
Secondary Arterial
Kabancalan C-Candoni-Sipalay C-Basay-Santa
Secondary Arterial
Catalina-Siaton-Dumaguete C

Page 78

National
Road No.
411
415
420

Island
Negros
Siquijor
Cebu

425

Cebu

426
430
435

Cebu
Mactan
Bohol

440
441
442
450

Bohol
Bohol
Bohol
Samar

455
460
465

Samar
Leyte
Leyte

466
470

Leyte
Biliran

471
475
476
477
480

Biliran
Leyte
Leyte
Leyte
Palawan

485
486
490
500
501
510

Palawan
Palawan
Camiguin
Mindanao
Mindanao
Mindanao

511

Mindanao

515
520
530

Mindanao
Mindanao
Mindanao

535

Mindanao

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Cities/Towns Passed
Dancalan (Jct N410)-Cauayan-Sipalay C
Siquijor Circumferential
Santander-Dumanjug-Toledo C-San Remigio-BogoSogod-Danao C
Cebu C-Adlaon-Talamban (Cebu Transcentral
Highway)
Lagtan (Jct N15)-Atlas Mining Town (Jct N16)
Mactan Circumferential
Bohol Circumferential (Tagbilaran C-TubigonClarin-Jetafe-Talibon-Trinidad-Ubay [Pitogo]-JagnaLoaya-Tagbilaran C)
Clarin-Carmen-Jagna (cross island link)
Trinidad-Carmen-Loay (cross island link)
Tagbilaran C-Panglao
Allen-Catarman-Laoang-Gamay-Lapinig-Oras-TaftBorongan-Gen. MacArthur-Balangiga-BaseyDolongan/San Juanico Bridge (2 links)
Wright-Taft (cross island link)
Palo-Capoocan (Lemon)-Ormoc C
Ormoc C-Merida-Palompon-Villaba-San IsidroCalubian-Leyte
Capoocan (Lemon)-Leyte-Biliran
Biliran Circumferential (Biliran-Naval-KawayanCulaba-Caibiran-Biliran)
Naval-Caibiran (cross island link)
Himayagan-Silago/Abuyog Bdry
Calangkaan-Sogod-Padre Burgos-Maasin C
Bato-Bontoo
Bacum (El Nido)-Roxas-Puerto Princesa C-NarraBataraza-Coral Bay
Island Bay-Quezon-Rizal (Marcos)
Quezon-Bahia Honda Pt
Camiguin Circumferential
Placer-Tandag-Lianga-Bislig C-Mati-Tagum C
Surigao Wharf Road
Ozamis C-Oroquieta C-Plaridel-Calamba
(Baliangao)-Sapang Dalaga-Rizal-Dapitan C
Katipunan-Sindangan-Liloy-Siocon-Siraway-SibucoLimasan-Zamboanga C
Liloy-Ipil
Marawi Lake Circumferential
Cagayan de Oro C-Lumpia-Talakag-PangantocanMaramag (Jct N23)
Pangantocan-Kibawe

Road
Classification
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
ARMM
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial

Page 79

National
Road No.
540
541
550

Island
Mindanao
Mindanao
Mindanao

560
570
580

Mindanao
Mindanao
Mindanao

Cities/Towns Passed
Gingoog C-Villanueva
Nasipit Wharf
Cotabato C-Kalamansig-Maitum-Kiamba-MaasinGen. Santos C
Gen. Santos C-Glan-Balangonan
Sulop/Malalag-Don Marcelino
Koronadal C-Tacurong C-Datu Piang-Talayan

590
591
600
610

Mindanao
Mindanao
Basilan
Samal

Isulan-Tacurong C-Mlang-Makilala (Kidapawan)


Mlang-Matalam
Maluso-Isabela C-Lamitan
Samal C-Kaputian

Proposed Road Re-Classification

Road
Classification
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
ARMM
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial
Secondary Arterial

Page 80

N1 is also known as Asian Highway No. 26 (AH26).

Appendix F