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title

Frankenstein

The Picture of Dorian Gray

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr.


Hyde

Full Title

Frankenstein: or, The Modern


Prometheus

The Picture of Dorian Gray

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr.


Hyde

Author

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley

Oscar Wilde

Robert Louis Stevenson

Type of Work

Novel

Novel

Novel

Genre

Comedy

Comedy

Comedy

Gothic

Gothic

Gothic

Mystery

Mystery

Mystery

Psychological Drama

Psychological Drama

Psychological Drama

Science Fiction

Science Fiction

Science Fiction

Year Published

1818

1890

1886

Original Language

English

English

English

Protagonist

Victor Frankenstein

Dorian Gray

Henry Jekyll

Antagonist(s)

Frankensteins monster

-Characters

Narrator(s)

Robert Walton

Elizabeth Lavenza (through letters to

Anonymous

anonymous

Victor)

Alphonse Frankenstein (through letter to


Victor)

Point of View

First-Person

First-Person

First-Person

Third-Person

Third-Person

Third-Person

Third-Person Omniscient

Third-Person Omniscient

Third-Person Omniscient

Geneva

The Swiss Alps

Ingolstadt

England and Scotland

The Northern ice

-Setting
Setting (Place)

Setting (Time)

London

London

Eighteenth century

1890s

The late nineteenth century

The title of the novel refers to a scientist,

The novel tells of a young man named

It is about a London lawyer named

-Composition
Premise

Victor Frankenstein, who learns how to


create life and creates a being in the
likeness of man, but larger than average
and more powerful.

Dorian Gray, the subject of a painting by


artist Basil Hallward. Basil is impressed
by Dorian's beauty and becomes
infatuated with him, believing his beauty
is responsible for a new mode in his
art.Realizing that one day his beauty will
fade, Dorian expresses his desire to sell
his soul to ensure the portrait Basil has

Gabriel John Utterson who investigates


strange occurrences between his old
friend, Dr Henry Jekyll, and the
misanthropic Edward Hyde.

painted would age rather than himself.


Dorian's wish is fulfilled, plunging him
into debauched acts... Show More
Climax

The murder of Elizabeth Lavenza on the


night of her wedding to Victor
Frankenstein.

Dorian kills Basil Hallward.

Lanyons witnessing to Hyde's


transformation into Jekyll

Resolution

Victor Frankenstein chases his monster to


the Norther Ice after it murdered
Elizabeth. There, he is rescued by Robert
Walton, narrates his story, and dies.

Dorian commits himself to the "yellow


book" and indulges in debauchery
without regard to his reputation.

Utterson leaves Jekylls laboratory, goes


home, and reads the letters from Lanyon
and Jekyll

Tense

Past

Past

Past

Tone

Emotional

Emotional

Emotional

Fatalistic

Fatalistic

Fatalistic

Gothic

Gothic

Gothic

Mysterious

Mysterious

Mysterious

Themes

Motifs

Symbols

Romantic

Romantic

Romantic

Tragic

Tragic

Tragic

Dangerous Knowledge

The purpose of art

The duality of human nature

Sublime nature

The supremacy of youth and beauty

The importance of reputation

Texts

The surface nature of society

Secrecy

The negative consequences of influence

Monstrosity

Passive women

The color white

Violence against innocents

Abortion

The picture of Dorian Gray

Silence

Homoerotic male relationships

Urban terror

Fire

The opium den

Jekylls house and laboratory

Light

James Vane

Hydes physical appearance

The yellow book

Meaning of the poem Daffodils


The word and the phrases presented in these lines have immense depth and implications. The myriad of the daffodils is expressed by the phrasesA crowd, a host, continuous as the stars, they stretched in never-ending lines, ten thousands saw eye at a glance.
The atmosphere of nature permeates through the entire framework of the poem.
The poet says: I wondered lonely as a cloud that floats on the high oer Wales and hills.
Daffodils, an everyday found flower has been portrayed with magical poetry and blended with transcendental romanticism.
Finally the daffodils outdid the sparkling waves in glee and left an everlasting mark in the mind of the readers of this poem.

Summary of Daffodils by William Wordsworth


Once the poet was wandering pointlessly beside a lake, he was all alone to wander freely akin to a patch of clouds floating in the sky over the valleys and the
hill. Suddenly he could view the large number of daffodil gathered by the side of the lake and they are sheltered under a growing tree. The Daffodils resembles
the color of gold and the airy breeze made them wave and dance, rejoice and play. The poet however could not estimate their number as they spread along
extensive sides of the lake.
They resemble akin to innumerable shining stars that one could see in the night sky in the form of Milky Way. As the poet made an instant glance, he could see
myriad of daffodils waving their heads, as if they were rejoicing and dancing out of alacrity. Seeing this, the waves of the lake accompanied dancing along with
these daffodils , but their lustrous dance was in no way comparable to the delight and gaiety of the flowers the poets seems to have frenzied with an ecstasy of
delight.
He realized that a poet who was susceptible to natural grace could not help feeling happy in the presence of such gay and beautiful flowers. He gazed at them,
hardly knowing what enormous treasure he was accumulating in his mind.
That vista was impregnated in the poets mind for an everlasting time. In future when the poet lay down on his couch, either in a lonely or a pensive mood, the
entire panorama that he saw in the woods beyond the Gowbarrow Park appeared before his minds eye. In the silence and solitude, when his mind is
unrestrained by disturbing things of the real world, he revives back the memories of the daffodil. Hence when the memory of that sight comes into view of the
poet, he derived ecstatic pleasure which he had enjoyed actually.

More Facts about the Poem, Daffodils


The poem is said to be written in the year 1802.
The poem is produced as a result of actual visualization and from experience, rather than imagery.
Dorothy, Wordsworths sister provides us an explanation of the occasion which inspired Wordsworth to produce this masterpiece.

This poem is typically Wordsworthian. Its portray Nature at its best and encompasses her grace to the pinnacle which very poets cannot reach. It projects
Wordsworths extraordinary delight in understanding and exploring common place things. Emotions recollected in tranquility are the distinct factor which
differentiates Wordsworth from other poets. The emotions associated with Wordsworth in this poem, Daffodils is not ephemeral but rather permanent and
everlasting. The poet derives the same bliss from his thoughts about the daffodil when he actually saw them.