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HISTORY OF ARNIS

The History of Arnis dates back before the colonization of the Spaniards, during those periods it
was called Kali and the techniques of the art is focused on bladed weapons fighting. Kali was
widely practiced throughout the archipelago; both nobleman and commoners were enthusiast
and practitioners of the said art. Also during those days Kali is being taught in a school like
training grounds, which was called Bothoan along with military tactics, Alibata (Native
Alphabet), and herbal medicines.
On the dawn of April 27, 1521 the Portuguese navigator and warrior named Ferdinand
Magellan was defeated by a native warrior chief named Lapu-lapu this was the recorded
incident which Kali was used against foreign invaders. Forty years after that event, on April of
1564 another warrior navigator from Spain named Miguel De Legaspi landed in Abuyog Leyte
Philippines. He was aware of the unfortunate fate of Magellan so took a non-hostile approach
to avoid battle with the native. He befriend the warrior chief Malitik, it is at this point he
witnessed the deadly fighting skills of the natives through a demo to entertain them.
Afterwards he traveled to the nearby island of Sugbo and met another warrior chief named
Tupas, he took a non-hostile approach to again avoid confrontation. For the second time he
witnessed the formidable fighting techniques of the natives through a demo.

Years have passed by Spain was able to colonize the Archipelago thru the use of religion and
what was then regarded as modern weapons such as Muskets and cannons. The Spaniards
claimed the Archipelago and named it Philippines in honor of the King Philip of Spain. This
was the start of the dark age of Kali, in the year 1764 the Spanish overlords banned the practice
of Kali to the natives. Using the alibi that the natives were wasting time practicing it instead of
tilling the fields. However the natives knew too well that their colonizers were just afraid that
such skills would be used in a revolution against them because due to oppression the
revolutionaries were gaining support from the natives.
The natives, hidden from the watchful eyes of their colonizers, practiced Kali secretly. Due to
some cultural influence of the Spaniards the term Escrima, Estoque, Fraile, and Kaliradman
were used to regard the native fighting system. It was also during these period when the
natives were able to develop the stick fighting techniques of the art, which was proven to be as
versatile as the bladed weapons technique. Even the Moro-Moro stage play to entertain the
colonizers was utilized as an excuse to practice the fighting system.
In 1873 the fighting system was renamed Arnis derived from the word Arnes which means
colorful trapping on defensive armors used on the Moro-Moro plays. Some of the heroes of the
Philippine revolution were also practitioners of Arnis namely Andres Bonifacio, the spouses
Diego and Gabriela Silang, and the young General Gregorio Del Pilar. The National Hero Jose
Rizal was also reported to practice the fighting system. As well as the founder of Aglipayan
Church Rev. Gregorio Aglipay was also recorded as a practitioner of the art.
After hundreds of years with Spanish colonization the Japanese invaders took their place to
invade the Philippines during the World War II, again experts of the native fighting arts were
called upon to fight for the countrys freedom. Kali, Escrima or Arnis whichever term the
individual prefer to use was once again employed on the battlefield. Its efficiency was put to a
test again but this time against the Japanese invaders.
The Filipinos fought side by side with the Americans. Natives with skills in the fighting art signed
up to be freedom fighters known as Guerillas. It is also these Guerillas who were usually
front liners during the encounter and they were usually sent on a commando mission for
reconnaissance against the Japanese.
After the war ended and peace took its path in 1975 then Major Favian Ver also noted
enthusiast and practitioners of Arnis formed the National Arnis Association of the Philippines
(NARAPHIL) with the objective to unite all Arnis group in the Philippines, but unfortunately
according to records the Generals effort was futile, some claimed that the association that the
General led tends to favor only one group and ignored the request for recognition of the
majority of the existing Arnis clubs.
After the Historical EDSA revolution General Favian Ver was exiled and NARAPHIL as a dominant
Arnis grouped ceased, eventually another brotherhood of Arnis was formed by a group of great
Masters on Arnis. July of 1986 Arnis Philippines (ARPHI) was established with the same

objective as NARAPHIL, at present time the government sanctioned groups NARAPHIL and
ARPHI exist together with a non-governmental organization PIGSAI, these organizations share a
common goal which is to promote, preserve, propagate, and regain the popularity of Arnis
throughout the country because economically even though the Filipino Martial Arts be it Arnis,
Escrima, or Kali earned its popularity in the different parts of the world. It is less popular in the
Philippines. Its birthplace, probably due to strong colonial mentality influence or just plain
negligence of the Filipinos to their Cultural Heritage, but these noble groups are striving to
ensure that the next generations of Filipinos will be able to claim their cultural heritage and
once again have these Filipino Martial Arts as the national system of fighting art.

HISTORY OF ARNIS ACCORDING TO WEDOSCAMAI


Ayon sa WEDO maraming dayuhang mananaliksik at Pilipinong manunulat ang
tumutuklas kung saan nagsimula ang salitang ARNIS. May nagsasabing ang Arnis raw ay
nagmula sa sa salitang ARNIS na nakasulat sa baluti ng sundalong kastila. Kung totoo
man ito, ibig sabihin hindi nag-simula ang ARNIS sa ating mga Pilipino.
May nagsasabing ang ARNIS raw ay nagmula sa ating magiting na unang bayani na si
RAJA LAPU-LAPU at ito ay nag-simula sa Kampilan na kanyang ginamit na sandata para
magapi ang manlalayag na si Ferdinand Magellan noong taong 1500. Ito ay tinatawag ng
ilan na KALI, na nagsimula sa salitang Kalis. Kung ito man ay may katotohanan, ang ibig
sabihin ang mga dayuhang kastila ang nagturo sa atin ng ARNIS o KALI, ESCRIMA.
Ayon sa WEDO maraming pananaliksik at pag-susulat patungkol sa ARNIS, ngunit
hanggang ngayon ito'y malaking katanungan sa kanilang kaisipan dahil walang sapat na
katibayan na nag-papatunay dito. Ayon sa pananaliksik ng WEDO ang limang (5) letra na
bumubuo sa salitang ARNIS ay may katotohanang kung iyong paniniwalaan. Ang Arnis ay
hindi ratan, kahoy, o yantok, bahi man ito o kamagong. Ang mga ito ay hindi matatawag
na Arnis.
Ayon sa WEDO ang salitang Arnis ay nagmula sa limang(5) unang pamilya ng mga
Arnisador at nag-eensayo na gamit ang ratan, na ang mga pamilyang ito'y mga tubong
Negros at Iloilo na kung saan sila'y sumasayaw ng SAULOG tuwing may okasyon o
pagdiriwang.
Ayon sa WEDO ang SAULOG kadalasan ay ginagamit ng mga Arnisador ng pang-gamot sa
mga may sakit. Kung tawagin sa Panay ay Baylan, sila'y sumasayaw na hawak ang ratan
at umiikot palibot sa may sakit. Ang kaugaliang ito ay tradisyon noong unang panahon
ng ating mga ninuno sa isla ng Panay.
Ayon sa tamang tuklas ng WEDO, ang ARNIS ay KAMAY. Ang Ratan o anumang bagay na

karugtong o hawak ng kamay ay di matatawag na Arnis. Ang bagay na hawak nating mga
Arnisador ay tinatawag na Baston o Tungkod. Batay sa ginawang pananaliksik ng WEDO,
ang tungkod o baston ay ginamit ng propetang si Moises noong unang panahon na ito'y
nakasaad sa Biblia sa Lumang Tipan.
Maliwanag na ang Arnis ay tumutukoy sa kamay nating mga Pilipino. Ang baston o
tungkod ay karugtong lamang ng ating mga KAMAY o ARNIS. Ang salitang Arnisador ay
tumutukoy naman sa taong may Kinaadman o may likas na kaalaman o kakayahan,
may hawak man ito ng baston o wala, mananatiling Arnisador ang tawag sa kanya.
Panahon na upang imulat ang ating kaisipan ayon sa WEDO. Kung may katanungan ang
sinuman ukol sa nakatuklas nito ay marapat lamang na kayo mismo ang sumagot.
Tuklasin at pag-aralan ang Arnis na nasa inyo at nasa ating lahat. Ito'y magsisilbing
hamon sa mga nag-nanais tuklasin ito.

THE HISTORY OF
VOLLEYBALL IN THE
PHILIPPINES

photo Credit Photodisc/Photodisc/Getty Images

The Philippines had more influence over the style of modern volleyball than you might think. In
fact, Philippine volleyball players invented the set and spike. More than 800 million people in
the world play volleyball at least once a week, according to information from the Westlake High

School physical education department. This competitive sport burns 364 calories per hour for a
200-pound person.

ORIGINS
The history of volleyball in the Philippines dates back to 1910. The Physical Director of the
YMCA, Elwood S. Brown, first introduced volleyball to the Philippines that year. Philippine
people began to play volleyball as a backyard sport and games of beach volleyball soon
followed, according to information from the Philippine Volleyball Federation, or PVF. Players
hung the net between two trees. They made up their own rules regarding how many players on
each side and how many times you could hit the ball before sending it over the net.
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THREE-HIT LIMIT
The Philippine style of volleyball inspired the Americans to create the three-hit limit, according
to information on the PVF website. Before the rule, Philippine volleyball teams would
sometimes let every player hit the ball before sending it over to the opposing side. This took
too much time and snuffed out the challenge and competitive nature of the game.

SET AND SPIKE


With the new three-hit rule in place, Philippine players experimented with new volleyball
techniques and came up with the set and spike, a.k.a. the Filipino Bomb. In this offensive
passing style, one player hits the volleyball and sends it high in the air to set it up for another
player on her team. A second player then strikes the ball sending it over the net at a downward
angle. This is called spiking the ball.

PHILIPPINE AMATEUR VOLLEYBALL ASSOCIATION


The date July 4, 1961 marks the birth of the Philippine Amateur Volleyball Association. The
director for the Playground and Recreation Bureau, members of the business community and
others gathered to create an organized volleyball association in the Philippines. The Philippine
Amateur Volleyball Association was later named the Philippine Amateur Volleyball Association
and is currently called the Philippine Volleyball Federation. It is affiliated with and accredited by
the Philippine Olympic Committee, Asian Volleyball Confederation and the Federation
International de Volleyball.

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND
OF SWIMMING IN THE
PHILIPPINES

The Filipinos needed motivation to appreciate swimming as a competitive sport. This


is due to the fact that their ancestors were sea-faring people owing to the more than 7,100
islands which compose this country. The American military men introduced swimming as a
comparative sport in the country.
Through the pioneering efforts of YMCA leaders working among the American
Military forces, the rudiments of the sports were impressed upon the Filipinos who saw in 1907
the construction of the first swimming pool in the country at Fort McKinley YMCA.
The holding of the first dual swimming meet between Manila YMCA and the Fort
McKinley YMCA in 1910 marked the formal inception in the Philippines of swimming as a
competitive sports. This initial competition among members of the defunct Philippine Scouts of
the US Army in the Philippines with the motive power of the YMCA which was later joined by
the American Columbian Club in the effort, kindled Filipino interest in the sport.

In 1911, Filipinos watched avidly from the sidelines as the first swimming
championship meet was held at the American Columbian Club swimming pool with competing
American team from the Manila YMCA, the American Columbian Club, and the USS Saratoga.
In the following year (1912), the Filipinos participated in the second championship
meet. Of the 42 individual entries, the late Condrado Benitez emerged as the most outstanding
Filipino swimmer.
During the Far Eastern Games held at Manila in 1913, the Philippine Team composed
of Condrado Benitez, J. del Pan, C. Aiville and L. Cristobal won the championship against China
and Japan.
The following decade, educational institutions, the first of which was the University
of the Philippines, followed later on by the Philippines Women's University, trained swimmers.
In 1924, Teofilo Yldefonso, a Philippine Scout soldier of the US Army won recognition
as the greatest Filipino swimmer for his feats in national championship meets, the Far East and
Olympic Games. Muslims, Filipinos from Sulu also made names in national championship
competition. Great muslim swimmers before World War II were Jikirum Adjalludin, Arasad
Alpad, Tuburan, Angkang Nakaria and Asdai Tahil.
The succeeding years up to 1951 saw the staging of the sixth Formosa - Philippines
Biennial-Swimming championship meets, the 9th and 10th Far Eastern Games and the series of
Manila-Hongkong Interport Swimming meets wherein Filipino men and women swimmers
showed outstanding performance. They were Sotero Alcantara, Rene Amabuyok, Edilberto
Bonus, Jacinto Cayco, Nulsali Maddin, Mahamad Mala, Eugenio Palileo, Artemio Salamat,
Serafin Villanueva, Artemio Villavieja, Lourdes Alba, Angela Fermin, Norma Guerrero, Andres
Ofilada, Ana Labayan, Encarnacion Partilo and Erudito Vito.
Women swimmers competed in the 1931 National Women's Swimming
Championship meet at the Rizal Memorial Pool where the University of the Philippines won.
The PWU Women's team won the championship in 1934. Women's participation in swimming
competitions were held yearly since then.
Swimming competitions were suspended during the Japanese occupation. It was
only in 1948 when swimming competitions were resumed. The first Asian games held in New
Delhi in 1951 gave the Filipino swimmers the opportunity to participate once again in
international competition. Among the swimmers were Artemio Salamat, Jacinto Cayco and
Nurhatab Rajab.
The second Asian games was held in Manila in 1954. Our swimmers who earned
honors for our country were Parson Nabiula, Amado Jimenez, Robert Cullins, Haydee Coloso,
Norma Yldefonso, Sandra Von Geise, Lolita Ramirez, Corazon Cullen, Bana Sailani, Agapito
Lozada, Raul Badulis and Jacinto Cayco. The participants to the third Asian Games in Tokyo in

1958 brought honors to the country. They were Bana Sailani, Walter Brown, Rodolfo Agustin,
Lorenzo Cortez, Haydee Coloso, Gertrudes Lozada, Sylvia Von Geise, Victoria Cagayat, and
Jocelyn Von Geise.
The fourth Asian Games at Jakarta, Indonesia in 1962 marked another significant
victory for the Filipino swimmers. They placed second. The standouts were Haydee Espino,
Gertrudes Lozada, Sampang Hassan, Rolando Landrito and Annurhussin Hamsain.
Participation of Filipino swimmers continued. In 1962, the Federation System under
Republic Act 3135 was inaugurated.
PASA launched a relatively-well-rounded and systematic program of development
for the purpose of reinforcing the Philippines against the challenges from other countries. The
first age group overseas program was the Philippines-Hongkong YMCA which started in 1968.
From then on, Hongkong and Philippines is hosting alternately for this annual swim meet. This
program continued on until 1978.
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In 1970, the First Asian Age Group was hosted by Singapore . This is the first age
group swimming team sent by the Philippine Amateur Swimming Association. Powerhouse
Japan and China were included in this yearly swim event. There were 16 age groupers who
represented the country. Philippines came in second behind host Singapore which had more
swimmers than any of the participating teams. The mere fact that we beat Japan and China at
the time was an enormous feat for the team. The asian age group went on until 1976. In 1977
the Southeast Asian (SEA) Age Group was born, hosted by Singapore , and later on, the ASEAN.
With the leadership of Eduardo Ledesma and former national standouts like , Ral
Rosario and Eric Buhain, PASA attained remarkable progress in the development of swimming.
Such projects as Regular Age Group Competitions, Coach to Coach Program, Annual Summer
Development Program, Olympic Development Swimming Program, Community Pools
Construction Program, Milo Learn to Swim Program and National Swimming Grand Prix were
launched.
Today, a fresh start in Philippine Swimming is now unfolding with the creation of
Aquatics Sports Association of the Philippines (ASAP). ASAP is a non-stock, non-profit
organization registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission. As stated in its Articles
of Incorporation, ASAP aims to promote swimming and other aquatic sports throughout the
country; and to recruit, train and develop world-class athletes to represent our country in

various international competitions. ASAP is headed by Atty. Luz Arzaga-Mendoza as president,


with Atty. Jane Ong as vice-president; Susan Papa, secretary; Beth Mascardo of synchronized
swimming, treasurer; Augusto Bonilla and Cesar Espino, trustees.
The swimming association is also strengthening its membership base and renewing
its campaign for both individuals and group to unite under the ASAP banner. It is now working
on the education and certification of all local swim coaches and instructors with the end in view
of upgrading the quality of coaching in the Philippines. This will involve a series of level of
certification for those concerned in the different aspect of coaching.
At present, the ASAP leadership is committed to a policy of good governance and
will be transparent in all its affairs, hiding nothing and simply working towards the betterment
of swimming in the country.

History of Badminton
In Philippines, it was in the 1920 when British and American exptriates
introduced badminton in the country. As early as 1950's, the International
Badminton Federation (IBF) recocognized the Philippines as its 21st member
country. Since then, Filipino's have been playing badminton in international
tournaments. In 1949 national rangkings produced Adriano Torres, first national
Men's single champion. In 1952, the Philippine Badminton Association (PBA)
was created and became the first national badminton group, organized by 28
badminton clubs. Johnny Yan and Stephen Cheng were the countries first
doubles champions at the Hong Kong Open heln on 1962. In the 1966 Triagular
Meet in Vietnam, the Philippine team achieved its first team championship in the
Men's division namely Amando Yanga, Conrado Co, Jaime Gapas, Renato
Navarro, and Danny So. In 1981, the Philippine badminton team participated in
the Southeast Asian (SEA) games. The country hosted the event. In 1984, the
Philippines made its first appearance in the Thomas Cup tournament. The
eighties to the mid-nineties saw a new crop of luminaries in the game - Renato
Reyes, Jessie Alonzo, Salvador "Badong" Banquiles, Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
and Naresh Ramnani. And in 1992 Melvin Llanes became the first Philippine
champion at the Prince Asian Juniors Championship for the 16-under age group.
It was in 1992 when the Philippines first played in the Uber Cup games, resulting
in a victory over Tanzania. It was duplicated in 1998 when the Philippine ladie's
team defeated Mauritius at the Uber Cup Asian Zonal Championship.

In 1995 Australian International Champioships (IBF-sanctioned international


tournament), Weena Lim and Kennie Asuncion were the first Philippine entry
(ladies double) to win a gold medal, and in 1996 Atlanta Olympics, Weena
became the first Philippine badminton player to qualify and participate in the
prestigious game.
In 1997 SEA games in Jakarta, Weena Lim and Kennie Asuncion were the first
bronzr medalist in the women's doubles event.
The following is a list of RP No. 1 players in Men's Singles and the corresponding
year:
1983 - Renato Reyes
1984 - Renato Reyes
1985 - Jessie Alonzo
1986 - Reyes/Alonzo
1987 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1988 - Salvador "Badong" Banquiles
1989 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1990 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1991 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1992 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1993 - Naresh Ramnani
1994 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1995 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr./Melvin Llanes
1996 - Melvin Llanes
1997 - Melvin Llanes
1998 - Ian Piencenaves
1999 - Ian Piencenaves
2000 - Ian Piencenaves
2001 - Kennevic Asuncion
2002 - Kennevic Asuncion
2003 - Kennevic AsuncionIn Philippines, it was in the 1920 when British and
American exptriates introduced badminton in the country. As early as 1950's, the
International Badminton Federation (IBF) recocognized the Philippines as its 21st
member country. Since then, Filipino's have been playing badminton in
international tournaments. In 1949 national rangkings produced Adriano Torres,
first national Men's single champion. In 1952, the Philippine Badminton
Association (PBA) was created and became the first national badminton group,
organized by 28 badminton clubs. Johnny Yan and Stephen Cheng were the
countries first doubles champions at the Hong Kong Open heln on 1962. In the
1966 Triagular Meet in Vietnam, the Philippine team achieved its first team
championship in the Men's division namely Amando Yanga, Conrado Co, Jaime
Gapas, Renato Navarro, and Danny So. In 1981, the Philippine badminton team
participated in the Southeast Asian (SEA) games. The country hosted the event.

In 1984, the Philippines made its first appearance in the Thomas Cup
tournament. The eighties to the mid-nineties saw a new crop of luminaries in the
game - Renato Reyes, Jessie Alonzo, Salvador "Badong" Banquiles, Antonio
"Jojo" Mance, Jr. and Naresh Ramnani. And in 1992 Melvin Llanes became the
first Philippine champion at the Prince Asian Juniors Championship for the 16under age group. It was in 1992 when the Philippines first played in the Uber Cup
games, resulting in a victory over Tanzania. It was duplicated in 1998 when the
Philippine ladie's team defeated Mauritius at the Uber Cup Asian Zonal
Championship.
In 1995 Australian International Champioships (IBF-sanctioned international
tournament), Weena Lim and Kennie Asuncion were the first Philippine entry
(ladies double) to win a gold medal, and in 1996 Atlanta Olympics, Weena
became the first Philippine badminton player to qualify and participate in the
prestigious game.
In 1997 SEA games in Jakarta, Weena Lim and Kennie Asuncion were the first
bronzr medalist in the women's doubles event.
The following is a list of RP No. 1 players in Men's Singles and the corresponding
year:
1983 - Renato Reyes
1984 - Renato Reyes
1985 - Jessie Alonzo
1986 - Reyes/Alonzo
1987 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1988 - Salvador "Badong" Banquiles
1989 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1990 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1991 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1992 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1993 - Naresh Ramnani
1994 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr.
1995 - Antonio "Jojo" Mance, Jr./Melvin Llanes
1996 - Melvin Llanes
1997 - Melvin Llanes
1998 - Ian Piencenaves
1999 - Ian Piencenaves
2000 - Ian Piencenaves
2001 - Kennevic Asuncion
2002 - Kennevic Asuncion
2003 - Kennevic Asuncion