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CATHERINE A.

RUSIANA
Sirawai Proper, Sirawai Zamboanga Del Norte,
Philippines, 7000
Cellphone: (+63) 09269334565

OBJECTIVE:
To develop more skills and competence through on the job training in your
prestigious institution.

PERSONAL DATA:
Full name: Catherine A. Rusiana
Date of birth: July 12, 1989
Place of birth: Tuyom carcar, Cebu City
Age: 20 Sex: female
Civil status: single
Citizenship: Filipino
Height: 5’5”
Weight: 57kgs.
Religion: Roman Catholic
Language: bisaya, tagalong, chavacano, english

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:
Elementary: Sirawai Central School – (2001 - 2002)
Secondary: Sirawai National High School – (2005-2006)
College: Universidad de Zamboanga - (2008 - present)
Course: Tourism Hotel and Restaurant Management
SKILLS:
Housekeeping, Cooking, f&b

REFERENCE:
1) Mr. Hataie O. Adjok
(ITE director/dean)

2) Ms. Rhodora Puaso


(THRM coordinator/teacher)

3) Mr. Ronnie Meñosa


(THRM teacher)

This is to certify that all information’s are true and correct.

CATHERINE A. RUSIANA
Signature over printed name
JADE L. BIRAO
A&W Putik Subdivision
Zamboanga City, Philippines, 7000
Cellphone: (+63) 09161747703

OBJECTIVE:
To develop more skills and competence through on the job training in your
prestigious institution.

PERSONAL DATA:
Full name: Jade L. Birao
Date of birth: September 26, 1986
Place of birth: Buenavista, Z.C.
Age: 23 Sex: male
Civil status: single
Citizenship: Filipino
Height: 5’3”
Weight: 55kgs.
Religion: Roman Catholic
Language spoken: tagalog, Ilonggo, English, Bisaya

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:
Elementary: Curuan Central School – (2008 - 2009)
Secondary: Curuan National High School – West (2002-2003)
College: Universidad de Zamboanga - (2008 - present)
Course: Tourism Hotel and Restaurant Management
SKILLS:
Housekeeping, Cooking, F&B

REFERENCE:
2) Mr. Hataie O. Adjok
(ITE director/dean)

2) Ms. Rhodora Puaso


(THRM coordinator/teacher)

3) Mr. Ronnie Meñosa


(THRM teacher)

This is to certify that all information’s are true and correct.

JADE L. BIRAO
Signature over printed name
FHOEVEE JANE C. LIM
Lower Calarian, Zamboanga City,
Philippines, 7000
Cellphone: (+63) 09161415324

OBJECTIVES:
To develop more skills and competence through on the job training in your
prestigious institution.

PERSONAL DATA:
Full name: Fhoevee Jane C. Lim
Date of birth: July 17, 1991
Place of birth: Lower Calarian, Z.C.
Age: 18 Sex: female
Civil status: single
Citizenship: Filipino
Height: 5’4”
Weight: 56kgs.
Religion: Roman Catholic
Language: tagalong, bisaya, English

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:
Elementary: Southcom Elementary School – (2002 - 2003)
Secondary: Zamboanga National High School –West (2006-2007)
College: Universidad de Zamboanga - (2008 - present)
Course: Tourism Hotel and Restaurant Management
SKILLS:
Housekeeping, Cooking, f&b, computer skills

REFERENCE:
3) Mr. Hataie O. Adjok
(ITE director/dean)

2) Ms. Rhodora Puaso


(THRM coordinator/teacher)

3) Mr. Ronnie Meñosa


(THRM teacher)

This is to certify that all information’s are true and correct.

FHOEVEE JANE C. LIM


Signature over printed name
SHEENA M. CASCARA
Poblacion, Mabuhay
Zamboanga Sibugay Province,
Philippines, 7000
Cellphone: (+63) 09263946151

OBJECTIVES:
To develop more skills and competence through on the job training in your
prestigious institution.

PERSONAL DATA:
Full name: Sheena Cascara
Date of birth: March 03, 1990
Place of birth: Poblacion Mabuhay, Zambo.Sibugay Provice
Age: 19 Sex: female
Civil status: single
Citizenship: Filipino
Height: 5’4”
Weight: 46kgs.
Religion: Roman Catholic
Language spoken: tagalog, English, Bisaya

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:
Elementary: Mabuhay Central School – (2002 - 2003)
Secondary: Mabuhay National High School – West (2006-2007)
College: Universidad de Zamboanga - (2008 - present)
Course: Tourism Hotel and Restaurant Management
SKILLS:
Housekeeping, cooking, f & b
REFERENCE:
4) Mr. Hataie O. Adjok
(ITE director/dean)

2) Ms. Rhodora Puaso


(THRM coordinator/teacher)

3) Mr. Ronnie Meñosa


(THRM teacher)

This is to certify that all information’s are true and correct.

SHEENA M. CASCARA
Signature over printed name
RIZZA FRANCISCO
Ayala Zone 8 Calle Pilar
Zamboanga City, Philippines 7000
Cellphone: (+63) 09169937362

OBJECTIVES:
To develop more skills and competence through on the job training in your
prestigious institution.

PERSONAL DATA:
Full name: Rizza Francisco
Date of birth: December 11, 1987
Place of birth: Ayala, Zamboanga City
Age: 22 Sex: female
Civil status: single
Citizenship: Filipino
Height: 5’3”
Weight: 50kgs.
Religion: Roman Catholic
Language: tagalong, bisaya, English, chavacano

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:
Elementary: Ayala National High School – (2000 - 2001)
Secondary: Ayala National High School – West (2005-2006)
College: Universidad de Zamboanga - (2008 - present)
Course: Tourism Hotel and Restaurant Management
SKILLS:
Making poem, story and other article which includes and publication and cooking.

REFERENCE:
5) Mr. Hataie O. Adjok
(ITE director/dean)

2) Ms. Rhodora Puaso


(THRM coordinator/teacher)

3) Mr. Ronnie Meñosa


(THRM teacher)

This is to certify that all information’s are true and correct.

RIZZA FRANCISCO
Signature over printed name
Automobile
An automobile, motor car or car is a wheeled motor vehicle used for transporting
passengers, which also carries its own engine or motor. Most definitions of the term
specify that automobiles are designed to run primarily on roads, to have seating for
one to eight people, to typically have four wheels, and to be constructed principally
for the transport of people rather than goods.[1] However, the term automobile is
far from precise, because there are many types of vehicles that do similar tasks.

As of 2002, there were 590 million passenger cars worldwide (roughly one car per
eleven people).[2] Around the world, there were about 806 million cars and light
trucks on the road in 2007; they burn over 260 billion gallons of gasoline and diesel
fuel yearly. The numbers are increasing rapidly, especially in China and India.[

Fuel and propulsion technologies


Most automobiles in use today are propelled by gasoline (also known as petrol) or
diesel internal combustion engines, which are known to cause air pollution and are
also blamed for contributing to climate change and global warming.[14] Increasing
costs of oil-based fuels, tightening environmental laws and restrictions on
greenhouse gas emissions are propelling work on alternative power systems for
automobiles. Efforts to improve or replace existing technologies include the
development of hybrid vehicles, and electric and hydrogen vehicles which do not
release pollution into the air.
Diesel
Diesel-engined cars have long been popular in Europe with the first models being
introduced as early as 1922 [15] by Peugeot and the first production car, Mercedes-
Benz 260 D in 1936 by Mercedes-Benz. The main benefit of diesel engines is a 50%
fuel burn efficiency compared with 27%[16] in the best gasoline engines. A down-
side of the Diesel engine is that better filters are required to reduce the presence in
the exhaust gases of fine soot particulates called diesel particulate matter.
Manufacturers are now starting to fit[when?] diesel particulate filters to remove the
soot. Many diesel-powered cars can run with little or no modifications on 100%
biodiesel and combinations of other organic oils.
Gasoline
Petrol engine
Gasoline engines have the advantage over diesel in being lighter and able to work at
higher rotational speeds and they are the usual choice for fitting in high-
performance sports cars. Continuous development of gasoline engines for over a
hundred years has produced improvements in efficiency and reduced pollution. The
carburetor was used on nearly all road car engines until the 1980s but it was long
realised better control of the fuel/air mixture could be achieved with fuel injection.
Indirect fuel injection was first used in aircraft engines from 1909, in racing car
engines from the 1930s, and road cars from the late 1950s.[16] Gasoline Direct
Injection (GDI) is now starting to appear in production vehicles such as the 2007
(Mark II) BMW Mini. Exhaust gases are also cleaned up by fitting a catalytic
converter into the exhaust system.
Biofuels
Ethanol, other alcohol fuels (biobutanol) and biogasoline have widespread use an
automotive fuel. Most alcohols have less energy per liter than gasoline and are
usually blended with gasoline. Alcohols are used for a variety of reasons - to
increase octane, to improve emissions, and as an alternative to petroleum based fuel,
since they can be made from agricultural crops. Brazil's ethanol program provides
about 20% of the nation's automotive fuel needs, as a result of the mandatory use of
E25 blend of gasoline throughout the country, 3 million cars that operate on pure
ethanol, and 6 million dual or flexible-fuel vehicles sold since 2003.[17] that run on
any mix of ethanol and gasoline. The commercial success of "flex" vehicles, as they
are popularly known, have allowed sugarcane based ethanol fuel to achieve a 50%
market share of the gasoline market by April 2008.[18][19][20]
Electric
The first electric cars were built around 1832, well before internal combustion
powered cars appeared.[21] For a period of time electrics were considered superior
due to the silent nature of electric motors compared to the very loud noise of the
gasoline engine. This advantage was removed with Hiram Percy Maxim's invention
of the muffler in 1897. Thereafter internal combustion powered cars had two
critical advantages: 1) long range and 2) high specific energy (far lower weight of
petrol fuel versus weight of batteries). The building of battery electric vehicles that
could rival internal combustion models had to wait for the introduction of modern
semiconductor controls and improved batteries. Because they can deliver a high
torque at low revolutions electric cars do not require such a complex drive train and
transmission as internal combustion powered cars. Some post-2000 electric car
designs such as the Venturi Fétish are able to accelerate from 0-60 mph (96 km/h) in
4.0 seconds with a top speed around 130 mph (210 km/h). Others have a range of
250 miles (400 km) on the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)
highway cycle requiring 3-1/2 hours to completely charge.[22] Equivalent fuel
efficiency to internal combustion is not well defined but some press reports give it at
around 135 miles per US gallon (1.74 L/100 km; 162 mpg-imp).
Steam
Steam power, usually using an oil- or gas-heated boiler, was also in use until the
1930s but had the major disadvantage of being unable to power the car until boiler
pressure was available (although the newer models could achieve this in well under
a minute). It has the advantage of being able to produce very low emissions as the
combustion process can be carefully controlled. Its disadvantages include poor heat
efficiency and extensive requirements for electric auxiliaries.[23].
Air
A compressed air car is an alternative fuel car that uses a motor powered by
compressed air. The car can be powered solely by air, or by air combined (as in a
hybrid electric vehicle) with gasoline/diesel/ethanol or electric plant and
regenerative braking. Instead of mixing fuel with air and burning it to drive pistons
with hot expanding gases; compressed air cars use the expansion of compressed air
to drive their pistons. Several prototypes are available already and scheduled for
worldwide sale by the end of 2008, though this has not happened as of January 2009.
Data transmission
Automobiles use CAM, MOSH (optic fiber), multiplexing, bluetooth and WiFi
between others.
Effects of the automobile on societies
Similarly the costs to society of encompassing automobile use, which may include
those of: maintaining roads, land use, pollution, public health, health care, and of
disposing of the vehicle at the end of its life, can be balanced against the value of the
benefits to society that automobile use generates. The societal benefits may include:
economy benefits, such as job and wealth creation, of automobile production and
maintenance, transportation provision, society wellbeing derived from leisure and
travel opportunities, and revenue generation from the tax opportunities. The ability
for humans to move flexibly from place to place has far reaching implications for
the nature of societies.[31]
Environmental impact The examples and perspective in this section may not
represent a worldwide view of the subject. Please improve this article and discuss
the issue on the talk page.
Global warming
Transportation is a major contributor to air pollution in most industrialised
nations. According to the American Surface Transportation Policy Project nearly
half of all Americans are breathing unhealthy air. Their study showed air quality in
dozens of metropolitan areas has got worse over the last decade.[32] In the United
States the average passenger car emits 11,450 lbs (5 tonnes) of carbon dioxide, along
with smaller amounts of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and nitrogen.[33]
Animals and plants are often negatively impacted by automobiles via habitat
destruction and pollution. Over the lifetime of the average automobile the "loss of
habitat potential" may be over 50,000 square meters (538,195 square feet) based on
Primary production correlations.[34]
Fuel taxes may act as an incentive for the production of more efficient, hence
less polluting, car designs (e.g. hybrid vehicles) and the development of alternative
fuels. High fuel taxes may provide a strong incentive for consumers to purchase
lighter, smaller, more fuel-efficient cars, or to not drive. On average, today's
automobiles are about 75 percent recyclable, and using recycled steel helps reduce
energy use and pollution.[35] In the United States Congress, federally mandated fuel
efficiency standards have been debated regularly, passenger car standards have not
risen above the 27.5 miles per US gallon (8.55 L/100 km; 33.0 mpg-imp) standard set
in 1985. Light truck standards have changed more frequently, and were set at 22.2
miles per US gallon (10.6 L/100 km; 26.7 mpg-imp) in 2007.[36] Alternative fuel
vehicles are another option that is less polluting than conventional petroleum
powered vehicles.
Images
CAR
A small vehicle moved on wheels; usually, one having but two wheels and drawn by
one horse; a cart. A vehicle adapted to the rails of a railroad. A chariot of war or of
triumph; a vehicle of splendor, dignity, or solemnity. The cage of a lift or elevator.
The basket, box, or cage suspended from a balloon to contain passengers, ballast,
etc. A floating perforated box for living fish. a conveyance for passengers or freight
on a cable railway; "they took a cable car to the top of the mountain" wheeled
motor vehicle; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car
to get to work" a wheeled vehicle adapted to the rails of railroad; "three cars had
jumped the rails" where passengers ride up and down; "the car was on the top
floor" car suspended from an airship and carrying personnel and cargo and power
plant.

HSV GTS with Magnetic Ride Control suspension (MRC)


“An outstanding innovation, which dramatically improves ride, handling and
safety”
HSV’s GTS accelerates from O-100km/h in less than five seconds. For that reason
alone, it belongs to an elite club.

Turbocharger
A Turbocharger is a small compressor driven by the engine’s exhaust gases which
increases power. Unlike a supercharger which is driven by a belt off the engine to
increase power. A Turbocharger is used to increase the power output of a car by
increasing the mass of oxygen entering the engine – essentially by cramming [...]

MacPherson struts
A modern front suspension system which supports the car’s weight and acts as
shock absorbers. The main alternative is a double wishbone arrangement.
McPherson Struts consists of a small subframe (or a substantial link stabilized by a
secondary link) which allows a mounting point for the axle of the wheel. Generally
the McPherson Strut [...]

Limited slip differential (LSD)


LSD is a mechanical version of traction control, limiting wheel spin on an axle in
two and four-wheel drives. We can notice the main advantage of a LSD when it is
compared to a typical standard differential. Imagine a scenario whereby in the case
of the standard differential one wheel has no [...]

Low profile tyres


Low profile tyres have excellent grip on dry roads but are stiffer than ordinary tyres
and therefore provide a firmer ride. These tyres have a greater width ratio to cope
with the demands of higher performance vehicles. “Profile” refers to the height of
the sidewall compared with the width of the tread, expressed [...]
Foglamp Foglights
An auxiliary headlamp mounted low on the front of a car (often on the bumper) for
use in fog. Casts a broad, flat beam on the left-hand kerb. Sometimes the fog lamps
can in different colours. For example the old Nissan Silva (S13) used a yellow beam.
Alternative coloured fog lamps can be [...]

Disc brakes
Disc brakes – unlike drum brakes,use a calliper that grips the disc rotor to the wheel
to gain friction. They tend to create more heat than drum brakes, but is designed to
continue operating effectively in these conditions – and they are also exposed to
outside air which helps with cooling. Within the [...]

Car Bash Plate


The protector plate fitted underneath vital components like your car’s engine,
transmission and fuel tank. The Bash plate is generally made from thick steel. The
Idea of the bash plate is to take the hard knocks that you might hit on the road.

Anti-lock braking System (ABS)


Anti-lock braking system prevents your car’s brakes from “locking up” and
skidding. When the brake pedal is hit with force, short sharp pulsations are felt as
the car’s computer system applies and release braking effort. A typical ABS is
composed of a central electronic unit (CEU), four speed sensors covering all wheels.

Windshield
Modern windshields are generally made of laminated safety glass, which consists of
two curved sheets of glass with a plastic layer laminated between them for safety,
and are glued into the window frame. Earlier windshields were made of toughened
glass and were fitted in the frame using a rubber or neoprene seal.
Windshields protect the vehicle’s.

Valves
A valve is a device that regulates the flow of fluids (either gases, fluidised solids,
slurries or liquids) by opening, closing, or partially obstructing various
passageways. The valves in your car open and close the valve ports. If the ports were
always open, the fuel exploded in the combustion chamber would leave through the
ports. [...]

Images
Airplane
A heavier-than-air vehicle designed to use the pressures created by its motion
through the air to lift and transport useful loads. To achieve practical, controllable
flight, an airplane must consist of a source of thrust for propulsion, a geometric
arrangement to produce lift, and a control system capable of maneuvering the
vehicle within prescribed limits. Further, to be satisfactory, the vehicle should
display stable characteristics, so that if it is disturbed from an equilibrium
condition, forces and moments are created which return it to its original condition
without necessitating corrective action on the part of the pilot. Efficient design will
minimize the aerodynamic drag, thereby reducing the propulsive thrust required
for a given flight condition, and will maximize the lifting capability per pound of
airframe and engine weight, thereby increasing the useful, or transportable, load.

There are three main flying instruments on a plane, including:

1. The Air Speed Indicator – this tells the pilot how fast the aircraft is going. It’s
kind of like a speedometer on a car except in knots instead of miles per hour or
kilometers per hour.

2. The Horizontal Situation Indicator - this picks up navigation beams from its
destination and indicates the distance and time it will take to reach the destination.

3. The Attitude Detector – this tells the pilot the difference between how straight
the wings are compared to the horizon, so the pilot can match them up.
Airplanes have many purposes. They’re not just for taking passengers to their
destination; they are also used for other reasons such as delivering mail or fighting
wars. Did you know that some people use planes for doing tricks such as loop the
loops or plunging down at a vertical drop and swooping up right before they hit the
ground? These people perform their tricks at shows and ride special planes called
Acrobats. Other planes are used for fighting wars and battles, like Jump Jets. Jump
Jets are planes that need very little runway and can land vertically. Another kind of
army jet is an Interceptor. An Interceptor is a plane that finds enemy aircraft and
stops them from bombing targets.

There are many different kinds of planes and some of them are really odd like the
glider. The glider is a plane that has no motors. Instead, it is towed by another
plane, then when let go, it relies on currents of warm air (thermals). Another weird
kind of airplane is a commuter airliner. Commuter airliners are smaller than
regular passenger planes and travel shorter distances. Commuter airliners typically
have engines with six propellers that push the plane forward. This is why they’re
called pusher engines. Commuter airliners also have radar in their nose cones, so
they can detect weather that’s miles away from them. There are also planes that
land on water instead of land. These planes are called seaplanes. Instead of wheels,
they have floats so they can float on the

There are many different kinds of planes and some of them are really odd like the
glider. The glider is a plane that has no motors. Instead, it is towed by another
plane, then when let go, it relies on currents of warm air (thermals). Another weird
kind of airplane is a commuter airliner. Commuter airliners are smaller than
regular passenger planes and travel shorter distances. Commuter airliners typically
have engines with six propellers that push the plane forward. This is why they’re
called pusher engines. Commuter airliners also have radar in their nose cones, so
they can detect weather that’s miles away from them. There are also planes that
land on water instead of land. These planes are called seaplanes. Instead of wheels,
they have floats so they can float on the water.
Helicopter
A helicopter is an aircraft that is lifted and propelled by one or more horizontal
rotors, each rotor consisting of two or more rotor blades. Helicopters are classified
as rotorcraft or rotary-wing aircraft to distinguish them from fixed-wing aircraft
because the helicopter achieves lift with the rotor blades which rotate around a
mast. The word 'helicopter' is adapted from the French hélicoptère, coined by
Gustave de Ponton d'Amecourt in 1861, which originates from the Greek
helix/helik- (ἕλικ-) = 'spiral' or 'turning' and pteron (πτερόν) = 'wing'.[1][2]

The primary advantage of a helicopter is from the rotor which provides lift without
the aircraft needing to move forward, allowing the helicopter to take off and land
vertically without a runway. For this reason, helicopters are often used in congested
or isolated areas where fixed-wing aircraft cannot take off or land. The lift from the
rotor also allows the helicopter to hover in one area more efficiently than other
forms of vertical takeoff and landing aircraft, allowing it to accomplish tasks that
fixed-wing aircraft cannot perform.

Although helicopters were developed and built during the first half-century of
flight, some even reaching limited production, it was not until 1942 that a helicopter
designed by Igor Sikorsky reached full-scale production,[3] with 131 aircraft built.
[4] Even though most previous designs used more than one main rotor, it was the
single main rotor with antitorque tail rotor configuration of this design that would
come to be recognized worldwide as the helicopter.
History
The earliest references for vertical flight have come from China. Since 400 BC,[5]
Chinese children have played with bamboo flying toys[6][7] and a book written in
4th-century China, referred to as Pao Phu Tau (also Pao Phu Tzu or Bao Pu Zi, 抱
朴 子 ), is reported to describe some of the ideas inherent to rotary wing aircraft:[8]“
Someone asked the master about the principles of mounting to dangerous
heights and traveling into the vast inane. The Master said, "Some have made flying
cars with wood from the inner part of the jujube tree, using ox-leather [straps]
fastened to returning blades so as to set the machine in motion."[9] ”
It was not until the early 1480s, when Leonardo da Vinci created a design for a
machine that could be described as an "aerial screw", that any recorded
advancement was made towards vertical flight. His notes suggested that he built
small flying models, but there were no indications for any provision to stop the rotor
from making the whole craft rotate.[10][11] As scientific knowledge increased and
became more accepted, men continued to pursue the idea of vertical flight. Many of
these later models and machines would more closely resemble the ancient bamboo
flying top with spinning wings, rather than Da Vinci's screw.
In July 1754, Mikhail Lomonosov demonstrated a small coaxial rotor to the Russian
Academy of Sciences. It was powered by a spring and suggested as a method to lift
meteorological instruments. In 1783, Christian de Launoy, and his mechanic,
Bienvenu, made a model with a pair of counter-rotating rotors, using turkey's flight
feathers as rotor blades, and in 1784, demonstrated it to the French Academy of
Sciences.
Sir George Cayley, influenced by a childhood fascination with the Chinese flying
top, grew up to develop a model of feathers, similar to Launoy and Bienvenu, but
powered by rubber bands. By the end of the century, he had progressed to using
sheets of tin for rotor blades and springs for power. His writings on his experiments
and models would become influential on future aviation pioneers.[10] Alphonse
Pénaud would later develop coaxial rotor model helicopter toys in 1870, also
powered by rubber bands. One of these toys, given as a gift by their father, would
inspire the Wright brothers to pursue the dream of flight.[12]

In 1861, the word "helicopter" was coined by Gustave de Ponton d'Amécourt, a


French inventor who demonstrated a small, steam-powered model. While celebrated
as an innovative use of a new metal, aluminum, the model never lifted off the
ground. D'Amecourt's linguistic contribution would survive to eventually describe
the vertical flight he had envisioned. Steam power was popular with other inventors
as well. Enrico Forlanini's unmanned helicopter was also powered by a steam
engine. It was the first of its type that rose to a height of 13 meters (43 ft), where it
remained for some 20 seconds after a vertical take-off from a park in Milan, in
1877. Emmanuel Dieuaide's steam-powered design featured counter-rotating rotors
powered through a hose from a boiler on the ground. Dandrieux's design had
counter-rotating rotors and a 7.7-pound (3.5-kilogram) steam engine. It rose more
than 40 feet (12 m) and flew for 20 seconds circa 1878.[10]

Uses
Due to the operating characteristics of the helicopter—its ability to takeoff and land
vertically, and to hover for extended periods of time, as well as the aircraft's
handling properties under low airspeed conditions—it has been chosen to conduct
tasks that were previously not possible with other aircraft, or were time- or work-
intensive to accomplish on the ground. Today, helicopter uses include
transportation, construction, firefighting, search and rescue, and military uses.

transportation firefighting Military uses

Fire fighters Search and rescue


Biography of Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei was born in Pisa, Italy on February 15, 1564. He was the oldest of
seven children. His father was a musician and wool trader, who wanted his son to
study medicine as there was more money in medicine. At age eleven, Galileo was
sent off to study in a Jesuit monastery.
Galileo Galilei - Rerouted from Religon to Science
After four years, Galileo had announced to his father that he wanted to be a monk.
This was not exactly what father had in mind, so Galileo was hastily withdrawn
from the monastery. In 1581, at the age of 17, he entered the University of Pisa to
study medicine, as his father wished.
Galileo Galilei - Law of the Pendulum
At age twenty, Galileo noticed a lamp swinging overhead while he was in a
cathedral. Curious to find out how long it took the lamp to swing back and forth, he
used his pulse to time large and small swings. Galileo discovered something that no
one else had ever realized: the period of each swing was exactly the same. The law of
the pendulum, which would eventually be used to regulate clocks, made Galileo
Galilei instantly famous.
Except for mathematics, Galileo Galilei was bored with university. Galileo's family
was informed that their son was in danger of flunking out. A compromise was
worked out, where Galileo would be tutored full-time in mathematics by the
mathematician of the Tuscan court. Galileo's father was hardly overjoyed about this
turn of events, since a mathematician's earning power was roughly around that of a
musician, but it seemed that this might yet allow Galileo to successfully complete his
college education. However, Galileo soon left the University of Pisa without a
degree.
Galileo Galilei - Mathematics
To earn a living, Galileo Galilei started tutoring students in mathematics. He did
some experimenting with floating objects, developing a balance that could tell him
that a piece of, say, gold was 19.3 times heavier than the same volume of water. He
also started campaigning for his life's ambition: a position on the mathematics
faculty at a major university. Although Galileo was clearly brilliant, he had
offended many people in the field, who would choose other candidates for vacancies.
Galileo Galilei - Dante's Inferno
Ironically, it was a lecture on literature that would turn Galileo's fortunes. The
Academy of Florence had been arguing over a 100-year-old controversy: What were
the location, shape, and dimensions of Dante's Inferno? Galileo Galilei wanted to
seriously answer the question from the point of view of a scientist.
Extrapolating from Dante's line that "[the giant Nimrod's] face was about as
long/And just as wide as St. Peter's cone in Rome," Galileo deduced that Lucifer
himself was 2,000 armlengths long. The audience was impressed, and within the
year, Galileo had received a three-year appointment to the University of Pisa, the
same university that never granted him a degree!

The Leaning Tower of Pisa


At the time that Galileo arrived at the University, some debate had started up on
one of Aristotle's "laws" of nature, that heavier objects fell faster than lighter
objects. Aristotle's word had been accepted as gospel truth, and there had been few
attempts to actually test Aristotle's conclusions by actually conducting an
experiment!
According to legend, Galileo decided to try. He needed to be able to drop the objects
from a great height. The perfect building was right at hand--the Tower of Pisa, 54
meters tall. Galileo climbed up to the top of the building carrying a variety of balls
of varying size and weight, and dumped them off of the top. They all landed at the
base of the building at the same time (legend says that the demonstration was
witnessed by a huge crowd of students and professors). Aristotle was wrong.

However, Galileo Galilei continued to behave rudely to his colleagues, not a good
move for a junior member of the faculty. "Men are like wine flasks," he once said to
a group of students. "...look at....bottles with the handsome labels. When you taste
them, they are full of air or perfume or rouge. These are bottles fit only to pee
into!"Not surprisingly, the University of Pisa chose not to renew Galileo's contract.

Necessity is the Mother of Invention


Galileo Galilei moved on to the University of Padua. By 1593, he was desperate in
need of additional cash. His father had died, so Galileo was the head of his family,
and personally responsible for his family. Debts were pressing down on him, most
notably, the dowry for one of his sisters, which was paid in installments over
decades (a dowry could be thousands of crowns, and Galileo's annual salary was 180
crowns). Debtor's prison was a real threat if Galileo returned to Florence.
What Galileo needed was to come up with some sort of device that could make him
a tidy profit. A rudimentary thermometer (which, for the first time, allowed
temperature variations to be measured) and an ingenious device to raise water from
aquifers found no market. He found greater success in 1596 with a military compass
that could be used to accurately aim cannonballs. A modified civilian version that
could be used for land surveying came out in 1597, and ended up earning a fair
amount of money for Galileo. It helped his profit margin that 1) the instruments
were sold for three times the cost of manufacture, 2) he also offered classes on how
to use the instrument, and 3) the actual toolmaker was paid dirt-poor wages.

A good thing. Galileo needed the money to support his siblings, his mistress (a 21
year old with a reputation as a woman of easy habits), and his three children (two
daughters and a boy). By 1602, Galileo's name was famous enough to help bring in
students to the University, where Galileo was busily experimenting with magnets.
Here Tonight– Laughing on a I’m the one who
Hale You Belong park bench, makes you laugh
So long to you my With Me – thinking to myself when you know
love Taylor Swift Hey, isn’t this you’re ’bout to cry
Don’t be afraid to *You’re on the easy? And I know your
run away phone with your And you’ve got a favorite songs and
I know you’ll be girlfriend, she’s smile that could you tell me ’bout
okay upset light up this whole your dreams
Just take your She’s going off town Think I know
time to find about something *I haven’t seen it where you belong,
that you said in a while since think I know it’s
But I need you ‘Cause she doesn’t she brought you with me
here tonight get your humor down *Can’t you see
I need you here like I do You say you’re that I’m the one
inside *I’m in the room, fine, I know you who understands
I need you here it’s a typical better than that you?
tonight Tuesday night Hey, what ya Been here all
I really, really I’m listening to the doing with a girl along, so why
need you here kind of music she like that? can’t you see?
tonight doesn’t like *She wears high You belong with
And she’ll never heels, I wear me
Made up my mind know your story sneakers *Standing by and
on this like I do She’s Cheer waiting at your
Too late for me to *But she wears Captain and I’m back door
hold you back short skirts, I on the bleachers All this time, how
Maybe too short wear T-shirts Dreaming about could you not
or dumb She’s Cheer the day when you know?
To cry for you but Captain and I’m wake up and find Baby, you belong
I will anyway on the bleachers That what you’re with me, you
Dreaming about looking for has belong with me
It’s all my fault the day when you been here the You belong with
To feel this way wake up and find whole time me
for you that day That what you’re *If you could see Have you ever
I know I am and I looking for has that I’m the one thought just
will been here the who understands maybe
Though it’s whole time you You belong with
wrong, so wrong *If you could see Been here all me?
that I’m the one along, so why You belong with
Cause I need you who understands can’t you see? me
here tonight you You belong with Closer You
I need you here Been here all me And I – Gino
inside along, so why *Standing by and Padilla
I need you here can’t you see? waiting at your *Hey, there’s a
tonight You, you belong back door look in your eyes
I really, really with me, you All this time how Must be love at
need you here belong with me could you not first sight
*I need you, I need *Walking the know? You were just part
you streets with you Baby, you belong of a dream
I need you here and your worn-out with me, you Nothing more so it
inside jeans belong with me seemed
I need you I need I can’t help *Oh, I remember *But my love
you thinking this is you driving to my couldn’t wait
I really, really how it ought to be house in the much longer
need you here middle of the night
Just can’t forget The twinkle in So much more so Just a little more
the picture of your your eye it seems time
smile In a little while I guess I found my We’ll be together
‘Coz everytime I Give it a time inspiration Every little smile
close my eyes Just a little more With just one That special smile
You come alive time smile, you take my The twinkle in
*The closer I get So we can get breath away your eye
to touching you closer So hold me close In a little while
The closer I get to You and I And say you’ll Give it a time
loving you *Then could I love stay with me now Just a little more
Give it a time you more time
Just a little more So much stronger *The closer I get So we can get
time than before to touching you closer
We’ll be together Why does it seem The closer I get to YouandI
Every little smile like a dream loving you
That special smile Give it a time
(girl I love, girl I And your heart Down to my last
One Time – love you) (and now I’ve got dime
Justin Bieber I’ma tell you one my) She makes me
Aye aye aye aye time happy
aye aye aye aye (girl I love, girl I Chorus: I know where I’ll
love you) One love be
Me plus you (I’ma And I’ma be your My one heart Right by your side
tell you one time) one guy My one life for cause
[x3] You’ll be my sure She is the one
number one girl Lemme tell you Chorus:
When I met you Always makin one time One love
girl my heart went time for you (girl I love, girl I My one heart
knock knock I’ma tell you one love you) My one life for
Now them time I’ma tell you one sure
butterflies in my (girl I love, girl I time Lemme tell you
stomach wont stop love you) (girl I love, girl I one time
stop I’ma tell you one love you) (girl I love, girl I
And even though time And I’ma be your love you)
its a struggle love (girl I love, girl I one guy I’ma tell you one
is all we got love you) You’ll be my time
Ao we gon’ keep number one girl (girl I love, girl I
keep climbin’ till You look so deep Always makin love you)
the mountain top You know that it time for you And I’ma be your
humbles me, I’ma tell you one one guy
Your world is my Your by my side time You’ll be my
world and troubles them (girl I love, girl I number one girl
And my fight is don’t trouble me love you) Always makin
your fight Many have called I’ma tell you one time for you
My breath is your but the chosen Is time I’ma tell you one
breath you (girl I love, girl I time
And your heart Whatever you love you) (girl I love, girl I
(and now I’ve got want shawty I’ll love you)
my) give it to you Shawty right there I’ma tell you one
Chorus: She’sgot time
One love Your world is my everything I need (girl I love, girl I
My one heart world and I’m gon’ tell love you)
My one life for And my fight is her one time (one
sure your fight time)Giveyou Me plus you (I’ma
Lemme tell you My breath is your everythingyou tell you one time)
one time breath need [x3]
JOSE MARIE COROS
Sampaloc Drive, Talon - talon
Zamboanga City, Philippines 7000
Cellphone: (+63) 0905457972

OBJECTIVES:
To develop more skills and competence through on the job training in your
prestigious institution.

PERSONAL DATA:
Full name: Jose Marie Coros
Date of birth: January 27, 1991
Place of birth: Talon-talon, Zamboanga City
Age: 18 Sex:male
Civil status: single
Citizenship: Filipino
Height: 5’4”
Weight: 45kgs.
Religion: Roman Catholic
Language: tagalong, bisaya, English, chavacano

EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND:
Elementary: Talon – talon Elementary School – (2002 - 2003)
Secondary: Zamboanga City High School MAIN- (2007-2008)
College: Universidad de Zamboanga - (2008 - present)
Course: Tourism Hotel and Restaurant Management
SKILLS:
Housekeeping, Cooking, F&B

REFERENCE:
6) Mr. Hataie O. Adjok
(ITE director/dean)

2) Ms. Rhodora Puaso


(THRM coordinator/teacher)

3) Mr. Ronnie Meñosa


(THRM teacher)

This is to certify that all information’s are true and correct.

JOSE MARIE COROS


Signature over printed name
Extended
output
# 3.1, 3.2
& 3.3
Submitted by:
Diane C. Lim
IV –

Submitted to:
Mr Antonio Alpechi
Science teacher