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EUROPEAN
DRAWINGS

THE SOLOMON

It.

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, NEW YORK

Published by The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation,


Library of Congress Card Catalogue Number: 66-17460

New

York, 1966

All Rights Reserved

Printed in The Netherlands

THE SOLOMON

K.

Cl'GGKNHEIM FOUNDATION

'I'KrsTKKS

IIARRV

F.

ALBERT
II. II.

PETER

O.

GUGGENHEIM, PRESIDENT

E. TII1EI.K,

VICE PRESIDEN"

ARNASON. VICE PRESIDENT, ART ADMINISTRATION

LAWSON-JOHNSTON, VICE PRESIDENT, BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

ELEANOR, COUNTESS CASTLE STEWART

DANA DRAPER
A.

CIIAUNCEY SEWLIN

MRS. HENRY OBRE


DANIEL CATTON RICH

MICHAEL

MEDLEY

<;.

F.
B.

WETTACH
WHELPLEY

CARL ZIGROSSER

series

at

The

They have proved

their

of drawing shows, no less than three,

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum


relevance to the
the public.

since 1962.

museum's exhibition program and

EUROPEAN DRAWINGS

American installment presented here


selections was

were held

made

follows a similarly conceived


in

1964. Neither of the two

to point to continental attributes

between "American" and "European"

is

their appeal for

and the decision

therefore an arbitrary one that

allowed for convenient concentration within a limitable geographic


entity.

Lawrence Alloway, the Museum's curator, has chosen both shows.

The

current selection, which like

museums and

art centers

features 37 artists

from 13

its

predecessor will be presented in

throughout the United States and Canada,


countries.

Thomas M.

Messer, Director

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

am

grateful to Arne Ekstrom, Robert Fraser, Alexander Iolas, Mr.

Lefebre, Pierre Matisse,

of this exhibition. I

am

and Arturo Schwarz for


indebted

translations of artists' texts


the work of

to

their personal help in the preparation

Frederick Tuten

and Simona Morini for

from French, German, and

Susan Tumarkin and Susan

and Mrs. John

Bissell.

Mary

Italian.

their

The bibliography

is

Grigoriadis prepared the final

manuscript for the printer and Linda Konheim was editor of the catalogue.
I. A,

LENDERS TO THE EXHIBITION

Mrs.

Rene

Mary Banham, London


Bertele, Paris

Arthur

T.

New

Bloomquist, Rye,

York

Otto Breicha, Vienna

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce Chatwin, London


Mr. and Mrs. John de Cuevas,

New

York

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Feldman, Pittsburgh

New

Alexander Iolas,

York

Jasper Johns, Edisto Beach, South Carolina

New

Mr. and Mrs. John Lefebre,

York

Benn Levy, London


Piero

Jon

Manzoni

Streep,

Milan

Estate,

New

York

Jane F. Umanoff,

New

York

Mr. and Mrs. Hans Warmbrunn, Neiv York

Michael White London


,

Galleria delV Ariete,

The Baltimore

Milan

Museum

of Art, Thomas E. Benesch Memorial Collection

Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris

Galeria Bonino, Ltd.,

New

York

Galerie Breteau, Paris

Cordier

and Ekstrom

Inc.,

New

York

Galerie Karl Flinker, Paris

Robert Eraser Gallery, London

Hanover Gallery, London

A lexander
Kasmin

Iolas Gallery,

Gallery,

Lefebre Gallery,

New

York, Paris, Geneva

London

New

York

Marlborough Fine Art

Ltd.,

London

Marlborough Galleria d 'Arte, Rome


Pierre Matisse Gallery,

New

York

Stddtische Kunsthalle, Recklinghausen,


Galerie Stadler, Paris

Howard Wise

Gallery,

New

York

Germany

1]

INTRODUCTION

Asger Jorn has stated that "I do not accept the existence of any European art"

There

a sense in which he

is

instance,

is

not.

However,

is

it is

Europe

correct, because

is

as if they

(French

still

be heard about the

art of the

Common

Market

esthetics. High-

American and European continents,

were comparable units. But such comparisons are usually no more than reflexes

logic,

German metaphysics)

being restricted to European


is

(1).

that America, for

not the purpose of this exhibition to demonstrate an infra-style,

uniting Belgium and Italy, England and Holland, a kind of


level generalizations can

way

divided in a

or dinner table insights.

artists (as

an

earlier

The reason

for this exhibition

drawings exhibition was limited

to

American)

way of organizing a pile of artists. Furthermore


connections which, though not amounting to a European style, reveal specific short-

that a continental division is a convenient

there are

term groupings. Jorn himself was part of one such group, (Cobra 1948-51) which joined Danish.
Belgian, and

Dutch

and Dusseldorf

artists.

Ten

years later another pattern of contacts involved Paris, Milan,

(see below). It is not, therefore, in defense of a

European mythos

that these

drawings are presented, but as a collection of work by a group of living individuals born after
1900. This year

is

perhaps the

earliest birth date of artists

originally in the 1940's (except for Fontana,


tists

who were

born just beyond

my

to

time

emerge decisively and

of each one

is

essential in

any showing of original post-war

Four of the

limit).

died prematurely: Manzoni at 30, Requichot at 32, Klein at 34, and

Wols

at 38.

ar-

The work

art.

In the 1940's a generation of American and European artists, born between 1900 and

new

1914, developed a

sensibility.

There was a widespread

preoccupation with the 'subjects of the

and from

artist'

shift

from pure abstract

art to a

a geometric vocabulary to a freer,

improvisatory technique. In Europe, drawing played an important part in this general shift of

New York where paintings were, fundamentally, the serious element in any esthetic development or discussion. The European development, which was separate from that of New York, owing to World War II and time-lags in communication afteremphasis, far larger than in

wards, has various approximate labels, as has the American. Here Abstract Expressionism,

School of

New

York, and Action Painting are in

fitful

use; in

Europe the terms Vart informel,

Vart autre, Tachisme, abstraction lyrique, have been proposed, either as general labels or in
connection with special interests. Simply to

might use the

modern

art

first

make some

was formal, whereas the new work

change in formality, not

its

What

is

not. Actually,

what

demise.) Informal Art, then, in Europe

by the works of Dubuffet, Michaux, and


Georges Mathieu).

initial generalizations possible

term, translated as Informal Art. (The doubtful premise

\^ ols (as

well as

is

is

is

being discussed

common

ness towards the materials of art and a belief in the mystery of

art,

is

Matiere

et

Memoire.)

Fautrier,

and

an increased responsive-

though not mystery in the

creepy and sexual terms of surrealism. (A group of Dubuffet's lithographs of 1944


significantly,

is

demonstrated variously

by Camille Bryen, Jean

these diverse individuals have in

we

that earher

is called,

12

W ols'

drawings are his prime expression, his paintings secondary: as he observed in

one of his aphorisms


His scale

is

(or

poems)

"One

tells his little

earthly fable/On tiny sheets of paper".

always that of the page, usually a notebook from the early drawings,

of schizophrenic art which might be called his Prinzhorn period

Here he communicates

like terrain.

swarming

a sense of fertile,

echoes

through the tiny drawings

(2),

of huge cities and harbour scenes, to the organic clumps of line and color,

some

full of

and hence finding natural expression in endless metamorphoses. His

some

wounds,

like

life,

pervading everything

later

forms have the blind

organic power of flowers that rupture concrete. Landscape, with biomorphic potentials

premise of

ols'

is

the

iconography, whereas Henri Michaux has treated the head as a world. Taking

as his point of departure the fact that heads occur spontaneously

pursued the

aimlessly, he has

identifies these naturally occuring

By drawing

(see Quotations*).

where anybody scribbles

head in a mixture of automatism and economic

reflex

human

heads with an internal

style.

He

image, a psychic inhabitant

between 1939 and 1947,

in amniotic water color, especially

Michaux provokes internal phantoms, charged with human content, indissolubly linked with

medium. Here

the

compound

that

is

of technical responsiveness and of natural mystery

(mystery that grows out of being a man) that

With one exception

(a

are later than the heroic period of the 40's,

Mirobolus,

Macadam &

though he

Hautes Pates, 1945^6,

Cie.

The drawings shown here

basic in early

is

European Informal Art.

landscape of 1944), the drawings by Dubuffet in this exhibition


absolutely central to

is

de

to the Corps

Dames

it,

series,

from the
1947-50.

relate to the extraordinary series of lithographs called, as a whole,

Les Phenomenes, 1958-62 and to the Texturology, 1958, and Materiology, 1960, paintings.

What

is

common

and paintings

to his drawings, lithographs,

textured surface. These all-over marks evoke earth, water,

the definition of an evenly

is

as a primal continuum. Thus,

air,

many American

the continuous field should not be regarded as abstract art (like

paintings with

an equally unaccented distribution), but as a kind of figuration by association. Dubuffet has


listed

"geography, geology, descriptive physics, biochemistry"

ences. It

is

clear that underlying early

scatter or flow of the artist's

European Informal Art

(3) as
is

providing possible refer-

a substratum of allusion.

The

marks propose an existing world.

Dubuffet has pointed out, apropos Les Phenomenes, the way in which "the suggestive

power endowing each (lithographic)


bitrary
sists

of

sometimes seemed.

it

naming things

as

It is

much

it had its name, and the irresistembodied the idea suggested by the name, however ar-

plate multiplied as soon as

able strength with which each plate

enlightening to see to what extent the

as in creating pictures

artist's

function con-

believe that fruitful discoveries are

... I

made, not through the production of images, but from the interpretation of them"
buffet,

by opposing problems of interpretation

to the physical process, goes far

form and content. He proposes

contrasts of visual

fact in the creation of a

work of art but

for the fact that paintings

that

it

that

meaning

may appear

is

says

is

not necessarily a determining

and drawings have variable meanings

that the physical structure of a

work of

Du-

subsequently. (This view also allows


in historical time.)

goes counter to the doctrine, or assumption, that a work of art

What he

(4).

beyond usual

is

Thus he

a purely visual structure.

art is a carrier

and/or a provoker of

meanings. Inter-relations of visual organization and meaning, including inversions of expected


order (when a work begins to resemble a

and reference an

title

conferred after completion),

make

association

integral part of the work.

Dubuffet's openness to the interaction of visual and verbal meanings has parallels in
the simultaneous practice of art
tity

their art).

Michaux

books are

in the anthology,

and drawing
its
is

and poetry of other Europeans. (This

but in type, from the statements of American

later.

is

artists,

a poet, as well as an artist, a selection of Wools'

Thus

and Lucebert began

there

is

ramifications. Obviously art

also a unity conferred

by

1.

differs,

not only in quan-

which are usually commentary on

as a poet for the

poems from

his sketch-

Cobra group, only painting

an implicit poetics accompanying much of Informal Art and

and writing have

common

different

authorship and by

2.

and

special properties, but there

shared themes. These themes raise

the issue of transferable content: to what extent can themes be stated in two ways and retain

References to Quotations can by found in the Anthology on page 22.

13

common properties
of

meaning

transfers possible

between two

face). It is clear that there are

moved from one language


is

redundancies

to another. Similarly, there are

media of communication. To

different

unique properties of the medium

to the
is

(which is the problem translators

that survive being

restrict art's value only

to exaggerate the characteristics of the channel. It

true that the channel characteristics are important, but to suppose the domination of the

channel over every other fact

too narrow a conception of

is

medium and

images can operate beyond the

human communication.

When

outside the creative act.

Ideas and

Lucebert writes

"she no longer comforts man/She comforts the larvae the reptiles the rats" or "every eye

bedbug

alhambra"

in a dream's gigantic

(5), his literary

images are comparable

is

to that of his

drawings. Just as literary sources have led artists to visual configurations (as iconographers

and painting of one man can be mutually

reveal), so the writing

to lower the level of visual organization that

sustaining. (This

one looks for in a work of

art,

is

not intended

but simply

to

deny

the adequacy of pure visibility as a criterion.)

Wols and Michaux


more than he
therefore

is

are primarily draughtsmen. Dubuffet

a painter or a graphic artist.

depend on drawing,

Though

is

a draughtsman, but no

the central definition of his art does not

plays a substantial part in his oeuvre. Another

it

drawing characterizes early European Informal Art

is

way

which

in

in the rapidity possible with its direct

techniques. Georges Mathieu, for example, transferred the speed of drawing to the area and
materials of painting

(6).

The

large canvases that he

produced have a linear suddenness, an

impetuous lunge, unlike, for example, Pollock's large drip paintings which are rhythmically
repetitive and/or tend towards the continuous color skin of painting.

work speed
grids

is

structural (he frequently records execution-span)

and repetitions of

line bear

no resemblance

men

unlike Pollock, operationally. Both

up the

traditional tools of the artist.

and dropping paint onto

Klee's influence

on

the heritage of

it is

Mathieu's work, he

Whereas Pollock

to paint fast

at the

end of

his

Nevertheless, a Klee drawing


is to

is

life,

surface.

death in 1940 has been

that critics,

to

discussed, possibly

many

of Klee's important

are drawings without the physical fullness of painting.

frequently to a painting by another artist what espresso coffee

an object, event, or idea, from

use an abundance of notational systems. In addition to figurative represen-

tation in various degrees of abstraction,


serial rows,

little

though inconclusively, have been worried

regular. His drawings usually postulate a definite origin, in

which he proceeds

and

but without giving

invented a way of pouring

about. Possibly, too, evaluation has been deterred by the fact that so

works except

like Mathieu,

is

act,

Mathieu and Sonderborg have kept the pressure

means of contact with the

artists after his

Cubism

A younger artist in whose

Sonderborg. Although his

have accelerated the creative

a horizontal surface,

of the hand, with brush or pen, as their

because

to

is

he used

letters,

numbers, arrows, exclamation points,

checker boards, and crosses. The use of different codes within one work led him to

invent forms of reciprocal ornament between different levels of signification. Growing arabesques

and sequential patterns combine iconographical references and decorative invention. This play
of conventions

is

a major addition to

modern

art's

formal possibilities, an opening-out of

drawing (and painting) to include signs and symbols not previously available. Another aspect
of his work
interested

derive

is

investing abstract-looking forms with organic implications and

American

artists,

from Klee in

deal more, though in

and extrapolates
drawing as a

to

medium

such as Baziotes and Gottlieb. (Tobey's all-over

for serious statement; he

a pictorial projection of myself.


I

was

this

which

seem

to

way that Pollock's do not). In Europe, however, Klee meant a great


somewhat underground terms. Wols, for instance, starts from Klee
more amorphous and rough style. In Europe Klee made possible

encoding, and of personal projection in

the canvas.

it

fields also

am my own

style" (7).

art.

was defender of the

As

scale of drawing, of multiple

early as 1902 he wrote: "I

see myself as a

complex but

flat

am my own

model,

configuration, clinging to

14

Asger Jorn's early work reveals


his

his

awareness of Klee (among other encounters), and

drawings of the early 40's reveal, with classic

clarity, the

and the emergence of an improvisatory free-wheeling

gradual relaxing of Klee's precision

line that pulls oceanic intuitions of per-

sonnages and landscape into linear definition. Gestural energy gradually overwhelms iconographical exactness as Jorn establishes his typical style of racing

magoric

Nordic Man. At

European

art,

especially in those

artists,

who

it

were, the

on the other hand, which shared

with American art in the 40's, has retained

art, characteristic

as

time American art was strongly biomorphic, but subsequently

this

the direction of abstract art.


(8)

hand and emergent phantas-

man becomes,

him, the mark of the individual

figures. In

its

graffiti

of

moved

in

stylistic parallels

and iconography,

curiosity about figuration

forms compatable with improvisation. The interest in reductive forms of

of the 1900-1914 generation in the United States,

retain a range of associative

imagery which grows

is

not shared by European

like fruit out of the process of

work. Troels Andersen, writing about connections between verbal and visual symbols in the

Cobra movement, observed: "The alliance between

art of the

art

and

Cobra prob-

literature in

ably arises from the synthetic conception of surrealism" (9) in which art and poetry were

Dotremont on La Chevelure des Choses

theoretically exchangeable. Jorn's collaboration with


(started

when both men were

in a sanitorium in Silkeborg)

and language, running into one another

verbal, objects

Among various possible groupings in


own teams)

patterns, their

is

Sweden who were not aware


However,

of one another's

artists

work

people

from Germany,

development of

in the

have their own

will

Italy,

way or another, picked up Klee's proposal of an

have, in one

all

this exhibition (other

one that connects four

and the

a vivid case of the scenic

is

(see illustration).

England, and

own

their

styles.

making simul-

art

taneous use of more than one sign system. Mary Bauermeister's ink drawings consist of
striations

and

series of repetitive

marks, but with the spatial display directionalized by words

which can only be read in one direction. She brings, covertly or flamboyantly, the temporal
element of words into the spatial display of

art. (Klee, too,

considered art as a temporal unfold-

ing as well as an instant spatial show.) Baruchello's drawings (he admires

Duchamp and

Klee),

with tbeir scatter of diagrammatic parts and details, are also temporal one's attention is directed
;

from point
is

to point within the sheet.

Or

get second?

if

Do

He

has written: "I observe

how

the terminology of time

grow older? Can they be slow or not? What about the midwe investigated the tactile nature of distance for example?" (10). In Bernard

also apt for space.

distances

Cohen's drawings the individually distinct signs generate sequences and coalitions like those
of discourse. Fahlstrom's imagery

is

organized in a narrative, instructional order, but one rich


in contradiction

these artists

-
f UC
:..

'c i.-^.

'

wA

frl

,-i

ii

R fl/^v Avnisr?)

\&QOT\~<*j

'

jt&i

contrast and interplay of visual

imager)

is

cartographic, whether

m ^"^t^on^^L^^"^ ^

u;n somewhere with

Hcb3" fC?tW'

implies

AkS]^'

Unm

Common

to

because of a story to be told, but because of the

and cross reference.

a discursive style, discursive, not

is

JC 4iwi /"'

recorded

<''V

^3ff\|
mPjIaP ^ ENC
!

''

^(IL

IHr gMmr^^C 'iS^f'i

'
''

'

lil^wSs^- .^SfiSifil
m^^vl^^^^^sWhff^/
Kfi^f fr>ANf w SmJIO^

&
i

^^gsg^go^S^j^^^L,

causa]
oi

relationships

Uechinsky,

are

l>\

associated in one's

temporal nature

ol

our

being

possible

those drawings

serial

or

recurrance and change of an image

or Photomaton.)

Page from La Chevelure des Choses, 1952.

shown

are

thai

(Another

multiple

images with recurring bul changing motifs,

activity as stressed

Asger Jorn, Christian Dotremont.

is

which

Their

find

or not, the play of signs

programmed.

graphic use of line


"'

ii

signs.

we can

is

mind with development


these

by such

"I

titles as

[ne

firmly

or

inexplicil

Open Journal

15

This exhibition includes the work of a group or a loose cluster, of

artists

who regard

the notion of drawing as a special procedure as "a concept of merely conventional value" (11).

In the late 1950's an anti-Informal body of art and opinion developed which involved contacts

between

that

is

Milan, and Diisseldorf. Castellani, in 1960, for example, dismissed

artists in Paris,

Wols

the art of

merely part of "a fashionable tendency arising out of a macabre

as

taste for all

pathological" (12). In Paris Yves Klein was seminal, with his polemical candour about

the creative act and with his

monochrome

hunks of

canvases, solid

blue,

compared

to the

organic complexities of Informal Art. Jean Tinguely was important, representing an art of

man and machines in

man

opposition to the nature and

terms of Informal Art. In Diisseldorf,

work and of the work of Fontana and Manzoni in Milan. Themes


of pro-technological opinion, color simplicity, systematic form, and technical experiment were
combined. From the German Zero Group formed in 1958 to the Dutch Nul Group, 1962, the
Piene and

Mack know

of their

interaction of these themes

became increasingly

fruitful to their originators

and

attractive to

other artists (13).

Of
in

Europe

great importance here,

consisted of perfunctory pen-strokes accompanied

period he pierced the canvas similarly and, a

this

became

so that the canvas

who has a meaning and value


By 1947 he made drawings that

the influence of Fontana

is

been registered in the United

that has not

States.

by

trails

little later,

a tangible layered space). Later the

of perforations. (In paintings of


scattered ceramic chips across

it,

rough perforations became more

regular and then, abruptly, stretched into a few long cuts, as opposed to collections of bullet
holes. This

way of work, rawly physical at

first,

and systematic

later,

proposes a drawing without

graphic traces, with the surface disrupted in order to create light and shadow; the piercing
that

we

become

associate with violation or destruction has

are seen in Castellani

and Uecker.

order.

Developments of this method

Castellani presses into moist paper

from the back,

devel-

oping, in negative, rows of impressions grouped in blocks of varying shape and density. Uecker
presses pins, nails, and screws into his paper from the back in sequences like the flow patterns

The

of magnetized particles.
illumination,

is to

make

effect of the

impressed surface, highly sensitive to sources of

the paper, as Uecker wrote of his white objects, into "a zone of light"

(14).

Yves Klein

is

a central figure in the anti-Informal

opment, in terms of technique and

He

prospectus.

anonymous"

scale, is significant

European avant-garde. His

rejected the brush as "too psychological.

(15).

After the rollered

smeared models, as "living brushes",

monochrome

painted with the roller, more

paintings, usually blue, he directed paint-

to print their bodies

on canvas. The procedure was much

publicized for an obvious reason and for a less obvious one: his aim was "to tear

temple

veil of the studio.

To keep nothing

on top of his car and drove in the rain to

of

elicit

my

devel-

both as personal record and as ideal

down

the

process hidden" (16). Later he put a canvas

the collaboration of nature.

The ascending

scale of

brush, roller, body, rain, leads to air architecture (see Klein quotation), of which the drawings
in the present exhibition are a part.

Nagy's proposal of
is

unmistakable.

jects, at the
ly,

new

air furniture

He was

Though

Piotr Kowalski has pointed out a debt to

(cushions of compressed

aiming,

first

air),

in terms of public spectacle, later in terms of large pro-

scale of the 20th century. First, the

magnitude of the new audience and second-

and harbours

the expansion of engineering to instant air fields

architecture to neighborhood development

and

city

comparable curiosity and environmental

ballets (groups of coordinated illuminated sculptures),

an

artificial

in

World War

II

and of

planning rather than individual houses,

have their echo in Klein's ambition. To compare Klein's profile of


(see Quotations) reveals a

Moholy

the logic of Klein's development

activities

and Mack with

island for erection in deserts, Antarctica, or the sea

with Manzoni'

stretch. Piene, with his light

(all

his Sahara Project (17),

areas of future big-scale

development) reveal parallel interests in an art transcending intimacy, growing

to a

new

scale.

16

Manzoni, who like Klein died unstatistically early,

by

group of figurative drawings, sour but

direct,

is

represented in the exhibition

and one non-figurative drawing,

across the paper that anticipates his subsequent moves. His later
(certainly accepted

ficance
sion,

is

by Informal and Cobra

artists)

of the

work

work of art

and representation" that he subsequently dismissed

excluded'" (18)

The

sufficiently wholistic.

is

as "non-existent problems."

and continuous surface from which

all

and white from 1958

in black

Then he began

He

color

physical

art.

Mack,

quote the

as, to

for instance,

artist,

too proble-

wax crayons, rubbing over a corrugated surface,


explored in his earlier work often by other technical

to use colored day-glo

regards the use of color in art as divisible into the decorative and the physical;

when

decorative
vertical

"Only

objective art, without formal surprises, for which

1964 regarding color

to

often glass, to obtain the graded effects

means.
is

signi-

interpretative possibilities are

Manzoni sought, connects with various forms of current systematic

matic.

assumption

an area into which

as

compressed. The figurative drawings show Manzoni engaged in the "allusion, expres-

a single uninterrupted

worked

a single line

rejects the

when

it

follows the spectrum (green between yellow

spectral order

is

violated (green between orange

bands of black and white or of color are tonally heavier

and blue,

and

at the

for instance),

drawings of

red). His

base than at the top where

they are more diffused and atmospheric; internally, too, each color step or tonal change echoes
this rising

rhythm. Clearly the systematic character of the work, deriving from a conceptual

origin, is strong,

but the idea

Touch, as usually defined in

is

art is

and made more complex by the

sensitized

act of drawing.

medium

not present, but the interference of the physical

in

the originating idea, preserves sensibility as a kind of underground factor.

The new

scale revealed in post-Informal

Art projects has nothing

The expansion

number

size of

post-war paintings.

not in

fact,

them

carried

of both size and

far out of traditional limits of scale

and quantity.

present sense, can be evoked better by drawings than by paintings.

becomes

a finished object, whatever traces

diagram.

On

the other hand, drawing

is

it

bears of

its

creation

do with the

to

of recent paintings has

Scale, in the

painting ultimately

by the

artist. It is

not a

naturally diagrammatic, a form of expression that

lends itself to projects, proposals, and rehearsals. Klein, with a kind of Shangri-La panache,
invents

on the
tions.

fire

fountains. Etienne Martin's drawings vary in inferred scale

street to a schematic for a building at least the size of

Having put down the

Etienne-Martin tangles

grid, however,

overs, like a flow pattern of Ariel. Play

is

a hop-scotch grid

it

more extensive than Etienne-Martin' s

The maze

not play as a

of connections invite ex-

architecturally-scaled sculpture, such as

Les Demeures which are actually occupied by the spectator. Sitting or standing in

made aware

of its physical bulk

and presence,

Kowalski's drawings express the

new

far

d Habita-

with a network of cross-

a strong element in these drawings

frivolous pastime, but play as activity to discover order.

cursions far

from

Le Corbusier's Unites

removed from

the codes

scale simply as the record of

it

we

are

and signs of drawing.

an experience. He used

under-water explosive forming to create instantly the main forms of a twenty foot high stainless
steel sculpture

in

Long Beach,

California.

The sketches

are not working drawings but

reminiscences, recording in processions of colored ideograms the


in sculpture for the

first

Technology
bands of Tinguely

in the art of the

it is

new method

of

work (used

time).

Zero Group tends

wildly conspicuous.

to

be reticent and smooth, but in the

The mechanical

elaboration of his constructions

suggests a nostalgia for early technology and an infatuation with engineers' experimental

models. His drawings record an improvisatory process that proliferates systems of pulleys and
gear wheels. Paolozzi's later sketches, in which serpentine and blocky shapes coalesce (as

snake charmer were working with geometric solids) and his Mickey Mouse

to

Robot

if

variations

have a comparable attitude. Technology nourishes fantastic play: with the functioning engine
in Tinguely's case, with the

product or the packaged machine in Paolozzi's. Despite the

differ-

ences between the economical, streamlined Zero Croup style and the copious inventions of

17

Tmguely and

common

Paolozzi. they have in

THEORV OFO??OSI7SS OR

'

"

tvt

?HS history of nothihg with


ri ~ suppression
of talent
INVOLVING THE WHEEL 07 THE
somqtive the
:. the ^og
shafi
J
*HE CYLINDER HEAD OF THE AERO r
plane the value of the over
VARIOUS DOMESTIC ARTICLES

regard art's function as the recovery of an archaic

level of identity as a defence against the machines.

much modern

Implicitly

art has operated

on

tAK

this

assumption (the Cobra group,


f,i

A
Awareness

of the

acceptance of
.

and

for

example).

j
j
man-made
environment and
an

an architecture from
tools of the child
?KE SEARCH FOR arch- types

within the process (techniques

ir

it

>

materials) or iconography of art provides a

link to artists like Hamilton

:r

;:

pro-technology attitude. INone of these artists

and Blake who accept

A * D the

"

METALLISATION OF THE DREAM


A short history of the common
"' OODEN circles, paper squares
,!NKWEEL 2934, OLD NEWSPAPERS
and a dictionary of guns.
THE CAMERA RUIND & VI3GIN
'

the

man-made scene

discrete objects

as given.

Hamilton compiles

which he then places in a simu-

lated environment (as in Hers

is

a Lush Situation

.
7 \
r
i
r>i
.i
or #ne),
quoter ot existing
" whereas Blake, though
&
& a1
i

a clockwork mask like an eye/

signs,

an observer of landscapes and people.

is

pallas

His drawing in the format of a polaroid photo-

graph

is

both quotation and. in the figures, an

convention in

acute piece of English realism

(a

which tone and lack of

oddly concur in

finish

hjduardo Paolozzi.
Metafisikal Translations, 1962.

page from

creating bodies in space).

Giacometti

in the late 30's

is

often regarded as a

man whose

works of the 30's and the

parts: the surrealist

when he worked from

or at least work, divides in two

life,

later figurative

works, divided by the long period

the model. In fact, fantastic elements are not restricted to

and a Head (The Forest) 1950 "reminded me"


many years (that was during my childhood)" (19).
early works, The Palace at 4 A.M. 1932-3, he identified one of the figures

the earlier works. Composition with 7 Figures

wrote the

artist,

riting of

"of a forest corner seen for

one of the

as "the statue of a

memories"

woman,

poems quoted

in

which

both works

(20). In

recognize

memory

my

mother, just as she appears in

intersects with the literal present image.

in the anthology reveal a similar resonance: in

sequence of images

change and fugitive

is

stopped with waking. That

Moving

is to say,

where multiple pressures and strokes in the

which remains in the

show

air,

Objects the effect of

solidity is

embodied

in

medium state a complexity

soft

without reassurance of firm boundaries. His drawings do not merely

by the persistence of analysis, but

a world

anxiety. In these terms the past, whether as

dreams

a post-Cezanne world of objects half obliterated

whose

prose-

both dreams and sensa-

tions are subject to one organizing principle, that of mutability. This is beautifully
his pencil drawings

earliest

The

Burned Grass the space and the

dream-like; in the prose poem, Silent,

detail has not

my

eroded by

memory and

or as hesitancy about present substance, shakes the outline, eats at the surfaces of forms. It
is

not the transience of the Impressionist (painting a world on the move), but a self-generated

restlessness

and doubt

The nude,

that dissolves objects into pale simulacre.

a traditional

theme of drawing, appears only

Giacometti might have been represented by nudes, but


are the two

it

artists with nudes in the show. Scott's large reclining

one arm up, one down, but beyond that point the reference
lines

and the ghosts of previous poses. Her

or the subway, as the long lines run

flatness is

from junction

rarely in this exhibition.

happens he

is

such that

nude

is
is

not; Scott and Mikl


in a traditional pose,

changed by the archaistic outit

suggests a

map

to junction. Mikl's reclining

of the Metro

nudes, on the

other hand, are glimpsed through a screen of gestural marks, either emanating from, or falling

upon, the model.

It is

curious that the most realistic techniques of rendering in the exhibition

are applied to fantastic subjects. Dado's bestiary


bizarre; Blake's April with Pipalo
ions.

is

and Star-King

meticulously drawn, but the subjects are

represents a child with imaginary compan-

D'Haese, who draws with a soft firm touch that evokes atmospheric bulk, nevertheless

describes fantastic scenes, like the Bruegel of Dulle Griet rather than of the Seasons.

18

Hollegha makes his "drawings after the visible reality of certain objects

and so on)" and he makes them large "as

tree trunks, dolls,


it" (21).

The

size

open

objects are

of the drawings
in

make

it

hard

at

is

in

whole body has

to

(like rotten

move doing

times to hold on to the starting point, for the

drawing as well as dilated. There

nature supplying the image, as there

my

is,

however, an unbroken sense of remote

Mundy's drawings. However, Mundy

refers less to

objects than to a sense of space (largely landscape in his earlier work, interiors in the present

drawings), which he creates as the analogue of an original spatial experience. Objects are no

than cues or semi-familiar surfaces, uninventoried points of use and

Such works, alluding


work

to the physical

world of perceived objects and spaces,

like Pedersen's or Saura's. Their art is figurative,

Mundy

Hollegha, Mikl, or

traffic in his

more

scenic space.

the reverse of

is

but not perceptual in the way that

on the basic of

are: Saura invents spectacular iconographies

his

hard curling calligraphy and Pedersen expands a fixed cast of creatures and encounters into
expressive symbols.

In Tapies* drawings the basic precision that has tended to be buried in the thick crust
of his paintings

is

out in the open. His drawings are spare and pale, a terse and economical

mark, or cluster of marks, which activate the paper even though occupying so

little

of

it.

The

central citing of symmetrical forms, as in the drawings in the exhibition, has a capacity for

meaning which is not

restricted to formal description.

Symmetry,

in even

forms, has implicit references to experiences that are not purely esthetic.
cy of

well as the elegance of restraint,

graffiti, as

ordinary capacity for communication (formality


not to use so

many

of

its

resources

is

its least

demonstrative

touch of the urgen-

present. Perhaps because of art's extra-

itself, as

order,

is

communicative), the decision

makes economy poignant.


Lawrence Alloway

NOTES
1.

Asger Jorn. Letter

2.

H. Prinzhorn. Bildnerei der Geisteskranken, Berlin, Springer, 1922, reproduces schizophrenic art and

to the author.

October 29, 1965.

influenced, with other studies, Dubuffet's

"Compagnie de

art",

cf.

Psychoanalytic Explorations

3.

Bibliography no. 48,

4.

Ibid.

5.

Bibliography, no. 107.

6.

in

Art,

comments that PrinzGerman expressionistic

l'Art Brut". Ernst Kris

horn's material "was meant to support an aesthetic thesis and to plead the cause of

London, Allen and Uniwen, 1953,

p.

88.

p. 17.

Unfortunately the speed of Mathieu's art was not matched by his correspondence; hence his regrettable

absence from this exhibition.

New

7.

Will Grohmann. Paul Klee,

8.

Lawrence Alloway. "Danish Art and Primitivism", Living Arts, London, no.

9.

Galerie K. K., Copenhagen,

10.

York, Harry N. Abrams, 1954,

September 30-October

p. 101.
1,

1965, pp. 44-52.

14, 1961, Cobra. Introduction

Gianfranco Baruchello. Unpublished typescript, 1964.

11. Bibliography no. 142. (See Quotations).

Museum, Leverkusen, March 18-May

12.

Stadtisches

13.

Bibliography no.

8,

1960,

Monochrome Malerei.

10.

14.

Uecker. Statement in bibliography no.

15.

Yves Klein. "Truth Becomes Reality", bibliography no.

16.

Ibid.

17.

Heinz Mack. "The Sahara Project", bibliography no.

18.

Bibliography no. 113.

19.

Bibliography no. 68,

20.

Ibid., p. 44.

21.

Wolfgang Hollegha. Letter

4.

4.

4.

p. 55.

to the author,

October 26, 1965.

by Troels Andersen.

21

QUOTATIONS

Translations by

WOLS

(7)

FREDERICK TUTEN

At work imitate the


stay

still

In every instant,

(8)

you

is

From

eternity.

It

around;

to the goal.

the beginning

But even suffering

in all matter,

cat,

like furniture that sits

this leads

(1)

SIMONA MORINI

and

teaches you suffering.

life

is

useful.

brings out whatever

is

in

you

(these waters that cannot be checked).


(2)

world had the possibility

If the

of not existing,

being would

(3)

still

(9)

have existed.

Sad poem:
a

dog does not see

(10)

his

own

One

tells

his little earthly fable

on tiny sheets of paper.

In Cassis the stones, the


the rocks, that

leash

fish,

viewed with a magnifying

glass,

the salt in the sea and the sky


(4)

From

made me

the very beginning, a man.

must be prepared

to

forget the importance of

All this urged

honestly interested in himself,

answer

humans.

me away from

the chaos of our industrial

life,

the following questions

and have shown me

Am I a vessel,

the ever-returning, ever-changing

or a funnel,

waves of the harbor

or a spring

Or

am

I nothing?

(11)

Every tiling

dream takes place

in a large, beautiful,
(5)

Rocks

though they too are ephemeral-

can teach us to what degree

we

dare not draw

it.

ourselves are ephemeral.


(12)

(6)

unknown town

with spacious roads and suburbs;

Earth without humans


a few small giraffes,

some

As we can

see, the best are killed

and without reason.


lizards

Society slaughters

them more quickly

here and there a bug in the grass

than cattle:

and a tiny sky above!

Ch. Baudelaire, E. A. Poe, Rimbaud, Lautreamont,

Not

to think

that's the

dream.

Roger

le

Comte, Van Gogh, Modigliani,

Artaud, Novalis, Mozart, Shelley

Werner Haftmann.

ed.

^ ols,

Wols Aufzeichnungen

Aquarelle, Aphorismen, Zeichnungen,

Cologne, Verlag

Dumont Schauberg,

1963, pp. 50-55.

22

GIACOMETTI

BURNED GRASS
Turning in the void, in broad daylight,

and

voice,

watch the space

rushing through the liquid silver surrounding

stars

me, and Bianca

head

turned to the echo of her

slightly

and the feathered steps near the

red, decaying

I revisit

the buildings

surreality.

which

love,

beautiful palace

columns, the

perfect, useless

aerial,

live in their

white-diced

it's

with black and red spots on which

we

own

floors

walk, the rocket-

laughing ceilings, and the pretty,

mechanisms.

grope in the emptiness for the invisible, white thread

of the marvelous, from which facts and dreams rush out

with the sound of a brook gushing over tiny, precious,


quivering stones.

gives

It

swirls of circling dice

follow each other,

life to life,

and needles

and the shimmering

alternately precede

and

and the drop of blood on milk white

skin; but suddenly a shrill cry: the air vibrates, the pale

The whole

contained in the marvelous encircling

life is

sphere that

glitters

women, who

heads slightly bent

imagined by the

THINKING ABOUT THE PHENOMENON OF


PAINTING
The willdeath of art. H. M.
you doodle mechanically, without any particular pur-

If

pose, almost invariably

we

From

fever.

the

moment

And

drawn

find yourself having

we

life,

suffer

from

facial

pick up a pencil, a brush,

on the paper, one

fifteen, twenty.

Am

you

lead such a facial

faces multiply

for the

most

after the other, ten,

part, they are savage.

drawing myself? Others? From what depth do they

my

come? Could they be the projections of

(Expressions of another face?


dares not cry

and therefore

thought?

suffering adult,

suffers internally, has a

who

poker

which covers a multitude of grimaces.) Behind an

face

immovable, blank mask, the other face writhes in an

From behind

unbearable paroxysm.
like

howling dogs, expressions try

boy,

little

all

The

time

first

particularly

sing sound-

the same women

dressed up,

who

and looked inside and outside many marvelous

the frozen features,

some way

to escape. In

it

happens one

is

amazed.

unknown

(strange,

known nor

remote correspondence!).

Faces of sacrificed personalities, of egos suffocated by


ambition, the taste for honesty and coherence.

will,

ran

through a meadow where time forgets time; he paused,

Faces that will reappear to the end

drown,

to

(it's difficult

to completely suppress things).

things.

Faces of childhood, of childhood's fears, whose meaning

palace!

and object are

La Surrealisme au Service de

May

\J

Lost faces, criminals perhaps, faces neither

and spins by the water jet.

search for agile, smooth-faced

less songs, their

Oh! palace

II

or other the brush frees them.

earth trembles.

IK

faces. Since

wall.

like

MSI

III

la

Revolution, Paris, no.

faces

lost,

though not the memory of the

which don't believe that

all is

settled with

fears;

adulthood

5,

and which

1933, p. 15,

still

fear dreadful regressions.

Faces of will perhaps, will which always dominates us and

SILENT,

tends to decide

MOVING OBJECTS

All things

near, far,

others yet to come,

all

things that are gone, and

all

my

things shift, and

girls

change

(you are beside them, yet they remain distant), others

approach, climb, descend, ducks in the water, there and


there, in space, climbing, descending

my

trousers on the chair, voices in a distant

is

no

station here,

you threw

orange peels from the terrace down into the deep and

the night, the mules brayed despairingly,


tomorrow Til
go out she draws her mouth
my ear her
big

narrow

street

toward morning they were slaughtered


to

they speak, they

stir,

there

and

la

but impossible to stop

while talking on the telephone)

leg,

there, but all

is

gone.

and unforms

...

like

as if

making faces
we were con-

Revolution, Paris, no.

which forms

response to ideas, and impressions

matographic synthesis.
Endless crowd: our clan.
It is

not in the mirror that one sees oneself.

look for yourself on paper.

There

is

a certain internal

fluid

eyes, the hair

found

being which has no affinity with bones


in friends, enemies, lovers,

parents, acquaintances, instantly recognizing

moment

friends,

phantom which one should be

and which we see

skin,

My

and not the nose, the

able to paint,
externally.

3,

itself in

modelled automatically in instant and, somehow, cine-

and

La Surrealisme au Service de
December 1931, pp. 18-19.

of epiphenomenon of thought (perfectly useless

sleep here, the

room: two or three people, from what station? The


whistling locomotives, there

Or a kind

intellectually,

stantly shaping a fluid, ideally plastic face,


I

flowered tapestry, the leaking water faucet, the design of


the curtains,

memory and

things; faces also of

all

desire.

them

at the

of encounter, not two minutes later: a charac-

teristic that is

understood by

all

sensitive people, except

unfortunately by painters.
Had

loved "isms" and wanted power over people,

would have

tomism

initiated a school of painting called

(or psychologism).

I'm not interested.

The

phan-

face has features, but

paint the features of the

phantom

23

(who does not necessarily have


whole cluster of eyes).

He

and may have a

nostrils

phantom's

also paint the

has some red, not necessarily on his cheeks or

but in some spot where his

on his forehead,
that

fire is. I

he deserves

if

it,

lips,

put also some blue,

(I

PIEBRB ALECHIXSKI

colors.

NOTE ON A BITE
Start
A few old

forgot to mention

have been practicing psychologism for some time).

These colors are the essence of the individual, they


comprise the beautiful, the ugly, the

some unassuming

times,

infinite variety of

caricaturists

and more

the real inside features,

rarely,

mind) some of the phantom's colors

essentially

though

second

his desk, near the ink

per. Yes,

sometime,

my

were a

if it

mute

little,

who

and the

pa-

draw one of

at night,

girl,

who

died

available to

is

our living eyes. Recognize her among

they

all

by

her body, docile to the whims of hygrometry.

solved a pictorial problem.

Give her a name.


Evocations

du

musty on

of elegance perhaps, but

have seen their own temperament, or maybe

Henri Michaux, "Peintures

skull.

Reinhoud, which he keeps dry or

them, as

painters

have rendered (but with quite different preoccupations


in

wave.

heap of orange peels collected by

friend

have guessed

some

double.

Model

temperaments.

At

lines.

Yet another. The character and his

skull.

et Dessins", Paris,

Le Pont

From
pot

purple: a

From

Jour, 1946.

memory

of school.

The

ink-

at desk-level, ill-smelling, filthy.

The bottom of

blue: short distances.

the water. Colorless. Diurnal.

From

green

in the

ANTOXIO SACRA

the wave. Fringes.

CROWDS

that isn't pleasure.

From
From

Conglomerations in a two-dimensional space of numerous, bodiless faces

which would conform

to

some law of

association of ensembles of antiforms, ceaselessly trying,

in

white

A seal which means nothing

the place.

The absence. Do not

touch. Pass by.

Technique The head alone. Lost.

We follow,

as in certain biological processes, to accomplish unions

and separations,

red vigor.

movement, the comb of

which the contradictory and simul-

Spiral, serpent, maze.

clumsily, spitting dryly.

The

full

ones and the unravelled, thin ones, willingly

taneous movements will create a feeling of continuity and

without reason. Without support? Here are

expansion. Composition of a restless, moving, expanding

my

mass, which expresses the clamour of

human masses

by a beam of light, toward a

cult, a spectacle

attracted, as

or a sudden explosion of anger.


in the

luminous beam

Any break

or eruption

my weak

At the

barrier.

risk of

the other side of

to

things, of going astray.

Support

Then boards eaten by

acid, except in certain

places reserved for the graver

reveals, in a flash, the variety of

End

antiforms of some antiportraits.

qualms,

jumping, of passing

Character

and the brush.

on the mountain.

Never seen

before.

Not too convincing,

COCKTAIL PARTY

racter,

because never really seen. But an

Illustrations of the western degeneration of the primitive,

answer leads the image into familiar places,

orgiastic feast,

which allowed the individual

pate in the collective

life

tal.

The

an excessive capacity for accumulation and

a mixture of forms and styles.


of a Spain that

is racist;

and the best dishes of

its tradi-

of ingredients which, at

seem contradictory.

THE TEMPTATIONS OF
The only way
is

of

One can hardly conceive

number

tional cuisine contain a


first sight,

Like a ball of earth.

as

some old

lines

best contri-

from the Arabs down


plateresque and baroque are the

butions to Spanish architecture

result of

see. It's as

are.

Transpositions of Spanish altar-pieces.

through

recognizable as a head on the victor's pedes-

of the tribe.

CATHEDRALS

to Gaudi,

Now

provokes the connection.

to partici-

that lonely cha-

to possess

ST.

ANTHONY

hundreds of women

at

with the imagination, by means of collage.

Galerie Stadler, Paris,

May 25-June 26,

Saura: Oeuvre Graphiques.

1965,

one time,

Galerie

La Hune,

Paris,

May

8,

1963.

This text includes specific reference to "Morsures'', 1962,

10 etchings by the

artist.

24

IVES KLEIX

OTTO PIFXK
"Graphic art"

nowadays a concept of merely conven-

is

tional value. It obviously belongs to the past, for in art

means

"to write"

But contem-

"to transfer thoughts."

porary7 and future art set out to accomplish a transfer of

Phenomena always precede concepts

power.

some time before "graphic


all,

In

will cease

my

which

art",

being called graphic

graphite drawings light

traditional way,

is

is

will take

it

not graphic at

represented in a rather

smoke drawings and

material

paintings.

At that time the

used was graphite powder, which

then rubbed

came across the technique

of

smoke drawings when

observed candle soot leaking through a screen and


depositing itself at the edges.

placed a sheet of paper

over the screen and held a candle under

impressed

the

with

sheet

mixing different processes,

being considered for the conditioning

it is

The sketch shows

of exclusive living areas."

sheltering a town with a roof of flowing

highway leading

The

a project for

central

town

into a

and protects the

living

to the airport divides the

and an

air.

industrial section.

air-roof at once conditions

aiea.

Floors are of transparent glass.

Kitchens, bathrooms, stockrooms and workrooms are

the smoke

In order to

different colors to

it.

it

become

pulsations, a

Red

is

applied

the most suitable color for

urge to hold the fleeting

used as the formative power,

simply provide the situation in which

moderate success

art, like light-ballet.

it

operates through
:

on a photo-sensitive paper.

in this area

encourages

ment further with the countless

me

My

to experi-

possibilities of the uses

of light.

town.

A new

condition of

The

is

12-February

human

completely

inhabitants'

intimacy

is

free, individual,

main occupation

What before were for architecture


obstacles, are now luxuries

possible.

impersonal.

is leisure.

only tedious, inevitable

firewalls

waterwalls
objects floating in the air
fire

fountains

water fountains
pools
airbeds, airchairs

The

true goal of immaterial architecture:

the condi-

tioning of yet larger residential areas.

The conditioning
Stadtisches

have,

exposed

old patriarchal family structure disappears.

human

a "light filter", light falls

still

completely

The

Light-graphic

itself is

light-flooded,

reached the desired inten-

amount of it. Vibrations


breathing, aesthetic form of energy.

a manifestation of the

which many of us

privacy,

this

inhabitants are naked.

pattern.

requires a greater

light.

in

The

vibrating

the paper resistant to heat,

smoke:

moment. Light

disappears

Society

make

Smoke produces

The concept of

By

its
I

it

sity of vibration.

is

but today

underground.

with cloth.
I

minds only as an

"Air-architecture has existed in our


idea,

residential area

art.

though they anticipate a "formal" theme

for later

A PLAN FOR AIR-ARCHITECTURE

Museum,
2,

Leverkusen, Germany, January

1962, Licht

und Rauch-Graphik.

will

be accomplished not so

much by

technical miracles, but rather through a metamorphosis

of

human

sensibility into a function of the universe.

The

theory of "dematerialization" negates the spirit of sciencefiction.

Through

this

new

sensibility, "the

new human

dimension governed by reason," the climate and the


essential conditions of nature will, in the future,

undergo

a metamorphosis.

To want means

to invent.

Together with

a desire to experience one's


cles are

accomplished in

all

own

this

wanting

is

invention. Thus, mira-

the domains of nature.

Ben Gurion: "He who does not

believe in miracles

is

not

a realist."

From Heinz Mack and Otto


vol. 3, 1961, n.p,

Piene, eds. Zero, Diisseldorf,

25

\ICH O CASTESLliANl

The reliefs I make on paper (drawings) have for me the


same value of the ones on canvas in other words, they
;

are both conceived

by the same

aesthetic principle ap-

plied to different kinds of technical processes.


is,

The

result

ultimately, very different because of the basic differ-

ence between the materials

N.WZOM

I'lIltO

use the very texture of the

In 1957

made my

in kaolin

and glue

which

chloride,

in time

with balls

acquiring a dynamic quality,

still

perceptible in the com-

pleted work; while paper, which

is

more

communicates the sensation of the repeated

material,

pressures

to

which

it

was

subjected.

Nevertheless,

common

the reiteration

drawings and paintings have in

of "punctuation", the major characteristic of


I

may add

in

inflexible

that

it is

not accidental that

my

my work

work.

develops

agreement with these two materials: they are the only

ones which maintain, even after the moulding process,


their

membrane

characteristic, thus preventing the equi-

vocal classification of

my work

as bas-relief. In

any

case,

in

experimented

with phosphorescent ones, and others soaked in cobalt

of either drawings or paintings. For the canvas, due to

its

made some

cotton-wool and expanded polystyrene.

some of straw and

requires a stretching process, thus

1959 the screens for the "achromes"

were sewing-machine seams. In 1960

respective materials plays a major role in the execution

natural elasticity,

"achromes" using cloth soaked

first

in

at

changed

plastic,

and a

color. In

1961

made

series of white paintings

of cotton-wool, then of fur

first

clouds of natural or

made

artificial fibres. I also

and

a sculp-

ture of rabbit skin.

In 1959

prepared a series of forty-five "air bodies"

(pneumatic sculptures), about 80 cm. in diameter and

120 cm. high, including the base.


In 1960

space:

completed an old project, the

first

sculpture in

suspended sphere supported by an

Working on the same


of pure light

principle,

spheroids

air jet.

then produced bodies

held up by an air

jet,

which

turn vertically on themselves virtually creating a volume.

At the beginning of 1959,


short at

first,

my

produced

first lines,

then longer (10 meters, 11, 33, 63, 1000

my

etc.).

for

(1960, Herning, Denmark). All these lines are enclosed

rhythms and new formal solutions, executed on a material

in sealed boxes. In 1960, during two conventions (Copen-

which can be more

hagen and Milan),

the drawings, in addition to being a variation of

painting

themes,

constitute

easily

field

and promptly

of

research

treated.

The

longest

letter

1965.

by the artist to Lawrence Alloway, October 28,

so far

consecrated to art a

boiled eggs, signing

made

ever

my

them with

is

7200 meters

number

of hard-

finger-prints.

The

audience was able to come directly in contact with these

devouring the entire exhibition in 70

objects of art,

minutes.

..

In January 1961

my

built

person or object rested on

remained there,

work of

Copenhagen; a third one

mark

it's

it

"magic base" whatever


:

became, for the time

art.

built a

From 1958

to

1960

it

it

second one in

in a park in Herning,

of iron, very large, and over

the base of the world


charts",

is

first

rests the

DenEarth

worked on a

series of "verification

eight of which have been lithographed and

published

in

portfolio

(maps,

alphabets,

finger-

prints...).

Stedelijk

Museum, Amsterdam,

April 15-June 8, 1965,

Nul, Negentienhonderd, Vijf en Zestig, Deel

Teksten.

26

BIBLIOGRAPHY

INDIVIDUAL ARTISTS

PIERRE ALECHINSKY

1927,

Resident

Brussels.

Paris.
14.

galerie nina dausset, Paris, November 19-December


15, 1954, Alechinsky.

Text by Christian Dotremont.

3 drawings illustrated.
15.

palais des beaux-arts, Brussels, March 26-April 10,


1955, Alechinsky. Retrospective, checklist. 1 draw-

GENERAL BIBLIOGR AIMIY

ing illustrated on cover.


16.

alechinsky,

"Paysages

pierre.

vants", Cahiers

Poursuivis

du Muse'e de Poche,

Poursui-

May

Paris,

1960, pp. 55-63. 2 drawings illustrated.


1.

2.

the art institute of Chicago, Chicago, 1952, Contem-

17.

Lausanne, no.

Foreword by Carl 0. Schniewind.

drawing

contemporary arts museum, Houston, November

20,

18.

Decade of Contemporary
Drawings (1948-1958). Introduction by Jermayne
1958-January

4, 1959,

MacAgy.
3.

ltd.,

London, January 20-Feb-

rence Alloway.

vol.
5.

c.

"Peinture

8.

Quadrum,

21.

rolf-gunter,

"Informelle

Kunstwerk, Baden-Baden,

vol.

lefebre gallery,

Schriften",
16, no.

New

3,

January 1963,

by Alechinsky

York, November 5-December

Alechinsky.

1963,

museum haus lange, Krefeld, January 20-March


1963. Mack, Piene, Uecker. Bibliography.
dienst,

Morphology of Orange Peels", The Situationist

and Reinhoud dHaese.

Brussels, no. 13, 1962, pp. 5-48.


7.

Cimaise, Paris, no. 60, July-August, 1962,

pp. 76-79. Illustrated with sketches

Sylvester.

et Ecriture",

Brussels,

alechinsky, pierre and d'haese reinhoud. "Study in


the

Diisseldorf,

arts council of great Britain, London, 1962, Drawing

legrand, francine

Quadrum,

gassiot-talabot, gerald. "Alechinsky and his Mon-

Times, Hengelo, Holland, no.

Towards Painting. Text by David


6.

"Pierre Alechinsky",

pp. 12-19. 2 drawings illustrated.

1961.

3,

f. c.

sters",

20.

mack, heinz and piene, otto, eds. Zero,

trated.
19.

Arthur tooth & sons,

legrand,

October 1961, pp. 34-39.

82,

illustrated.

no. 11, 1961, pp. 123-32, 192-93. 1 drawing illus-

ruary 14, 1959, Actualites. Introduction by Law-

4.

putnam, jacques. "Conversation dans L' Atelier", L'Oeil,

porary Drawings from 12 Countries (1945-1952).

Text

by

Edouard

7,

Jaguer.

2 drawings illustrated.

17,

22.

Das

lefebre gallery, New York, April 13-May

1965,

8,

Alechinsky. Reprint of no. 17. 2 drawings illustrated.

10, April

1963, p. 4.
9.

alte galerie, Kassel, June 27-October

10.

5,

III.

GILLIAN AYRES

1964, Docu-

Werner Haftmann.
piene, otto. "The Development of The Group Zero",
menta

Introduction by

23.

1930, London. Resident London.

Hamilton galleries, London, September 17-October


12, 1963, Gillian Ayres.

4 drawings

illustrated.

The Times Literary Supplement, London, September


11.

3,

1964, pp. 812-13.

mathildenhohe, Darmstadt, September 12-November


15, 1964, Internationale der

H.

W.

Sabais,

Zeichnung. Texts by

Werner Hofmann, Dore Ashton,

and C. G. Heise.
12.

Mack, Piene,

Schmied,

Uecker.

Text

7,

1965,

by Wieland

Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, and Gunther

Uecker.
13.

armando; peeters, henk; sleutelaar, hans; VAANdrager, c.b. and verhagen, hans, eds. De Nieuwe
Stijl, Amsterdam, De Bezige Bij, n.d.

1924, Lovonna, Italy.

Resident Rome.
24. bonicatti, maurizio. "Gianfranco Baruchello", Metro,

Milan,

kestner-gesellschaft, Hannover, May 7-June


Zero:

GIANFRANCO BARUCELLO

no.

8,

January-March 1963, pp. 66-77.

3 drawings illustrated.
25. galeria la

Text

tartaruga, Rome, May 20, 1963, Baruchello.

by Maurizio Bonicatti and Alain

4 drawings
26. asiiton,

dore.

"Art",

Angeles, vol.

4 drawings

Jouffroy.

illustrated.

81,

Arts
no.

illustrated.

4,

and

Architecture,

April 1964, pp.

Los

6-7.

27

MARY BAUERMEISTER
New York and
27.

JEAN DUBUFFET

1934, Frankfort. Resident

Kettenberg, West Germany.

New York, March 17- April 18,


Poem by Sandberg. 2 combi-

galeria bonino, ltd.,

43. cordier, daniel.

York, George

1964, Bauermeister.

nation construction-drawings.
28. galeria bonino, ltd.,

Bauermeister.
1

New York,

by

Introduction

and

drawing

44.

April 13-May

construction-

Braziller, 1960.

musee des arts decoratifs,


Text by the

45.

drawings illustrated.

December

Paris,

74 drawings

artist.

Dartford, England. Resident

London.
29.

Art Institute of Chicago and Los Angeles

drawings
46.

coleman, ROGER, "The Art of Counterfeit", The Painter

and

Sculptor,

London,

vol.

1,

no. 1, Spring 1958,

il

47. barilli,

"Only Sixteen", Ark, London,

segno, Rome,

May 28-June

48.

Robert. "The Durable Expendables of Peter

renato. Dubuffet Materiolo gue Bologna, Edi,

loreau, max,

ed.

Catalogue integral des Traveaux de

Jean Dubuffet,

Paris,

Jean-Jacques Pauvert, 20

"Les Phenomenes",

Blake", Motif, London, no. 10, Winter 1962-63, pp.

vols., in preparation.

14-35. 3 drawings illustrated.

1964. Texts by Jean Dubuffet,

32. "Peter Blake in Hollywood",

London, November

Sunday Times Magazine,

15, 1964. 6

Limbour, Lorenza Trucci, R.

Robert fraser gallery, London, October 20-Novem-

XVI,

vol.

Loreau, Noel

Barilli.

Lithographs

pertaining to drawings in the present exhibition.


49. stedelijk

museum, Amsterdam, November

January

11,

Jean

1965,

Gouaches. 31 drawings

ENRICO CASTELLANI

Max

Arnaud, Andre-Pieyre de Mandiargues, Georges

drawings illustrated.

ber 27, 1965, Peter Blake. Notes by Robert Melville.

Dubuffet

26,

1964-

Tekeningen,

illustrated.

1930, Castelmassa (Rovigo),

Resident Milan.

Italy.

dorfles.

no. 8,
35.

28, 1962. Text


illustrated.

in the present exhibition.

vol. 25,

1960, p. 29. 12 drawings in comic strip form.

34. gillo,

20

zioni Alfa, 1963. Paintings pertaining to drawings

30. blake, peter.

33.

galleria

artist.

illustrated.

by Giuseppe Marchiori. 2 drawings

pp. 21-23.

31. melville,

1960-

illustrated.

County Museum of Art. Text by the


1932,

16,

museum of modern art, New York, February 19-April


8, 1962, The Work of Jean Dubuffet. Also exhibited
at the

PETER BLAKE

New

The Drawing of Jean Dubuffet,

February 25, 1961, Jean Dubuffet (1942-1960).

1965,

8,

Solomon.

Alan

combination

13

1901, Le Havre. Resident Paris and

Vence, France.

galleria

"Enrico

dell'ariete,

Castellani. Text
36. stedelijk

Castellani",

Metro,

ETIENNE-MARTIN

Milan,

January-March 1963, pp. 34-37.

by

February

Milan,

1913, Loriel, Provence, France.

Resident Paris.
1963,

26,

50.

galerie

breteau,

Paris,

Martin. 3 drawings

Gillo Dorfles.

museum, Amsterdam, April 15-June

8,

1965,

51.

kunsthalle, Bern, November 2-December

E tie nne- Martin.

Enrico Castellani.

December 1960, Etienne-

illustrated.

of a letter

1963,

1,

Introduction by H.S., reproduction

from the

artist.

52. bayl, friedrich. "Etienne-Martin", Art International,

BERNARD COHEN
37.

1933, London. Resident London.

Zurich, vol. VII, no. 8,

cohen, Bernard. "Gesture and Style", Gazette, London,


no. 2, 1961.

38.

cohen, Bernard. "The Allegorical Situation Definitions


:

drawings

illus-

53.

stedelijk museum, Amsterdam, December

13,

1963-

January 27, 1964. Introduction by H. Szeemann.

drawings illustrated.

p. 59. 12

cohen, Bernard. "Observations about the Photographs

OYVIND FAHLSTROM

of the Painting 'Generation"", Cambridge Opinion,

Cambridge, Spring 1964, pp. 54-56.


40.

10, 1963, p. 30.

in no. 51. 8

trated.

and Pictures", Living Arts, London, April 1964,


39.

November

Reproduction of letter as

kasmin limited, London, December

4,

1964. Bernard

Cohen: Drawings 1961-64. 19 drawings

hulten, k.g. "Oyvind Fahlstrom", Quadrum, Brussels,

55.

galerie daniel cordier, Paris, December

no. 8, 1960, pp. 150-151.

drawing

Novem-

Dado. Text by Georges Limbour.

1960,

illustrated.

42. galerie daniel cordier, Paris,

Dado; Peintures

28, 1961,
illustrated.

November 3-November
et dessins. 3

12, 1963,

6,

1962-

Oyvind Fahlstrom. Text by Robert

Rauschenberg.

1933, Cetinje, Yugoslavia. Resident Paris.

41. galerie daniel cordier, Frankfurt- Am-Main,

ber

Sao Paolo. Resident

54.

illustrated.

January

DADO

1928,

Stockholm.

drawings

56. Sidney janis

gallery,

New

York. February 4-March

1963, Jim Dine. Text by Oyvind Fahlstrom.

2,

28

LUCIO FONTANA

Rosario

1899,

Santa

di

57. "Lucio Fontana",

1943.

vol. 2, nos. 47,

75.

pp. 120-121.

Including "Manifesto Technico" by Lucio Fontana.

"Lucio

paul.

2,

International,

Hamilton, richard.
London, no.

78.

drawing

illustrated.

ALBERTO GIACOMETTI

le

dAlberto Giacometti", Derriere

York,

May

jacques.

Rome,

Editalia,

Giacometti,

Drawings,

New York,

Gallery, October 24, 1964. Text

drawings illustrated.

On

148-149. 1 drawing

1961, pp.

11,

JEAN IPOUSTEGUY
Maeght

Paris,

81.

artist

michel conil. "Of the Surreal and the Erotic"

Studio International, London,

1965,

including sketches. 21

in the

studio.

Alberto Giacometti. Reproduction of autobiographstatement by the

UOeil, Lausanne, no. 105,

September 1963, pp. 30-35. Conversation


83. lacoste,

12,

artist.

82. hoctin, luce. "Ipousteguy",

New Y ork, November

17-December 12, 1964.


museum of modern art, June 9-October

galerie claude Bernard, Paris, June 1962, Ipousteguy.


Statements by the

Pierre Matisse

by James Lord. 47

1920, Dun-sur-Meuse, France.

Resident Paris.

the occasion of the exhibi-

tion at Pierre Matisse Gallery,

ical

hofmann, werner. "Wolfgang Hollegha", Quadrum,

1962.

Editeur, 1962. Bibliography. 26 drawings illustrated.

68.

New

drawing

1959. 28 drawings illustrated.

Giacometti,

Alberto

67. Alberto Giacometti

June 1960, pp. 58-59.

illustrated.

Isere,

Bibliography. 12 drawings illustrated.


66. dupin,

"Wolfgang Hollegha", Arts,

vol. 34, no. 9,

Brussels, no.

Barbezat,

1929, Klagenfurt, Austria.

illustrated.

80.

sketches.

larronde, Olivier. Rien Voila L'Ordre, Decines

Max

20,

the

9 drawings illustrated.

79. b(utler), b(arbara).

alberto. Schriften, Fotos, Zeichnungen,

65. bucarelli, palma.

drawings

10

Resident Vienna.

Zurich, 1958. Reproduction of original notes and

64.

4459.

pp.

WOLFGANG HOLLEGHA

1901, Stampa, Switzerland

Miroir, Paris, Maeght Editeur, no. 98, 1957.

63. giacometti,

1963,

2,

hanover gallery, London, October 20-November


1964, Paintings etc. '56-64. Commentary by
artist.

died 1966, Chur, Switzerland.


62. genet, jean. "L' Atelier

1961, n.p.

1,

"Urbane Image", Living Arts,

illustrated.

galerie anne abels, Cologne, April 9-May 29, 1965,


Fontana.

1958,

3,

illustrated.

77.

March 1962, pp. 37-40.


York, Harry N. Abrams,

Inc., 1962.

61.

drawing

Chrysler Corpora-

London, no.

Hamilton, richard. "For the Finest Art Try POP",

New

Fontana,

"Hommage

Gazette, London, no.

Art

Fontana",

Zurich, vol. VI, no.


60. tapie, michel.

Resident

76.

2 drawings illustrated.
59. Oliver,

Hamilton, richard.

tion", Architectural Design,

illustrated.

giampiero. Spazialismo, Milan, Conchiglia, 1956.

58. giani,

London.

1922,

London.

Parana, Argentina,

drawing

HAMILTON

RICHARD

Fe,

Argentina. Resident Milan.

vol.

167, no. 852,

April 1964, p. 162.


84.

hanover gallery, London,

July 14 August 29, 1964.

Ipousteguy. Introduction by John Ashbery.

drawings illustrated.

draw-

ing illustrated.

ROEL D'HAESE

1921,

Gramment, Belgium. Resident

ASGER JORN

Rhode-Saint-Genese, Belgium.
69. galerie

claude Bernard,

d'Haese Sculptures
70.

Paris,

et Dessins. 1

drawing illustrated.

85.

walravens, Jan. "Dessins de Roel d'Haese", Quadrum,


Brussels,

no.

8,

1960,

pp.

115-122,

Conseilles Technique

rudolf

February
1

73.

17,

drawing

zwirner,
1963,

XXe

Cologne,

January

87.

statens museum for kunst,

portantes d'Asger Jorn, 1959.

17-

1961,

Drawings of Roel d'Haese.

Siecle, Paris, vol.

XXVI,

no. 23,

illustrated.

illustrated.

jorn, asger and dotremont, christian.

La Chevelure

Gauche, 1961. Preface by Pierre Alechinsky.


89.

Roel d'Haese, Brussels, Les Editions

Meddens, S.A., 1964. 3 drawings

Summer
Elise Jo-

des Choses, 1948-1953, Paris, Editions Galerie Rive

May

1964, pp. 59-63. Discussion about drawing.

Copenhagen,

Den Kgl. Kobberstiksamling: Fru

hansens Samling. 5 drawings


88.

illustrated.

74. meuris, Jacques.

Detournement, 1957.

debord, guy-ernst. Memoires, Copenhagen, Structure

dypreau, jean. "Roel d'Haese ou L'Angoisse Apprivoisee",

le

86.

UExposition des Dessins de Roel d'Haese. 15


galerie

pour

visatory silk-screen techniques.

galerie claude Bernard, Paris, October 25, 1962,

drawings illustrated.
72.

Italy.

debord, guy-ernst. Fin de Copenhague, Copenhagen,


This and no. 86 below illustrated by Jorn in impro-

197-198.

7 drawings illustrated.
71.

1914, Jutland, Denmark. Resident Paris

and Albisola sur Mare,

October 1958. Roel

olsen,

R.

dahlmann. Beskedne Luxusbilleder, Copen-

hagen, 1962. 23 drawings illustrated.


90.

kunstforeningen, Copenhagen, February 22-March 17


1964, Papirer. Foreword by R.
2 cover illustrations.

Dahlmann

Olsen.

29

Asger

guy.

91. atkins,

92. atkins,

93.

artist. 1

guy and schmidt,

Jorns

Skrifter

London, Methuen,

Jorri,

Statement by the

drawing

1964.

MARLBOROUGH NEW LONDON GALLERY, London, 1963,


Lucebert Edited By Lucebert. Poems and texts by

108.

museum boymans van-beuningen, Rotterdam, March

Asger

eric. Bibliografi over

1963, Copenhagen, Permild and

til

107.

illustrated.

Lucebert.

Rosengreen, 1964. 14 drawings illustrated and 2

14-April 26, 1964, Lucebert. Text by H.R. Hoetink.

cover drawings.

26 drawings

schade,

Asger

virtus.

Copenhagen,

Jorn,

Stig

Vendelkaer, 1965. 8 drawings illustrated.


110.

illustrated.

Diisseldorf, April 15-May 6, 1964.


Gouachen und Zeichnungen von Lucebert.
staatliche kunsthalle, Baden-Baden, July 11-27,

109. galerie

niepel,

1964, Lucebert, Zeichnung, Gouache, Grafik.

YVES KLEIN
94.

1928, Nice; died 1962, Paris.

wember, paul. "Yves Klein", Art International, Zurich,


vol.

HEINZ MACK 1931,


and New York.

V, no. 2, March 1961, pp. 58-65. 9 drawings

illustrated.

95.

galleria apollinaire, Milan, November 1961,


Klein:

II

Nuovo Realismo

Yves

See nos.

Diisseldorf. Resident Diisseldorf

7, 12, 13.

del Colore. Text by

Pierre Restany. 4 drawings illustrated.


96. "Klein",

Art International, Zurich,

February 1962,
97.

drawing

p. 77. 1

tokyo gallery, Tokyo,

vol.

VI,

no.

July 23-July 31, 1962, Re-

trospective Yves Klein. 7 drawings illustrated.

98.

PIERO MANZONI

1,

illustrated.

1933, Milan; died 1963, Milan.

HI. da azimut, Milan, December 4-24, 1959, Manzoni. Text


by Vincenzo Agnetti.
112.

Azimuth, Milan, 1959.

113. Piero Manzoni. "Libra

collaboration with Neil Levine and John

114. peeters, henk. "Piero

text in

Archambault. 2 drawings

Paris, vol.

XXV,

no. 21,

May

f",

Nul-O,

XXe Siecle,
HENRI MICHAUX

de Feu. Texts by Otto Piene and Pierre Restany.

1899,

Namur, Belgium. Resident,

Paris.

115. michaux, henri. Peintures, sept poemes et seize illustrations, G.L.M., 1939.

illustrated.

Foreword by Louis Cheronnet.

116. michaux, henri, Peintures et Dessins, Paris,

See no. 13.

Jour, 1946. Foreword by author,


his poetry.

PIOTR KOWALSKI

Lwow, Poland.

1927,

Resident

1951.

101. choay, francoise. "Structures natives, formes coulees et

102.

Babel

Ring des

65, Paris, no. 1, 1965.

119. galerie

rene drouin,

Parcours Henri

103. sydhoff, beate. "Experiment

Med Formens

Konstrevy, Stockholm, vol. XLI, no.

Mojliche1,

1965,

Stockholm,
Resident

Bergen,

Lucebert. Introduction
artist.

16,

1956,

1956. 7 drawings

Das Kunstwerk, Baden

April 1959, pp. 31-32.

"Snabbhet och Tempo", Konstrevy,


vol.

XXXVI,

no. 2, 1960, pp. 68-71.

illustrated.

shown

at

123. bonnefoi, Genevieve.

national museum, Jerusalem, April 14-May


Lucebert: Dessins,

Ad

Michaux",

Marlborough

Fine Art Ltd., London, 1963.

Introduction by

recentes

1959-1962.

Genevieve Bonnefoi. 17 drawings

Amsterdam, March 7-April, 1962,

Lucebert: Gouaches. Also

1962,

illustrated.

May 25-June

Michaux 1939 a

Michaux-oeuvres

by Jan G. Elburg, statements

7 drawings illustrated.

105. galerie espace n.v.,

106. bezalel

4 drawings

museum, Amsterdam, April 17-May 26, 1959,

by the

Siecle, Paris, no. 4,

122. galerie daniel cordier, Paris, October 25, 1962, Henri

Holland.
104. stedelijk

Paris,

vol. XII, no. 10,

121. michaux, henri.

Amsterdam.

XXe

illustrated.

Baden,

1924,

Le Point du Jour,

illustrated.

120. bense, max. "Henri Michaux",

pp. 12-15.

LUCEBERT

Paris,

January 1954, pp. 47-50. 4 drawings

ski included.

ter",

Movements,

poem. 65 drawings

118. michaux, henri. "Signes",

Arts, Zurich, no. 2, 1961.

Statement by Piotr Kowal-

Le Point du

and excerpts from

43 drawings illustrated.

117. michaux, henri.

Paris.

Architecture",

series 1,

1963. 4 drawings

illustrated.

drawing

Manzoni

no. 2, April 1963.

100. galerie schmela, Diisseldorf, April 15, 1964, Peintures

illustrated.

Dimensione", Azimut, Milan,

no. 2, 1960, n.p.

illustrated.

99. restany, pierre. "Ives Klein (1928-1962)",

drawing

Alexander iolas gallery, New York, November 5-24,


1962, Yves Klein. Accompanied by Yves Klein,

124.
8,

Gouaches, Eaux-fortes.

Petersen. 3 drawings illustrated.

XXe

Text

by

illustrated.

"Le Lointain interieur d'Henri

Siecle, Paris, vol.

XXV,

no. 22,

December 1963. 13 drawings illustrated.


stedelijk museum, Amsterdam, February 7-March 22,
1964, Henri Michaux. Text by Genevieve Bonnefoi,
Rene Bertele, quotations from Michaux, bibliography. 33 drawings illustrated.

125.

musee national d'art moderne, Paris, February 12April 4, 1965, Henri Michaux. Preface by Jean
Cassou. 12 drawings illustrated.

30

JOSEPH MIKL

OTTO PIENE

1929, Vienna. Resident Vienna.

126. schmeller, a. "Josef

MiM", Quadrum,

142. stadttsches

1960, pp. 158-159.


127. galerie
1

128.

der Spiegel, Cologne, March 1963, Josef Mikl.

drawing

museum des
March

phik. Text by the

jahrhunderts, Vienna, January

1964, Josef Mikl. Text by

8,

mann. 8 drawings

museum, Leverkusen, Germany, January 12-

February 25, 1962, Piene: Licht und Rauch-Gra-

illustrated.

20.

1928, Laasphe, (Westfalen), Germany.

Resident Diisseldorf and New- York.

Brussels, no. 8,

17-

143. galerie

Werner Hof-

artist.

Alfred schmela,

4 drawings

Diisseldorf,

ber, 1963, Piene: Olbilder

illustrated.

September-Octo-

und Gouachen. Text by

the artist. 6 drawings illustrated.

illustrated.

144.

Howard wise gallery, New York, November

4-20,

1965, Piene: Light Ballet. 2 pages of diagrams.

HENRY MUNDY

1919, Birkenhead, England. Resi-

See nos.

7, 12.

dent London.
129.

hanover gallery, London, September


Henry Mundy. Text by Alan Bowness.

130.

mundy, henry. "Effects Used


London, no.

2,

1961, p.

6-30,

BERNARD REQUICHOT

Painting",

in

1960,

Gazette,

(Reprinted in catalogue.

145. galerie

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York,


1964,

Guggenheim International Award).

drawing

9, 1962,

6,

1961-

Requichot. 3 drawings illustrated.

146. alvard, julien. "Requichot",

Cimaise, Paris, vol.

9,

no. 58, March-April 1962, pp. 46-53. 2 drawings

hanover gallery, London, June 6-30,


Mundy. Text by David Sylvester.

Henry

1962,

drawings

illustrated.

jacques.

147. lassaigne,

illustrated.

132.

daniel cordier, Paris, December

January

illustrated.

131.

1929, Saint Gilles, France;

died 1961.

"Requichot

Siecle, Paris, vol.

hanover gallery, London, March 2-April


Henry Mundy. 1 drawing illustrated.

2,

1965,

91.

4 drawings

XXV,

(1928-1961)",

May

no. 21,

XXe

1963, pp. 86-

illustrated.

148. galerie daniel cordier, Paris, June

30-September 29,

1963, Bernard Requichot. 5 drawings illustrated.

EDUARDO PAOLOZZI

1924, Leith, Scotland. Resident

149. cordier, daniel. "Bernard Requichot: Lettre ouverte

de Daniel Cordier a lediteur", Art International,

London.
133. paolozzi, eduardo. "Notes from a Lecture
stitute of

no.

1,

Zurich, vol. VII, no.

at the In-

Contemporary Arts", Uppercase, London,


150.

n.d. [1958]. 7 drawings illustrated.

September 25, 1963, pp.

7,

82-83. 2 drawings illustrated.

galerie daniel cordier, Paris, April 1964, Retrospecdrawings illustrated.

tive (1929-1961). 5

134. paolozzi, eduardo. Metafisikal Translations, London,


privately printed, 1962.

eduardo. The Metallization of a Dream,


London, Lion and Unicorn Press, 1963. Commen-

135. paolozzi,

tary

by Lawrence Alloway. 33 drawings and

ANTONIO SAURA

1930,

Huesca,

Resident

Spain.

Madrid.

collages

New

151. pierre matisse gallery,

York, March 6-April

1,

Text by Jose Ayllon.

illustrated.

136. paolozzi,

1961,

eduardo. "The History of Nothing", Cam-

drawings illustrated.

bridge Opinion, Cambridge, no. 37, 1964, pp. 61-63.


Filmscript by the
137.

Antonio Saura.

152. gallerie dell'ariete, Milan,

March

27, 1961, Saura.

artist.

hatton gallery, University

Text by Juan-Eduardo

of Newcastle, Newcastle-

upon-Tyne, England, February 8-March

6,

1965,

Cirlot.

4 drawings

illustrated.

153. taillandier, yvon. "Saura: J"aime passionnement les


spectacles de la vie",

Eduardo Paolozzi, Recent Sculpture, Drawings and

no.

Collage, 7 drawings illustrated.

22,

XXe

Siecle, Paris, vol.

December 1963, pp.

XXV,

drawings

49-59. 2

illustrated.

154. pierre matisse gallery,

CARL-HENNING PEDERSEN

1913,

Resident Copenhagen.
138.

155. stedelijk

4,

drawing

museum, Amsterdam, April 4-May

25, 1964,

23 drawings illustrated.

5 drawings illustrated.

museum for kunst, Copenhagen, Summer


1961, Den Kgl. Kobberstiksamling Fru Elise Jo-

139. statens

156. galerie stadler, Paris,

hansens Samling. 6 drawings

26, 1965, Saura:

illustrated.

illustrated.

February 15-March

May 25-June

Oeuvre Graphiques. Notes by Saura. 13 drawings

Paris,

Antonio Saura: Drawings. Text by Jose Ayllon.

hagen, Biblioteque de Cobra 15, 1950. Cover and

de France,

York, March 10-April

illustrated.

dotremont, christian. Carl-Henning Pedersen, Copen-

140. galerie

New

1964, Antonio Saura. Reprint of no. 153.

Copenhagen.

16, 1963,

Carl-Henning Pedersen. Text by Christian Dotremont. 8 drawings


141.

WILLIAM SCOTT

illustrated.

DEN FRIE UDSTILLINGS bygning, Copenhagen, November

23-December
Retrospektiv

8,

1963,

Carl-Henning

Pedersen

Udstilling 1963. Text by Christian

Dotremont. 7 drawings

illustrated.

1913, Greenock, Scotland. Resident

Somerset, England.
157.

martha jackson gallery, New York, October 29November 17, 1956. William Scott: Paintings and
Drawings.

31

158. galerie

Charles lienhard, Zurich, 1959,

Scott.

William

176. tomkins, calvin.

Text by Alan Bowness.

robles gallery, Los Angeles, January 1961,


William Scott. Introduction by John Anthony

p. 44.

Thwaites. 2 drawings illustrated.

145-187).

159. ester

160. melville, Robert.

"William Scott", Motif, London,

177.

Winter 1961, pp. 31-49.


161. martha jackson gallery, New York, September 25October 20, 1962,

William

Bowness. 2 drawings

Text by Alan

Scott.

162. galerie
10,

1923,

1960,

statement by the

drawing

no.

1961,

10,

Cover and 3 drawings


164. galerie

karl flinker,

1962,

25 drawings

27,

1962,

July-August 1962, pp. 52-59.

"Une Sculpture-machine de Tinguely pour


de Metro", Metro, Milan, no.

March 1963. Drawings

for

moving

8,

January-

"do-it-yourself"

sculpture; fold-out insert.


181. galerie

195-196.

Alexandre iolas,

January

illustrated.

Paris,

Sonderborg.

131-140,

pp.

5-July

Mahlow and Godula

Alexander iolas gallery, New York, November 27December 30, 1962, Tinguely. Text by Willem

les lecteurs

illustrated.

grohmann, will. "K. R. H. Sonderborg", Quaolrum,


Brussels,

July

Sandberg.

Paris,

artist. 1

York, Viking Press, 1965, pp.

Baden-Baden,

180. hulten, K. G.

Paris.

New

Bucholz.

November 15-December
Sonderborg. Text by Will Grohmann,

karl flinker,

kunsthalle,

vol. 9, no. 60,

SONDERBORG (K. R. H. HOFMANN)

York, February 10, 1962,

178. boudaille, georges. "Jean Tinguely", Cimaise, Paris,

illustrated.

Sonderborg (Alsen), Denmark. Resident

New

(Reprinted in Calvin Tomkins. The Bride and

Tinguely. Text by Dietrich

179.

K. R. H.

"Beyond the Machine, Jean Tinguely",

Yorker,

The Bachelors,

no. 8,

163.

New

The

9,

Paris,
u

1965, Tinguely

December

10,

1964-

Meta". Text by Gerard

Minkoff and K. G. Hulten, bibliography. 4 drawings

October 30-November 30,

Text by Annette Michelson.

illustrated.

182.

illustrated.

Alexander iolas gallery, New York, March 19-April


u

10, 1965, Tinguely,

165. bayl, friedrich. "K. R. H. Sonderborg", Art Inter-

ten.

4 drawings

Meta

11".

Text by K. G. Hul-

illustrated.

national, Ziirich, vol. VII, no. 8, October 25, 1963,

pp. 50-56. 5 drawings illustrated.

GUNTHER UECKER.

166. vii bienal, Sao Paulo, 1963, K. R. H. Sonderborg. Text

by Werner Schmalenbach. 8 drawings


167. hahn, otto. Sonderborg,

illustrated.

York, Harry N. Abrams,

karl flinker,

Paris,

kolnischer

kunstverein,

October

3,

February 9-March

1965, K. R. H. Sonderborg:

ANTONI TAPIES

1923,

Gemdlde

Bar-

celona.

170.

GUGGENHEIM museum, New York,

R.

rence Alloway, bibliography.

&

cie, Paris,

May

[1965].

Rome, February

1,

7, 12, 13.

Died

Paris, 1951.

rene drouin,

Sylveire

Rene Drouin, 1947.

Paris, 1948, Wols.

Text by

and Wols.

illustrated.

1964,

La

Tarta-

7,

illustrated.

188. dorfles, gillo.

Milan, Vanni Scheiwiller 1958.

illustrated.

189.

van de loo, Munich, April 1965, Antoni

hofmann, werner, "Der Maler Wols", Werk, Winterthur, Switzerland, vol. 46, no. 5,

Tdpies: Gouachen, Zeichnungen und Collagen aus

den Jahren 1963-1965. Text by Tapies. 20 drawings

W ols,

Bibliography. Cover and 16 drawings and engravings

1964, Antoni

collages.

1,

October-November 1958, pp. 14-23. 4 drawings

artist.

gaspar, Barcelona, November


Tdpies: cartons, papiers, fustes

187. restany, pierre. "Wols", Cimaise, Paris, vol. 6, no.

ruga: Tdpies. Statement by the

174. galerie

1913,

186. galerie

1963, Papiers et Cartons.

Text by Jacques Dupin. 12 drawings


172. galleria d'arte,

173. sala

WOLS (ALFRED OTTO WOLFGANG SCHULZ)

n.d.

185. guilly, rene. Wols, Paris, Editeur

THE SOLOMON

berggruen

illus-

Berlin.

March-April 1962, Antoni Tdpies. Text by Law-

171.

2 drawings illustrated.

drawing

See nos.

Resident

artist.

trated.

illustrated.

Barcelona.

Hofhaus Presse,

Gunther Uecker, Cologne, Verlag M.

Dumont Schauberg,

3-

September

Diisseldorf,

by John Anthony Thwaites,

Introduction

statements by the

6,

Wendorf (Mecklenburg),

Diisseldorf.

Weisstrukturen,

184. strelow, hans.

Cologne,

Zeichnungen. 4 drawings

Uecker:

1962.

1965. 23 drawings illustrated.


169.

183.

drawings illustrated.

Inc., 1964. 12

168. galerie

New

1930,

Germany. Resident

May 1959, pp. 180-

186. 2 drawings illustrated.

190.

illustrated.

grohmann, will. "Das Graphische Werk von Wols",


Quadrum,

Brussels,

no.

6,

October

1959,

pp.

95-118. Illustrated.

JEAN TINGUELY

dent Soisy-sur-ecole,
175.

France.

Azimuth, Milan, 1959. Insert of reproduction of "MetaMatic no. 72".

191.

fahlstrom, oyvind. "Wols", Konstrevy, Stockholm,

192.

haftmann, werner,

1925, Fribourg, Switzerland. Resi-

vol.

relle,

XXXVI,

no. 3, 1960, pp. 64-66.


ed.

Wols

Aufzeichnungen, Aqua-

Aphorismen, Zeichnungen, Cologne, Verlag

M. Dumont Schauberg, 1963.

32

DRAWINGS

IK

THE EXHIBITION

PIERRE ALECH1XSKY
1.

OPEN JOURNAL.

1963. Ink, 24i x 35".

Collection Arthur T. Bloomquist, Rye,


2.

FAMILY ALBUM (LEFT PAGE).

New

York.

1965. Ink,

four sheets, each 16i x 21|".

Lent by Lefebre Gallery,


3.

PHOTOMATON.
Collection Mr.

4.

New

York.

1964. Ink, 23i x 26*".

and Mrs. Hans Warmbrunn,

THE WHEEL.

New

York.

1965. Watercolor and ink, 20 x 16".

Collection Mr. and Mrs. Sidney

M. Feldman, Pittsburgh.

GILLIAN AIRES
5.

UNTITLED.

1964. Crayon, 9i x 12".

Lent by Kasmin Gallery, London.


6.

UNTITLED.

1964. Crayon, 18 x 24**.

Lent by Kasmin Gallery, London.


7.

UNTITLED.

1964. Crayon, 24* x 36*".

Collection Jane F. Umanoff,


8.

UNTITLED.

New

York.

1964. Crayon, 191 x 24+".

Lent by Kasmin Gallery, London.

GIANFRAJVCO BARIC HELLO


9.

BUT WHAT'S THE DEATH OF A BILLION MEN


(AS LONG AS WE ARE AMONG THE
SURVIVORS).

1964. Gouache and ink, 19* x 25i".

Lent by Cordier and Ekstrom


10.

Gouache and

New

York.

ink, 19* x 25+/'.

Lent by Cordier and Ekstrom


11.

Inc.,

THE REASON FOR AN ABSURD PROCEDURE


\\ HEREBY THE IMPORTANCE OF THE
AREA OF TOTAL USELESSNESS IS
DELIBERATELY DISGUISED. 1964.
Inc.,

New

York.

HUGE SHED WILL SHELTER THE WORKERS


LOOKING INTO VIVIDLY COLORED
DEMI-JOHNS.

1964.

Gouache and

Lent by Cordier and Ekstrom

Inc.,

ink, 19* x 25+".

New

York.

33

MARY
12.

HERVARD

lUllltUI ISTlit

UNTITLED NO.

Ink and gouache, 194 x 294".

10. 1962.

New

Lent by Galeria Bonino, Ltd.,


13.

DRAWING
Ink and

NO.

collage, 194

25.

New

14.

15.

UNTITLED NO.

1964. Ink, 22+ x 18"

26.

New Y ork.

19. 1964. Ink, 194

Lent by Galeria Bonino, Ltd.,

New

x 234".

27.

28.

1963.

APRIL WITH PIPALO AND STAR-KING.

29.

UNTITLED.

1964. Crayon and pencU, 204 x 25".

UNTITLED.

1964. Sprayed ink, 224 x 304".

Museum

UNTITLED

#1. (DOGS). 1964. Ink,

UNTITLED

of Art.

Inc..

194x234"

New

York.

#3. 1964. Ink, 194 x 254".

UNTITLED

Inc.,

New

York.

#2. 1965. Ink, 194 x 254".

Lent by Cordier and Ekstrom

Inc.,

New

York.

Benesch Memorial Collection.

HOLLYWOOD.
Collection Mr.

19.

1962. Crayon and pencd, 20f x 25".

Lent by Cordier and Ekstrom

1963.
30.

Lent by the Baltimore

18.

UNTITLED.

Lent by Cordier and Ekstrom

Pencil, 244 x 29f".

E.

9 x 104

1\IM>

GRAUMAN'S CHINESE THEATER.


^ atercolor and pencil, 13 x 10".

Thomas

c.

Lent by Kasmin Gallery, London.

York.

Lent by Robert Fraser Gallery, London.


17.

1962.

9 x 104", b. 9 x 104",

Private collection, London.

PETER BLAKi:
16.

a.

Lent by Kasmin Gallery, London.

\ork.

DRAWING NO. 27, 27 PERHAPS.


Lent by Galeria Bonino, Ltd.,

UNTITLED (TRYPTICH).
Private collection, London.

1964.

x 23V'.

Lent by Galeria Bonino, Ltd.,

4HII \

Crayon and pencil,

York.

THREE PERGAMENTS.

16,

24.

1963. Crayon and ink, 10 x 124".

JEAN DIBIFFET

and Mrs. Bruce Chatwin, London.

"A TRANSFER".

1963.

Ink, crayon and pencil, 124 x 10".

31.

LANDSCAPE.
Lent by the

Collection Michael V? hite, London.


32.

1944. Gouache and ink, 8f x 94"

artist.

PERSON LOOKING FOR ROCKS.

1960.

Ink, 94 x 12".

EMC 14 'O IASTELLAXI


20.

DRAWING.

Lent by the
33.

1964. Paper

relief,

27 x 4H".

DRAWING.

1964. Paper relief, 27 x 414".


34.

Lent by Galleria delTAriete, Milan.


22.

DRAWING.

1964. Paper

Lent by Galleria

relief,

dell' Ariete,

DRAWING.

1964. Paper

274 x 414"

274 x 414"

Lent by Galleria delTAriete, Milan.

Lent by the

artist.

AREA

MATERIOLOGIES SERIES.

III,

Lent by the

Milan.

relief,

1961.

1961.

Ink. 194 x 254".

35.
23.

MATERIOLOGIES SERIES.

II,

Ink, 194 x 254".

Lent by Galleria delTAriete, Milan.


21.

AREA

artist.

AREA

V,

artist.

MATERIOLOGIES SERIES.

Ink, 191 x 254".

Lent bv the

artist.

1961.

34

ALBERTO UIACO.UETTI

ET1E.X \ E-M ARTIN


36.

PLAN NO.

44. 1964. Ink, 25i x 19f".

48.

37.

PLAN NO.

46. 1964. Ink

pencil, 19* x 251

and

49.

PLAN NO.

54. 1964.

Ink 12* x 17|".

50.

Lent by Galerie Breteau, Paris.


39.

PLAN NO.

INTERIOR WITH A DOG.

VASE AND CUP.


New

55. 1964. Ink, 12* x 17*".


51.

INTERIOR.

New
52.

NOTES FOR

"SITTING... SIX

LATER", (Double
Ink, 8| x lOi"

1948. Pencil, 20 x 13i

New

York.

1952. Pencil, 19* x 13*".

1957. Pencil, 25* x 19*".

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum,

York.

STUDY OF A CHAIR.

1962. Pencil, 19* x 12*".

New

Lent by Pierre Matisse Gallery,

MONTHS

York.

York.

Collection

OYVIAD FAHLSTRO.M

New

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum,

Collection

Lent by Galerie Breteau, Paris.

40.

1946. Pencil, 111 x 8*".

Lent by Pierre Matisse Gallery,

Lent by Galerie Breteau, Paris.


38.

JEAN-PAUL SARTRE.

Lent by Pierre Matisse Gallery,

Lent by Galerie Breteau, Paris.

York.

drawing). 1962.

and 8* x Hi".

ItOII

Al SI

It II

Collection Jasper Johns, Edisto Beach,

South Carolina.
41.

NOTES

"150

Tempera,

53.

PERSONS".

collage,

and

ink, 18f x 23 J".

Lent by Cordier and Ekstrom


42.

Inc.,

UNTITLED.

1954. Charcoal, 12| x 10".

Lent by Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris.

1963.
54.

New

THREE PACKAGES (TRIPTYCH).

York.

UNTITLED.

1958. Ink, 12* x 91".

Lent by Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris.

1953.
55.

Ink and collage, 23 x 17*".

UNTITLED.

1961. Charcoal, 15 x Hi".

Lent by Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris.

Lent by Cordier and Ekstrom

Inc.,

New

York.
56.

UNTITLED.

1964. Pencil, 22 x 15".

Lent by Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris.

IA CIO
43.

FO.WANA

SPACIAL CONCEPT.

RICHARD HAMILTON

1947. Ink, 10* x 8*".

Lent by Marlborough Galleria d'Arte, Rome.


57.

44.

SPACIAL CONCEPT.

1949.

Ink and perforations, 9* x

CORPORATION".

SPACIAL CONCEPT.

Ink, collage

58.

SPACIAL CONCEPT.

59.

STUDY FOR

New

A LUSH SITUATION".

York.

and

ink, 10 x 6*".

Benn Levy, London.

Collection
60.

silver paper, 7i x

"$HE". 1958.

Collage, watercolor

1951.

Ink and perforations, 13 x

IS

and gouache on

Private collection,

1950.

Lent by Marlborough Galleria d'Arte, Rome.

SPACIAL CONCEPT.

STUDY FOR "HERS


Ink, collage

Perforations on white cardboard, 13* x 10*".

47.

8i".

Mary Banham, London.

13".

Lent by Marlborough Galleria d'Arte, Rome.


46.

and gouache, 13i x

Collection Mrs.

1949.

Ink and perforations, 8* x

1957.

6*".

Lent by Marlborough Galleria d'Arte, Rome.


45.

STUDY FOR "HOMMAGE A CHRYSLER

THE SOLOMON

R.

GUGGENHEIM.

9+".

and gouache, 20 x

Pastel

Lent by Marlborough Galleria d'Arte, Rome.

23".

Lent by Robert Fraser Gallery, London.

WOI
61.

\\. IIOI

TRUNKS.

(.11 \

1962. Crayon, 39* x 52*".

Collection Dr. Otto Breicha, Vienna.


62.

FRUITS.

1963. Pencil, 51 x 60".

Lent by the

artist.

1965.

Hi".

1958.

35

PIOTR KOHALSKI

JEAN IPOl STEGIJY


63.

AGED WOMAN.

1958. Ink, 19* x 25*".

76.

Lent by Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris.


64.

UNTITLED.

1959. Ink, 25 x 19**.

Lent by the

Lent by Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris.


65.

OLD CHRIST

IN REPOSE.

HIGH ENERGY EXPLOSIVE-FORMING


PROGRAM FOR STAINLESS STEEL;
"NOW", I/III. 1965. Ink and watercolor, 25* x 39*".

1959. Ink, 19* x 25*

77.

Lent by Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris.

HIGH ENERGY EXPLOSIVE-FORMING


PROGRAM FOR STAINLESS STEEL;
"NOW",

II/III.

Lent by the
\S<.I

66.

It

JOIt \

UNTITLED.

78.

1940. Ink and pencil, 9* x 7*".

Collection Jon Streep,


67.

UNTITLED.
UNTITLED.

UNTITLED.
UNTITLED.
UNTITLED.

Lent by the

New

York.

New
New
New

1947. Ink,

Collection Jon Streep,

York.

79.

York.

80.

2,

81.

x 8*".

3,

5,

Iolas Gallery,

1958-59. Ink and

NO.

6,

8*x

10*".

THE OLD WOMAN PAYS ATTENTION.

1962.

20*".

HEINZ MACK
83.

New York,

BLACK DRAWING.

1965. Crayon, 60 x 56*".

Lent by Howard Wise Gallery,


Paris,

Geneva.

84.

COLOUR DRAWING.

New

York.

1965. Crayon, 60 x 49*".

Lent by Howard Wise Gallery,

STUDIES FOR LUMINOUS FOUNTAINS.

New

York.

pencil, 13* x 18*".

Lent by Alexander Iolas Gallery,


75.

3A. 1962. Ink,

York, Paris, Geneva.

STUDIES FOR LUMINOUS FOUNTAINS.

Lent by Alexander

NO.

DRAWING

STUDIES FOR LUMINOUS FOUNTAINS.

New

New York,

Paris,

Geneva.

PIERO MANZONI

STUDIES FOR LUMINOUS FOUNTAINS.

1958-59. Ink and pencil, 14* x 13*".

Lent by Alexander Iolas Gallery,

1961.

Lent by Marlborough Fine Art Ltd., London.

1958-59. Ink and pencil, 11* x 14*".

74.

A STRANGE HARE.

Gouache and crayon, 15 x

Lent by Alexander Iolas Gallery,

NO.

1960. Ink, 10* x

Lent by Marlborough Fine Art Ltd., London.

York.

1958-59. Ink and pencil, 14* x 234".

73.

7,

Lent by Marlborough Fine Art Ltd., London.

YVES KLEIN
NO.

NO. 2A. February

Crayon and gouache, 25* x 20".

York.

11-1

New

DRAWING

Lent by Marlborough Fine Art Ltd., London.

pencil, 10* x 7".

82.

72.

artist.

LUCEBERT

1945. Ink, 11* x 8*".

Collection Jon Streep,


71.

HIGH ENERGY EXPLOSIVE-FORMING


PROGRAM FOR STAINLESS STEEL;
"NOW" III/III. 1965. Ink, 25* x 39*".

pencil, 10* x 9*'

1945. Ink and

Collection Jon Streep,


70.

1965. Ink and watercolor, 25* x 39*"

artist.

1941. Pencil, 12* x 94".

Collection Jon Streep,


69.

York.

1941. Ink and

Collection Jon Streep,


68.

New

artist.

New York,

85.
Paris,

Geneva.

UNTITLED NO.

2235. 1956. Tempera, 27* x 19*

Lent by Piero Manzoni Estate, Milan.


86.

UNTITLED NO.
Tempera, 19* x

2229. 1957.

13*".

Lent by Piero Manzoni Estate, Milan.


87.

UNTITLED NO.
Oil

2230. 1957.

on paper, 19* x

15*".

Lent by Piero Manzoni Estate, Milan.


88.

UNTITLED NO.

2231. 1959. Ink, 26 x 19".

Lent by Piero Manzoni Estate, Milan.

36

HEM! MKHAIX

89.

LAZINESS

LOVE TO SWIM).

(I

1934.

103.

90.

1939.

104.

Watercolor, 94 x 8+".

91.

Rene

TROPICS.

92.

HERMAPHRODITIC

107.

PERMUTATIONS.

ARLHIIWIVG PEDERSEX

artist.

ROSE FORM.

1947.

108.

ink, 18 x 12".

BIRD WITH GOLDEN EGG.

artist.

Lent by the

97.

NO.

15,

1940.

Watercolor and crayon, 134 x 184".

RECLINING WOMAN.

1962.

110.

FIREBIRD.
Lent by the

Ink, 14* x 19i".

Lent by the

artist.

THE MEETING. TWO BIRDS MEET.


Lent by the

14,

1939.

Watercolor and crayon, 12* x 14*".

109.

NO.

and

1947.

JOSEF HI Kl
96.

13",

1964. Ink, 9* x 124"

Lent by Robert Fraser Gallery, London.

artist.

Gouache and
Lent by the

August 1964. Ink, 8 x

ALUMINUM STRUCTURES.

ink, 124 x 9i".

HEAD ON BLUE GROUND.

OVA

1964. Ink, 94 x 124" and 94 x 14".

Lent by Robert Fraser Gallery, London.

95.

IDOL. 1963.

TWO VARIATIONS ON A THEME OF


MICKI.

Watercolor and ink, 18i x 124".

Lent by the

1949.

Lent by Robert Fraser Gallery, London.


106.

FIGURES ON A MAUVE AND


BROWN GROUND. 1946.
Lent by the

STANDING SCULPTURES.

Ink, 12 i x 9i".

artist.

Gouache and

94.

105.

artist.

1946. Watercolor and ink, 12 x 94".

93.

1947.

Lent by Robert Fraser Gallery, London.

Bertele, Paris.

PERSON AND ANIMAL ON ROSE GROUND.


Lent by the

DRAWING FOR A SCULPTURE.

Ink, 13i x 16*".

1943. Gouache on black paper, 9+ x 124"

Lent by the

PAOLOZZI

Lent by Robert Fraser Gallery, London.

artist.

IN THE MAGIC COUNTRY.


Collection

tltlM)

Ink, 12| x 16".

Pastel, 9+ x 124".

Lent by the

III

artist.

111.

RECLINING WOMAN.

1965. Watercolor, 15 x 18".


artist.

LEAVE-TAKING.
Lent by the

1962.

artist.

1965. Watercolor, 15i x 18J

artist.

Ink, 134 x 19*".

Lent by the
98.

NO.

23,

artist.

BRUSH DRAWING.

Gouache, 9* x
Lent by the

OTTO PIENE

1963.

6*".

112.
artist.

SMOKE DRAWING.

1959. Smoke, 19* x 28*".

Lent by Howard Wise Gallery,


99.

NO.

24,

BRUSH DRAWING.

Gouache, 9* x

Lent by the

1963-64.
113.

7".

115.

COMPOSITION.

1964.

Charcoal, gouache and collage, 22 1 x 30".

Lent by Hanover Gallery, London.

COMPOSITION.

1964.

Charcoal, gouache and collage, 22* x 30".

Lent by Hanover Gallery, London.


102.

Smoke, 154x394".

artist.

HEMtV MIMH

101.

1959.

York.

Lent by Stadtische Kunsthalle, Recklinghausen.


114.

100.

SMOKE DRAWING.

New

COMPOSITION.

1964.

Charcoal, gouache and collage, 22 x 301".

Lent by Hanover Gallery, London.

SMOKE DRAWING ON RED. 1960.


Smoke and paint, 204 x 15*".
Lent by Howard \^ ise Gallery, New York.
ROSE OR STAR.
Smoke

1964-65.

over silk screen, 191 x 25+".

Lent by Howard Wise Gallery,

New

York.

37

RERXARD REQITCHOT
116.

UNTITLED.

JEAX TIXGLELY

1958. Ink and gouache,

38i x 25i".

133.

117.

UNTITLED.

134.

STUDY OF MACHINE.

135.

STUDY FOR SCULPTURES.


Lent by Alexander

AXTOMO SAIRA
1957. Ink, 26j x 18*".

York, Paris,

1965.

16".

Iolas Gallery,

STUDY OF MACHINE.

New

York, Paris.

1965. Ink, 11* x 16*".

Lent by Alexander Iolas Gallery,

Lent by Galerie Stadler, Paris.

CURES.

New

Geneva.
136.

120. 25

York, Paris,

Geneva.

Ink and pencil, 12| x

CURE.

New

1965. Ink, 12* x 16*".

Lent by Alexander Iolas Gallery,

MUSHROOMS LOOKING AT THE THRESHOLD


OF THE EAR. 1961. Ink, 28+ x 20".
Collection D.B.C., Paris.

119.

1965. Ink, 12* x 15*".

Geneva.

1961. Ink, 27+ x 29*".

Collection D.B.C., Paris.


118.

STUDY OF MACHINE.

Lent by Alexander Iolas Gallery,

Collection D.B.C., Paris.

New

York, Paris,

Geneva.

1960. Ink, 23| x 34*".

Lent by Galerie Stadler, Paris.


121.

MUTATIONS.

GOiTHER DECKER

1961. Ink and gouache, 24* x 35"

Lent by Galerie Stadler, Paris.


137.
122.

CROWD, NO.

6.

1962. Ink and

oil,

24+ x 35*".

Lent by Galerie Stadler, Paris.

Lent by the
138.

139.

RECLINING NUDE

1955/56. 1955-56.

Charcoal, 29i x 81*".

140.

Lent bv Hanover Gallery, London.

K. R. H.

RIVER.

Stamped paper, 25+ x

19*".

1965.

Stamped paper, 25+ x 191"

artist.

1965.

Lent bv the

SOVDERRORG

1965.

artist.

WHITE RAIN.
Lent by the

1965.

artist.

FOUNTAIN.
Lent by the

WILLIAM SCOTT
123.

SPIRAL, SPIRAL, SPIRAL.


Stamped paper, 25+ x 19f".

Stamped paper, 25+ x

19J".

artist.

hols
(alfred otto wolfgang schilz)

124.

UNTITLED.

1965. Ink, 42* x 29*".

Lent by Galerie Karl Flinker y Paris.


125.

UNTITLED.

Lent by Galerie Karl Flinker,


126.

UNTITLED.
UNTITLED.
UNTITLED.

New

Paris.

142.

New

143.

York.

and Mrs. John Lefebre,

144.

New

UNTITLED,

n.d.

145.

ink, 6* x 4*".

Ink and gouache, 4+ x

UNTITLED,

n.d. Ink

UNTITLED,
UNTITLED,

n.d.

6*".

\'ork.

and gouache, 6* x

Ink and gouache, 4i x

n.d. Ink

Collection Mr.

New

8*".

and Mrs. John de Cuevas, New York.

Collection Alexander Iolas,

York.

and

York.

Collection Mr.

1965. Ink, 10i x lOi".

Collection Mr.

n.d. Watercolor

The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum,

Collection Alexander Iolas,

York.

1965. Ink, 10* x 8".

Lent by Lefebre Gallery,


128.

New

UNTITLED,
Collection

1965. Ink, 42+ x 29j".

Lent by Lefebre Gallery,


127.

141.

1965. Ink, 42* x 29*".

New

7".

York.

and gouache, 9 x

6".

and Mrs. John de Cuevas,

New 1 ork.

AATOXT TAPIES
146.
129.

GOUACHE

NO.

680. 1962. Gouache, 19* x 25*"

Lent by Galerie Stadler, Paris.


130.

GOUACHE

NO.

682. 1962. Gouache, 20* x 25*"

Lent by Galerie Stadler, Paris.


131.

GOUACHE

NO.

686. 1962. Gouache, 19* x 26j*

Lent by Galerie Stadler, Paris.


132.

GOUACHE

NO.

692. 1962. Gouache, 19! x 26j"

Lent by Galerie Stadler, Paris.

UNTITLED,

n.d. Ink

and gouache, 5 x

CoUection Mr. and Mrs. John de Cuevas,

4*".

New ^ ork.

CU3
U~<

v'

CJ

fcs

&

2?

r^

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'

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O
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FINISHED IN 60 SECONDS

HOI.I
16. Peter Blake.

Grauman's Chinese Theatre. 1963. Watercolor and

pencil. 13 x 10"

K.

A
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36. Etienne-Martin.

P/an

iVo. 44. 1964. Ink,

25i x 19|"

-4

-%

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47. Lucio Fontana. Spacial Concept. 1951. Ink

and perforations, 13 x 9b"

48. Alberto Giacometti.

Jean-Paul

Sartre. 1946. Pencil,

Hi

x 8*'

i*
'"J

/#*>
-.*

^UV
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56.

Roel D'Haese. Untitled. 1964. Pencil, 22 x 15"

60. Richard Hamilton.

The Solomon R. Guggenheim. 1965. Pastel and gouache, 20 x

23".

62.

Wolfgang Holleeha.

Fruits. 1963. Pencil, 51 x 60".

70.

Asger Jorn. Untitled. 1945. Ink, ll x 8"

'

75.

Ives Klein.

<Vo. 6,

"* r A.

Studies for Luminous Fountains. 1958-59. Ink and


pencil, 14j x 13*"

VJ

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> ^

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80. Lucebert. .4 Strange Hare. 1961.

Crayon and gouache, 25+ x 20".

'

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IrWmVrtwWVWWW*

.mmnmrnmnm,

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83. Heinz

Mack. Black Drawing. 1965. Crayon, 60 x 56i"

Piero Manzoni. Untitled No. 2231. 1959. Ink, 26 x 19".

'!

/
MM

\
94.

Henri Michaux. ifead

ore

Blue Ground. 1947. Watercolor and ink, 18* x 12i"

\V

Vr

i)

H<4**K4bin.*J^(-it

105.

Eduardo

/*/,/.

Paolozzi. Hermaphroditic Idol. 1963. Ink, 12| x 9i"

tj

117. Bernard Requichot. Untitled, 1961. Ink, 27'\ x 29|"

>

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^

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291*
124. K. R, H. Sonderborg. Untitled. 1965. Ink, 42f x

139.

Gunther Uecker. White Rain. 1965. Stamped paper, 251x191"

-^^

ft

> <|

39

^O^S
141. Wols. Untitled, n.d. Watercolor and ink. 6i x 4i".

THE SOLOMON

R.

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

STAFF

Thomas M. Messer

Director

Curator

Lawrence Alloway

Associate Curator

Louise Averill Svendsen

Research Fellows

Diane Waldman and Rose Carol Washton

Librarian

Mary Joan Hall

Public Affairs

Everett Ellin

Membership

Carol Tormey

Registrar

Alice Hildreth

Goldman

and Saul Fuerstein

Conservation

Orrin Riley

Photography

Robert E. Mates

Custodian

Jean Xceron

Business Administrator

Administrative Assistant
Office

Manager

Glenn H. Easton,

Jr.

Viola H. Gleason

Agnes R. Connolly

M. Funghini

Purchasing Agent

Elizabeth

Sales Supervisor

Judith E. Stern

Building Superintendant

Peter G. Loggin

Head Guard

Fred

C.

Mahnken

PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS
All

photographs but the following were made by Robert E. Mates and Paul Katz, The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Bacci Attilio, Milan; 47, 88

Robert David, Paris; 117


Dela Eniere, Paris; 34
Jacqueline Hyde, Paris; 94
Galerie Stadler, Paris; 121, 132

Studio Wolleh, Diisseldorf; 139

Exhibition 66/1

February-March, 1966

3,000 copies of this catalogue

designed by Herbert Matter

have been printed by Joh. Enschede en Zonen, Haarlem, Holland


in

January 1966

for the Trustees of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation


on the occasion of the exhibition

"European Drawings"

THE SOLOMON

It.

GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM

1071 FIFTH AVENUE,

NEW YORK

10028