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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor

2014-2015

Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Table of Contents
Jazz

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3
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3

The Principal Study


Artists in Residence
Career Preperation
Student exchange
Eujam
Bachelors Degree Programme
Curriculum

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5

Course descriptions

General descriptions of the principal subject,


technique and ensembles

Descriptions of the principal subjects


Bass guitar
Composition/Arranging
Double bass
Guitar
Percussion
Piano
Saxophone
Drums
Theory of Music
Trombone and bass trombone
Trumpet
Voice
Other subjects

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24
29
34
36
40
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Prachtical matters
Study advice
Student counsellor
Study secretariat

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Attachment: Education and examination regulations

Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Jazz
Ruud van Dijk Associate Director / Head of the Jazz & Popular Music Department
Bram Strijbis Programme Co-ordinator, Study Adviser

Studying at the Jazz Department


At the CvA, jazz includes all kinds of musical styles - Brazilian, Afro-Cuban, R&B, pop,
funk, fusion and crossover are all on offer. The programme allows students ample
freedom to discover their own personal interests. Ensemble is an important component
- from trios with voice or soloist to special groups devoted to particular principal
subjects, Latin and crossover groups, jazz choir and big band.
Internationally acclaimed musicians regularly give workshops, clinics and
masterclasses, such as, in 2012, Brad Mehldau and Kurt Elling.

Artists in Residence
The CvA has developed an outstanding Artist-in-Residence programme. For each
department, an internationally acclaimed guest will give clinics, workshops,
masterclasses and private lessons for one week at least once every year. This week
will be concluded with a concert given by the Artist in Residence and the students.

Career Preparation
Thanks to our contacts in the world of broadcasting, at the studios, in show business
and the new media, we can help students establish the contacts they need.
Additionally, a special set of courses prepares students for the business aspects of the
music industry.

Student exchange
The Cva Jazz Department maintains student exchange programmes with the
Manhattan School of Music, New York; New England Conservatory, Boston; Frost
School of Music, University of Miami; University of North Texas; Berklee College of
Music Boston; Temple University Philadelphia; State University of New York at
Purchase and Loyola University New Orleans. There are also many exchange
possibilities with prominent European institutes.

Eujam
2010 saw the start of a new international master's degree programme, a joint venture
by the conservatories of Amsterdam, Berlin, Copenhagen, Paris and Trondheim.

Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

I have had the pleasure of being a guest artist and conductor at the Amsterdam
Conservatory for nine years, and have found that the students level of performance,
interest, dedication, commitment and energy are of the highest order. The Amsterdam
Conservatory Jazz Program offers a wholly integrated jazz environment, comprising
study, research, and immersing students in the aural jazz tradition and historical
musical context and culture. This program is of the utmost importance and relevance
in todays musical world. The Amsterdam Conservatory Jazz Project as I call it, is
setting a new standard for jazz performance, composition, musical knowledge and
understanding in our comtemporary global society.
I highly recommend the Amsterdam Conservatory Jazz program without any
reservation.
Justin DiCioccio, Assistant Dean
Chairman Jazz Arts program
Manhattan School of Music

Bachelor's Degree Programme


The Bachelor of Music course consists of a propaedeutic year (first academic year) and
a main phase (second, third and fourth academic years). The propaedeutic year has an
introductory nature, and may lead to students being advised not to continue their
conservatory study. The propaedeutic examination concludes the first year of study.
In May or June, students will take the propaeduetic exam for their principal subject. If
you pass the exam, and if you have completed all first-year subjects, you have earned
the 60 credits you need to complete the first year, and you will receive your
propaedeutic diploma. This means that you are allowed to continue your study at the
CvA.
Binding Recommendation Regarding the Discontinuation of the Student's Studies
It may be possible that on the basis of your study performance in the first year you may
be deemed unfit for the study. In this case the CvA can issue at the end of your first
year a binding recommendation that you should discontinue your studies, the so-called
binding recommendation regarding the continuation of studies. This means that you
are not allowed to continue your study at the CvA.
If you have not completed the propaedeutic programme at the end of the first year, you
may still get a binding recommendation that you should discontinue your studies as
long as you have not passed your propaedeutic exam. If you still have not passed your
propaedeutic exam at the end of the second year of study, you will be recommended to
discontinue your study. Before you receive the binding recommendation to discontinue
your study you will receive a warning in order to give you time to improve your
academic performance. If you should get such a warning, it is of the utmost
importance to discuss this thoroughly with your principal subject teacher and/or the
study adviser.
During the main phase (second-fourth year) the required subjects are evaluated
annually by means of in between exams. The learning track is determined in close
consultation with the principal subject teacher. The final exam concludes the study
programme.

Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Diploma
A bachelor's diploma in music will be conferred on candidates who have successfully
completed the vocal/instrumental principal or arranging study programmes.

Programme details
Study load
240 credits
Study length
4 years, full-time
Language of instruction
Dutch and English
CROHO code
34739 (B Music)
Title
Bachelor of Music

Curriculum
The Jazz & Popular Music Department offers training in the following types of subjects:
* practical subjects
* theoretical subjects
* educational subjects
* individual credits

Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Practical Subjects
In addition to private lessons with the principal study teacher, lessons in ensemble
playing are an essential part of the course. Students are offered ample opportunity to
gain experience in a wide variety of ensembles, including trios with vocalist ot soloist,
special groups related to the principal subject, latin, fusion and crossover groups, jazz
choir and bigband.

Theoretical subjects
Subjects such as solfge, analysis, harmony, counterpoint and music history help
students develop their inner ear and musical perception. Contemporary music is given
much attention, especially within the framework of subjects like analysis, music
history and cultural history; the history of Afro-American music, popular and jazz music
is linked with the history of Western music.

Pedagogical subjects and the Programme for


Entrepreneurial Artists (DOK programme)
With the Bachelor's Diploma in Music of the CvA students are qualified to teach at a
music school or centre for artistic education.
Methodology, pedagogy and internships are part of the programme and help to create
a solid foundation for those wishing to establish their own teaching practice or to work
in music education in the broadest sense of the word. In addition, the student prepares
himself for the practical and business aspects of the music profession. A special
programme - the entrepreneurial artist (DOK - De Ondernemende Kunstenaar) - has
been designed to help students develop all the skills required in professional music life.
This programme is supported by the www.beroepskunstenaar.nl website, which has
been developed in cooperation with Kunstenaars & CO. The DOK programme can be
structured to a large extent by the students themselves.

Individual credits
Part of the study programme can be tailored to the students' own wishes. Thus the
programme may focus in particular on ensemble projects, world music, improvisation,
live electronics, studio technique and instruments related to the principal-study
instrument. More in-depth study of theoretical or educational aspects is also possible.

Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Course descriptions
This Prospectus gives a generic description of the courses. In many of the course
descriptions, the reader is referred to the detailed information found in the curriculum
information for each principal subject. The jazz programme general curriculum is set
out below, followed by the general course descriptions. Each principal subject is
subsequently dealt with in detail.
The course descriptions also include the learning objectives (also referred to as
competences) for each subject. The description of the learning objectives includes
numeric codes that correspond to the learning objectives presented below. The
learning objectives are consistent with the terminology used in the curriculum.
The Music programme learning objectives can be broken down into three categories:
artistic competence;
technical competence; and
professional and social competence.
Within these categories, nine competence areas are further identified:
vision and creativity, communication, the ability to collaborate, technique, analytical
ability, contextual focus, entrepreneurship, innovation, and a methodical and
thoughtful approach.
The specific competences for each competence area are listed below, along with the
numeric codes given in the course descriptions.

1
1.1
1.1.
1

Artistic competence
Vision and creativity: The musician is artistically driven and is capable of forming

opinions and convictions relating to his own specialist field and can communicate these
in the professional music world.

has developed a musical and artistic personality which enables him to make music
employing an expressive language and being professionally driven
possesses the ability, when creating or performing music, to work with various
musical concepts, styles and forms of interpretation, giving expression to these in
music

1.1.
2

1.2

Communication: The musician can communicate his approach efficiently and

effectively in various contexts and convey the artistic meaning of music to others.
1.2.
1
1.2.
2

1.3
1.3

Ability to collaborate: The musician is capable of making an active contribution to a

explores artistic opportunities in interaction with target groups


can present himself, either alone or with others

joint product or process together with others.

has the social and communication skills to participate in various musical


collaborative forms

Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

2
2.1

Technical competence
Technique: The musician maintains a wide range of technical knowledge and skills,

which enable him to function in the national and international professional music world.
2.1.
1
2.1.
2
2.1.
3
2.1.
4
2.1.
5

2.2
2.2.
1
2.2.
2

possesses a distinctive musical imagination that supports him in real-life situations


possesses the instrumental/vocal musical skills to prepare and perform music from a
chosen field of repertoire, as well as a knowledge of the historical and stylistic
context of the music
has a mastery of enough repertoire (solo/band/ensemble/choral/orchestra) to be
able to function in a professional context
is capable of making new repertoire his own
knows how to make use of and manage any relevant parameters

Analytical ability: The musician can break down and cognitively dissect music.
is capable of analysing music he hears, or notated music with which he is presented,
based on his understanding of rhythmic, melodic and harmonic structures and forms,
and on that basis, can interpret and perform it
has knowledge of the relevant music literature and the historical and stylistic
context of performance practice, and is capable of purposefully applying that
knowledge

Professional and social competence

3.1
3.1.
1

Contextual focus: The musician is alert to developments in society and integrates these

3.1.
2

3.1.
3

3.2
3.2.
1
3.2.
2
3.2.
3

Entrepreneurship: The musician can create an independent professional life for himself

into his work as a musician.

can make connections between his own artistic work, developments in music and
the other arts disciplines, and the social context
is capable of seeing the musical activities he undertakes from a musical vantage
point involving different traditions, style periods, cultures and regions
is capable of participating in musical life and can network with other musicians,
listeners and potential clients

in the world of music.

can function as a cultural entrepreneur in respect of his own productions


presents himself and his musical product (functionally, organizationally and
financially) to potential clients
maintains a professional attitude when dealing with clients and customers

Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

3.3

Innovation: The musician is capable of exploring, and experimenting within, his own

specialist field, which is reflected in innovative musical processes and productions.


3.3

3.4

A methodical and thoughtful approach: The musician is capable of conducting himself

3.4.
1

has an enquiring mind when it comes to the further development of his specialist
field and the relevant context

in a methodical and professional way, can reflect on his conduct, is independent, and
can give and receive feedback.

has sufficient professional knowledge, understanding and experience to examine his


own artistic performance and, on that basis, to permanently evaluate its quality and
further develop it
is capable of setting realistic goals, can plan and adopt a structured approach to his
work, and is capable of reflecting on his own approach

3.4.
2

3.5

Didactics: The musician can structure and undertake teaching situations in such a way

that students are encouraged to learn in the best possible way.


3.5.
1
3.5.
2
3.5.
3
3.5.
4

possesses didactic and methodological knowledge, insight and skills in order to


prepare, undertake and evaluate relevant learning situations
is capable of designing both short- and long-term learning processes which focus on
the abilities and aspirations of the target groups
is capable of coaching amateur-level ensembles
is capable of creating and/or arranging practice material for use in various learning
situations

Upon graduation, the student will have acquired all the competences referred to in this
overview.

Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

General descriptions of the principal subject,


technique and ensembles
Title

Principal subject

Course contents

The principal subject forms the core of the study. The CvA Jazz
Department offers a wide range of specializations including
Brazilian, Afro-Cuban, R & B, pop, funk, fusion and crossover. In
addition to group lessons, there are evening group recitals and
masterclasses.
The degree programme allows students ample freedom to
discover their own personal interests. Ensemble is an important
component from trios with voice or soloist to special groups
devoted to particular principal subjects, Latin and crossover
groups, jazz choir and big band.

Learning objectives
Course type

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4.


Required

Level

Ba 1, Ba 2, Ba 3 and Ba 4.

Teacher(s)

Principal study teachers, see description per principal subject.

Credits

See the overview of credits per principal subject above in the


Prospectus.

Literature/repertoire

See description per principal subject.

Method of
instruction

Private lessons and ensemble lessons plus projects,


masterclasses and workshops.

Means of evaluation

Practical examinations Ba 1: propaedeutic examination; Ba 2


and 3: end-of-year examinations; Ba 4: concluding examination
as part of the final examination.

Assessment criteria

See description per principal subject.

Language(s)

Dutch and English

Scheduling

One-hour private lessons once a week, projects contingent on


project participation.

Location

CvA, Oosterdokskade 151

Information

Bram Strijbis at bram.strijbis@ahk.nl; see also description per


principal subject.

Title

Technique

Course contents

General description possible, or solely per principal subject?


For example: Lessons in technique are provided in respect of
all performance principal subjects. Attention is given to

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

technical skills including posture, breathing, finger-picking


(guitar), general technical skills for wind players (brass), etc.
Learning objectives
Course type

1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.4.1.


Required

Level

Ba 1, Ba 2, Ba 3 and Ba 4.
Depending on the principal subject, technique will be taught
only in Ba 1 and 2 or in the upper years.
Technical teachers, see description per principal subject.

Teacher(s)
Credits

Ba 1: 7 points; Ba 2 and 3: 5 points; Ba 4: 2 points.


See the overview of credits per principal subject above in the
Prospectus.

Literature/repertoire

See description per principal subject.

Method of
instruction
Means of evaluation

Private lessons.

Assessment criteria

See description per principal subject.

Language(s)

Dutch and English

Scheduling

Weekly one-hour private lessons.

Location

CvA, Oosterdokskade 151

Information

Bram Strijbis at bram.strijbis@ahk.nl; see also description per


principal subject.

Title

Ensembles

Course contents

The objective is to allow the student to acquire the necessary


practical experience and to stimulate his individual creativity so
that, upon leaving the degree programme, he can successfully
function in the various styles common to his instrument.
Because instrumental and individual needs can be rather
diverse, a wide variety of ensembles are offered.

Learning objectives
Course type

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1.2, 3.4.


Required

Level

Ba 1, Ba 2, Ba 3 and Ba 4.

Teacher(s)

Eva Baggerman, Rob van Bavel, Albert Beltman, Berend van den
Berg, Jasper Blom, Ren Brijker, Randal Corsen, Arnold
Dooyeweerd, Bart Fermie, Harmen Fraanje, Ernst Glerum,
Maarten van der Grinten, Frits Heimans, Frans van der Hoeven,
Yuri Honing, Josee Koning, Debby Korfmacher, Sylvia
Langelaan, Erik van Lier, David de Marez Oyens (coordinator),
Yaniv Nachum, Jan Oosthof, Ruud Ouwehand, Juan Pereira

Practical examinations Ba 1: propaedeutic examination; Ba 2


and 3: end-of-year examinations; Ba 4: concluding examination
as part of the final examination.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Gomes Sobrinho, Johan Plomp, Niti Ranjan Biswas, Rafael Reina,


Maurice Rugebregt, Martijn Sohier, Henk Sprenger, Bodhi
Sykora, Erik Vaarzon Morel, Lillian Vieyra, Len te Voortwis,
Hans Vroomans, Jos Zwaanenburg
Credits

Ba 1: 49 points; Ba 2 and 3: 7 or 8 points; Ba 4: 36 points.


The number of points depends on the principal subject; for more
information, see the overview of credits per principal subject in
the Prospectus.

Literature/repertoire

During the first year, the emphasis in all principal subjects is on


ensemble skills in jazz and related types of music. In addition to
a specially created ensemble, there are trios with voice, a choir
and a funk/crossover group. Nearly all the ensembles give
performances at the Amsterdam Blue Note. In subsequent years,
there are, on the one hand, the style-oriented ensembles, such as
jazz octets, jazz trios with a vocal or instrumental soloist,
improvisation ensembles, big bands, flamenco, Latin rhythm
section, Brazilian and various crossover groups. On the other,
there are the instrument-oriented groups, such as the guitar
ensembles, bass guitar ensembles, saxophone ensembles,
trombone ensembles and both choirs Ladies Only and Vocal
Inchoiry. A number of groups are required. The student can also
take certain ensembles as electives, choosing from a wide
selection, and thus determine the direction of his studies. In the
third and/or fourth year, the student can even form his own
group, determine an objective and/or repertoire and choose a
teacher.

Method of
instruction
Means of evaluation

Ensemble lessons plus projects, masterclasses and workshops.

Assessment criteria

See description per principal subject.

Language(s)

Dutch and English

Scheduling
Location

Varies, see relevant schedule.


CvA, Oosterdokskade 151

Information

David de Marez Oyens at david.demarezoyens@ahk.nl.

Title

Ensemble skills

Course contents

This ensemble explores collective improvisation. In this regard,


the registering of and reacting alertly to stimuli and the
development of initiatives are of primary importance. The
various aspects of ensemble playing volume/choice of sound,
dynamic development, improvised section playing, choice of
playing method, etc. are isolated in these lessons and
addressed. Students imaginations are also trained, as
participants are assigned the task of choosing a composition
and then leading the group. During these lessons, the teacher
will also pay particular attention to students interest in

Practical examinations Ba 1: propaedeutic examination; Ba 2


and 3: end-of-year examinations; Ba 4: concluding examination
as part of the final examination.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

subjects like arranging and ensemble conducting.


Learning objectives

1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 2.2, 3.1, 3.3, 3.4.

Course type

Required

Level

Ba 1

Teacher(s)
Credits

Arnold Dooyeweerd
2

Literature/repertoire

By agreement with the teacher

Method of
instruction
Means of evaluation

ensemble lessons
practical examinations

Assessment criteria

Being alert and responding to stimuli, and developing initiative


and the imagination, which means that the performance will be
assessed on the volume/choice of sound, dynamic
development, improvised section playing and choice of playing
method.

Language(s)

Dutch and English

Scheduling
Location

One hour a week for the entire year


CvA, Oosterdokskade 151

Information

Arnold Dooyeweerd at arnold.dooyeweerd@ahk.nl.

Descriptions of the principal subjects

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Bass Guitar
This section provides training in all styles available for this relatively young
instrument, jazz, rock, latin, funk, latin (Cuban and Brazilian), fusion and 20th-century
composed music. The course aims to train students to become creative all-round bass
guitarists with a personal style.
In addition to teachers Charly Angenois, Theo de Jong, David de Marez Oyens and
Len te Voortwis, such guest teachers as Anthony Jackson, Chuck Rainey, Gary Willis,
Jimmy Haslip, Victor Bailey and Michel Hatzigeorgiou have also contributed
considerably to the course.
Co-ordinator: David de Marez Oyens

Study programme

Objective
The objective of the programme is to produce creative, all-round bass guitarists with
their own personalities who can also teach at various levels. In other words, 'the
student should be able to perform the role of bass player adequately in a great number
of different professional situations and should be able to play an active role in the

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

creative process whenever the opportunity should arise'. Moreover, students should be
able to continue independently to develop technically and musically after having
completed the programme.

Propaedeutic Year
Principal subject
Assuming that students will be brimming with all sorts of musical ideas, the principal
private lessons will initially be devoted to structuring these ideas. On the one hand,
this will entail working on songs and bass parts with which the student is familiar with
a view to refining and, where necessary, correcting these; on the other hand, this will
involve bringing the student's own ideas to the surface. The skill of making
associations between chord progressions and the positions of the hand will be
addressed nearly every week. On the basis of forms with which the student is already
familiar, the student will gradually acquire new ideas which run parallel to the theory
lessons and the ensembles to which the student has been assigned. As the year
progresses, the student will increasingly devote his/her attention to preparing for the
propaedeutic examination, focusing on areas such as ear-training, sense of tempo,
understanding of harmony and melody, and reading ability. He/she will also devote
attention to the repertoire to be prepared: three pieces with band, to be arranged by
the student, and at least the bass part to seven additional pieces; students must
perform all music from memory. Attention will also be devoted in the lessons to soul
(Motown), R & B and simple fusion, in addition to the standard jazz repertoire.
Technique
The technique lessons will also focus to some degree on the material played by the
student. Things to be addressed include tone production, steady beat, stringdampening, position-playing and an overview of the entire evaluation. Approximately
one month before the end-of-year technique examination, the student will receive the
sheet music for the piece to be played, which will incorporate various aspects that
have been addressed.
Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* crossover group
Participation in certain ensembles may be required throughout the entire programme.
All bass guitar students are required to perform once each year on an evening group
recital. In the propaedeutic year this will be in January, in connection with the binding
recommendation regarding the continuation of the study. As regards the additional
subjects, please see the credit list.

Examination (summary)
Playing ability
A list of ten pieces which the student has worked on, with a short description, three of
which should be pepared with ensemble, which allow the players to interact and to
present different characters, tempos, rhythms (binary and ternary) and keys. At least
the bass part to seven additional pieces is also required.

Ear, tempo/timing and reading ability


The following will be evaluated: playing along and repeating by ear, tempo test,
reading chord symbols, notes and rhythm.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Assessment
The assessment will focus on musicality, ear, understanding of melody/harmony, tone
and fingering, sense of rhythm and tempo, affinity with the instrument, ensemble
playing and improvisatory skills, technique, reading ability and tone production, and
the progress on these items.

Second year
(studio exam in December)
Principal subject
Student enrichment will continue in conjunction with the theory lessons and the
ensembles. Students will develop their rhythmic awareness to an even greater extent
now by inventing drum and bass grooves within a song structure; this is put into
practice during the studio examination (first- and second-year Song, third-year Jingle).
From a harmonic perspective, the interpretation of chord charts and reharmonizations
are emphasized. Additionally, attention is devoted to styles such as Latin, Brazilian and
fusion, as well as to slightly more difficult jazz standards and jazzblues. Throughout the
year, students will also work on the new repertoire for the interim examination.
Technique
First-year subjects will be studied in greater detail, such as playing patterns on the
entire finger-board and harmonic progession. Students will now be expected to invent
their own exercises to solve the problems that they face while working on their own
repertoire. They will also devote attention to the production of an even more refined
tone, various means of attack, e.g. placement, slapping, playing with the mute.
Approximately one month before the final technique examination, the student will
hand out the sheet music for the pieces to be played, which will incorporate various
aspects that have been addressed. The student's own exercises will also be included in
the assessment. Additionally, the student may choose to study the double bass as a
subsidiary subject. The student is required to purchase his/her own double bass and
should plan to conclude studying the subject within two to three years.
Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2
* trio plus voice (optional)
* crossover group and other traditions are required electives in year 2 or 3
* bass guitar group in year 2 for the entire year or for one term (in the event of high
demand)
* big band optional

Examination (summary)
Playing ability
Same as for the propaedeutic examination, with a new list of ten pieces, one of which
should be a jazzblues in an interpretation of the student's choice, and an extensive
reading ability test. The other exercises will no longer be tested unless the committee
considers this necessary.

Assessment
The assessment will focus on musicality, ear, understanding of melody/harmony,
sense of rhythm and tempo, ensemble playing and improvisatory skills, technique and
tone production and the progression on these parts.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Third year
(studio exam in December)
Principal subject
Students will increasingly be encouraged to arrange and even compose pieces
themselves so that their ideas can be placed within a broader context. Along the way,
they will also be guided in their preparations for a recital in which their own views will
be given free rein. Naturally, requirements will be set in respect of the breadth of the
programme to ensure the student's all-round musicianship. As regards rhythmic
development, irregular metres and the phenomenon of cross-rhythm will now be
addressed, among other things. The student's capacity to maintain a steady tempo will
be assessed during the recital in a fragment to be played without drums or percussion.
Harmonic, melodic and rhythmic ideas will continue to crystallize in the student's
improvisations.
Ensembles
* trio plus voice (optional)
* trio plus soloist (optional)
* crossover group and other traditions are required electives in year 2 or 3
* big band optional
At least three ensembles are required. Jazz group and/or trio with voice (preferably
double bass), improvisation group, guitar quintet, fusion group and/or Latin group
and/or Brazilian group and bass guitar group.

Examination
Guidelines for the recital, the practical exam. This is the last exam before the final
exam and should therefore be prepared thoroughly.

The programme
In consultation with the principal study teacher, candidates will prepare a varied
programme in which they can present themselves as accompanists and soloists to the
best of their ability. Students must submit their draft programme to the teacher before
Christmas break. As was the case with previous examinations, the student's own
views in this regard are highly valued. The student should not simply 'mimic' existing
arrangements, as these demonstrate relatively little of the candidate's ability and
personality. Students should consider the following aspects when choosing repertoire:
rhythm, melody, harmony and technique. It is extremely important that these aspects
be reflected throughout the programme in a balanced way. The duration of the exam,
including the assessment, is 45 minutes (max. 30 minutes of music).
The following is expected from the candidate:
* a broad repertoire with at least:
- one jazz standard with complex harmonies in swing
- one crossover piece (or jazz rock or fusion)
- one piece from another musical tradition (Brazilian, latin, flamenco etc.)
* playing solos at a reasonable level in at least two pieces in contrasting styles, one of
which should be the jazz standard
* one piece for solo bass guitar and/or
* accompanying a soloist (rubato)
* one rhythmic fragment without drums/percussion

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Although the student is not required to perform his/her own compositions, this is
looked upon quite favourably, as is the playing of his/her own arrangements and
irregular metres.

The assessment
Provided that the student has no more problems regarding rhythm and harmony, the
committee will pay attention to the level of being an 'all round' musician (in choice of
musical styles, techniques, acccompanying, playing solos), intensity, taste, interaction
and progress. Specializing and originality will be appreciated, but are not deciding in
the committee's final assessment.

Fourth year
(studio exam in December)
Principal subject
Preparation for the final studio examination. Students have 50 minutes to record a song
and a short piece like those used for the examinations held in the second and third
years. As the final examination approaches, the principal study teacher will play an
increasingly advisory role in relation to the make-up of the programme and the
group(s) and the musical choices made. Nearing the end, things like a stage plan and a
programme booklet may also be discussed during the lessons.
Ensembles
Two ensembles are required unless the student has fulfilled all his/her obligations. For
more information, please see the ensemble overview. Jazz group and/or trio with voice
(preferably double bass), improvisation group, big band (only in the case of double
bass as a subsidiary instrument), fusion group and/or Latin group and/or Brazilian
group and bass guitar ensemble.

Examination (summary)
The final exam requires a broad repertoire in which all the parts of the recital have
been developed into a full concert programme.

Playing ability
In consultation with the principal study teacher, candidates will prepare this varied
programme in which they can present themselves as accompanists and soloists to the
best of their ability. Students must submit their draft programme to the teacher before
Christmas break. As was the case with previous examinations, the student's own
views in this regard are highly valued. The student should not simply 'mimic' existing
arrangements, as these demonstrate relatively little of the candidate's ability and
personality. Students should consider the following aspects when choosing repertoire:
rhythm, melody, harmony and technique. It is extremely important that these aspects
be reflected throughout the programme in a balanced way.
Additionally, the following is expected from the candidate:
* an improvisation in at least two pieces of contrasting styles, one of which at least
should be based on a harmonic progression
* one piece for solo bass guitar
accompanying a soloist (rubato)
* one rhythmic fragment without drums/percussion
Although the student is not required to perform his/her own compositions, this is
looked upon quite favourably, as is the playing of his/her own arrangements, various

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tempi and irregular metres. The concert may not exceed 60 minutes, including
announcements and stage changes.

Assessment
The committee will decide if all exam components have been performed sufficiently
and will take into account the measure in which the candidate has developed into an
all-round bass guitarist with a distinghuished own style who will be able to make a
professional career for him/herself.

Teachers
Charly Angenois
Theo de Jong
David de Marez Oyens coordinator + methodology
Len te Voortwis

Admission requirements
1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces prepared by the candidate which show
that he/she both masters his/her instrument and has a reasonable rhythmic, harmonic
and melodic understanding. This means that a complete repetition of existing
arrangements or classic pieces is not appreciated, because this shows little of the
candidate's skill (take this into account especially when selecting pop and fusion
pieces).
b. Being able to play all major and minor scales and triads at a reasonable tempo.
Future students often think they are obliged to play 'swing' at the entrance
examination. This is not the case; we would like to hear you play the music that you
feel related to.
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to
the committee, he/she has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of
30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the candidate to show his/her skills as
quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.
It is not required to play 'swing'; the committee prefers to hear candidates play the
music they feel related to.
2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills
This may consist of:
* accompanying by ear an unknown simple piece, without any previous information
* repeating by ear a sung or played line
* playing of a self-selected part at a given tempo (clicktrack)
* filling in (accompanying/solo playing of a harmonic progression to given chord
symbols)
* playing of a written bass line/melody
The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show
the candidate's skill which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.

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3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.
Important issues for the assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding (also in bass lines), and the ability to
relate this to the instrument
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with the instrument and the music styles which are directly connected with
it
but besides these also:
4. harmonic understanding, reading chords
5. technique, tone quality
6. sight reading

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Composition / Arranging
This faculty's programme centres on writing music for both small and large ensembles.
A well-equipped studio helps students prepare themselves for a diversity of situations
they may encounter as professional musicians. The size of the Jazz Department, in
terms of numbers of students, offers ample opportunity for students? works to be
performed in almost any instrumental or vocal setting.
Principal teachers are Jurre Haanstra and Henk Huizinga. Over the past years guest
teachers have included Michael Abene, Jim McNeely, Jerry van Rooijen, Bob Mintzer
and Peter Herbolzheimer.
Coordinator: Ruud van Dijk

Study programme

Objective
The Composition/Arranging course focuses on developing the student's musical
personality to the greatest extent possible, thus enabling him/her to develop into a
versatile composer/arranger, by teaching him/her many practical skills. In addition to
the principal subject, the course of study includes the subjects of instrumentation,

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

counterpoint, harmony at the piano, music history, general theoretical subjects and
solfge/ear-training.
The course focuses on jazz and jazz-based music, offering students the possibility to
extend the programme to symphonic music. Various ensembles made up of different
combinations of instruments, choirs and big bands are all available to perform
approved arrangements.
During the entrance examination, the student must convince the committee of his/her
merit by means of his/her own compositions and/or arrangements, which will be
evaluated on the basis of their notation, form, instrumentation, playability, etc.
Although exceptions are possible, candidates should first have completed the basic
theory subjects as part of an instrumental principal study.

Propaedeutic Year
Principal subject
In the principal lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* harmony, developing insight into harmonic and melodic progessions and
* writing for saxophones
* writing for brass
* writing of combination scores of saxophones and brass
* writing for rhythm section
* dynamics and phrasing
* outlining arrangements and compositions: form, treatment of themes/motifs, dosage
(climax, dynamics) etc.
* writing of arrangements for octet and/or big band
Assessment
* after the first term: the progress will be discussed with the teacher and the
coordinator
* after the propaedeutic year: assessment by a committee on the basis of a number of
arrangements for octet and/or big band written by the student
Important issues for the assessment are melodic and harmonic insight, rhythm, form,
instrumentation, inventiveness.

Second and third year


Examination according to the procedures as outlined in the propaedeutic year.
Additional subjects during the principal subject lessons are:
* writing for strings
* analysis of existing scores

Fourth year
Preparation for the final examination. The student chooses his/her repertoire in
consultation with the principal subject teacher.
Final examination
The student prepares a well thought-out and varied programme, lasting approximately
forty minutes, in which he/she presents some works for bigband, and possibly some
works for octet and/or chamber music ensemble with guest soloist(s).

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Additional subjects based on the principal subject


Instrumentation, Year 1, 2, 3
This course explains in a practical way the history of writing for orchestras. Students
make piano extracts of orchestra scores and score piano pieces for orchestra. The first
year ('about 1800') focuses on the composers Haydn, Beethoven and Schubert, the
second year ('the 19th century') on Wagner, Brahms and Franck. The third and final
year centres on, among others, the composers Debussy, Stravinsky and Xenakis.
Harmony and analysis of Classical music, Year 1, 2
This two-year course centres on the Classical repertoire from the Baroque period to the
early twentieth century. The course follows a chronological plan, in which analysis and
harmony run parallel. Theory of harmony is based on the Classical fourpart writing,
which originates from the early counterpointal styles. During the first year, the course
covers the period from the Baroque style up to the simple chromatic writing of the
early nineteenth century. The second year centres on more complex chromatics,
enharmonics, new modality, octotonic writing, etc. as used in the late nineteenth and
early twentieth century, on which the jazz closely follows.
The analysis course centres in the first year on the work of composers such as Bach,
Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert, in the second year on e,g, Chopin, Schumann,
Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Debussy, Ravel and Stravinsky.
Counterpoint, Year 2, 3
Arrangers will begin with the two-year counterpoint course in the second year. This
course centres on the period of modal counterpoint, the 16th century. Objective of this
course is to learn to write two-, three- and fourpart compositions, in which the student
distinguishes between cantus firmus scores and pieces with imitations. It is possible to
follow the course Baroque counterpoint after the first year, this should be discussed
with the coordinator of the Classical Department first. This course also takes two
years.
Elective - Composing for Film
Third-year students may choose as an elective this unique and comprehensive
theoretical and practical course.

Teachers
Jurre Haanstra
Henk Huizinga
Andr Douw instrumentation
Clemens Kemme harmony and analysis of Classical music
Lucas Vis conducting

Admission requirements
The candidate is to send in three arrangements one month prior to the examination.
These works will be assessed as to their artistic possibilities and technical standard.
Strength: big band or at least four wind instrument players and a rhythm section. In
addition to this there will be an interview. If possible, a recording can be supplied.

Double Bass
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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

The double bass faculty offers a world-class training programme with teachers Ernst
Glerum, Frans van der Hoeven, Ruud Ouwehand. Students are trained to become good
accompanists and improvisers in any jazz style.
Co-ordinator: Frans van der Hoeven

Study programme

Objective
The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the
student's musical potential on the one hand, and the greatest possible development of
the student as a musician ready to enter the professional music world on the other. In
the course, an approach focusing on jazz and related music has been chosen.
Consequently, students will be fully equipped to deal with all styles upon entering the
professional world.

Propaedeutic Year
Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* musical development. Naturally, not every student will develop in the same way;
nothing is more personal than this development! The approach adopted will therefore
have to be quite individual. Students' musical development can, in any event, be
broken down into the following components: harmonic, rhythmic, melodic and

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auditory.
* technical development. Technical development can be broken down into the
development of left-hand technique and the development of right-hand technique.
Good posture is crucial for an effective technique. Relaxation is of primary importance
in this regard.
* reading ability. Mastery of musical notation, begun during the preparatory course,
will be further developed. In addition, students will be trained in the swift analysis and
playing of chord symbols.
Technique
In the technique lessons, which will focus primarily on bowing, the following issues
will be addressed:
Technical:
* three bow speeds (slow-medium-fast)
* simple bow division (whole-half)
* consistently playing on the string and changing bows
* applying the above techniques in a piece of music, playing legato, bowing technique
Conceptual: being able to distinguish between so-called functional bass-playing and
more soloistic approaches.
Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* trio plus voice (optional)
Participation in certain ensembles may be required throughout the entire programme.
As regards the additional subjects, please see the credit list.

Examination (summary)
Playing ability
Three pieces that clearly demonstrate the student's rhythmic, harmonic and melodic
capabilities. During the propaedeutic examination, the student's technical ability to
provide support (bowing) will also be assessed, in addition to the application of the
aforementioned techniques in a piece that he/she is free to choose.

Ear, tempo/timing and reading ability


The following will be evaluated: technique and acoustic tone production,
understanding of melody, reading notes and rhythm, development of the ear and
knowledge of the repertoire.

Assessment
The assessment will focus on musicality, sense of rhythm and tempo, ear,
understanding of melody/harmony, affinity with the instrument, ensemble playing and
improvisatory skills, technique, reading ability and tone production.

Second and third year

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Principal subject
The approach outlined in the propaedeutic year will be continued.
Technique
First-year subjects will be studied in greater detail.
Ensembles
Each year, three ensembles are required, each lasting at least one term. Jazz group (in
the second year), jazz group and/or big band (in the third year), guitar trio and/or trio
with voice (second year) and with soloist (third year) and at least one term of
saxophone, trumpet or trombone group. Students may additionally elect crossover,
Brazilian and/or Latin group and contemporary music employing non-Western
techniques.
This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last
assessment before the final examination and will take place during the second term of
year 3.

Examination (summary)
Playing ability
The candidate will prepare approximately six pieces that best demonstrate his/her
ability. Total duration including the assessment and setting up is approximately 45
minutes. In at least one piece, the potential of the bass as a string instrument must be
accentuated. For the most part, the recital must consist of pieces from the jazz and
improvisation repertoire. Although the student is not required to perform his/her own
compositions, this is looked upon quite favourably.

Techniques
* accompanying soloists
* playing themes
* soloing at a reasonably high level (on a chart)
* tone, intonation and timing will all be important factors in the assessment
* convincingly skilled in arco (bowed) bass-playing
Assessment
Provided that fundamental aspects like rhythmic and harmonic interpretation are
found to be in order, attention will be paid primarily to the student?s all-round
musicianship (with respect to musical styles, techniques, pizzicato, arco,
accompanying as a specialization, playing solos, functionality, intensity and taste).
Specialization and originality are looked upon favourably.

Fourth year
Principal subject
As the final examination approaches, the principal study teacher will play an
increasingly advisory role in relation to the make-up of the programme and the
group(s) and the musical choices made.
Ensembles
Two ensembles are required unless the student has fulfilled all his/her obligations. For
more information, please see the ensemble overview.

Examination (summary)
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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Playing ability
In consultation with the principal study teacher, candidates will prepare a varied
programme in which they can present themselves as accompanists and soloists to the
best of their ability. The teacher must receive the draft programme at least three
months before the examination. Students' own views are highly valued. Techniques
and assessment: please see the section on the recital.

Teachers
Frans van der Hoeven coordinator
Ruud Ouwehand
Ernst Glerum technique + methodology

Admission requirements
1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces (one blues or one rhythm scheme)
prepared by the candidate, which show the committee that he/she both masters
his/her instrument and has a reasonable rhythmic, harmonic and melodic
understanding.
b. Being able to play the most important major (G, C, F, B flat, E flat, A flat) and minor
(E, A, D, G, C, F) scales, preferably bowed, reasonable knowledge and command of the
chords major, minor, diminished and augmented at a reasonable tempo.
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to
the committee, he/she has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of
30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the candidate to show his/her skills as
quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.
2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills
This may consist of:
* repeating by ear a sung or played line
* accompanying by ear an unknown, simple piece, without any previous information
* filling in (with a logical bass line) of a harmonic progression to given chord symbols
* playing of a written bass line/melody
The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show
the candidate's skills which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.
3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.
Important issues for the assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding (also in bass lines)
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with the instrument and the music styles which are directly connected with
this instrument
but besides these also:
4. harmonic understanding, reading chords
5. technique, tone quality, playing in tune
6. sight reading

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Guitar
The bachelor programme for guitarists provides training in jazz from all periods.
Students are encouraged to develop their own style. They can be taught by various
principal-study teachers throughout the study and there are opportunities to play in a
wide range of ensembles (Latin, fusion etc.).
The teaching staff: Maarten van der Grinten, Martijn van Iterson, Jesse van Ruller,
Martien Oster and Edoardo Righini. In the past guest teachers have included Jim Hall,
John Scofield, Mike Stern, Peter Bernstein, Leonardo Amuedo, Jeff Richmond and Eef
Albers.
Co-ordinator: Maarten van der Grinten

Study programme

Objective
The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the
student's musical potential on the one hand, and the greatest possible development of
the student as a musician ready to enter the professional music world on the other. In
the course, an approach focusing on jazz and related music has been chosen.

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Consequently, students will be fully equipped to deal with all styles upon entering the
professional world.

Propaedeutic Year
Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* the playing of melody (single note): tone production, left-hand technique (legato
without overlapping notes), right-hand technique (plectrum, hybrid picking),
knowledge and analysis of melodies from the repertoire, timing, notion of swing,
varying melody through rhythm, transposition
* improvisation:
1. rhythmic awareness, timing, notion of swing, tempo (metronome, foot), phrasing,
rests, feel for four- and eight-measure phrases (also without chord chart)
2. playing in a key, melodic variation, auxiliary notes (diatonic and chromatic
suspensions and passing notes), arpeggios, diatonic non-harmonic tones, altered nonharmonic tones, scales (church modes, harmonic and melodic minor, octatonic, altered,
whole-tone, pentatonic), awareness of intervals, sequences
3. dynamics and amplification
4. chord charts for repertoire pieces
5. the transcribing and playing of recordings (of an improvisation by a guitarist and by
a wind player)
* Accompaniment: knowledge of chords, terminology, use of the left thumb, omitting
fifths, playing rhythm and comping like on the piano, one- and two-voice
accompaniment (fills), creating intros and codas, becoming aware of the difference
between two- and four-beat accentuation, knowledge of chord charts, functional
analysis of these charts with variations and non-harmonic notes, scale degrees (of the
major and harmonic minor scales), ensemble skills and concentrating on listening to
one's fellow players, amplification and dynamics, tempo
* solfge in relation to the instrument: repeating melodies, improvising on chords by
ear, learning a standard without using music, working out solos on the instrument
without having to notate them
* sight-reading: (although dealt with in the principal subject, is focused on particularly
in Sight reading I and II) melodies (jazz and pop standards, classical work for clarinet,
classical work for violin), chords, chords with melody in the upper voice
The principal private lesson is given on an individual basis. Much of this time will be
spent playing pieces with the principal study teacher (melody, improvisation and
accompaniment); the student's initiative with respect to the choosing of pieces is
encouraged. During the course, the student will switch principal study teachers at
least once.

Second and third year


Principal subject
* taking the lesson material worked on during the propaedeutic year to a higher level
* dealing with the components of the tude examination and all related issues
* dealing with the pieces to be played during the performance examination and all
related issues
* developing an awareness of different styles of the repertoire and of composers,
familiarization with the origin of the pieces
* bass lines
* being able to accompany a melody with chords
* sweeping

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

* transposing chord charts


Technique
* Basic Technique II (second-year group lesson taught by Peter Mingaars) is a
continuation of Basic Technique I. The following will also be addressed: classical
tudes (single-string: inventions and partitas by Bach, Perpetuum mobile by Paganini,
etc.); transcribing and playing along with solos chosen by the student; and a list of
solos from which the student must choose one to perform.
* Sight-reading II (if not completed in the propaedeutic year)
Ensembles
* guitar quintet, Henk Sprenger: arrangements for five guitars plus rhythm section in
big-band style. To enrol, students must first have completed Sight-reading I and II.
* guitar group III (taught by Maarten van der Grinten): the pieces for the tude
examination are dealt with from a practical perspective; in this respect,
communication with the rhythm section is one of the focal points
* big band (optional)
* trio plus soloist (optional in the third year)
* other traditions and/or crossover group (students must choose at least one term of
both of these)

Examination (summary)
tude examination (third year, second term)
A list of required repertoire pieces in the following styles:
* medium two-beat
* up-tempo (bop or 'cool' four-beat composition)
* chord arrangement of a ballad (partly rubato)
* Coltrane piece (parallel thirds relationship)
* Brazilian (emphasis on accompaniment)
* modal (one or no chord in improvisation chart)
* post-bop (chart with non-functional chords)
Performance examination (fourth year, first term)
A precursor to the final examination; the programme will last approximately 40
minutes. The student is free to choose the pieces that he/she will perform. One piece
must have been composed recently-a piece that exhibits other influences in addition to
jazz and/or Latin influences.
Students are expected to perform at least once a year on an evening group recital; they
are responsible for finding their own rhythm section.

Fourth year
Performance examination in the first term; please see above.
Principal subject
Everything related to the repertoire of the final examination. Preparing to function
independently in the musical arena.
Ensembles
* ensembles as described in the third-year section, based on choice and availability.
Final examination
Students are free to choose the pieces that they will perform; they are, however,
expected to choose pieces that illustrate their technical versatility. The candidate must

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demonstrate good organizational skills, skill in arranging (at least for small ensemble)
and possess musical expressivity. Length of the programme: 50 minutes.

Teachers
Maarten van der Grinten coordinator
Martijn van Iterson
Martien Oster
Jesse van Ruller
Edoardo Righini technique, methodology
Lydia Kennedy Classical guitar as a subsidiary subject
Erik Vaarzon Morel flamenco
Reinier Baas guest teacher

Admission requirements
Candidates from abroad for the principal subject guitar jazz will be selected
beforehand by means of a recording (cd or minidisc) of three pieces, each one
preferably shorter than 3 minutes, to be sent in by the candidate. The candidate is free
in his choice of the pieces.
If there is the possibility to send it by e-mail in mp3 format (or AAC, m4a), we prefer
that. Please send this mail to studadmin@cva.ahk.nl, subject: application. Please do
not forget to repeat your name in the e-mail text.
If the candidate's playing on the recording does not match the required level, the
candidate will not be invited to the entrance examination.
NB: Nobody will be admitted on the basis of the recording only, and being invited to
the entrance exam does not mean the candidate is admitted to the school.
1. Playing skill
a. Repertoire: the committee will choose from three pieces from the standard jazz
repertoire prepared by the candidate including one (jazz-) blues theme and at least one
jazz standard. The candidate will be expected to play the chosen jazz standard melody
single stringed (without the underlying chords).
Each piece must contain theme, improvisation and accompaniment. The candidate will
be accompanied by one of the guitar teachers unless he/she has brought own
accompaniment.
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to
the committee, he/she has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of
30 minutes).
b. Technique: the candidate must show sufficient knowledge of chords and major and
minor scales in position. When this is not evident in the chosen repertoire, the
candidate may be asked to provide further prove.
The course assumes the use of a plectrum. When the candidate does not use a
plectrum, the committee will give special attention to the quality of the single string
melody) playing.
2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills
This may consist of:
* repeating by ear a played line
* accompanying by ear a played harmonic progression without having received any
indication
* playing of a written melody; after a short preparation, also in position
* playing of a harmonic progression to given chord symbols

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The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show
the candidate's skill which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.
3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.
Important issues for the assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with jazz
but besides these also
4. harmonic undestanding, reading chords
5. technique, tone quality
6. sight reading

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Percussion
The principal study Percussion at the CvA offers a many-sided program which focuses
on various musical styles, such as jazz, crossover, rock, pop, salsa, flamenco and music
of African, Cuban and Brazilian origin. These styles are a model for the many musical
styles in which an all-round percussionist in contemporary Western-European/US
must be able to express himself.
The objective of the course is to train students to become all-round percussionists with
optimum possibilities for a successful career. Besides the ability to play a large number
of instruments - like timbales, conga, repenique as well as cajon, udu and
miscellaneous small percussion instruments - the all-round percussionist must also be
aware of each instrument's cultural background and its individual qualities. The
creative development of the student is also of great importance for (future) performing,
studio sessions, and/or a possible teaching position. This enables him/her to combine
instruments and techniques in such a way that they will come up with unique grooves
and sound.
Teachers are Bart Fermie and Lucas van Merwijk. Ensembles will be taught by Randal
Corsen.

Study programme

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Teachers
principal subject
Bart Fermie
Lucas van Merwijk
ensembles
Randal Corsen

Admission requirements
1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces prepared by the candidate in which the
candidate shows the committee, in addition to command of the instrument and a
reasonable rhythmic understanding, a distinct musical understanding, preferably in
various styles such as Cuban/Brazilian/African.
b. The student is to prove in these pieces that he has mastered sufficient skills on
different instruments, played by hand as well as sticks. The committee can ask for this,
if necessary.
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to
the committee, he/she has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of
30 minutes).
2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills
This may consist of:
* playing by ear an unknown, simple piece, without any previous information
* singing and playing by ear a sung and played rhythm
* playing of a part of the student?s choice at a given tempo (clicktrack)
* playing vue of a written rhythm
The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show
the candidate's skills which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.
3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.
Important issues for the assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and rhythmic understanding
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with the instruments and the musical styles that are connected with the
instruments
but besides these also:
4. sense of form
5. technique and tone quality
6. reading of rhythms, sight reading

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Piano
Principal-study pianists are trained as soloists, orchestra musicians and accompanists
in all spheres of the musical profession and as improvisers in modern jazz settings as
well. Alongside the principal study there are special technical courses which focus on
composed music, piano technique and sight-reading. All pianists take a course in
music technology. Teachers are Rob van Bavel, Karel Boehlee, Hans Vroomans, and
two teachers for technique.
Over the past years guest teachers have included Brad Mehldau, Jason Moran, Kenny
Werner, Larry Goldings and Fred Hirsch.
Coordinator: Karel Boehlee

Study programme

Objective
The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the
student's musical potential on the one hand, and the greatest possible development of
the student as a musician ready to enter the professional music world on the other. In
the course, an approach focusing on jazz and related music has been chosen.

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Consequently, students will be fully equipped to deal with all styles upon entering the
professional world.

Propaedeutic Year
Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* the development of the ear
* the development of a sense of rhythm and tempo
* harmony: developing an understanding of harmonic progressions
* reading notes and chord symbols
* developing musical memory
* improvising
* technique
* accompanying/ensemble playing
* learning how to practice
Technique
In addition to the principal subject, special technique lessons will focus on composed
music, piano technique, sight-reading, etc.
Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* crossover group
For the remaining subjects, please see the credit list.

Examination (summary)
Playing ability
Programme:
* three pieces of different character, two of which are set for trio and one with a
soloist, because of the accompanimental aspect
* one composed piece (concert piece, polyphonic or tude), which demonstrates
mastery of the basic technique
* demonstrating knowledge of major and minor scales, pentatonic, octatonic,
chromatic scales, church modes

Ear and reading ability


Reflex, sight-reading, ear-training.

Assessment
The following will be assessed:
* musicality: ear, understanding of melody/harmony, sense of rhythm and tempo
* affinity with the instrument
* technique, tone production, reading ability

Second and third year


Principal subject
The approach outlined in the propaedeutic year will be continued.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Technique
In the third year, a final examination will take place. Requirements: one concert piece,
one polyphonic piece, two tudes and one piece to be sight-read
Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2
* trio plus voice in year 2
* trio plus soloist in year 3
* crossover group and/or other traditions are a required elective in year 2 or 3
* principal subject group in year 2 or 3
* big band optional
This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last
assessment before the final examination and will take place during the second term of
year 3.
Examination

* candidates should present a well-prepared and varied programme lasting


approximately 40 minutes; it is also recommended that candidates include on the
programme a piece that they have composed
* a solo piece: a long, rubato solo introduction to an ensemble piece is also acceptable
* the programme should be performed mainly at the piano; the use of electronics (e.g.
synthesizers) for colouring is permitted
* various settings in which the student can be heard as a soloist and as an
accompanist.

Fourth year
This final year will be devoted to preparations for the final examination.
Principal subject
Individual development is particularly emphasized at this point.
Ensembles
Two ensembles are required unless the student has fulfilled all his/her obligations. For
more information, please see the ensemble overview.
Final examination
* performance of at least 50 minutes, not to exceed one hour
* the student will choose the setting(s) and the repertoire; the programme will be as
varied as possible and chosen in consultation with the principal study teacher
* the quality of the arrangements, the student's own compositions and originality will
all weigh heavily in the assessment
* students may deviate from the above should they have devoted themselves to the
study of a style to such an extent that they have mastered it (to be assessed by the
department).
Throughout the programme, all piano students are required to perform at least once
each year on an evening group recital.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Teachers
Karel Boehlee coordinator
Rob van Bavel
Hans Vroomans
Matthijs Verschoor technique
Gert-Jan Vermeulen technique
Jaco Benckhuijsen methodology

Admission requirements
1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces from standard jazz repertoire prepared
by the candidate (among which one blues and one ballad), in which the candidate
shows the committee that he/she both masters the instrument and has a reasonable
rhythmic, harmonic and melodic understanding.
b. Two pieces from the classical repertoire, or written out jazz etudes and solos (bring 4
copies of sheet music for the committee).
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to
the committee, he/she has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of
30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the candidate to show his/her skills as
quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.
2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills
This may consist of:
* repeating by ear lines and chords
* accompanying by ear an unknown, simple piece, without any previous information
* filling in (with a logical bass line) of a harmonic progression to given chord symbols
* being able to play a given piece (melody and chord symbols)
The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show
the candidate's skills which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.
3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.
Important issues for the assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with the instrument and the music styles which are directly connected with
this instrument
but besides these also:
4. creative skills (arrangements and improvisation)
5. knowledge of chords (major, minor, dominant seventh and half diminished chords
with their augmentations) and playing skill of chords (two-hand voicing)
6. technique, among which fingering, toucher, major and minor scales, broken chords
7. sight reading (chords, notes and rhythm)

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Saxophone
The wind faculty seeks to train students to become all-round musicians capable of
functioning in all areas of the professional practice: from musical orchestras to big
bands through to jazz, fusion, pop and Latin ensembles, both live and recorded.
Students gain experience in a variety of musical situations, with ensemble playing,
solo performance and improvisation as focal points. Separate courses are offered for
lead trumpet and lead alto, these are unique in Europe.
The teaching staff of the saxophone section includes Albert Beltman, Jasper Blom,
Ferdinand Povel and Simon Rigter. In the past years Bob Mintzer, Chris Potter, and Joe
Lovano were guest teachers. Dick Oatts (Manhattan School of Music) is regular guest
teacher at the Conservatorium van Amsterdam.
Coordinator: Albert Beltman and Ferdinand Povel

Study programme

Objective
The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the
student's musical potential on the one hand, and the greatest possible development of
the student as a musician ready to enter the professional music world on the other.
This is accomplished by allowing the student to take part in various musical situations

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

in which ensemble playing and the development of soloistic qualities (improvisation)


are key. The student's own contribution (creativity) is also stimulated.

Propaedeutic Year
Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the student becomes acquainted with basic musical
structures on which improvisation is based. The following are addressed:
* the development of the ear
* the development of a sense of rhythm and tempo
* tone production
* understanding of harmony in relation to improvisation
* the development of a personal musical language.
Technique
In the technique lessons, attention is given to the development of specific technical
skills related to the saxophone. The following are addressed:
* scales
* arpeggios with variations
* tudes and transcriptions focusing on the jazz performance tradition.
Students will begin studying the clarinet as a subsidiary instrument. In late April, a
technique examination will be held.
Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* saxophone group
For the remaining subjects, please see the credit list.

Examination (summary)
Playing ability
Programme: the student will prepare a number of pieces that exhibit his/her musical
development.

Ear and reading ability


Reflex, sight-reading, ear-training.

Assessment
The following will be assessed:
* musicality; ear, understanding of melody/harmony, sense of rhythm and tempo
* affinity with the instrument
* technique, tone production, reading ability
* the development of the student's vocabulary

Second and third year


Principal subject
The approach outlined in the propaedeutic year will be continued.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Improvisation
The following are addressed:
* creativity
* the development of a personal style
* analysis of solo transcriptions
* knowledge of the repertoire
* ear-training in conjunction with the instrument
* interpretation of various styles
Technique
* tudes: Londeix, Allard
* fusion/funk performance tradition
* compound metres (Karg-Elert, Lacour)
* orchestral playing
* flageolets, double tones, circular breathing, etc.
Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2 and 3
* trio plus soloist in year 3
* Latin group, required elective in year 2 or 3
* crossover group and/or other traditions are a required elective in year 3 or 4
* big band in year 3 and year 2 and/or year 4
This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last
assessment before the final examination and will take place during the second term of
year 3.

Examination
The student will prepare no more than six pieces. For more information, please see the
section on the propaedeutic year. In late April of the third year, a technique
examination will be held, and a flute/clarinet examination in late June.

Fourth year
This final year will be devoted to preparations for the final examination.
Principal subject
Individual development is particularly emphasized at this point.
Ensembles
Two ensembles are required: trio plus soloist and one ensemble of the student's choice.
Final examination
* performance of at least 50 minutes, not to exceed one hour
* the student will choose the setting(s) and the repertoire; the programme will be as
varied as possible and chosen in consultation with the principal study teacher
* the quality of the arrangements, the student's own compositions and originality will
all weigh heavily in the assessment
* the student should present himself/herself to the best of his/her ability as an
improviser and saxophonist.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Teachers
Ferdinand Povel coordinator
Albert Beltman coordinator + methodology + clarinet as a subsidiary subject
Jasper Blom
Simon Rigter
Dick Oatts regular guest teacher
Raymond Honing flute as a subsidiary subejct
Joris Roelofs guest teacher of bass clarinet

Admission requirements
1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces of a different character, tempo and key
prepared by the candidate, in which he/she shows the committee both command of
the instrument and affinity with jazz. In playing these pieces improvisation should be
an important part. For candidates who give priority to playing in an orchestra, there
are also possibilities. In this case improvisatorial skills are less important.
b. The candidate must also play written material, e.g. jazz solos, jazz etudes, and/or
classical etudes (bring 4 copies of sheet music for the committee).
c. Being able to play all major and minor scales and triads at a reasonable tempo.
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to
the committee, he/she has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of
30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the candidate to show his/her skills as
quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.
2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills
This may consist of:
* playing by ear on harmonic progressions which are given by the committee members
* repeating of played fragments
* being able to play a prima vista a piece in jazz idiom (for instance a section from an
orchestral part or a simple etude)
The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show
the candidate's skills which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.
3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the
committee. Important issues for the assessment are:
* musicality and hearing
* feeling for rhythm and tempo
* disposition for the instrument
* sight reading, technique, tone quality

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Drums
The drums faculty is characterised by versatility. Students are trained all-round,
acquiring experience both in the studio and on stage, with all kinds of ensembles: big
band, jazz combo, Latin and fusion ensembles and rock bands. Teachers are Gerhard
Jeltes, Lucas van Merwijk, Marcel Serierse and Martijn Vink. Guest teachers have
included John Riley, Adam Nussbaum and Bill Stewart.
Co-ordinator: Gerhard Jeltes

Study programme

Objective
The objective of the course is twofold: the greatest possible development of the
student's musical potential on the one hand, and the greatest possible development of
the student as a musician ready to enter the professional music world on the other. In
the course, an approach focusing on jazz and related music has been chosen.
Consequently, students will be fully equipped to deal with all styles upon entering the
professional world.

Propaedeutic Year
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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following aspects will, in theory, be addressed:
1. Perfecting those style(s) with which the student has less affinity; the most important
styles can be roughly divided into three categories: jazz, fusion and Latin. The
characteristic features of each style will be dealt with, as well as well-known standards
and grooves. Much attention will be given to playing along with influential drummers
of the 20th century, listening to CDs and watching DVDs and videos. In addition, it is
important that students be allowed to continue developing their own talents to boost
their motivation and self-confidence. Therefore students will bring their own
recordings of concerts, studio sessions etc. tothe lesson to be discussed.
2. Playing a tempo both with a click track (drum computer) and with play-along
recordings, such as duos without drums and recordings that are especially developed
for timing exercises.
3. Technique:
* jazz coordination (important for all styles)
* the rudiments of the drums
* sound production and striking a good balance between the various percussion
elements
* brushes
4. Style/knowledge of repertoire: attention will be focused primarily on jazz repertoire
beginning in the 1920s (Warren 'Baby' Dodds, Zutty Singleton, Philly Joe Jones, Jimmy
Cobb, Kenny Clarke, Max Roach), in addition to the other styles).
5. Sight-reading in the various style disciplines. Ensemble parts will be dealt with in the
lessons.
6. Playing, learning to recognize and working with form charts (12- and 32-bar charts,
irregular form, e.g. 40 bars). Students will also work on dynamics, soloing and
accompanying soloists.
7. Ensemble playing: at least twice a year, lessons will be combined with those of the
bass students. Additionally drum students may play with their own ensemble in the
lessons.
* Evening performance (late January) in preparation for the propaedeutic examination.
* A number of methods will be used, as well as a great deal of the students' own
material.
Side drum technique
Supplementary to the principal private lessons.
Side drum (private lessons given by Haye Jellema). Objective: to improve the student's
overall technique and sound. For a detailed objective, material covered and
examination requirements, please consult the side drum syllabus.
Ensembles
All ensembles in this year are required:
* jazz group
* ensemble skills
* fusion group

Examination

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Playing ability
Programme: three pieces in the three styles mentioned above will be played with a
group put together by the student. Repertoire will be chosen in close consultation with
the principal study teacher(s); the rehearsals must be recorded and the tapes will be
listened to and gone over during the lessons.
N.B. As a general rule, examinations may take place only if the student has submitted
his/her recorded rehearsals for review well before the examination, and the teacher
has given his approval.

Assessment
The following will be assessed:
* musicality: ear, understanding of melody/harmony, sense of rhythm, tempo and
dynamics
* affinity with the instrument
* technique and sound
N.B. The committee can decide (generally on the basis of the propaedeutic
examination) that an interim examination is necessary to check the student's progress
in the second year before he/she continues with the third. To receive as broad an
education as possible, the student must switch principal study teachers at least once
during the entire course.

Second and third year


Principal subject
First-year material will be studied in greater depth; additionally, the specific role(s) of
the drummer in various groups will be addressed; functioning as the band's motor will
constitute the unifying element throughout the lessons.
* jazz: 3/4, 6/8 and 12/8 metres, practising switching from Latin rhythms to jazz time
('Green Dolphin Street'), focus on the bebop and hard bop periods, including Roy
Haynes, Art Taylor, Elvin Jones, Tony Williams and Jack deJohnette, in addition to the
young generation of top drummers including Bill Stewart, Jeff Watts, Victor Lewis and
Brian Blade. Transcription and execution of simple solos. Part of the big band
repertoire will be dealt with.
* fusion: focus on funk, soul, rock, jazz rock, second line, reggae
* Latin: mainly the Brazilian and Afro-Cuban repertoire will be dealt with here.
Brazilian: samba, bai'o, bossa and partido alto; Afro-Cuban: mambo, rumba,
mozambique and songo. An important aspect relating to the Brazilian and Afro-Cuban
repertoire is that the student must know how to hold back when playing with one or
more percussionists.
* irregular metres
* working in the studio. Adjusting drums, placement of microphones, click track,
ensemble playing and dynamics.
* sight-reading, writing out and playing drum parts and drum solos
* rhythm-section lessons
* in the third year, polyrhythms and metric modulations (Dennis Chambers, David
Garibaldi and Royal Hartigan) and preparation for the recital
Technique
The subsidiary subject of side drum will be concluded in the third year unless the
student wishes to continue studying it for one additional year.
Ensembles
* trio plus voice (required in the second year, optional in the third)

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

* trio plus soloist (required in the third year, optional in the second)
* Latin group, Brazilian group, fusion group (student may elect at least two of the
three, one term each)
* big band: third year optional, provided that the student has developed sufficiently
and has an affinity with the repertoire. In addition to the tutti rehearsals, separate
rhythm-section rehearsals will be held.
* jazz group, optional

Examination
* final examination: the student's ability to play and function in the studio will be
assessed (at the end of the first term)
* the recital will be given at the end of the second term. In this phase, it is expected
that the student gradually develop his/her own style and identity, preferably in all
style disciplines; this must be demonstrated during the recital. The recital must be
seen as a blueprint of the final examination to be held in the following year.
* if elected, final big band examination (stated on the diploma). If the student
completes the course successfully: opportunity to play with the big band during the
final examination as well.

Fourth year
Principal subject
During this year, any shortcomings in all areas will be addressed and improved; much
of this period will be devoted to preparing for the approaching final examination.
Depth and musical experience will constitute particularly important areas, as will the
intensity of the student's playing; additionally, students will work on becoming
mentally prepared for a possible professional career. Finally, instructional videos of a
higher level will be shown during the lessons.
Ensembles
As described in the third-year section, based on choice and availability.

Final examination
Students are asked to choose as varied a selection from the repertoire as possible, but
they are also welcome to demonstrate a particular specialization, of course; they
should, however, ensure that the programme does not become too monotonous. The
examination must be seen as a concert and the student should bear this in mind when
putting together the programme.
Length of the programme: 50 minutes.

Teachers
Gerhard Jeltes coordinator + methodology
Lucas van Merwijk
Marcel Serierse
Martijn Vink
Haye Jellema technique

Admission requirements
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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Candidates from abroad for the principal subject drums jazz will be selected
beforehand by means of a recording of three pieces to be sent in by the candidate. The
candidate is free in his choice of the pieces. If the candidate's playing on the recording
does not match the required level, the candidate will not be invited to the entrance
examination.
N.B. Nobody will be admitted on the basis of the recording only, and being invited to
the entrance exam does not mean the candidate is admitted to the school.
During the entrance examination the candidate is tested for:
1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose two pieces from three pieces prepared by the candidate
in which the candidate shows the committee both command of the instrument and
musical understanding, preferably in various styles such as jazz, latin or fusion.
b. Playing vue of a short little drum etude at the level of Mitchell Peters' Intermediate
Snare Drum Studies no. 14.
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to
the committee, he/she has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of
30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the candidate to show his/her skills as
quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.
2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills
This may consist of:
* playing by ear an unknown, simple piece, without any previous information
* playing of some rhythms at a given tempo (clicktrack)
* playing vue of some rhythms for percussion. In these rhythms some rudiments have
been incorporated.
* playing a simple 'play along' of 8 bars, including written part
The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show
the candidate's skills which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.
3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.
Important issues for the assessment are:
1. musicality and hearing
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with the instrument and the musical styles that are connected with this
instrument
but besides these also:
4. technique and tone quality
5. reading of rhythms

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Theory of Music
Students are trained to teach theoretical subjects at conservatories. The course aims to
provide students with the necessary and thorough knowledge of all theoretical aspects
of jazz, jazz-related styles and their practical applications.
Admission normally takes place after the third year of an instrumental principal study.
Regular teachers are Barbara Bleij, Clemens Kemme and Henk Huizinga (arranging).
The course includes as principal subject the items harmony/analysis, ear training
('solfge'), harmony at the piano, arranging, methodology (including jazz 'solfge') and
history of jazz.
As additional subject the lessons include classical music theory (harmony/analysis
and modal counterpoint) and analysis of twentieth-century music. Writing a thesis
which in principle can be published is an important feature of the final examination.
Co-ordinator: Ruud van Dijk

Study programme

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

The Jazz Music Theory principal study (course intended to prepare candidates to
become teachers of theory subjects within a jazz degree programme) is a
Postgradutate Course programme and should, in principle, be seen as an opportunity
for candidates already having completed or about to complete an instrumental
principal study in jazz to continue this study.
Although exceptions are possible, this instrumental programme is crucial for gaining
insight into and developing a bond with the music world. Before candidates may take
the entrance examination to participate in the first trial year of the principal study,
they must have completed the theory and additional subsidiary subjects. This entrance
examination will consist of a written and an oral part.
The study includes the following principal subject components:
* harmony/analysis (1.5 lesson units)
* harmony at the piano (0.5 lesson unit)
* arranging (1 lesson unit)
* methodology (also of jazz solfge) and thesis supervision (0.5 lesson unit)
* history of jazz (1 lesson unit for one year)
The study includes the following subsidiary subject components:
* classical harmony/analysis
* modal counterpoint (two-year course up to and including three voices)
These subsidiary subjects must be completed satisfactorily by the student. The
student may also elect to take other theory subjects in the Classical Department.

Teachers
Ruud van Dijk coordinator
Barbara Bleij
Clemens Kemme additional study classical music
Henk Huizinga arranging

Admission requirements
The entrance examination focuses especially on:
* affinity with jazz
* knowledge of jazz history
* aptitude towards and proficiency in the specific rhythm and harmony of jazz
* ear perception (harmonic, rhythmic and melodic hearing)* harmony at the piano
* certain knowledge of classical music theory
* readiness to do music-theoretical research

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Trombone and Bass Trombone


The wind faculty seeks to train students to become all-round musicians capable of
functioning in all areas of the professional practice: from musical orchestras to big
bands through to jazz, fusion, pop and Latin ensembles, both live and recorded.
Students gain experience in a variety of musical situations, with ensemble playing,
solo performance and improvisation as focal points. Separate courses are offered for
lead trumpet and lead alto, these are unique in Europe.
The members of the trombone section are Bert Boeren, Martijn Sohier, Erik van Lier,
Martin van den Berg and Jilt Jansma.
Co-ordinator: Erik van Lier

Study programme

Objective
The objective of the course is to train musicians to be as versatile as possible. The
programme offers students various means of specialization, which corresponds to the
individual talents of the student. This objective is accomplished by allowing the
student to take part in various musical situations in which good ensemble skills and
the development of soloistic qualities (improvisation) are key; additionally, the
student's own contribution (creativity) is stimulated to the greatest extent possible.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Propaedeutic Year
Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* becoming acquainted with basic musical structures on which improvisation is based.
Attention is paid to tone production, articulation, phrasing, timing and an
understanding of harmony in relation to improvisation.
* the development of a personal musical language
* playing all major and minor scales
* acquainting the student with II-V-I progressions, also unaccompanied over two bars
* learning themes by heart and their accompanying chord charts
* collecting jazz repertoire on LP records, CDs and cassette tapes
These lessons are given by the improvisation teacher.
Technique
In the technique lessons, attention will be given to:
* improving general horn technique: posture, breath, breath support, embouchure,
slide technique, tone production, articulation, range and flexibility
* becoming acquainted with various practice methods and warm-up exercises
* a practical introduction to various trombone schools and the methods and various
styles (solo pieces)
* improvement/development of reading accidentals and clefs in common trombone
material
* improvement of tone conception (tone production) by listening to trombonists (CD,
LP)
Both classical and jazz. The jazz teacher will also check technique using material by
Remington, Slokar, Van Lier, Bequet and Kleinhammer. These technique books will
continue to be explored and discussed throughout the four-year period.
Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* trombone group

Examination (summary)
* playing four pieces of different character from memory
* playing two tudes requiring different articulation
* playing two classical solo pieces of different character

Second and third year


Principal subject
In the lessons in improvisation, the following points will receive extra attention:
* ear-training in conjunction with the instrument
* stimulating creativity and helping to develop the student's own individual style
* the analysis of solo transcriptions
* knowledge of the repertoire
* further exploration of scalar material in various intervals and with various
articulations
* continuing to develop stamina for lead parts; range should extend up to a high D at

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

least
* becoming aware of different types of tone and being able to produce these as well
* developing dynamic ability (pp?ff)
* refining the conditioning routines and learning the effect of the various exercises
* being able to execute the solos of Dick Nash, J.J. Johnson and Carl Fontano
* studying the old bands and their trombone sound, as well as classical trombone
soloists
In his/her lesson plan, the student will draw up his/her own improvisation teaching
method to be implemented at three different levels: for amateurs, music schools and
conservatories.
Technique
First-year material will be taken to a higher level. In the lessons, attention will be given
to playing classical tudes and concert pieces.
Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2 and 3
* trio plus soloist in year 3
* crossover group and/or other traditions are a required elective in year 3 or 4
* trombone group in year 2 and 3
* big band in year 2 and 3 and year 1 and/or year 4
This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last
assessment before the final examination and will take place during the second term of
year 3.

Examination (summary)
The student will prepare no more than six pieces. For more information, please see the
section on the propaedeutic year.

Fourth year
Principal subject
Preparation for the final examination. Extending the student's range on the instrument
up to a high F. Increase dynamics and stamina.
Technique
In late January, a final technique examination will be held in which the student will
perform classical tudes and concert pieces.
Ensembles
Two ensembles are required: trio plus soloist and one ensemble of the student's choice.
Final examination
The examination will last at least 50 and no more than 60 minutes. All students will be
responsible for putting together the repertoire that they will perform for the final
examination so that they can present themselves to the best of their ability

Teachers
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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Erik van Lier coordinator


Bert Boeren
Martijn Sohier
Martin van den Berg bass trombone
Jilt Jansma+ methodology
Bart van Lier regular guest teacher

Admission requirements
1. Playing skill
a. The committee will choose from three pieces from the standard jazz repertoire
(theme and improvisation) of different character, tempo and key, prepared by the
candidate, in which he/she shows the committee both command of the instrument
and a reasonable rhythmic, harmonic and melodic understanding. In playing these
pieces improvisation must be an important factor. For candidates who give priority to
playing in an orchestra there are also possibilities. In this case improvisatorial skills are
less important.
b. The candidate must also play written material, e.g. jazz solos, jazz etudes and/or
classical etudes (bring four copies of sheet music for the examination committee).
c. Being able to play all major and minor scales and triads at a reasonable tempo.
The committee reserves the right to interrupt the candidate's playing as according to
the committee, he/she has supplied enough information (because of the limited time of
30 minutes). Therefore it is important for the candidate to show his/her skills as
quickly as possible: not too many and/or too long solos of fellow players, no
unnecessary repetitions.
2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills
This may consist of:
* repeating by ear a sung or played line
* filling in (playing solo) of a harmonic progression of given chord symbols
* playing of a written melody a prima vista
The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show
the candidate's skills which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.
3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.
Important issues for the assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with jazz or derived forms is supposed to be present
but besides these also:
4. harmonic understanding, reading chords
5. technique and tone quality
6. sight reading

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Trumpet
The wind faculty seeks to train students to become all-round musicians capable of
functioning in all areas of the professional practice: from musical orchestras to big
bands through to jazz, fusion, pop and Latin ensembles, both live and recorded.
Students gain experience in a variety of musical situations, with ensemble playing,
solo performance and improvisation as focal points. Separate courses are offered for
lead trumpet and lead alto, these are unique in Europe.
The teaching staff of the trumpet section consists of Ruud Breuls, Jan Wessels and Jan
Oosthof (lead trumpet). Wynton Marsalis, Marvin Stamm, Bobby Shew, Earl Gardner,
Ambrose Akinmusire, Benny Bailey and Ack van Rooijen were guest teachers in the
past years.
Co-ordinator: Jan Oosthof

Study programme

Objective
The objective of the course is to train musicians to be as versatile as possible. The
programme offers students various means of specialization, which corresponds to the
individual talents of the student. This objective is accomplished by allowing the
student to take part in various musical situations in which good ensemble skills and

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the development of soloistic qualities (improvisation) are key; additionally, the


student's own contribution (creativity) is stimulated to the greatest extent possible.

Propaedeutic Year
Principal subject
In the principal private lessons, the following issues will be addressed:
* becoming acquainted with basic musical structures on which improvisation is based.
Attention is paid to tone production, articulation, phrasing, timing and an
understanding of harmony in relation to improvisation.
* the development of a personal musical language
* playing transcriptions that focus on the performance tradition of jazz music
* playing all major and minor scales, arpeggios with variations
These lessons are given by the improvisation teacher.
Technique
The technique teacher will focus particularly on technical skills including posture,
breathing, embouchure and tone production.
Ensembles
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* ensemble skills
* jazz group
* trumpet section

Examination (summary)
* playing four pieces of different character from memory
* playing four classical solo pieces of different character

Second and third year


Principal subject
In the lessons in improvisation, the following points will receive extra attention:
* ear-training in conjunction with the instrument
* stimulating creativity and helping to develop the student's own individual style
* the analysis of solo transcriptions
* knowledge of the repertoire
* further exploration of scalar material in various intervals and with various
articulations
* continued development of the student's range on the instrument
In addition, attention is now devoted to the performance tradition of fusion/funk
music. The student's jazz, classical and ensemble repertoire is expanded. In the third
year, classes are put together for the purpose of studying and performing various
styles.
Ensembles
* jazz group in year 2 and 3
* trio plus soloist in year 3
* crossover group and/or other traditions are a required elective in year 3 or 4
* big band in year 2 and 3 and year 1 and/or year 4

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This phase will be concluded with a recital. This recital will constitute the last
assessment before the final examination and will take place during the second term of
year 3.

Examination (summary)
The student will prepare no more than six pieces. For more information, please see the
section on the propaedeutic year.

Fourth Year
Principal subject
During this year, the student will prepare a varied programme with the help of his/her
principal study teacher.
Technique
In late January, the final technique examination will be held.
Ensembles
Two ensembles are required: trio plus soloist and one ensemble of the student's choice.

Final examination (summary)


The examination will last at least 50 and no more than 60 minutes. All students will be
responsible for putting together the repertoire that they will perform for the final
examination so that they can present themselves to the best of their ability.

Teachers
Jan Oosthof lead trumpet; technique; methodology; coordinator
Ruud Breuls
Jan Wessels

Admission requirements
1. Playing skill
The committee will choose from three pieces from the standard jazz repertoire (theme
and improvisation) of different character, tempo and key, prepared by the candidate, in
which he/she shows the committee both command of the instrument and a reasonable
rhythmic, harmonic and melodic understanding. In playing these pieces improvisation
must be an important factor. For candidates who give priority to playing in an
orchestra there are also possibilities. In this case improvisatorial skills are less
important.
b. The candidate must also play written material, e.g. jazz solos, jazz etudes and/or
classical etudes (bring four copies of sheet music for the examination committee).
c. Being able to play:
* all major and minor scales
* all major and minor triads and dominant seventh chords
2. Hearing, tempo/timing and reading skills
This may consist of:
* repeating by ear a sung or played line
* filling in (playing solo) of a harmonic progression of given chord symbols

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* playing of a written melody a prima vista


The committee supplements the examination with some exercises which must show
the candidate's skills which have not been sufficiently disclosed up till then.
3. Assessment
The possibilities to follow a principal subject study will be discussed by the committee.
Important issues for the assessment are:
1. musicality, hearing and melodic understanding
2. feeling for rhythm and tempo
3. affinity with jazz or derived forms is supposed to be present
but besides these also:
4. harmonic understanding, reading chords
5. technique and tone quality
6. sight reading

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Voice
Lydia van Dam, Josee Koning, Sylvi Lane, Lilian Vieira and G Titulaer are the principal
teachers. Technique teachers are Lieve Geuens, Wiebe-Pier Cnossen and Esther
Kuiper. Regular guest teacher is David Linx.
Students are trained to be professional vocalists capable of functioning in any branch
of the musical profession, both on the stage and in the studio. Therefore they learn to
interpret and improvise in various jazz styles and in black music, rock, fusion, pop and
Latin (Brazilian). All this is made possible by the vocal faculty's broad range of
teachers, and guest teachers such as Kurt Elling, Peter Eldridge, Deborah Brown,
Dianne Reeves, Nancy Marano (Manhattan School of Music) and Anne-Marie Speed.
Each student is taught by two principal teachers, for vocal-technical and artistic
aspects respectively. The two teachers are jointly responsible for the end result. It is
possible for vocal students to study with various teachers in the course of their fouryear study. Candidates are requested to ascertain that the study will not present
medical problems. Candidates will be selected beforehand by means of an audio or
video recording to be sent in by the candidate.
Co-ordinator: Sylvi Lane

Study programme

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Objective
The principal subject of jazz voice is a course designed to train students to become
vocalists and vocal teachers in the broad field of jazz and popular music. The
programme focuses on the student's musical development - particularly through
exposure to jazz music - and vocal development. There are two principal study
teachers, one of whom focuses on technical issues pertaining to the voice, and the
other on artistic aspects. Together, they are responsible for the end result. In their four
years of study, students may study with several teachers.

Propaedeutic Year
Principal subject, interpretation class
In these classes, the following subjects are addressed:
* timing
* introduction to American 'standard' repertoire
Consequently:
* a few other genres, e.g. Brazilian or fusion, are addressed (please see second and
third year)
* there are as yet no requirements involving the use of the voice (please see vocal
development class)
* students will demonstrate what they have learnt by taking part in evening group
performances
Vocal development class
The vocal development teacher initially works on vocal development and/or repair
independently of other classes. In time, a link with the repertoire studied in the
interpretation class will be established; please see second and third year. The objective
of these lessons is to instil in the student a solid vocal technique; this is accomplished
by means of:
* developing and maintaining the health of the student's voice
* providing insight into and instruction with respect to the use of the voice and the
workings of the vocal apparatus: correct breathing, diction, treatment of the text,
keeping the voice supple, etc.
Ensembles, choirs, workshops
In this year, the following ensembles are required:
* choir
* ensemble skills
* trio with voice

Examination (summary)
Playing ability (the practical component)
* at least two pieces on the basis of which the quality and use of the voice will be
assessed; students may not use a microphone
* at least two pieces from the 'standard' repertoire with microphone
Ear and reading ability
An aural skills test and possibly a sight-reading test.
Assessment
The following checklist will be used:

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* musicality: ear, understanding of melody/harmony, sense of rhythm and tempo


* affinity with singing and with vocal styles
* technique and tone production, presentation and reading ability
* intonation and vocal material
* dealing with accompaniment

Second and third year


Principal subject, interpretation class
Continuation of the material studied during the propaedeutic year. Beginning the
second half of the second year:
* more contemporary popular music and fusion
* Brazilian repertoire, see also workshops
* continuation of the jazz repertoire
Vocal development class
The repertoire will consist of:
* standard repertoire to be sung straight
* repertoire addressed in the interpretation classes
* repertoire aimed at developing the voice
Where possible, the projects scheduled for the academic year will be prepared in
relation to the choice of repertoire and language.
Ensembles, choirs, workshops
* jazz/improvisation (optional) in the third year
* trio with voice, required in the second year, optional in the third year
* Latin, optional
* Brazilian, required in the second and third years
* crossover, required for one term, to be concluded with a crossover evening in the
second, third or fourth year
* choir, required in the second and third years
* big band, one unit (three rehearsals) required in the third or fourth year
* workshop on stage presence

Examination (summary)
Transition from the second to the third year
- Vocal development component
Repertoire: one vocalise, one ballad, one chanson
- Interpretation component
Repertoire: three songs. Assessment will be carried out as it was in the propaedeutic
year. Repertoire and timing are particularly important.
Transition from the third to the fourth year (recital)
Repertoire: six songs, choice by analogy with the repertoire of the final examination,
q.v. The overall performance will carry more weight with respect to the assessment
than it did in previous examinations. The propaedeutic checklist will remain in effect.

Fourth year

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Principal subject, interpretation class


The student is free to choose the teacher and the repertoire. Preparation for the final
examination.
Vocal development class
The objective - a solid vocal technique - will serve as the guiding principle in the course
and in the preparations for the final examination. The vocal development examination
will be held in December or January.
Vocal development examination (= technique examination)
Evaluation of the technique necessary for singing and teaching jazz/popular music
repertoire. Checklist: broken thirds, scales, articulation, singing legato, breathing,
staccato, necessary vocal colours. These are evaluated by means of exercises,
vocalises and three standards.
Ensembles
All ensembles are optional unless big band or crossover has not yet been concluded.

Final examination (summary)


* jazz/swing repertoire
* fusion/popular repertoire
* Brazilian repertoire
The candidate must demonstrate good organizational skills and must perform as part
of various kinds of groups; the programme may also consist partly of the candidate's
own arrangements. For practical reasons, certain components may be concluded
before the actual final examination is held.

Teachers
principal subject
Sylvi Lane coordinator
Humphrey Campbell
Lydia van Dam
Lilian Vieira Brazilian
Sanna van Vliet
technique
Lieve Geuens
Wiebe-Pier Cnossen
Bodhi Sykora methodology
Eva Baggerman choirs
regular guest teacher
David Linx
guest teachers
Kurt Elling
Peter Eldridge
Deborah Brown

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Audition
The first qualifying round

For foreign candidates


Please send in a recording of yourself of three songs on CD, or put the recordings on
your myspace-site and send us the url. Two songs are to be chosen from the jazzsonglist (http://www.ahk.nl/en/conservatorium/studyprogrammes/bachelor/bachelor-jazz/voice/list/#c23695): one jazz-swing and one
jazz-ballad. The third song is a free choice.
The accompaniment should be bass, drums and piano or guitar, but piano or guitar
only will do. The recording doesnt have to be made in a professional studio as long as
the sound is clear enough to give a good impression of the performer.
On the basis of this recording candidates will be selected for the audition. It is not
possible to correspond about the assessment of the recordings.
Audition
The candidates will prepare the following songs and a solo:
1. one jazz-swing
2. one jazz-ballad
3. one ong of the candidates own choice
4. one ong chosen from the technique- songlist:
www.ahk.nl/en/conservatorium/study-programmes/bachelor/bachelorjazz/voice/technique-list/#c25081
5. perform a transcribed improvisation/solo. This can be either a existing solo
transcribed from the recording or self-written one.
One of the songs has to be chosen from the the jazz-songlist
(http://www.ahk.nl/en/conservatorium/study-programmes/bachelor/bachelorjazz/voice/list/#c23695); this must be another song than the ones you have sent for
the qualifying round.
The audition committee chooses from this list at least three songs for the candidate to
perform.
The conservatory will provide accompaniment by a trio of piano, drums and bass.
Please bring charts of your songs, in the right key, for each instrumentalist.
At the end of the audition the candidate will be told if he/she may be admitted to the
first year of the bachelors programme and will be put on the waiting list.

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Other subjects
Other principal subjects, such as violin, viola, cello, flute, clarinet and French horn,
follow the general study programme adapted to the instrument.

Practical matters
Study advice
For information and advice regarding the contents and progess of your study, such as
exemptions, extra subjects, electives, individual credits, you may contact:
Bram Strijbis, study advisor
bram.strijbis@ahk.nl
020-5277569
office hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 10.30-12.30h, or by appointment
Student Counsellor
The Conservatory Student counsellor is Heleen de Kam, telephone 020-5277584, walkin office hours: Tuesdays and Thursdays 11.00-13.00h, and by appointment.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

The student counsellor informs and guidesstudents with respect to conditions of the
course, i.e. all sorts of practical and personal matters relating to the students situation
and being a student (financial assistance, laws and regulations, insurance, residence
permits, etc.). The student counsellor can also be consulted about personal matters,
such as injuries, psychic problems, family matters, lack of motivation or other personal
problems wich may cause students to fall behind in their studies.
The student counsellors objective is to try to help the student find ways to solve
problems and resolve issues. The student counsellor is also the contact person for
foreign students and students with a handicap. In many cases, the student counsellor
can refer the student to other individuals or authorities at or outside the conservatory.
All consultations with the student counsellor are strictly confidential. Please find more
information on our intranet.
Study secretariat
The study secretariat is housed on the 10th floor and is open every weekday from 10.0012.00 and 14.00-16.00h to help you with various study matters, For instance, they can
print an overview of your study results or help you get certain documents or
certificates. You can also contact the office when you have questions about exam
dates of the exam schedule. For matters concerting the payment of your tuition fee or
your enrolment, you should contact the Central Student Registrar Office of the AHK,
Jodenbreestraat 3.

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Study Guide Jazz Bachelor 2014-2015

Conservatorium van Amsterdam


Education and examination regulations 2014-2015

For the study programmes


* bachelor's degree in music CROHO no. 34739
* bachelor's degree in music in education CROHO no. 39112
* master's degree in music CROHO no. 44739
* master's degree in opera CROHO no. 49105

of the faculty of Music of the Amsterdam School of the Arts

The general articles in these regulations also apply to DNOA. For a number of specific articles general
regulations are made, with the Royal Conservatoire, for DNOA. These regulations for DNOA are written
down in the addendum to the CvA regulations, and are therefore a part of these regulations.

Table of contents

Section 1: General
Section 2: Propaedeutic Phase of the Bachelor's Degree Programmes
Section 3: Post-Propaedeutic Phase of the Bachelor's Degree Programmes
Section 4: Master's Degree Programmes
Section 5: Taking Examinations
Section 6: Examination Results
Section 7: Exemption
Section 8: Temporary interruption and cessation of study
Section 9: Reviews
Section 10: Academic Guidance
Section 11: Preservation of student work
Section 12: Final Provision and Provisions Pertaining to Implementation

Addendum: joint regulations for DNOA

Section 1: General

Article 1: Applicability of the Regulations


The Board of the Amsterdam School of the Arts, hereby represented by the Conservatory Board [directie]
of the Conservatorium van Amsterdam, has, with the consent of the Faculty Participation Council
[faculteitsraad], resolved to establish the following regulations regarding the content and structure of the
tuition and examinations of the Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music in Education, Master of Music and
Master of Opera programmes. This will be done in accordance with section 7(13) of the Dutch Higher
Education and Research Act (Wet op het Hoger onderwijs en Wetenschappelijk onderzoek (WHW)).
These programmes are offered by the Faculty of Music of the Amsterdam School of the Arts, hereinafter
referred to as the Conservatorium van Amsterdam. In accordance with section 7(14) of the Act, the
Executive Board [College van Bestuur] will also regularly assess and where appropriate amend these
regulations, taking into account the time thus involved for the students.

The students rights and obligations which are connected with these Education and Examination
Regulations, are formulated in the Student Statute of the Amsterdam School of the Arts. This statute is
available on the School of the Arts website. These regulations apply to the education and examinations
of the Bachelor of Music, Bachelor of Music in Education, Master of Music and Master of Opera
programmes unless it is explicitly indicated or it is clear from the context that the relevant passage is only
applicable to one or a limited number of these four programmes. Any reference in these regulations to
the programme or programmes without any additions being given is a reference to all four programmes.
The programmes are offered by the Conservatorium van Amsterdam, the Faculty of Music of the
Amsterdam School of the Arts, hereinafter referred to as the conservatorium.

Article 2: Definitions
In these regulations, the following will be taken to mean:
a. the Law: the Higher Education and Research Act [Wet op het hoger onderwijs en wetenschappelijk
onderzoek, WHW]
b. student: he or she who is enrolled in the Amsterdamse Hogeschool voor de Kunsten to receive training
and/or to take the examinations and undergo the reviews connected with the programme
c. the 'hogeschool': the Amsterdamse Hogeschool voor de Kunsten
d. the Conservatory: The Conservatorium van Amsterdam, the faculty of
Music of the Amsterdamse Hogeschool voor de Kunsten
e. examination board: the committee as referred to in Article 7(12) of the Act, which is charged with, inter
alia, guaranteeing the quality of the examinations;
f. board of examiners: with regard to the preparation and/or implementation of parts of examinations,
boards of examiners can be established as referred to in section 7(12) of the Act. The board of
examiners will be appointed by the examination board;
g. examiner: a member of the board of examiners, as referred to in section 7(12)(3) of the Act. Examiners
are charged with administering and assessing examinations and other forms of testing.
h. admissions board: the board of examiners charged with administering the admissions examination.
i. programme: a coherent whole made up of units of study, aimed at realizing well-defined objectives in

the areas of knowledge, insight and skills that those completing the programme should possess
j. bachelor's degree programme: degree programmes in higher education pursuant to Article 7(3)(a)(2) of
the Law with a study load of 240 credits
k. master's degree programme: an advanced programme in higher education pursuant to Article
7(3)(a)(2) of the Law with a study load of 120 credits
l. term: uninterrupted period of lessons acctoring tot the annual academic calendar
m. propaedeutic year: the propaedeutic phase of the programme as referred to in Article 7(8) of the Law.
n. post-propaedeutic phase: that part of the bachelor's degree programme which follows the
propaedeutic year
o. component: a unit of study of the programme within the meaning of the Law.
p. examination: each unit of study is concluded with an examination, which constitutes an investigation of
the candidate's knowledge, insight and skills, as well as an assessment of the results of that investigation
q. practicum: a practical exercise in one of the following forms:
- writing a bachelor's or master's thesis
- writing a paper or creating a project
- carrying out a research assignment
- participating in fieldwork or an excursion
- doing an internship
- or participating in another educational activity aimed at achieving certain skills
r. departments: the Conservatory has the main departments Classical Music, Jazz and Pop music and
Music in Education
s. principal subject: the principal subject is an instrument, vocal study, composition, conducting ot theory
t. study guide: the electronic guide to the programmes containing specific information about them,
published on the Conservatory's intranet
u. recognition of competences: activities carried out or programmes participated in or completed as a
result of which exemptions from programme components may be granted
s. fraud: conduct whereby a student endeavours to reduce or eliminate the possibility of an accurate
assessment being formed of his or her or other students knowledge, understanding and skills
v. plagiarism: the reproduction or paraphrasing or passing off as one's own work, either wholly or in part,
of projects, papers and other written assessments of texts or other works such as compositions and
arrangements of other authors without providing proper source references and without clearly indicating
where citations begin and end.

Article 3: Objective of the Programmes


The primary objective of the programmes is to provide students with the knowledge, insight and skills
necessary for successful careers as teachers, performing musicians and/or composers.

The underlying objectives of the programme are as follows: The programmes must focus on the artistic
and professional world in the broadest sense and the teaching profession to which it is connected. In
addition to performing with orchestras, ensembles and on stage, graduates will also work at cultural
institutions, in education and as independent entrepreneurs.
The programmes are 'socially relevant' in that the exit requirements have been tailored to the greatest

extent possible to meet the demands of the professional world. To this end, direct contact with the
professional world is a necessity.

Objective and exit qualifications


The relationship between objectives and exit qualifications in the individual programmes or main subject
has been incorporated in the study guide.
The substance of each programme and exit qualification is described in the study guide.
The programmes are conducted in two languages: Dutch (Classical Music, Jazz, Pop Music and Music in
Education divisions) and English (Classical Music and Jazz divisions).

Bachelor's Degree Programme in Music


subject clusters for musicians
* instrumental and vocal principal subjects (classical music, early music, jazz and pop music)
* conducting (choral, orchestral, concert and brass band)
* theory of music (classical music and jazz)
subject clusters for composition students
* composition (classical music)
* composition/arranging (jazz)

Bachelor of Music in Education Degree Programme


subject clusters for music in education
* music teacher in primary education
* music teacher in seconday education
* community music teacher

Master's Degree Programme in Music


subject clusters for musicians
* instrumental and vocal principal subjects (classical music and jazz)
* principal subject of contemporary music (including Live Electronics)
* conducting (choral, orchestral, concert and brass band)
* theory of music (classical music and jazz)
* theatre singer/performer (in collaboration with De Theaterschool)
subject clusters for composition students
* composition (classical music)
* composition/arranging (jazz)
* composing for film (in collaboration with the Netherlands Film
Aacdemy)

Master's Degree Programme in Opera


subject clusters for opera

Article 4: Full-time
The programmes are offered on a full-time basis.

Article 5: The Examinations


5.1 The following examinations may be given in the bachelor's degree programmes:
* the propaedeutic examination
* the final examination

5.2 The following examination may be given in the master's degree programmes:
* the final examination

Section 2: Propaedeutic Phase of the Bachelor's Degree Programmes

Article 6: Structure and Study Load


The course components of the propaedeutic year have been defined on the website by department,
programme and principal subject along with the corresponding study load, term and type of examination
administered (written, oral or practical). Students must earn a total of 60 credits during the propaedeutic
phase.

Article 7: Binding Recommendation Regarding the Discontinuation of the Student's Studies


7.1.a. At the end of the propaedeutic year, each student will be issued a recommendation regarding the
continuation of his/her bachelor's studies by or on behalf of the Conservatory Board [directie]. Where
appropriate, the website contains further regulations pertaining to the recommendation.

7.1.b. Students enrolled on a bachelor's programme who have yet to pass the propaedeutic examination
may be dismissed pursuant to Article 7(8)(b) of the Law for an indefinite period if their academic
performance fails to meet the following requirements:
I. the student must have earned all credits for the core subjects
II. the student must have earned at least 70% of the credits for the additional theoretical subjects
III. the student must have earned at least 50% of the credits for any introductory or auxiliary subjects
included in his/her course of study.

7.1.c. A student may also be dismissed indefinitely if he or she fails to complete the propaedeutic year
within two years of enrolling in a programme.

7.1.d. The dismissal is binding. Furthermore, students who are dismissed may not enrol again in the
'hogeschool' for the purpose of pursuing the degree for which the dismissal was issued.

7.2. The division of each individual principal subject into core subjects, additional theoretical subjects and
introductory and auxiliary subjects is listed on the website.

7.3. The Executive Board [College van Bestuur] will issue the dismissal at the Conservatory Board's
recommendation and with due regard to the personal circumstances of the student in question.
The personal circumstances will be limited to:
a. illness of the student in question
b. physical, sensory or other functional impairment of the student in question
c. pregnancy of the student in question d. special family circumstances
e. membership in or chairpersonship of the Central Participation Council [Centrale
Medezeggenschapsraad], the Faculty Participation Council [Facultaire Medezeggenschapsraad] or
another formal faculty council
f. other circumstances to be indicated by the 'hogeschool' in which the student in question carries out
activities within the context of the organization and the management of the affairs of the 'hogeschool'
g. membership in the board of a student organization of considerable size having full legal capacity, or in
a similar organization of considerable size for which the protection of the general interests of society are
focal and which does, in fact, carry out activities to this end. The provisions apply only to the positions of
chairperson, secretary and treasurer.

7.4. Prior to dismissal, the student in question will receive a written warning from or on behalf of the
Conservatory Board no later than 1 February of the current academic year. If a considerable deterioration
in the student's performance merits a written warning only after 1 February, this warning will still be
issued. The Student Counsellor and the Study Adviser will be informed of this warning, as a result of
which the Student Counsellor or the Study Adviser may issue a recommendation to the Conservatory
Board.

7.5. If the Conservatory Board intends dismissing a student on behalf of the Executive Board, it will notify
the student counsellor in writing, who will have five working days to issue a recommendation to the
Conservatory Board at his or her discretion. The student will also be informed of the Conservatory
Boards intention as well of the option to explain his or her position to the student counseloor based on
personal circumstances. The student will be heard by the chairperson of the examination board regarding
the intention of the Conservatory Board. If the student expresses the wish to be heard in relation to the
Conservatory Boards intention, he or she may meet with the chairperson of the examination board.

7.6. Any student claiming to be affected by personal circumstances as referred to under 3(b) will be
required to submit the necessary evidence of such circumstances to the Student Counsellor's Office or
programme coordinator. In the event of illness, special family circumstances, a physical, sensory or other
functional impairment or pregnancy of the student in question, he/she must submit a doctor's certificate
attesting to such a condition.

7.7. If the Student Counsellor does not issue a recommendation to the Conservatory Board, he or she will
notify it in a timely manner. The Conservatory Board will inform the student of the Student Counsellor
decision in writing, providing a copy to the Student Counsellor.

7.8. If the Student Counsellor does issue a recommendation based on personal circumstances, the
Conservatory Board will inform the Executive Board of its intention to issue a dismissal notice regarding
the students studies, making the complete file available. In such instances the Executive Board will
decide on whether to issue a binding recommendation and will notify the student of it in writing, providing
copies to both the Conservatory Board and the Student Counsellor.

7.9. Dismissal will be effected at the end of the last term, but no later than on 15 July of the current
academic year. The student will be notified in writing of his or her dismissal, at the address that he or she
has most recently registered with the central student office. The decision of the Conservatory Board or
the Executive Board will set forth the appeal procedure.

7.10 If the propaedeutic phase is extended, the conditions and requirements to be satisfied by the
student as well as the time limit for meeting them in order to preclude the issue of a dismissal notice will
be recorded in writing.

7.11 A dismissal notice may be issued at any time during the propaedeutic phase.

Section 3: Post-Propaedeutic Phase of the Bachelor's


Degree Programmes

Article 8: Structure and Study Load


The course components of the post-propaedeutic phase have been defined in the study guide by
department, programme and principal subject along with the corresponding study load, term and type of
examination administered (written, oral or practical). Students must earn a total of 180 credits during the
post-propaedeutic phase.

Section 4: Master's Degree Programmes

article 9: Structure and study load


The master's degree programmes are structured by means of an individual plan of study. The committee
of examinators of the master's programme will assess the individual plan of study submitted by the
student. The subjects that can be taken in the master's degree programmes are defined in the study
guide and in the programme description of the master's subjects. The master's degree programmes are
concluded with a final examination. Students must earn a total of
120 credits during the master's programme.

The following stipulations in respect of the structure, the taking and administering of examinations and
reviews for the bachelor's degree programmes will, to the greatest extent possible, apply mutatis
mutandis to the master's degree programmes.

Section 5: Taking Examinations

Article 10: Order of the Examinations


10.1. Students may not take an examination until they have successfully passed all other examinations
from previous terms or academic years in that same subject unless the syllabus of a certain subject
explicitly permits this.

10.2. Under the following conditions, the examination board may, at the student's request, allow him/her
to take certain post-propaedeutic examinations before he/she has passed the propaedeutic examination:
I. the student must have successfully passed the minimum required propaedeutic components so as not
to risk being issued a binding recommendation to discontinue his/her studies as referred to in Article 7;
II. the student will be allowed to take only the examinations for those components of which the student
has already passed the propaedeutic examination;
III. permission to take the examinations will be valid for a period to be determined but not to exceed
twelve months.

Article 11: Examination Periods and Frequency of Examinations


11.1. For the components referred to in Articles 6 and 8, students will be given at least one opportunity
during the academic year in which the examination is offered to resit that examination. The examinations
taken initially and resat by students of the components referred to in Article 6 have no influence on the
time periods stipulated in Article 7, within which students must earn the required number of credits in
each category of subjects in the light of the regulations pertaining to the binding recommendation
regarding the discontinuation of studies set forth therein.

11.2. Notwithstanding the provisions of the foregoing subclause, students will be given but a single
opportunity to take the examination of a component in which he/she is not enrolled in a given academic
year.

11.3. Students may not take any particular course component more than twice. If a student fails to
complete the course component, then in consultation with study supervisors he or she must
independently acquire the requisite knowledge in order thus to complete the course component
successfully.

Article 12: Qualifying examination for moving up from the first to the second study year of the master's
degree programme
12.1 All students take a qualifying examination at the end of the first study year of the master's degree
programme. If the result of this examination is insufficient, the student is entitled to a re-examination
during the re-examination week at the end of August of the same year. If the qualifying examination takes
place outside the examination period from May to July, the re-examination will take place within two
months after the examination which the student has failed.

12.2 Students may only participate in the lessons and examinations of the second study year of the
master's degree programme after they have passed the qualifying examination from the first to the
second year.

12.3 If a candidate has not shown up at the examination without a valid reason (please see article 7.3 of
these regulations), he/she forfeits the right to a re-examination.

Article 13: Form of the Examinations


13.1. The examinations of the components referred to in Articles 6 and 8 will be taken in the manner
indicated in the study guide. At the
student's request, the examination board may allow an examination to be given in a manner other than
that referred to above.

13.2. Physically disabled students and students suffering from a sensory impairment will be given the
opportunity to take their examinations in a manner most suited to meet any special needs they may have.
Where necessary, the examination board will obtain the opinion of one or more experts before rendering
a decision.

Article 14: Oral and Practical Examinations


14.1. Oral and practical/performance examinations are administered individually unless the make-up of
the examination requires otherwise or the examination board has determined differently.

14.2. Oral and practical/performance final examinations, the research presentation and the exam at the
end of the first year of the master's programme are open to the public unless the examination board or
the examiner in question exceptionally determines otherwise.

Section 6: Examination Results

Article 15: Determining and Announcing the Results


15.1. After having administered an oral/practical/performance examination, the examiner will determine
the results and issue these to the student in a written statement, accompanied by a list of reasons in
support of the results.

15.2. The examiner will determine the results of a written examination within 30 days of the day on which
the examination was administered and will provide the Conservatory Registrar Office with the necessary
information for issuing written proof of the results to the student.

15.3. In the written statement notifying the student of his/her results in respect of an examination, the
student will be informed of his/her right of inspection as referred to in Article 16(1).

15.4 The examiner is responsible for promptly notifying the

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Conservatory Registrar Office of students examination results by means of a report card.

Article 16: Period of Validity


Examination components passed are valid for six years. With respect to a certain component for which
the examination was taken more than six years subsequently, the examination board can,
notwithstanding the foregoing and based on a reasoned recommendation by a teacher, require that the
student take an additional or alternative examination before permitting him/her to take the examination in
question.

Article 17: Right of Inspection


17.1. For at least 30 days after the results of a written examination have been announced, the student
may request to inspect his/her evaluated work. He/she may request a copy of the aforementioned work,
which will be provided at cost.

17.2. During the period referred to in the first subclause, any member of the Conservatory population
may acquaint himself/herself with the questions and tasks relating to the examination involved, as well as
with the standards on the basis of which the assessment was made.

Section 7: Exemption

Article 18: Exemption from Examinations


18.1 At the request of the student and recommendation of the relevant study advisor/study coordinator,
the examination board can exempt a student from an examination of a component referred to in Article 6,
8 or 9 if that student meets one of the following conditions:
I. the student has passed an examination of a similar component and with respect to content, level and
study load as part of a comparable professional training course in the Netherlands
II. the student has passed an examination of a similar component with respect to content, level and study
load as part of a comparable university degree programme in the Netherlands
III. the student can produce evidence that he/she has worked for a number of years to be determined by
the examination board in an area relevant to the examination in question or has practised a profession
relevant to the examination in question
IV. the student has passed an examination of a similar component with respect to content, level and
study load as part of a comparable course abroad, possibly after a Nuffic committee charged with
comparing the foreign diploma with that of a comparable programme offered in the Netherlands has
recognised the examination.

The recommendation of the study advisor/study coordinator will be made using the designated form and
will be accompanied by the requisite supporting documents.

18.2 If a student is exempted from one or more examinations, he or she will not participate in any
course(s) in preparation for that/those examination(s).

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Section 8: Temporary interruption and cessation of study

Article 19
19.1 A student may submit a reasoned request to the study supervisors to interrupt his or her study for a
specific period. The study supervisors will decide whether to grant this request.

19.2 If the students request is granted, the study supervisors and the student will agree in advance about
when and under what conditions the student will be entitled to resume his or her study.

19.3 A student must de-register in order to interrupt his or her study.

19.4 A student may not interrupt his or her study for more than one year.

19.5 If a student prolongs the agreed interruption of study without obtaining permission from the head of
division, he or she will be deemed to have ceased studying without being automatically entitled to resume
studies. In that case the study supervisors may deny a request for a renewed entrance examination.

19.6 A student who interrupts his or her study by de-registering without complying with the stipulations
laid down in paragraphs 1 to 4 will be deemed to have ceased studying and will not be entitled to resume
studies. In that case the study supervisors may deny a request for a renewed entrance examination.

19.7 To administer the entrance examination, the study supervisors will appoint an assessment
committee which will determine whether and at what level a student may resume his or her studies and
which components of the programme he or she must complete or repeat from the preceding phase of
study. This recommendation will be submitted for the approval of the examination board.

Section 9: Reviews

Article 20: Review Periods and Frequency of Reviews


20.1 Once the student has submitted sufficient proof that he/she has passed the examinations of the
components making up the course, he/she will be given the opportunity of undergoing a review.

20.2 The student will only receive his/her diploma after he/she has successfully completed all course
components.

Article 21: Final Exam Results


21.1. The examination board will determine the results of the final exam once the student has submitted
sufficient proof that he/she has passed the required examinations.

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21.2. Notwithstanding the provisions of the first subclause, the examination board can, prior to
determining the results of the examination, enquire into the student's knowledge, insight and skills with
regard to one or more components of the programme, if and to the extent that the results of the
examinations in question give it cause to do so.

Article 22 Degree Certificates


22.1 Once a student has passed the final degree programme examination, he or she will be awarded the
corresponding degree certificate by the examination board.

22.2 The examination board may mark a Bachelors Degree or Masters Degree certificate 'cum laude' if
in the unanimous opinion of the examination board members the student has shown an exceptional level.

Article 23: Fraud and plagiarism


23.1. If in any examination or any other form of assessment an examiner suspects that a student has
committed fraud, he or she will inform the examination board in writing as soon as possible.

23.2. The examination board will decide within two weeks on the measures it will take. It will not make
that decision before the student in question has been heard or at least proper action has been taken to
summon the student to a hearing. A report will be drawn up of the hearing.

23.3. The examination board will draw up its decision in writing. It may mean that the student is denied
the right to re-take the component in which he or she is found to have committed fraud for a period of
time determined by the board.

23.4 The examination board will stipulate that the examiner must mark the student 0 (zero) for the
component in which he or she has committed fraud. The decision will state the students options for
appeal or objection and the applicable time limits.

23.5 Articles 23.1 to 23.4 apply correspondingly to instances of plagiarism.

23.6 If a student commits fraud or plagiarism with the knowledge and/or cooperation of a fellow student,
the latter will be an accessory, to whom the relevant guidelines and procedures will apply
correspondingly.

Article 24: The Examination Appeals Board


The student may appeal to the Examination Appeals Board as referred to in Article 7 (60) of the Law in
respect of decisions rendered by the examination board or examiners, or of decisions as referred to in
Article 7 (Dismissal).

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Section 10: Academic Guidance

Article 25: The Student's Performance and Academic Guidance


25.1. The Conservary Board will ensure that the student's results are recorded such that each student
can obtain an overview of his/her results with respect to the course curriculum.

25.2. The Conservary Board will ensure that the progress of students enrolled on the programme will be
monitored partly for the purpose of introducing them to possible learning tracks in and outside the
programme.

Section 11: Preservation of student work

Article 26
26.1 Theses, recordings of final practical examinations, reports and assessments will be preserved seven
years following the date affixed to them.

26.2 The material referred to in paragraph 1 may be used to communicate about the programme or for
educational or accreditational purposes.

Section 12: Final Provision and Provisions Pertaining to Implementation

Article 27: Special Power of the Examination Committee


27.1 In respect of examinations and reviews governed by the present Education and Examination
Regulations, the Conservatory examination board is entitled to adopt additional regulations.

27.2 In individual cases the examination board is authorized to make an exception to the Education and
Examination Regulations in favour of a student if there are important reasons for doing so.

Article 28: Notification and Modification


28.1. Modifications to the present regulations will be adopted by means of a separate resolution, but not
after the proposed resolution has been approved by the Faculty Participation Council.

28.2a The Education and Examination Regulations in force will be made public before the start of the
academic year.

28.2b. The Faculty Board will ensure that the present regulations, the rules and guidelines established by
the examination board, and any modifications of these documents are duly made public.

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28.2c. No modifications which apply to the current academic year will


be made unless reasonable standards dictate that the students' interests will not be prejudiced. In the
eevent of major changes from the previous Education and Examination Regulations a transitional
arrangement will be made for current students.

Article 29: Entry Into Force


29.1 These regulations will come into effect on 1 September 2014. Enacted by order of the Conservatory
Board on 17 June 2014 having obtained the approval of the Faculty Participation Council on 26 May
2014.

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Addendum to the Education and Examination Regulations (OER) 2014-15 of the


Conservatorium van Amsterdam and the Education and Examination Regulations
(OER) 2014-15 of the Royal Conservatoire

1. General
The boards of the Amsterdam School of the Arts and the University of the Arts The Hague,
herewith represented by the directorates of the Conservatorium van Amsterdam and the
Royal Conservatoire, attach this addendum to the Education and Examination Regulations
(OER) of both conservatories. The addendum is endorsed by the faculty counsels of both
conservatories and concurs with article 7.13 of the Dutch law for higher education and
scientific research. It concerns the content and form of the educational programme and
examinations for the Master of Opera degree at the Dutch National Opera Academy
(DNOA). This DNOA master programme is jointly offered by the Music Faculty of the
Amsterdam School of the Arts (hereinafter Conservatorium van Amsterdam) and the Royal
Conservatoire of the University of the Arts The Hague.

The general provisions, including the enactment and the date of coming into operation of
the Education and Examination Regulations of both conservatories, apply fully to the
DNOA. The purpose of this addendum is to synchronize the DNOA programme and its
student assessments with the regulations of both conservatories.

2. Programme
The two-year DNOA programme consists of four semesters. Each semester is comprised of
an instruction period and a project period. The programme is presented each semester in
the digital study guide, including course form, assessment, and number of credits.

3. Auditions
Audition requirements for enrollment at the DNOA are specified on the DNOA website. A
successful audition for the DNOA means that a student has demonstrated sufficient
qualities to be able to attain the final qualifications.

4. Sequence of Exams
A prerequisite for admission to an exam is that all previous exams in said subject or
academic year have been successfully passed, unless the curriculum of a subject
specifically allows exception to this prerequisite.

5. Exams and Re-exams


5.1 If a student fails an exam, he/she will be offered the opportunity to take the exam again
within the same academic year.

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5.2 By way of derogation from article 5.1, students are offered only one opportunity to take
an exam for a course not on offer in said academic year.

5.3 Students can enroll a maximum of two times for each part of the programme. If still not
completed successfully, students must consult the head of the department on how to
prepare for the exam on their own.

6. Type of Exams
The DNOA has two types of exams: written and practical. Exams for cognitive courses will
be given as described in the DNOA study guide. If requested by a student and after consent
is obtained from his/her instructor, the committee of examiners may permit a student to take
another form of examination.

7. Practical Exams
7.1 Each semester students taking practical courses are assessed in a practical exam,
consisting of the realization of a project at the end of the semester. The practical exam is by
its nature almost always a group exam, in which the individual achievements of each
student are judged as an integral part of the entire project.

7.2 Practical exams are open to the general public, unless determined otherwise in special
cases by the principle examiner or the committee of examiners.

8. Exam Results
8.1 At the end of each semester the integral development of a student is discussed at a
plenary evaluation meeting. During this meeting both the students achievements in the
opera production and the students overall development during the past semester are
evaluated.

8.2 At the conclusion of the evaluation meeting, the artistic director of the DNOA
(chairperson of the committee of examiners) meets with each student to relay the
evaluation. This is followed by a written and motivated statement, presented to the student
by the chairperson of the committee of examiners.

8.3 Twice a year the chairperson of the committee of examiners is responsible for timely
relaying student evaluations to the administration of the appropriate conservatory.

9. Final Exam

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9.1 The final exam consists of the successful completion of a project in the fourth semester,
unless in exceptional cases the central exam committee or the appointed committee of
examiners determines otherwise.

9.2 The final exam is an integral evaluation of the students development and level of
achievement. Each student final exam file includes:
- Overview of six complete roles (suited to the students type of voice), studied during
enrollment in the programme;
- Extensive list of audition repertoire, suited to the students type of voice;
- Participation in two to four fully staged opera productions;
- Written part of the exam, based on research into one of the roles performed.

9.3 The committee of examiners for the final exam at the DNOA is comprised of staff
members of the DNOA, the principle vocal instructor of the candidate, and an external
expert. Assessment of the student by the committee of examiners takes place directly after
the final exam performance. Directly after the committees assessment, the results of the
examination are verbally communicated.

9.4 The assessment criteria are described in the DNOA study guide. The result of the exam
is expressed in a grading system ranging from 1 to 10.

10. Cum laude


If the student is unanimously judged to have demonstrated exceptionally high standards,
the committee of examiners can add the designation cum laude on the degree certificate.

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