Sie sind auf Seite 1von 31

Lord Ashcroft International Business School

International Marketing
Department: Marketing, Strategy and Enterprise
Module Code: MOD001194

Level: 6

Academic Year: 2014/15


Semester/Trimester: One

Module Guide

Contents
International Marketing ................................................................................................ 1
1. Key Information ....................................................................................................... 2
2. Introduction to the Module ....................................................................................... 2
3. Intended Learning Outcomes .................................................................................. 2
3.1 Employability Skills Delivered in this Module ......................................................... 3
4. Outline Delivery ....................................................................................................... 4
4.1 Attendance Requirements ..................................................................................... 6
5. Assessment ............................................................................................................. 7
5.1 Submitting via TurnitinUK ................................................................................... 9
5.2 Submitting your work ........................................................................................... 11
5.3 Marking Rubric and Feedback ............................................................................. 11
5.4 Re-Assessment (re-sit) ........................................................................................ 12
6. How is My Work Marked? ...................................................................................... 12
7. Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards ........................................................ 14
7.1 Specific Assessment Criteria - Assessment 01 ................................................... 14
7.2 University Generic Assessment Criteria .............................................................. 18
8. Assessment Offences ............................................................................................ 20
9. Learning Resources .............................................................................................. 22
9.1. Library ................................................................................................................. 22
10. Module Evaluation ............................................................................................... 23
11. Report on Last Delivery of Module ...................................................................... 25
Appendix 1: Re-Assessment Information .................................................................. 27

Page 1

Module Guide

1. Key Information
Module:

International Marketing

Module Leader (ARU):

Module Tutors:

Dr Niall Caldwell
Campus / Building / Room: Cambridge/ LAB 322
Extension: 2491
Email: niall.caldwell@anglia.ac.uk

Ishani Weerasinghe (Online Delivery)


Gayan Jayasinghe (Online Delivery)

Every module has a Module Definition Form (MDF) which is the officially validated record of the module.
You can access the MDF for this module in four ways via:

the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)


the My.Anglia Module Catalogue at www.anglia.ac.uk/modulecatalogue
Anglia Ruskins module search engine facility at www.anglia.ac.uk/modules
the final section of this module guide

All modules delivered by Anglia Ruskin University at its main campuses in the UK and at Associate
Colleges throughout the UK and overseas are governed by the Academic Regulations. You can view
these at www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs. A printed extract of the Academic Regulations, known as the
Assessment Regulations, is available for every student from LS London office.
In the unlikely event of any discrepancy between the Academic Regulations and any other publication,
including this module guide, the Academic Regulations, as the definitive document, take precedence
over all other publications and will be applied in all cases.

2. Introduction to the Module


This module is designed to provide students with an understanding of marketing from an international
perspective. The increased access to new markets across the world means that both opportunities and
threats face marketers in the global context. Overcoming cultural issues remains a key challenge, along
with the ability to communicate effectively to perhaps a very different target audience. Given the huge
number of multi-national firms now operating in China e.g. Siemens, Ikea, McDonalds' and BP, many
employers now expect international marketers to have knowledge of more than one cultural group. The
lectures will therefore enable students to analyse marketing issues in an international context by
providing a range of theoretical frameworks and practical examples. The seminars will largely focus on
case examples, allowing students to apply relevant theories. One of the main focuses for the design of
this module has been the further development of relevant employability and professional skills. A new
assessment has been incorporated into this 2014/15 module guide (Presentation 30%).

3. Intended Learning Outcomes

Anglia Ruskin modules are taught on the basis of intended learning outcomes and that, on successful
completion of the module, students will be expected to be able to demonstrate they have met those
outcomes.

Page 2

Module Guide

No.

Type

Knowledge and
understanding

On successful completion of this module the student will be


expected to be able to:
Demonstrate a full understanding of the environmental
challenges facing international marketers

Knowledge and
understanding

Show how an international marketing mix can be applied


to real case examples

Intellectual,
practical, affective
and transferable
skills
Intellectual,
practical, affective
and transferable
skills

Distinguish between the range of market entry methods

Construct an international marketing plan

3.1 Employability Skills Delivered in this Module


It is important that we help you develop employability skills throughout your course which will assist you
in securing employment and supporting you in your future career. During your course you will acquire a
wide range of key skills. In this module, you will develop those identified below:

SKILL

Skills acquired in this


module

Communication (oral)
Communication (written)
Commercial Awareness
Cultural sensitivity
Customer focus
Data Handling
Decision making
Enterprising
Flexibility
Initiative
Interpersonal Skills
Leadership/Management of others
Networking
Organisational adaptability
Project Management
Problem Solving and analytical skills
Responsibility
Team working
Time Management
Other

X
X
X
X
X

Page 3

X
X

X
X
X
X

Module Guide

4. Outline Delivery

Wk
1

Lecture
International
Marketing An
Overview

Student activity
In order to fully benefit from
the lessons, students are
expected to read the
recommended Lecture notes,
Practical applications and
case studies, available on the
IMSS.

Reading references
Ghauri and Cateora (2010) Ch.1, 2
Cateora P.R., Graham J.L., and Salwan
P. 2011. International Marketing. 13th ed.
New Delhi: McGraw Hill. Chapter 1,2
Onkvisit S. and Shaw J.J., 1997.
International Marketing: Analysis and
Strategy. 3rd ed. New Delhi: PHI
Learning Private Limited. Chapter 1,2,3
Kotabe, M., Peloso, A., Noble, G.,
Macarthur, W., Neal, C., Riege, A., and
Helsen, k., 2005, International Marketing:
An Asia Pacific Focus. New Delhi: Wiley
India (P.) Ltd. Chapter -1

International
Marketing
Environment

In order to fully benefit from


the lessons, students are
expected to read the
recommended Lecture notes,
Practical applications and
case studies, available on the
IMSS.

Analysing
International
Marketing
Opportunities

In order to fully benefit from


the lessons, students are
expected to read the
recommended Lecture notes,
Practical applications and
case studies, available on the
IMSS.

International
Marketing Mix
Part I Product
and
Communications

In order to fully benefit from


the lessons, students are
expected to read the
recommended Lecture notes,
Practical applications and
case studies, available on the
Page 4

Ghauri and Cateora (2010) Ch.3, Ch.4,


Ch.5, and Ch.6.
Cateora P.R., Graham J.L., and Salwan
P. 2011. International Marketing. 13th ed.
New Delhi: McGraw Hill. Chapter
3,4,5,6,7
Onkvisit S. and Shaw J.J., 1997.
International Marketing: Analysis and
Strategy. 3rd ed. New Delhi: PHI
Learning Private Limited. Chapter 4,5,6
Kotabe, M., Peloso, A., Noble, G.,
Macarthur, W., Neal, C., Riege, A., and
Helsen, k., 2005, International Marketing:
An Asia Pacific Focus. New Delhi: Wiley
India (P.) Ltd. Chapter 3,4,5
Ghauri and Cateora (2010) Ch.7
Cateora P.R., Graham J.L., and Salwan
P. 2011. International Marketing. 13th ed.
New Delhi: McGraw Hill. Chapter 8,7
Onkvisit S. and Shaw J.J., 1997.
International Marketing: Analysis and
Strategy. 3rd ed. New Delhi: PHI
Learning Private Limited. Chapter 8,9
Kotabe, M., Peloso, A., Noble, G.,
Macarthur, W., Neal, C., Riege, A., and
Helsen, k., 2005, International Marketing:
An Asia Pacific Focus. New Delhi: Wiley
India (P.) Ltd. Chapter 6,7,8
Ghauri and Cateora (2010) Ch.12 &
Ch.15,
Ghauri and Cateora (2010) Ch.19 &
Ch.20,
Cateora P.R., Graham J.L., and Salwan
P. 2011. International Marketing. 13th ed.

Module Guide

IMSS.

International
Marketing Mix
II - Marketing
Channels and
Pricing

In order to fully benefit from


the lessons, students are
expected to read the
recommended Lecture notes,
Practical applications and
case studies, available on the
IMSS.

Global
Marketing
Strategy

In order to fully benefit from


the lessons, students are
expected to read the
recommended Lecture notes,
Practical applications and
case studies, available on the
IMSS.

Page 5

New Delhi: McGraw Hill. Chapter


12,13,16
Onkvisit S. and Shaw J.J., 1997.
International Marketing: Analysis and
Strategy. 3rd ed. New Delhi: PHI
Learning Private Limited. Chapter
10,11,14,15
Kotabe, M., Peloso, A., Noble, G.,
Macarthur, W., Neal, C., Riege, A., and
Helsen, k., 2005, International Marketing:
An Asia Pacific Focus. New Delhi: Wiley
India (P.) Ltd. Chapter 9.10,11
Ghauri and Cateora (2010) Ch.13 &
Ch.17,
Cateora P.R., Graham J.L., and Salwan
P. 2011. International Marketing. 13th ed.
New Delhi: McGraw Hill. Chapter
14,15,18
Onkvisit S. and Shaw J.J., 1997.
International Marketing: Analysis and
Strategy. 3rd ed. New Delhi: PHI
Learning Private Limited. Chapter
12,13,15
Kotabe, M., Peloso, A., Noble, G.,
Macarthur, W., Neal, C., Riege, A., and
Helsen, k., 2005, International Marketing:
An Asia Pacific Focus. New Delhi: Wiley
India (P.) Ltd. Chapter 12,13,14
Ghauri and Cateora (2010) Ch.8 & Ch.9,
Ghauri and Cateora (2010) Ch.10, 11
Ghauri and Cateora (2010) Ch.14,
Cateora P.R., Graham J.L., and Salwan
P. 2011. International Marketing. 13th ed.
New Delhi: McGraw Hill. Chapter 19
Kotabe, M., Peloso, A., Noble, G.,
Macarthur, W., Neal, C., Riege, A., and
Helsen, k., 2005, International Marketing:
An Asia Pacific Focus. New Delhi: Wiley
India (P.) Ltd. Chapter 15, 16

Module Guide

4.1 Attendance Requirements


Attending all your webinars/online activities is very important and one of the best ways to help you succeed
in this module. Research has found a clear correlation between student attendance and overall
performance. In accordance with the Student Charter, you are expected to actively take part in the online
webinars and other online activities. For further details contact Joanna Shear at
arusupport@lseducationgroup.com
London School of Marketing will closely monitor the attendance of all students. Continued absence can
result in various consequences including the termination of your registration as you will be considered to
have withdrawn from your studies.
International students who are non-EEA nationals and in possession of entry clearance/leave to remain as
a student (student visa) are required to be in regular attendance at London School of Marketing. Failure to
do so is considered to be a breach of national immigration regulations. London School of Marketing, like
all British Universities, is statutorily obliged to inform the UK Border Agency of the Home Office of
significant unauthorised absences by any student visa holders.

Page 6

Module Guide

5. Assessment
The assessment for this module consists of two parts.
Part
1

Type of Assessment
Assessment 1 Individual
Presentation (Soft
copy submission with
full speaker notes on
each slide)

Learning
Outcome
1,2,4

% Weighting

Word Limit

Submission Method

30%

12 Slides Max

LSM Submission Website


http://www.lsmsubmissions.com

2.1

*Draft - Individual
Report - Assessment
2

1,2,3,4

N/A

2 page draft

IMSS > module assessment > current


assessment > draft submission

2.2

Assessment 2 Individual Report Final submission

1,2,3,4

70%

2,000 words

LSM Submission Website


http://www.lsmsubmissions.com

Submission
Dates
Please refer
to the
timetable on
the IMSS and
follow email
corresponden
ce for
deadlines and
any possible
revisions.

Key Contact
Person
Tutor

Tutor

Tutor

* Requirement of the Draft: The draft SHOULD NOT exceed 2 page limit and should consist of a skeleton of your report by covering both task one and two.
The purpose of this draft is to check whether your understanding of the requirements of the report is correct. Depending on your draft, a feedback will be
given on how to improve your answers against the marking criteria.

Page 7

Module Guide

Assignment 1: 30% Individual presentation on a brand chosen from the Interbrand Top 100 Brands. The
presentation will last 8 minutes maximum on the date stated above.
Choose a brand from the Interbrand Top 100
brands/2012/Best-Global-Brands-2012-Brand-View.aspx

list

http://www.interbrand.com/en/best-global-

Figure 1: The Building Blocks of a Brand


Kevin Keller (Strategic Brand Management) describes the stages of building a brand
Starting at the bottom level of the pyramid, shown how your chosen brand has achieved each of the
following steps:
1. Who are you? Brand Salience (Identity)
2. What are you? Brand Performance and Brand Imagery (Meaning)
3. What about you? Consumer reactions (Responses)
4. What about you and me? Consumer Brand Resonance (Relationships)
Your task is to explain your chosen brand using this model. You are allowed a maximum of 10 slides, and
a maximum of 8 minutes. Soft copy of your slides including detailed speaker notes to be submitted.
Answer the 4 questions from the viewpoint of your brand using the 6 building blocks in the pyramid
above.

Assignment 2: 70% Individual 2000 word report on the individual chosen brand to answer the questions
in Assignment 2 below. The brand chosen for assignment 2 must be different from the brand studied in
assignment 1.

STEP 1
Choose ONE brand from Interbrands Top 100 Global Brands 2012:
http://www.interbrand.com/en/best-global-brands/2012/Best-Global-Brands-2012-Brand-View.aspx
This must not be the same brand as you choose in Assignment 010

Page 8

Module Guide

You are a senior marketing consultant working for Global Marketing Solutions plc. Your chosen global
brand has commissioned you to produce a report that answers the following questions:

STEP 2
Answer ALL of the following questions:
1. Critically analyse the extent that your chosen global brands marketing mix is standardised and/or
adapted across international markets. Conclude by providing a 2-3 paragraph summary that
discusses whether you consider this to be an appropriate strategy(s). Remember to support your
answer. (65 marks)
2. Discuss which Internationalisation Process Theory (IPT) best describes the internationalisation
process that your chosen global brand has undertaken. Again, remember to support your answer.
(30 marks)

A maximum of 5 marks are awarded for presentation -

(5 marks)

5.1 Submitting via TurnitinUK


You are required to submit your written asignmets online via Turnitin. You must put YOUR
Student ID number (SID) as the submission title (details below).
You will be enrolled automatically to a Turnitin class: The Originality Report Class to which you
can submit multiple drafts for originality checking. You should follow the detailed instructions
provided on the IMSS.
When you submit your paper, remember to:
a) Keep Default

b) Enter your first


and last name(s)

SID

c) Enter your SID


as the submission
title: VERY
d) Browse to search for your
assignment file

f) or cancel

e) Upload
Page 9

Module Guide

Plagiarism Requirement:
Prior to dispatching the dissertation to the External Examiner, the Research Proposal must be
submitted to the electronic plagiarism checking software (i.e. Turnitin);
Turnitin.com uses the Originality Check tool to compile the Originality Report, which
contains detailed information about the number and the use of each primary source in the
submitted document. This is done through the Similarity Index, which is a percentage of
words in the paper that match all the primary sources to all words in the document.
The Similarity Index also shows a copy of the student paper with primary sources. Each
primary source is given a colour and number. The text within the students paper, which
corresponds to a primary source, will be highlighted in that respective colour and attached
with its respective number. The percentage of each primary source refers to a percentage
of words in the entire paper that match the source.
HOW TO VIEW YOUR FEEDBACK
Click on the class that you wish to view and then you will see the assignments for the
module listed. Click the blue view button to open up the document viewer. A new window will
open and you will see your feedback on the right-hand side of the screen.

Click on the View button

POINTS TO NOTE
1. All work submitted MUST be entitled by your Student ID number.
2. The Originality Report is automatically generated by Turnitin on submitting work. A
paper copy of the originality report is not required.
3. The Originality Report will not be used to make assessment decisions unless
concerns arise as to poor academic practice, plagiarism, or collusion. The report
may then be considered as part of the normal investigatory procedures undertaken
by the academic team and the Director of Studies (again, please see Section 10
of the Assessment Regulations).
4. Re-sits and extensions are also to be submitted via Turnitin. New Turnitin classes will
be created for re-sits.

Page 10

Module Guide

5. Full details as on submitting to Turnitin, the Originality Report, and a FAQs list, can
be located on the module VLE.
All coursework assignments and other forms of assessment must be submitted by the
published deadline. It is your responsibility to know when work is due to be submitted
ignorance of the deadline date will not be accepted as a reason for late or nonsubmission.

5.2 Submitting your work


All student work which contributes to the eventual outcome of the module (i.e.: if it
determines whether you will pass or fail the module and counts towards the mark you
achieve for the module) is submitted according to your institutions guidelines. Academic
staff CANNOT accept work directly from you.
Any late work will NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment
task in question.
You are requested to keep a copy of your work.
5.3 Marking Rubric and Feedback
The rubric, shown in Section 7.1 Specific Marking Criteria, will be used to mark your work.
Feedback
You are entitled to written feedback on your performance for all your assessed work. For all assessment
tasks which are not examinations, this is provided through the completion of the assignment coversheet
on which your mark and feedback will relate to the achievement of the modules intended learning
outcomes and the assessment criteria you were given for the task when it was first issued.
Examination scripts are retained by London School of Marketing and are not returned to students.
However, you are entitled to feedback on your performance in an examination and may request a
meeting with the Module Leader or Tutor to see your examination script and to discuss your
performance.
London School of Marketing is committed to providing you with feedback on all assessed work within 20
working days of the submission deadline or the date of an examination. This is extended to 30 days for
feedback for a Major Project module (please note that working days excludes those days when LS is
officially closed; e.g. between Christmas and New Year). Personal tutors will offer to read feedback from
several modules and help you to address any common themes that may be emerging.
On occasion, you will receive feedback and marks for work that you completed in the earlier stages of
the module. We provide you with this feedback as part of the learning experience and to help you
prepare for other assessment tasks that you have still to complete. It is important to note that, in these
cases, the marks for these pieces of work are unconfirmed. This means that, potentially, marks can
change, in either direction!

Page 11

Module Guide

5.4 Re-Assessment (re-sit)


If you are unsuccessful with the 1st attempt of your assessment, you must complete a re-assessment.
As indicated in Section 6.2.7. of the Senate Code of Practice, this is a NEW assessment, you CANNOT
re-work the assessment explained in this section. The re-assessment information is given in Appendix
1.

6. How is My Work Marked?


After you have submitted your work or you have completed an examination, Anglia Ruskin undertakes a
series of activities to assure that our marking processes are comparable with those employed at other
universities in the UK and that your work has been marked fairly, honestly and consistently. These
include:
Anonymous marking your name is not attached to your work so, at the point of marking, the
lecturer does not know whose work he/she is considering. When you undertake an assessment task
where your identity is known (e.g. a presentation or Major Project), it is marked by more than one
lecturer (known as double marking)

Internal moderation a sample of all work for each assessment task in each module is moderated
by other Anglia Ruskin staff to check the standards and consistency of the marking

External moderation a sample of student work for all modules is moderated by external
examiners experienced academic staff from other universities (and sometimes practitioners who
represent relevant professions) - who scrutinise your work and provide Anglia Ruskin academic staff
with feedback, advice and assurance that the marking of your work is comparable to that in other UK
universities. Many of Anglia Ruskins staff act as external examiners at other universities.

Departmental Assessment Panel (DAP) performance by all students on all modules is discussed
and approved at the appropriate DAPs which are attended by all relevant Module Leaders and
external examiners. Anglia Ruskin has over 25 DAPs to cover all the different subjects we teach.
This module falls within the remit of the Marketing Strategy and Enterprise DAP.
The following external examiners are appointed to this DAP and will oversee the assessment of this
and other modules within the DAPs remit:

MARKETING, ENTERPRISE AND STRATEGY


External Examiners Name
Dr Lindsey Carey

Academic Institution

Position or Employer

Glasgow Caledonian University

Lecturer

The above list is correct at the time of publication. However, external examiners are appointed at
various points throughout the year. An up-to-date list of external examiners is available to students and
staff at www.anglia.ac.uk/eeinfo.
Anglia Ruskins marking process is represented in the flowchart below:

Page 12

Module Guide

Student submits
work / sits
examination

DAP4 Stage
1
2

Work collated and passed to


Module Leader

Work is marked by Module


Leader and Module Tutor(s)1. All
marks collated by Module Leader
for ALL locations2

Internal moderation samples


selected. Moderation undertaken
by a second academic3

Any issues?

YES

NO
Students receive
initial (unconfirmed)
feedback

External Moderation Stage

Internal Moderation Stage

Marking Stage

Flowchart of Anglia Ruskins Marking Processes

Unconfirmed marks and feedback


to students within 20 working
days (30 working days for Major
Projects)

External moderation samples


selected and moderated by
External Examiners4

Any issues?

YES

NO
Marks submitted to DAP5 for
consideration and approval
Confirmed marks
issued to students
via e-Vision

Marks Approved by DAP5 and


forwarded to Awards Board

All work is marked anonymously or double marked where identity of the student is known (e.g.in a presentation)
The internal (and external) moderation process compares work from all locations where the module is delivered
(e.g.Cambridge, Chelmsford, Peterborough, Malaysia, India, Trinidad etc.)
The sample for the internal moderation process comprises a minimum of eight pieces of work or 10% (whichever
is the greater) for each marker and covers the full range of marks
Only modules at levels 5, 6 and 7 are subject to external moderation (unless required for separate reasons). The
sample for the external moderation process comprises a minimum of eight pieces of work or 10% (whichever is
the greater) for the entire module and covers the full range of marks
DAP: Departmental Assessment Panel Anglia Ruskin has over 25 different DAPs to reflect our subject coverage

Page 13

Module Guide

7. Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards


7.1 Specific Assessment Criteria - Assessment 01
LSM/SID Number
Brand
1st Marker

Agreed mark:

2nd Marker

CRITERIA

COMMENTS

MARKS %

Range and use of


secondary sources
Theoretical context how
well has the candidate
applied their analysis to the
Keller model?
Brand context how well
has the candidate applied
their work to the selected
brand?
Evaluation a higher level
student will identify
limitations of their data,
identify where assumptions
are subjective, say where
data is not available,
evaluate their findings,
critique the model, etc
Quality of presentation
use of the slides to analyse
the brand, variety / style,
timings, evidence of
working on analysis (both
demonstrate awareness /
understanding of contents),
structure / organisation
Communication of ideas
logical storytelling,
professionalism,
presentation skills, clarity
of communication and
clear ideas
Total marks

WEIGHT
0.1
0.2

0.2

0.1

0.2

0.2

Overall comment

Marker:

Date:
Page 14

WEIGHTED
MARK

Module Guide

Specific Assessment Criteria - Assessment 02


Student SID Number:
Brand :
First Marker:

Suggested Mark:

Second Marker:

Suggested Mark: %

MARKING CRITERIA

COMMENTS

Critically analyse the extent that


your chosen brands marketing
mix is standardised and/or
adapted across international
markets. Accordingly, the first part
of the answer should include:

MARKS
%

Agreed Mark: %

WEIGHT

0.65

Product Student analyses


standardisation and adaptation in
relation to a number of product
related issues e.g. branding,
design, usage, and positioning.
Price Evidence of analysis
based on standardisation and
adaptation in terms of pricing
strategy(s).
Place Ability to analyse
distribution, including channels,
POS, and market entry in terms of
standardisation and adaptation.
Promotion Student analyses
adaptation and standardisation in
relation to advertising; PR and
other marketing communications
tools.
Conclude by providing a 2-3
paragraph summary that
discusses whether you consider
this to be an appropriate strategy.
Remember to support your
answer.
Second part of the answer should
include:
2-3 paragraph summary that
discusses whether their
chosen brand has adopted an
Page 15

WEIGHTED
MARKS

Module Guide

appropriate strategy(s).
Evidence of a range of
theories and case studies to
support answer.

Discuss which Internationalisation


Process Theory (IPT) best
describes the internationalisation
process that your chosen global
brand has undertaken.

0.30

The answer should include:


Review of main IP theories.
Discussion which best
applies. This may include
Born Global, Uppsala, stages
etc.
Analysis of advantages and
disadvantages of the best IP
theory selected.
Presentation Well structured,
theory applied to the case, good
range of references, Harvard
Referencing System is adopted
throughout.

0.05

Total weighted mark

Overall comment

Marker:

Date:

Marking Rubric Assessment 02

Page 16

Module Guide
90-100%
Pa rt 1 (65%)
Excepti ona l
Cri ti ca l l y a na l ys e the
unders ta ndi ng of the
extent tha t your chos en i s s ues of
bra nd's ma rketi ng mi x i s s ta nda rdi s a ti on a nd
s ta nda rdi s ed a nd/or
a da pta ti on a ppl i ed to a
a da pted a cros s
pa rti cul a r bra nd i n the
i nterna ti ona l ma rkets .
i nterna ti ona l ma rketi ng
Concl ude by provi di ng a 2- a rena . Shows
3 pa ra gra ph s umma ry
extra ordi na ry ori gi na l i ty
tha t di s cus s es whether a nd crea ti ve us e of
you cons i der thi s to be
exa mpl es .Exepti ona l
a n a ppropri a te
jus ti fi ca ti on of the
s tra tegy(s ). Remember to s tra tegy of your chos en
s upport your a ns wer.
bra nd.

80-89%
Outs ta ndi ng
unders ta ndi ng of the
i s s ues of
s ta nda rdi s a ti on a nd
a da pta ti on a ppl i ed to a
pa rti cul a r bra nd i n the
i nterna ti ona l ma rketi ng
a rena . Shows good
ori gi na l i ty a nd crea ti ve
us e of exa mpl es .
Exepti ona l jus ti fi ca ti on
of the s tra tegy of your
chos en bra nd.

70-79%
Excel l ent unders ta ndi ng
of the i s s ues of
s ta nda rdi s a ti on a nd
a da pta ti on a ppl i ed to a
pa rti cul a r bra nd i n the
i nterna ti ona l ma rketi ng
a rena . Shows good
ori gi na l i ty a nd crea ti ve
us e of exa mpl es .
Excel l ent jus ti fi ca ti on of
the s tra tegy of your
chos en bra nd.

60-69%
Good unders ta ndi ng of
the i s s ues of
s ta nda rdi s a ti on a nd
a da pta ti on a ppl i ed to a
pa rti cul a r bra nd i n the
i nterna ti ona l ma rketi ng
a rena . Shows s ome
ori gi na l i ty a nd s ome
crea ti ve us e of
exa mpl es . Good
jus ti fi ca ti on of the
s tra tegy of your chos en
bra nd.

50-59%
Sa ti s fa ctory
unders ta ndi ng of the
i s s ues of
s ta nda rdi s a ti on a nd
a da pta ti on a ppl i ed to a
pa rti cul a r bra nd i n the
i nterna ti ona l ma rketi ng
a rena . Shows l i ttl e
ori gi na l i ty or crea ti vi ty
i n the us e of exa mpl es .
Sa ti s fa ctory jus ti fi ca ti on
of the s tra tegy of your
chos en bra nd..

40-49%
Li mi ted unders ta ndi ng
of the i s s ues of
s ta nda rdi s a ti on a nd
a da pta ti on a ppl i ed to a
pa rti cul a r bra nd i n the
i nterna ti ona l ma rketi ng
a rena . Shows onl y very
ba s i c ori gi na l i ty a nd
l i ttl e crea ti vi ty i n the
us e of exa mpl es .
Li mi ted jus ti fi ca ti on of
the s tra tegy of your
chos en bra nd.

30-39%
Ma rgi na l unders ta ndi ng
of the i s s ues of
s ta nda rdi s a ti on a nd
a da pta ti on a ppl i ed to a
pa rti cul a r bra nd i n the
i nterna ti ona l ma rketi ng
a rena . Shows no
ori gi na l i ty a nd l i ttl e
crea ti vi ty i n the us e of
exa mpl es . Fa i l s to gi ve
a dequa te jus ti fi ca ti on
of the s tra tegy of your
chos en bra nd.

20-29%
Fa i l ure to demons tra te
unders ta ndi ng of the
i s s ues of
s ta nda rdi s a ti on a nd
a da pta ti on a ppl i ed to a
pa rti cul a r bra nd i n the
i nterna ti ona l ma rketi ng
a rena . Fa i l ure to s how
ori gi na l i ty or crea ti vi ty
i n the us e of exa mpl es .
Fa i l s to gi ve a dequa te
jus ti fi ca ti on of the
s tra tegy of your chos en
bra nd. No
compens a ti on
a va i l a bl e.

10-19%
Fa i l s to gi ve a n
a dequa te a ns wer to
thi s ques ti on.
Qua l i fyi ng ma rk not
s a ti s fi ed. No
compens a ti on
a va i l a bl e. Ina dequa te
knowl edge ba s e.
Ina dequa te
unders ta ndi ng of
i s s ues of
s ta nda rdi s a ti on a nd
a da pta ti on a ppl i ed to a
pa rti cul a r bra nd i n the
i nterna ti ona l ma rketi ng
a rena . Fa i l ure to s hows
ori gi na l i ty or crea ti vi ty
i n the us e of exa mpl es .
Fa i l s to gi ve a dequa te
jus ti fi ca ti on of the
s tra tegy of your chos en
bra nd. Ma jor di ffi cul ty
wi th theory a nd
probl em s ol vi ng i n
di s ci pl i ne.

0-9%
Fa i l s to gi ve a n a dequa te a ns wer to
thi s ques ti on. Qua l i fyi ng ma rk not
s a ti s fi ed. No compens a ti on
a va i l a bl e. Ina dequa te knowl edge
ba s e. Ina dequa te unders ta ndi ng of
i s s ues of s ta nda rdi s a ti on a nd
a da pta ti on a ppl i ed to a pa rti cul a r
bra nd i n the i nterna ti ona l ma rketi ng
a rena . Fa i l ure to s hows ori gi na l i ty or
crea ti vi ty i n the us e of exa mpl es .
Fa i l s to gi ve a dequa te jus ti fi ca ti on of
the s tra tegy of your chos en bra nd.
Ma jor di ffi cul ty wi th theory a nd
probl em s ol vi ng i n di s ci pl i ne. No
evi dence of knowl edge ba s e; no
evi dence of unders ta ndi ng of
di s ci pl i ne. Tota l i na bi l i ty wi th theory
a nd probl em s ol vi ng i n di s ci pl i ne.
0% i s a wa rded for: (i ) nons ubmi s s i on; (i i ) da ngerous pra cti ce
a nd; (i i i ) i n s i tua ti ons where the
s tudent fa i l s to a ddres s the
a s s i gnment bri ef (eg: a ns wers the
wrong ques ti on) a nd/or rel a ted
l ea rni ng outcomes .

Pa rt 2 (30%)
Di s cus s whi ch
Interna ti ona l i s a ti on
Proces s Theory (IPT)
'bes t' des cri bes the
i nterna ti ona l i s a ti on
proces s tha t your chos en
gl oba l bra nd ha s
underta ken. Aga i n,
remember to s upport
your a ns wer.

Excepti ona l
unders ta ndi ng of
Interna ti ona l i s a ti on
Proces s Theori es (IPT).
Exepti ona l jus ti fi ca ti on
of the 'bes t' theory
whi ch fi ts your chos en
bra nd; together wi th
excepti ona l a na l ys i s of
a dva nta ges a nd
di s a dva nta ges .

Outs ta ndi ng
unders ta ndi ng of
Interna ti ona l i s a ti on
Proces s Theori es (IPT).
Outs ta ndi ng
jus ti fi ca ti on of the
'bes t' theory whi ch fi ts
your chos en bra nd;
together wi th
outs ta ndi ng a na l ys i s of
a dva nta ges a nd
di s a dva nta ges .

Excel l ent unders ta ndi ng


of Interna ti ona l i s a ti on
Proces s Theori es (IPT).
Excel l ent jus ti fi ca ti on of
the 'bes t' theory whi ch
fi ts your chos en bra nd;
together wi th excel l ent
a na l ys i s of a dva nta ges
a nd di s a dva nta ges .

Good unders ta ndi ng of


Interna ti ona l i s a ti on
Proces s Theori es (IPT).
Good jus ti fi ca ti on of
the 'bes t' theory whi ch
fi ts your chos en bra nd;
together wi th good
a na l ys i s of a dva nta ges
a nd di s a dva nta ges .

Sa ti s fa ctory
unders ta ndi ng of
Interna ti ona l i s a ti on
Proces s Theori es (IPT).
Sa ti s fa ctory jus ti fi ca ti on
of the 'bes t' theory
whi ch fi ts your chos en
bra nd; together wi th
s a ti s fa ctory a na l ys i s of
a dva nta ges a nd
di s a dva nta ges .

Li mi ted unders ta ndi ng


of Interna ti ona l i s a ti on
Proces s Theori es (IPT).
Wea k jus ti fi ca ti on of
the 'bes t' theory whi ch
fi ts your chos en bra nd;
together wi th wea k or
l i mi ted a na l ys i s of
a dva nta ges a nd
di s a dva nta ges .

Ma rgi na l a nd wea k
unders ta ndi ng of
Interna ti ona l i s a ti on
Proces s Theori es (IPT).
Ins uffi ci ent jus ti fi ca ti on
of the 'bes t' theory
whi ch fi ts your chos en
bra nd; together wi th
wea k or l i mi ted
a na l ys i s of a dva nta ges
a nd di s a dva nta ges .

Fa i l ure to demons tra te


unders ta ndi ng of
Interna ti ona l i s a ti on
Proces s Theori es (IPT).
Fa i l ure to gi ve
jus ti fi ca ti on of the
'bes t' theory whi ch fi ts
your chos en bra nd;
together wi th no
a na l ys i s of a dva nta ges
a nd di s a dva nta ges .

Fa i l ure to demons tra te


unders ta ndi ng of
Interna ti ona l i s a ti on Proces s
Theori es (IPT). Fa i l ure to gi ve
jus ti fi ca ti on of the 'bes t' theory whi ch
fi ts your chos en bra nd; together wi th
no a na l ys i s of a dva nta ges a nd
di s a dva nta ges .Fa i l s to a chi eve
modul e outcome(s ) rel a ted to thi s
ques ti on. Qua l i fyi ng ma rk not
s a ti s fi ed. No compens a ti on
a va i l a bl e. Ina dequa te us e of
l ea rni ng res ources . Extremel y wea k
a ca demi c/i ntel l ectua l s ki l l s . Work
s i gni fi ca ntl y des cri pti ve. Ma jor
di ffi cul ty wi th s tructure/a ccura cy i n
expres s i on. Ina dequa te pra cti ca l l /
probl em-s ol vi ng s ki l l s .No evi dence of
a ca demi c/i ntel l ectua l s ki l l s . Work
whol l y des cri pti ve. Incoherent
s tructure/a ccura cy a nd expres s i on. No
evi dence of pra cti ca l /profes s i ona l /
probl em-s ol vi ng s ki l l s . 0% i s
a wa rded for: (i ) non-s ubmi s s i on; (i i )
da ngerous pra cti ce a nd; (i i i ) i n
s i tua ti ons where the s tudent fa i l s to
a ddres s the a s s i gnment bri ef (eg:
a ns wers the wrong ques ti on) a nd/or
rel a ted l ea rni ng outcomes .

Pa rt 3 (5%)
Pres enta ti on qua l i ty of
the report.

Outs ta ndi ngl y hi gh


Excepti ona l l y hi gh l evel l evel of pres enta ti on
of pres enta ti on qua l i ty qua l i ty of the
a s s i gnment.
of the a s s i gnment.

Ma rgi na l fa i l i n terms
of qua l i ty of
pres enta ti on of
a s s i gnment.

Fa i l s to demons tra te
a dequa te l evel of
qua l i ty expected from
report a t thi s l evel .

Fa i l ure to demons tra te


unders ta ndi ng of
Interna ti ona l i s a ti on
Proces s Theori es (IPT).
Fa i l ure to gi ve
jus ti fi ca ti on of the
'bes t' theory whi ch fi ts
your chos en bra nd;
together wi th no
a na l ys i s of a dva nta ges
a nd
di s a dva nta ges .Fa i l s to
a chi eve modul e
outcome(s ) rel a ted to
thi s ques ti on.
Qua l i fyi ng ma rk not
s a ti s fi ed. No
compens a ti on
a va i l a bl e. Ina dequa te
us e of l ea rni ng
res ources . Extremel y
wea k
a ca demi c/i ntel l ectua l
s ki l l s . Work
s i gni fi ca ntl y
des cri pti ve. Ma jor
di ffi cul ty wi th
s tructure/a ccura cy i n
expres s i on. Ina dequa te
pra cti ca l l / probl ems ol vi ng s ki l l s .
Fa i l s ba dl y to
demons tra te a dequa te
l evel of qua l i ty
expected from report a t
thi s l evel .

Excel l ent l evel of


Good l evel of
Sa ti s fa ctory l evel of
Poor qua l i ty of
pres enta ti on qua l i ty of pres enta ti on qua l i ty of pres enta ti on qua l i ty of pres enta ti on of thi s
the a s s i gnment.
the a s s i gnment.
the a s s i gnment.
a s s i gnment.

Page 17

Tota l l y fa i l s to demons tra te


a dequa te l evel of qua l i ty expected
from report a t thi s l evel .

Module Guide

7.2 University Generic Assessment Criteria


ANGLIA RUSKIN UNIVERSITY GENERIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA AND MARKING STANDARDS
LEVEL 6
Level 6 is characterised by an expectation of students increasing autonomy in relation to their study and developing skill sets.
Students are expected to demonstrate problem solving skills, both theoretical and practical. This is supported by an understanding
of appropriate theory; creativity of expression and thought based in individual judgement; and the ability to seek out, invoke, analyse
and evaluate competing theories or methods of working in a critically constructive and open manner. Output is articulate, coherent
and skilled in the appropriate medium, with some students producing original or innovative work in their specialism.

Generic Learning Outcomes (GLOs) (Academic Regulations, Section 2)


Mark Bands

Outcome

Characteristics of Student Achievement by Marking Band

Knowledge & Understanding

Intellectual (thinking), Practical,


Affective and Transferable Skills

90-100%

Exceptional information base exploring and analysing


the discipline, its theory and ethical issues with
extraordinary originality and autonomy. Work may be
considered for publication within Anglia Ruskin
University

Exceptional management of learning resources, with a


higher degree of autonomy/exploration that clearly
exceeds the assessment brief. Exceptional
structure/accurate expression. Demonstrates intellectual
originality and imagination. Exceptional
team/practical/professional skills. Work may be
considered for publication within Anglia Ruskin University

80-89%

Outstanding information base exploring and analysing


the discipline, its theory and ethical issues with clear
originality and autonomy

Outstanding management of learning resources, with a


degree of autonomy/exploration that clearly exceeds the
assessment brief. An exemplar of structured/accurate
expression. Demonstrates intellectual originality and
imagination. Outstanding team/practical/professional
skills

Excellent knowledge base that supports analysis,


evaluation and problem-solving in theory/practice/ethics
of discipline with considerable originality

Excellent management of learning resources, with degree


of autonomy/research that may exceed the assessment
brief. Structured and creative expression. Very good
academic/ intellectual skills and
practical/team/professional/problem-solving skills

60-69%

Good knowledge base that supports analysis,


evaluation and problem-solving in theory/
practice/ethics of discipline with some originality

Good management of learning resources, with consistent


self-directed research. Structured and accurate
expression. Good academic/intellectual skills and
team/practical/ professional/problem solving skills

50-59%

Satisfactory knowledge base that supports some


analysis, evaluation and problem-solving in
theory/practice/ethics of discipline

Satisfactory management of learning resources. Some


autonomy in research but inconsistent. Structured and
mainly accurate expression. Acceptable level of
academic/ intellectual skills going beyond description at
times. Satisfactory team/practical/professional/problemsolving skills

40-49%

A marginal pass in
module outcome(s)
related to GLO at this
level

Basic knowledge base with some omissions at the level


of theoretical/ethical issues. Restricted ability to discuss
theory and/or or solve problems in discipline

Basic use of learning resources with little autonomy.


Some difficulties with academic/intellectual skills. Some
difficulty with structure/accuracy in expression, but
evidence of developing
team/practical/professional/problem-solving skills

30-39%

A marginal fail in
module outcome(s)
related to GLO at this
level. Possible
compensation. Satisfies qualifying mark

Limited knowledge base. Limited understanding of


discipline/ethical issues. Difficulty with theory and
problem solving in discipline

Limited use of learning resources. Unable to work


autonomously. Little input to teams. Weak academic/
intellectual skills. Still mainly descriptive. General difficulty
with structure/accuracy in expression.
Practical/professional/ problem-solving skills that are not
yet secure

Little evidence of knowledge base. Little evidence of


understanding of discipline/ethical issues. Significant
difficulty with theory and problem solving in discipline

Little evidence of use of learning resources. Unable to


work autonomously. Little input to teams. Very weak
academic/ intellectual skills. Work significantly descriptive.
Significant difficulty with structure/accuracy in expression.
Little evidence of practical/professional/problem-solving
skills

Inadequate knowledge base. Inadequate


understanding of discipline/ethical issues. Major
difficulty with theory and problem solving in discipline

Inadequate use of learning resources. Unable to work


autonomously. Inadequate input to teams. Extremely
weak academic/intellectual skills. Work significantly
descriptive. Major difficulty with structure/accuracy in
expression. Inadequate practical/professional/ problemsolving skills

70-79%

20-29%

10-19%

Achieves module
outcome(s) related to
GLO at this level

Fails to achieve
module outcome(s)
related to this GLO.
Qualifying mark not
satisfied. No
compensation
available

Page 18

Module Guide

1-9%

0%

No evidence of knowledge base; no evidence of


understanding of discipline/ethical issues. Total
inability with theory and problem solving in discipline

No evidence of use of learning resources. Completely


unable to work autonomously. No evidence of input to
teams. No evidence of academic/intellectual skills. Work
wholly descriptive. Incoherent structure/accuracy and
expression. No evidence of practical/professional/
problem-solving skills

Awarded for: (i) non-submission; (ii) dangerous practice and; (iii) in situations where the student fails to address the
assignment brief (eg: answers the wrong question) and/or related learning outcomes

Page 19

Module Guide

8. Assessment Offences
As an academic community, we recognise that the principles of truth, honesty and mutual respect are
central to the pursuit of knowledge. Behaviour that undermines those principles weakens the community,
both individually and collectively, and diminishes our values. We are committed to ensuring that every
student and member of staff is made aware of the responsibilities s/he bears in maintaining the highest
standards of academic integrity and how those standards are protected.
You are reminded that any work that you submit must be your own. When you are preparing your work
for submission, it is important that you understand the various academic conventions that you are
expected to follow in order to make sure that you do not leave yourself open to accusations of plagiarism
(e.g. the correct use of referencing, citations, footnotes etc.) and that your work maintains its academic
integrity.

Definitions of Assessment Offences


Plagiarism
Plagiarism is theft and occurs when you present someone elses work, words, images, ideas, opinions or
discoveries, whether published or not, as your own. It is also when you take the artwork, images or
computer-generated work of others, without properly acknowledging where this is from or you do this
without their permission.
You can commit plagiarism in examinations, but it is most likely to happen in coursework, assignments,
portfolios, essays, dissertations and so on.
Examples of plagiarism include:

directly copying from written work, physical work, performances, recorded work or images, without
saying where this is from;
using information from the internet or electronic media (such as DVDs and CDs) which belongs to
someone else, and presenting it as your own;
rewording someone elses work, without referencing them; and
handing in something for assessment which has been produced by another student or person.

It is important that you do not plagiarise intentionally or unintentionally because the work of others
and their ideas are their own. There are benefits to producing original ideas in terms of awards, prizes,
qualifications, reputation and so on. To use someone elses work, words, images, ideas or discoveries is
a form of theft.
Collusion
Collusion is similar to plagiarism as it is an attempt to present anothers work as your own. In plagiarism
the original owner of the work is not aware you are using it, in collusion two or more people may be
involved in trying to produce one piece of work to benefit one individual, or plagiarising another persons
work.
Examples of collusion include:

agreeing with others to cheat;


getting someone else to produce part or all of your work;
copying the work of another person (with their permission);
submitting work from essay banks;
paying someone to produce work for you; and
Page 20

Module Guide

allowing another student to copy your own work.

Many parts of university life need students to work together. Working as a team, as directed by your
tutor, and producing group work is not collusion. Collusion only happens if you produce joint work to
benefit of one or more person and try to deceive another (for example the assessor).
Cheating
Cheating is when someone aims to get unfair advantage over others.
Examples of cheating include:

taking unauthorised material into the examination room;


inventing results (including experiments, research, interviews and observations);
handing your own previously graded work back in;
getting an examination paper before it is released;
behaving in a way that means other students perform poorly;
pretending to be another student; and
trying to bribe members of staff or examiners.

Help to Avoid Assessment Offences


Most of our students are honest and want to avoid committing assessment offences. We have a variety
of resources, advice and guidance available to help make sure you can develop good academic skills.
We will make sure that we make available consistent statements about what we expect. You will be able
to do tutorials on being honest in your work from the library and other support services and faculties, and
you will be able to test your written work for plagiarism using TurnitinUK (a software package that
detects plagiarism).
You can get advice on how to use honestly the work of others in your own work from the library website
(www.libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/referencing.htm) and your lecturer and personal tutor.
You will be able to use TurnitinUK, a special software package which is used to detect plagiarism.
TurnitinUK will produce a report which clearly shows if passages in your work have been taken from
somewhere else. You may talk about this with your personal tutor to see where you may need to
improve your academic practice. We will not see these formative TurnitinUK reports as assessment
offences. All students in Cambridge and Chelmsford are also expected to submit their final work through
TurnitinUK as outlined above.
If you are not sure whether the way you are working meets our requirements, you should talk to your
personal tutor, module tutor or other member of academic staff. They will be able to help you and tell
you about other resources which will help you develop your academic skills.

Procedures for assessment offences


An assessment offence is the general term used to define cases where a student has tried to get unfair
academic advantage in an assessment for himself or herself or another student.
We will fully investigate all cases of suspected assessment offences. If we prove that you have
committed an assessment offence, an appropriate penalty will be imposed which, for the most serious
offences, includes expulsion from Anglia Ruskin. For full details of our assessment offences policy and
procedures, see Section 10 of the Academic Regulations at: www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs.

Page 21

Module Guide

9. Learning Resources
9.1. Library

Library Contacts
Faculty of Arts, Law and Social Sciences
libteam.alss@anglia.ac.uk
Lord Ashcroft International Business School
libteam.aibs@anglia.ac.uk
Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education
libteam.fhsce@anglia.ac.uk
Faculty of Science and Technology
libteam.fst@anglia.ac.uk

Reading List Template Anglia Ruskin University Library


Resources

Notes

Key text
Pervez N.Ghauri and Philip Cateora (2010) International
Marketing, 3rd edn, Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill.(ISBN-10 007-712285-2)

We will draw heavily on this book, including case


studies which will be discussed in class. Students
are advised to purchase a copy.

Secondary Text
Kevin Keller Strategic Brand Management: A European
Perspective, Pearson 2013

This text is available as an ebook through the


library.
Ch 1,2 3 are essential reading for the presentation

Page 22

Module Guide

Books
Jeannet J., and Hennessey, H.D., (2003) Global Marketing
Strategies (6th edition) Houghton Mifflin.
Doole, I. & Lowe, R. (2004) International Marketing
Strategy, 4th edition, Thomson / ISBN: 1-84480-0253

There are many useful texts that have been


published in the area of International Marketing.
This list is not exhaustive.

Bradley, F. (2002) International Marketing Strategy,


4th edition, Prentice Hall / ISBN: 0-273-65571-X
Usunier, J. (2000) Marketing Across Cultures, 3rd
edition, Prentice Hall / ISBN: 0-13-010668-2

Journals
Harvard Business Review
European Journal of Marketing
Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing & Logistics
European Business Review
Journal of Advertising
International Journal of Advertising
International Marketing Review
Journal of Advertising Research
Journal of International Marketing
Journal of Business Research
Journal of Marketing Communications
Journal of International Business Studies
Journal of World Business
Journal of Marketing
Journal of Consumer Research

There are many Marketing Journals which can all be


accessed through the University Library

Specific journal articles

Some articles will be posted to the VLE

Websites
The Interbrand website will be used extensively in
this module

http://www.interbrand.com/en/Default.aspx
www.cim.co.uk The Chartered Institute of Marketing

CIM is the UK based home of Professional


Marketers

www.marketingpower.com The American Marketing


Association
Additional notes on this reading list
Additional reading will be recommended weekly in class.
Link to the University Library http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/
Link to Harvard Referencing guide http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm

10. Module Evaluation


During the second half of the delivery of this module, you will be asked to complete a module evaluation
questionnaire to help us obtain your views on all aspects of the module.
Page 23

Module Guide

This is an extremely important process which helps us to continue to improve the delivery of the module
in the future and to respond to issues that you bring to our attention. The module report in section 11 of
this module guide includes a section which comments on the feedback we received from other students
who have studied this module previously.
Your questionnaire response is anonymous.
Please help us to help you and other students at Anglia Ruskin by completing the Module Evaluation
survey. We very much value our students views and it is very important to us that you provide feedback
to help us make improvements.
In addition to the Module Evaluation process, you can send any comment on anything related to your
experience at Anglia Ruskin to tellus@anglia.ac.uk at any time.

Page 24

Module Guide

11. Report on Last Delivery of Module


MODULE REPORT FORM

This form should be completed by module tutors (where there is more than one delivery) and forwarded to Module Leaders who
compiles the results on to one form for use at the Programme Committee and other methods of disseminating feedback to
students.

Module Code and Title: MOD001194, International Marketing


Anglia Ruskin Department: MET
Location(s) of Delivery: Cambridge, Chelmsford
Academic Year:

2014/15

Semester/Trimester: Sem 1

Enrolment Numbers (at each location): 284 in Cambridge, 120 in Chelmsford


Module Leader: Niall Caldwell
Other Module Tutors:
Student Achievement Provide a brief overview of student achievement on the module as evidenced by the range of marks awarded. A
detailed breakdown of marks will be available at the Departmental Assessment Panel.

The results for this module compared favourably with the University average for L6 modules. The pass rate was over 80%

Feedback from Students Briefly summarise student responses, including any written comments

Page 25

Module Guide
Module Leader/Tutors Reflection on Delivery of the Module, including Response to Feedback from Students
(including resources if appropriate)
Students enjoyed the opportunity to present work as a group, although there were a number of problems of uneven
distribution of work within some groups. The presentations took place during 4 seminar periods and this will be changed
to 3 seminar slots in the coming year.

Developments during the current year or planned for next year (if appropriate)
In the next year we will be using http://readinglists.anglia.ac.uk/index.html
This is where to find all the useful books, articles and videos relating to this module.

External Examiners Comments State whether the external examiner agreed the marks and/or commented on the
module
The external examiner agreed the marks and commented that there could be more theory within the module. Extra
reading suggestions will be added to the library webpage for r this module.

Page 26

Module Guide

Appendix 1: Re-Assessment Information

THIS INFORMATION ONLY APPLIES TO STUDENTS WHO ARE


UNSUCCESSFUL IN THEIR FIRST SUBMISSION
DRAFT VERSION AWAITING EXTERNAL EXAMINER APPROVAL
Assessment will be confirmed before the re-assessment period
The re-assessment for this module consists of two parts:
Part
010

011

Type of assessment

Word or
time limit
Individual presentation. Students who must resit the
12 ppt
presentation will be required to submit revised PPT
slides
slides with notes explaining how the work has been
improved.
Individual report. This should be unique to each
2000
student based on their choice of Brand, you must
words
improve the original in light of feedback and
resubmit.

Submission dates
TBA

TBA

010 Presentation slides

Mark
30%

Learning
Outcome
1,2, 4

011 Coursework report

70%

1,2,3,4

TOTAL MARKS

Page 27

100%

Module Definition Form (MDF)


Module Code: MOD001194

Version 2

Date amended 8/4/13

1. Module Title
International Marketing
2a. Module Leader
Niall Caldwell

2b. Department
2c. Faculty
Dept of Marketing, Strategy and Lord Ashcroft International
Enterprise
Business School

3a. Level
6
4a. Credits

3b. Module Type


Standard Module
4b. Study Hours

15

150

5. Restrictions
Type
Module Code
Module Name
PreBD130002S
Managing People, Finance and Marketing
requisites:
CoNone
requisites:
Exclusions:
None
Courses to which this
None
module is restricted

Condition
AND
(Compulsory)

LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT INFORMATION


6a. Module Description
This module is designed to provide students with an understanding of marketing from an
international perspective. The increased access to new markets across the world means that
both opportunities and threats face marketers in the global context. Overcoming cultural issues
remains a key challenge, along with the ability to communicate effectively to perhaps a very
different target audience. Although the module examines a range of case examples and
international markets, special attention is given to the Chinese market. Rapid economic growth,
hosting of the 2008 Olympic games, government support and WTO accession means China is
an attractive market to many potential investors. However, it still remains a largely unknown
market. Given the huge number of multi-national firms now operating in China e.g. Siemens,
Ikea, McDonalds' and BP, many employers now expect international marketers to have
knowledge outside Europe. The lectures will therefore enable students to analyse marketing
issues in an international context by providing a range of theoretical frameworks and practical
examples. The seminars will largely focus on case examples, allowing students to apply relevant
theories.
One of the main focuses for the design of this module has been the further development of
relevant employability and professional skills. Such skills are implicit in the learning outcomes.
Multiculturalism has been considered during the design of this module and will be considered
when the assessment brief is written.

MDF generated on Tuesday 12 November 2013, 00:17:40.13

Page 1 of 3

6b. Outline Content


-International marketing environment (including cultural issues)
-International Brand marketing mix
-Market entry methods
-The International marketing plan
6c. Key Texts/Literature
Key text: Pervez N.Ghauri and Philip R. Cateora (2010) International Marketing, McGraw-Hill
(ISBN: 10: 0077122852)
Kevin Keller (2012) Strategic Brand Management Pearson, ISBN-10: 0132664259
Other reading: Jeannet J., and Hennessey, H.D., (2003) Global Marketing Strategies (6th
edition) Houghton Mifflin.
The Journal of Marketing, European Journal of Marketing
Last Updated: 14/Jul/2010

6d. Specialist Learning Resources


None
7. Learning Outcomes (threshold standards)
No. Type
On successful completion of this module the student will be
expected to be able to:
1
Knowledge and
Demonstrate a full understanding of the environmental challenges
understanding
facing international marketers
2
Knowledge and
Show how an international marketing mix can be applied to real
understanding
case examples
3
Intellectual, practical, Distinguish between the range of market entry methods
affective and
transferable skills
4
Intellectual, practical, Construct an international marketing plan
affective and
transferable skills
8a. Module Occurrence to which this MDF Refers
Year
Occurrence
Period
Location
2013/4
ZZD
Template For
Distance Learning
Delivery

Mode of Delivery
Distance Learning

8b. Learning Activities for the above Module Occurrence


Learning
Hours
Learning
Details of Duration, frequency and other comments
Activities
Outcomes
Lectures
0
N/A
N/A
Other teacher
Students are required to read the weekly lecture
managed
notes, case studies and all other learning materials
learning
associated with every lesson and then attempt to
12
1-4
answer the given questions at the end of each week.
Students are also expected to participate in
webinars and video conferences for the purposes of

MDF generated on Tuesday 12 November 2013, 00:17:40.13

Page 2 of 3

8b. Learning Activities for the above Module Occurrence (Continued)


Learning
Hours
Learning
Details of Duration, frequency and other comments
Activities
Outcomes
assignment briefings and formative and summative
assessments.
Students are required to submit their work to the
online tutor on a weekly basis and demonstrate that
they have engaged with the module and have
achieved the required levels of the wider reading
and understanding.
Student
Students are required to read the weekly lecture
managed
notes, case studies and all other learning materials
learning
associated with every lesson and then attempt to
answer the given questions at the end of each week.
Students are also expected to participate in
webinars and video conferences for the purposes of
138
1-4
assignment briefings and formative and summative
assessments.
Students are required to submit their work to the
online tutor on a weekly basis and demonstrate that
they have engaged with the module and have
achieved the required levels of the wider reading
and understanding.
TOTAL
150
9. Assessment for the above Module Occurrence
Assessment
Assessment
Learning
Weighting (%) Fine Grade or Qualifying Mark
No.
Method
Outcomes
Pass/Fail
(%)
010
Practical
1.2.4
30
Fine Grade
30
Details:
PRESENTATION
011
Coursework
1-4
70
Fine Grade
30
Details:
ASSIGNMENT
In order to pass this module, students are required to achieve an overall mark of 40%.
In addition, students are required to:
(a) achieve the qualifying mark for each element of fine grade assessment as specified
above
(b) pass any pass/fail elements.

MDF generated on Tuesday 12 November 2013, 00:17:40.13

Page 3 of 3