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Identify eight common causes of fire in workplace.

Eight common causes of fire in workplace are


Deliberate (Arson)
Electrical faults
Misuse of electrical equipment
Smokers materials
Smoking in prohibited areas
Loss of control burning rubbish
Heating equipment
Unsafe storage of materials
Flammable liquids/gases
Welding/hot work
Mechanical heat (Friction)
Identify the control measures that could be implemented to reduce the risks to
pedestrians in areas where vehicles are maneuvering
The control measures that could be implemented to reduce the risks to pedestrians in
areas where vehicles are maneuvering
Design and display safety signage to minimise hazards.
If hazards exist segregate pedestrians by means of barriers, fences or wardens.
Warn of existing hazards with signs/flags/indicators etc.
Segregation pedestrians and vehicles if possible with separate routes
High visibility clothing for pedestrians
Provide clearly marked/signed routes
Provide gangways suitable width and clearance
Implement Speed limits
Provide adequate lighting
Provide clear direction signs and door marking
Avoid sharp bends
Good floor conditions/gentle gradients
Sufficient parking
Avoid reversing
Alerting people to hazard Outline specific hazards associated with the use of the
battery powered fork lift trucks AND state the precautions in each case.
An organization uses small amount of toxic chemicals
a. Indentify 4 possible routes of entry of toxic chemicals.
Inhalation
Ingestion
Absorption
Injection (Direct Entry)
b. Explain the difference between acute and chronic health effect

Acute :
Is an immediate or rapidly produced adverse effect, following a single or shortterm exposure to a hazardous substance, usually with a rapid or immediate
response which is normally reversible.
Chronic:
Adverse health effect resulting from prolonged, repeated exposure to a
hazardous substance the response being gradual (often unrecognised for a long
time) may get worse with no further exposure and is often irreversible.
c. identify the sources of info which could be used in the assessment of risk of
toxic substance
The sources of info which could be used in the assessment of risk of toxic substance
Checking information that came with the product, e.g. a safety data sheet;
the information from supplier, sales representative and trade association;
looking in the trade press for health and safety information;
Checking on the Internet, eg HSEs website pages.
NH40 for Workplace Exposure Limits (WELs) of the substance to know if the
substance assigned an exposure limit
Local and international medical reports and publications to know are there
any ill-health reports
Look at the results of health surveillance reports
identification and how much of the substance is in use or produced by the
process
What is the activity at risk
How long and how often is the exposure
Who can be exposed and how
How can the substance enter the body
In what form is of the substance
What is the concentration of the substance

d. outline control measures that might be required in order to minimize risk to


workers
Control measures that might be required in order to minimize risk to workers

Elimination or substitution of hazardous substances or forms of substances


Process changes
Reduced time exposure based on significance of time weighted average
Enclose of hazards
Segregation of process
Segregation of people by distance, age, time and gender

Local exhaust ventilation ensuring general application and principles of


capture and removal of hazardous substances.

Excavation work is being carried out on construction site. Identify the control
measures needed to reduce the risk to workers.
The control measures needed to reduce the risk to workers.

Minimise vibration on the excavation site by appropriate choice of plant to


undertake the work.
Review the system of work to minimise the times that vibration causing plant are
working simultaneously.
All services should be located and clearly marked on site prior to work
commencing. Services can be located by digging trial holes, core hole drilling,
gas detectors, remote location devices or hand digging.
Use devices which lower the water table around the excavation site.
Use sumps to pump any seepage from the excavation.
Fence off or cover any holes where any water is retained.
Ensure there is quick access out of the excavation.
Keep all equipment and excavation material away from the edge of the
excavation.
The perimeter should be fenced or appropriate barriers in place with clear
signage.

Outline the factors that may lead to occupational stress among workers.
The factors that may lead to occupational stress among workers
Inadequate Lighting
Cramped/dirty/untidy conditions
Poor Layout (Privacy/Security)
Glare, Temperature/Humidity
Inadequate ventilation/stale air
Noise, Vibration
Inadequate welfare facilities
Inclement weather conditions

a. Identify 4 mechanical hazards associated with the use of pedestal drill.


The four mechanical hazards associated with the use of pedestal drill are
o
o
o
o

Entanglement with rotating bit


Contact with rotating bit
Ejections for materials Flying objects
Puncture

b. Outline 4 control measures to reduce the injury to operators of pedestal


drill.
Four control measures
o
o
o
o
o
o

Installing sound guarding


Secure work pieces with clamps to prevent movement
Wear appropriate PPE
Inspect and maintain tools
Remove faulty tools
Procedures for reporting and replacing damaged tools

A. Identify 4 factors that could affect the severity of injury resulting from contact with
electricity.
The factors that could affect the Severity of Electric Shock are
Current in amperes
Length of contact time
Path through the body
Conductivity/resistance of the body
The voltage
Conductivity of the environment
Nature of the contact
Age and health status of victim

a. In relation to classification of fires give an example of material (fuel) that falls


within each of classes A,B,C,D.
Classification of fires
A
Combustible solids
B
Flammable liquids or liquefied solids
C
Flammable gases
D
Flammable metals
b. Identify 2 methods of heat transfer AND explain each method contributes to
the spread of fire.
Conduction - Movement of heat through materials
Convection - Movement of hotter gases up through the air
A maintenance worker regularly uses handheld grinder and exposed to vibration.
a. Outline the symptoms

Decreased grip strength

Decreased hand sensation and dexterity

Finger blanching or white fingers

Carpal tunnel syndrome

b. Outline six control measures.


Hand and arm vibration may be more difficult to control, but the proper selection and
maintenance of tools can dramatically decrease vibration exposure. Vibration levels
associated with power hand tools depend on tool properties, including size, weight,
method of propulsion, handle location, and the tool drive mechanism. Primary prevention
through eliminating excessive vibration and shocks can be accomplished through better
ergonomic tool designs.
Administrative controls can be very important. In high-risk situations, job rotation, rest
periods, and reduction in the intensity and duration of exposure can help reduce the risk
of adverse health effects. All workers should be advised of the potential vibration hazard
and receive training on the necessity of regular tool maintenance and be taught to grip
the tools as lightly as possible within the bounds of safety.
Early prevention through exposure monitoring and through the early reporting of initial
signs and symptoms of vibration exposure can dramatically reduce chronic health
effects.

Outline the hazards that a worker could be exposed to when using a petrol chainsaw
to cut down the tree
The hazards that a worker could be exposed to when using a petrol chainsaw to cut down
the tree

Machine hazards
Point of operation (contact, entanglement, abrasion, etc)
Rotary and reciprocating movements
In-running nip points (pinch points)
Kickbacks (hit back from logs or equipment)
Flying chips, material
Tool projection (puncture, struck by)
Fire and explosion hazards
Electrical hazards

Health hazards

Noise
Vibration
Wood dustcarcinogens
Chemical hazardsfrom exposure to coatings, finishings, adhesives, solvent
vapors