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BALLAD OF NARAYAMA
March 7, 2013 | by Roger Ebert
"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great
beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling
cruelty. What a space it opens up between its origins in
the kabuki style and its subject of starvation in a
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SPIRIT OF THE BEEHIVE


November 20, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
In a vast Spanish plain, harvested of its crops, a farm
home rests. Some distance away there is a squat building
like a barn, apparently not used, its doors and windows
missing. In the home lives a family of four:
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MONSIEUR HIRE
December 21, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about
loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary
people who have nothing else in common. It involves a
murder, and the opening shot is of a corpse. Monsieur
Hire is a scrawny, balding
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MULHOLLAND DR.
November 11, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
It's well known that David Lynch's "Mulholland Dr." was
assembled from the remains of a cancelled TV series,
with the addition of some additional footage filmed
later. That may be taken by some viewers as a way to
explain the
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VERONIKA VOSS
December 4, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
Rainer Werner Fassbinder premiered "Veronika Voss" in
February 1982, at the Berlin Film Festival. It was hailed as
one of the best of his 40 films. Late on the night of June
9, 1982, he made a telephone call from

THE LIFE OF OHARU


October 29, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
Here is the saddest film I have ever seen about the life of
a

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Black, a Nevada police detective whose retirement party


is interrupted by news of the brutal murder of a young
girl. Across the noisy
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CLO FROM 5 TO 7
August 26, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
In France, the afternoon hours from five to seven are
known as the hours when lovers meet. On this afternoon,
nothing could be further from Cleo's mind than sex. She
is counting out the minutes until she learns the results
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FRENCH CANCAN
May 31, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
It is universally agreed that Jean Renoir was one of the
greatest of all directors, and he was also one of the
warmest and most entertaining. "Grand Illusion" and
"Rules of the Game" are routinely included on lists of
the
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SPIRITED AWAY
July 11, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
Viewing Hiyao Miyazaki's "Spirited Away" for the third
time, I was struck by a quality between generosity and
love. On earlier viewings I was caught up by the
boundless imagination of the story. This time I began to
focus on
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LA COLLECTIONNEUSE
May 14, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
During lazy summer days and nights, the subjects of "La
Collectionneuse" practice idleness and slow-motion
mind games in a villa in the hills above St. Tropez on the
French Riviera. Sensuality is always in the air, where it
drifts aimlessly.
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THE PLEDGE
June 18, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
Sean Penn's "The Pledge" begins when it seems his
protagonist's career is ending. Jack Nicholson plays Jerry

LA CEREMONIE

SMILES OF A SUMMER NIGHT


April 17, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
The French have a name for the events leading up to a
death by guillotine. They call it "the ceremony." Although
Claude Chabrol's "La Ceremonie" (1995) contains no
guillotines, there is a relentless feeling to it, as if the
characters
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January 31, 2012 | by Roger Ebert


Adultery was the great subject of many of Ingmar
Bergman's films and much of his life. He was married five
times, and not very faithfully, because he also had fairly
public relationships with the actresses Harriet Andersson,
Bibi Andersson and
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DIARY OF A LOST GIRL


March 22, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
When they were leaving the world premiere of G. W.
Pabst's film
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IVAN THE TERRIBLE, PARTS I & II


January 19, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
The two parts of Eisenstein's "Ivan the Terrible" are epic
in scope, awesome in visuals, and nonsensical in story. It
is one of those works that has proceeded directly to the
status of Great Movie without going through the
intermediate
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HARAKIRI
February 23, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
Samurai films, like westerns, need not be familiar genre
stories. They can expand to contain stories of ethical
challenges and human tragedy. "Harakiri," one of the
best of them, is about an older wandering samurai who
takes his time to
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THE KILLING
January 9, 2012 | by Roger Ebert
Stanley Kubrick considered "The Killing" (1956) to be his
first mature feature, after a couple of short warm-ups. He
was 28 when it was released, having already been an
obsessed chess player, a photographer for Look
magazine and a director
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been sparse. The owner of the orchestra sadly tells them


it must shut down. He comes home and informs
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THE MAN WHO SHOT LIBERTY VALANCE


December 28, 2011 | by Roger Ebert
John Ford and John Wayne together created much of the
mythology of the Old West we carry in our minds.
Beginning with "Stagecoach" (1939), continuing from
1948 through 1950 with the Cavalry Trilogy ("Fort
Apache," "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"
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A MAN ESCAPED
November 21, 2011 | by Roger Ebert
Robert Bresson's films are often about people
confronting certain despair. His subject is how they try to
prevail in the face of unbearable circumstances. His plots
are not about whether they succeed, but how they
endure. He tells these stories
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CONTACT
December 21, 2011 | by Roger Ebert
"Contact" is a film that takes place at the intersection of
science, politics and faith. Those are three subjects that
don't always fit easily together. In the film, an alien
intelligence transmits an image of three pages of
encrypted symbols.
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SHADOW OF A DOUBT
November 9, 2011 | by Roger Ebert
No one would ever accuse Alfred Hitchcock's "Shadow of
a
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DEPARTURES
NOSFERATU THE VAMPYRE
December 5, 2011 | by Roger Ebert
It is a bad time for the young couple. He plays the cello
in a small provincial orchestra. Their audiences have

October 24, 2011 | by Roger Ebert

There is a quality to the color photography in Werner


Herzog's "Nosferatu the Vampyre" that seeps into your
bones. It would be inadequate to call it "saturated." It is
rich, heavy, deep. The earth looks cold and dirty. There
isn't

It is almost always raining in the city. Somerset, the


veteran detective, wears a hat and raincoat. Mills, the kid
who has just been transferred into the district, walks
bare-headed in the rain as if he'll be young forever. On
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THE MATCH FACTORY GIRL


August 18, 2011 | by Roger Ebert
This poor girl. I wanted to reach out my arms and hug
her. That was during the first half of "The Match Factory
Girl." Then my sympathy began to wane. By the end of
the film, I think it's safe
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A.I. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE


July 7, 2011 | by Roger Ebert
Stanley Kubrick always referred to the story as
"Pinocchio." It mirrored the tale of a puppet who dreams
of becoming a real boy. And what, after all, is an android
but a puppet with a computer program pulling its
strings?
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STAGECOACH

BADLANDS

August 1, 2011 | by Roger Ebert


"Stagecoach" is a film in which two great careers were

June 24, 2011 | by Roger Ebert


Holly describes her life as if shes writing pulp fiction.
Little did I realize, she tells us, that what began in the
alleys and back ways of this quiet town would end in the
Badlands of Montana. It is the

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SEVEN
July 18, 2011 | by Roger Ebert

AN AUTUMN AFTERNOON

May 31, 2011 | by Roger Ebert


Two middle-aged students take their old teacher out to
dinner, and he gets thoroughly drunk and is overtaken
by sadness. We are alone in life, he tells them. Always
alone. He lives with his daughter, who takes care of
him,

Werner Herzog's "Heart of Glass" (1976) is a vision of


man's future as desolation. In a film set entirely in a
Bavarian village around 1800, it foresees the wars and
calamities of the next two centuries and extends on
into
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SENSO
PALE FLOWER
May 16, 2011 | by Roger Ebert
At the center of "Pale Flower" stands a very quiet man,
closed within himself, a professional killer. He works for a
gang in the Yakuza, the Japanese Mafia, and as the film
begins he has returned to Tokyo after serving

February 21, 2011 | by Roger Ebert


Visconti's "Senso" (1954) opens in an opera house and in
a way never leaves it. This is a passionate and
melodramatic romance, with doomed lovers, posturing
soldiers, secret meetings at midnight , bold adultery and
dramatic deaths. That it mostly

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DIARY OF A COUNTRY PRIEST


April 13, 2011 | by Roger Ebert
For its 60th anniversary, a restored digital presentation
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SHOAH
December 29, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
For more than nine hours I sat and watched a film
named "Shoah," and when it was over, I sat for a while
longer and simply stared into space, trying to
understand my emotions. I had seen a memory of
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HEART OF GLASS
March 23, 2011 | by Roger Ebert

RED BEARD

November 18, 2010 | by Roger Ebert


Told in the world of early 19th century Japan, Akira
Kurosawa's "Red Beard" is a passionate humanist
statement, almost the last he would make about an
exemplary human being. After completing its two years
of filming in 1965, the master
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LOST IN TRANSLATION
August 4, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
Bill Murray's acting in Sofia Coppola's "Lost in
Translation" is surely one of the most exquisitely
controlled performances in recent movies. Without it, the
film could be unwatchable. With it, I can't take my eyes
away. Not for a second,
SUPERMAN

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November 4, 2010 | by Roger Ebert


The first time we see Superman in his red, blue and
yellow uniform is nearly an hour into "Superman."
Perhaps the filmmakers agreed with Spielberg's famous
statement that "Jaws" would work better the longer he
kept the shark off the
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MYSTERY TRAIN
July 21, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
At nights in the summertime I heard lonesome whistles
blowing, and dreamed of taking the train to the future.
To romance. To the rest of my life. Or just simply out of
town. Trains embody the fact of travel, the
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THE CIRCUS
October 20, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
Charlie Chaplin was a perfectionist in his films and a
calamity
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THE ONLY SON


July 6, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
Why was I thinking about flower arrangement while
watching
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COME AND SEE


June 16, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
It's said that you can't make an effective anti-war film
because war by its nature is exciting, and the end of the
film belongs to the survivors. No one would ever make
the mistake of saying that about Elem Klimov's
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THE BIG LEBOWSKI


March 10, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
"The Big Lebowski" is about an attitude, not a story. It's
easy to miss that, because the story is so urgently
pursued. It involves kidnapping, ransom money, a porno
king, a reclusive millionaire, a runaway girl, the Malibu
police, a
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METROPOLIS
June 2, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
The opening shots of the restored Metropolis are so
crisp and

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PINK FLOYD: THE WALL


February 24, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
The rock opera "Pink Floyd: The Wall," first performed in
1978, came at a time when some rock artists were taking
themselves very seriously indeed. While the Beatles and
Stones had recorded stand-alone songs or themed
albums at the most,
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VIRIDIANA
April 29, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
I can't think of a more mischievous filmmaker than Luis
Buuel. After you get to know him, you can catch him
winking in the first few shots. Under the opening title
shot of "Viridiana," we hear Handel's "Messiah," but
knowing

MAKE WAY FOR TOMORROW


February 11, 2010 | by Roger Ebert

When I was still living in Urbana, I would often take my


mother
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Visiting an old people's home, I walked down a corridor


on the floor given over to advanced Alzheimer's parents.
Some seemed anxious. Some were angry. Some simply
sat there. Knowing nothing of what was happening in
their minds, I wondered
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THE HAIRDRESSER'S HUSBAND


January 27, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
The hairdressing shop is their ocean liner, their lives are a
cruise around the world. They will sail the Nile, kiss in the
shadows of the Great Pyramids, see the sun set on every
earthly paradise, and it will always
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25TH HOUR
December 16, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
Depend upon it, Sir, when a man knows he is to be
hanged in a fortnight, it concentrates his mind
wonderfully. -- Dr. Johnson
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CACH
January 13, 2010 | by Roger Ebert
How is it possible to watch a thriller intently two times
and completely miss a smoking gun that's in full view?
Yet I did. Only on my third trip through Michael Haneke's
"Cache" did I consciously observe a shot which
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ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND


January 2, 2010 | by Roger Ebert

THE RED SHOES


December 9, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
Beautiful 35mm print opens Friday at the Music Box.
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MON ONCLE D'AMERIQUE


November 4, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
Three children are born in France. One, Rene, is the son
of

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works largely because in a universe of horror, the


director found a narrative of
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LEON MORIN, PRIEST


October 21, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
In 1961, one year after he appeared in "Breathless"
(1960) and two years after she appeared in "Hiroshima,
Mon Amour," Jean-Paul Belmondo and Emmanuelle Riva
made "Leon Morin, Priest." They were both in the white
heat of their early careers;
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BARRY LYNDON
September 9, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
Stanley Kubrick's "Barry Lyndon," received indifferently in
1975, has grown in stature in the years since and is now
widely regarded as one of the master's best. It is
certainly in every frame a Kubrick film: technically
awesome, emotionally distant,
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RICHARD III
October 7, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
Was ever there a villain such as Richard the Third?
Murderer of his brother Henry VI; of Prince Edward; later
of Edward's wife Anne; of his own brother Clarence; of
Anne's brother Rivers; of his henchmen Grey and
Vaughn; of
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SPRING, SUMMER, FALL, WINTER... AND SPRING


August 26, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
Rarely has a movie this simple moved me this deeply. I
feel as if I could review it in a paragraph, or discuss it for
hours. The South Korean film Spring, Summer, Fall,
Winter and Spring (2003) is Buddhist,
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THE GREY ZONE


September 23, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
Rare among films about the Holocaust, Tim Blake
Nelson's "The Grey Zone" (2001) lacks an upbeat ending.
Even a great film like Steven Spielberg's "Schindler's List"

IN A LONELY PLACE

August 13, 2009 | by Roger Ebert


The courtyard of the Hollywood building occupied by
Humphrey

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TENDER MERCIES

SOULS FOR SALE


July 29, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
In the 1920s, the golden age of silent films, millions of
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June 17, 2009 | by Roger Ebert


"Tender Mercies" won Robert Duvall his only Academy
Award in six nominations. It contains one of his most
understated performances. It's mostly done with his
eyes. The actor who shouted, "I love the smell of napalm
in the morning!" here
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RIO BRAVO

THE CABINET OF DR. CALIGARI

July 15, 2009 | by Roger Ebert


Howard Hawks didnt direct a film for four years after the
failure of his "Land of the Pharaohs" in 1955. He thought
maybe he had lost it. When he came back to work on
"Rio Bravo" in 1958, he was

June 3, 2009 | by Roger Ebert


The first thing everyone notices and best remembers
about
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THE THIEF OF BAGDAD


MAN WITH A MOVIE CAMERA
July 1, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
In 1929, the year it was released, films had an average
shot length

May 6, 2009 | by Roger Ebert


To begin with a story: Our grandson Taylor was deeply
immersed
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Drunch. We would commence with shots of creme de


menthe and pint glasses of real Coke, in the hope that
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CHOP SHOP
April 22, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
"Chop Shop" has such an immediate sense of time and
space that it comes as a slight shock to understand that
the time is now and the place is in the shadow of the late
Shea Stadium -- or, more
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EXOTICA
March 11, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
Sex for money sometimes conceals great sadness. It can
be sought to treat wounds it cannot heal. I believe that
may happen less in actual prostitution than in the parody
of prostitution offered in "gentleman's clubs." Whatever
is going on
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LA BELLE NOISEUSE
April 12, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
Frenhofer, the great artist, has painted nothing for ten
years. He threw down his brush in the middle of painting
what was intended as his masterpiece, to be titled "Le
Belle Noiseuse," or "the beautiful nuisance." His model
was his
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THE DOUBLE LIFE OF VERONIQUE


February 25, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
Here is a film about a feeling. Like all feelings, it is one
that can hardly be described in words, although it can be
evoked in art. It is the feeling that we are not alone,
because there is more
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WITHNAIL AND I
March 25, 2009 | by Roger Ebert
In my drinking days, some of us would gather around
noon on Saturdays at Oxford's Pub for what we called

WAKING LIFE

February 11, 2009 | by Roger Ebert


It is hard to say how much of Richard Linklater's "Waking
Life" (2001) is a dream. I think all of it is. His hero keeps
dreaming that he has awakened. He climbs out of bed,
splashes water on his face,
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MON ONCLE ANTOINE


December 23, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
The key action in Claude Jutra's "Mon Oncle Antoine"
(1971) takes place over a period of 24 hours in a Quebec
mining town. Although the film begins earlier in the year,
everything comes to a focus beginning on the morning
SECRETS AND LIES

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January 28, 2009 | by Roger Ebert


Too much attention is paid to Mike Leigh's famous
method for "devising" his screenplays. It is well known
that he imagines characters and a situation, casts actors
to play the characters, joins with them in workshops
where the dialogue and
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THE SILENCE
December 10, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
Two women and a boy share a compartment on a train.
It is an unhappy journey, and we sense tension and
dislike between the women. The boy wanders out into
the corridor, stares at other passengers, watches as
another train
AFTER HOURS

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January 14, 2009 | by Roger Ebert


"After Hours" approaches the notion of pure filmmaking;
it's a nearly flawless example of -- itself. It lacks, as nearly
as I can determine, a lesson or message, and is content
to show the hero facing a series of interlocking
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MAGNOLIA
November 27, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
"Magnolia" is a film of sadness and loss, of lifelong
bitterness, of children harmed and adults destroying
themselves. As the narrator tells us near the end, "We

may be through with the past, but the past is never


through with
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If man sends another Voyager to the distant stars and it


can carry only one film on board, that film might be
"Baraka." It uses no language, so needs no translation. It
speaks in magnificent images, natural sounds, and
music
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A PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION


November 12, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
"Ebert's Altman Home Companion": A compilation of
excerpts from his reviews and interviews with Altman
over the years.
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THE GODFATHER, PART II


October 2, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
The musical score plays an even greater role in The
Godfather: Part II than it did in the original film.
Nostalgic, mournful, evoking lost eras, it stirs emotions
we shouldnt really feel for this story, and wouldnt, if the
score
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THE LAST TEMPTATION OF CHRIST


October 29, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
Note: This is a shortened version of an essay written for
my new book, Scorsese by Ebert. Reading my 1988
review of The Last Temptation of Christ, I find it is more
concerned with theology than cinema. It must have
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ADAPTATION
September 18, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
Charlie Kaufman's screenplay for "Adaptation." (2002)
has it three ways. It is wickedly playful in its construction,
it gets the story told, and it doubles back and kids itself.
There is also the sense that to some degree it's true:
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BARAKA
October 16, 2008 | by Roger Ebert

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L.A. CONFIDENTIAL

THROUGH A GLASS DARKLY

September 4, 2008 | by Roger Ebert


"L.A. Confidential" finished at No. 1 in a list of films shot
in the last 25 years about Los Angeles culture. In a poll
conducted by the Los Angeles Times, Curtis Hanson's
1997 drama topped P.T. Anderson's "Boogie Nights"
and

July 24, 2008 | by Roger Ebert


The great subject of the cinema, Ingmar Bergman
believed, is the human face. He'd been watching
Antonioni on television, he told me during an interview,
and realized it wasn't what Antonioni said that absorbed
him, but the man's face. Bergman

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MEPHISTO

COOL HAND LUKE

August 21, 2008 | by Roger Ebert


In "Mephisto," a movie that takes place in Germany

July 10, 2008 | by Roger Ebert


All these years after the release of "Cool Hand Luke" in
1967, all you have to do is say, "What we have here is-failure to communicate." Everyone knows the line, and
everyone can identify the film, even those who may

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DOG DAY AFTERNOON


August 7, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
"Dog Day Afternoon" runs a little longer than the
average feature, and you think maybe they could have
cut an opening montage of life in New York. But no.
These shots, stolen from reality, establish a bedrock for
the film.

TRIUMPH OF THE WILL


June 26, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
...By general consent [one] of the best documentaries
ever

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ORDET
ROCCO AND HIS BROTHERS
June 12, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
Luchino Visconti was a man of many tempers, styles and
beliefs, and you can see them all, fighting for space, on
the epic canvas of his masterpiece, "Rocco and His
Brothers" (1960). Visconti (1906-1976) was gay, an
aristocrat, a Marxist,

March 8, 2008 | by Roger Ebert


For the ordinary filmgoer, and I include myself, "Ordet" is
a difficult film to enter. But once you're inside, it is
impossible to escape. Lean, quiet, deeply serious,
populated with odd religious obsessives, it takes place in
winter in Denmark
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WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE?


MY MAN GODFREY
May 29, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
When Carole Lombard and the family maid discuss the
newly hired
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February 16, 2008 | by Roger Ebert


The staircase should be billed along with the stars in
Robert Aldrich's "What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?"
(1962). On a claustrophobic set, it dominates many
shots, separating the upstairs captivity of the paraplegic
Blanche from the downstairs lair of
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JOHNNY GUITAR
May 8, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
Nicholas Ray's "Johnny Guitar" (1954) is surely one of
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VENGEANCE IS MINE
January 17, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
The title "Vengeance Is Mine" poses an implied question
that is never answered: Vengeance for what? This

portrait of a cold-blooded serial killer suggests a cruel


force without motivation, inspiration, grievance. Unlike
most sociologically oriented films in the true crime
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Paul Schrader's "Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters" (1985)


is the most unconventional biopic I've ever seen, and
one of the best. In a triumph of concise writing and
construction, it considers three crucial aspects of the life
of the
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DIVA
January 10, 2008 | by Roger Ebert
Peering into obscure corners of Paris, Jean-Jacques
Beineix emerged with an assembly of unlikely, even
impossible, characters to populate his "Diva" (1981), a
thriller that is more about how it looks than what
happens in it. Here is an exhilarating
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WINTER LIGHT
December 1, 2007 | by Roger Ebert
On the day Ingmar Bergman died, the first film of his
that came into my mind was "Winter Light." Odd,
because I had not seen it since teaching a film class in
the 1970s. In the weeks that passed, I
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THE BEST YEARS OF OUR LIVES

THE ENIGMA OF KASPAR HAUSER

December 29, 2007 | by Roger Ebert


Homer thinks maybe they should stop at his Uncle
Butch's saloon

November 17, 2007 | by Roger Ebert


Werner Herzog's films do not depend on "acting" in the
conventional sense. He is most content when he finds an
actor who embodies the essence of a character, and he
studies that essence with a fascinated intensity. Consider
the case

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MISHIMA: A LIFE IN FOUR CHAPTERS


December 15, 2007 | by Roger Ebert

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BLADE RUNNER: THE FINAL CUT


THE GREAT DICTATOR
November 3, 2007 | by Roger Ebert
In an earlier review of "Blade Runner," I wrote; "It looks
fabulous, it uses special effects to create a new world of
its own, but it is thin in its human story." This seems a
strange complaint, given that so

September 27, 2007 | by Roger Ebert


In 1938, the world's most famous movie star began to
prepare a
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SANSHO THE BAILIFF


October 20, 2007 | by Roger Ebert
Kenji Mizoguchi's "Sansho the Bailiff," one of the best of
all Japanese films, is curiously named after its villain, and
not after any of the characters we identify with. The
bristle-bearded slavemaster Sansho is at the center of
two journeys,

BABEL
September 22, 2007 | by Roger Ebert
England and America are two countries separated by a
common language. George Bernard Shaw

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WERCKMEISTER HARMONIES
EL TOPO
October 6, 2007 | by Roger Ebert
A man in black rides the desert vastness of Mexico with a
naked child in front of him on the saddle. Three heehawing gunmen appear from out of hiding, laughing
that they have been sent to kill him. The man

September 8, 2007 | by Roger Ebert


Bela Tarr's "Werckmeister Harmonies" (2000) is
maddening if you are not in sympathy with it,
mesmerizing if you are. If you have not walked out after
20 or 30 minutes, you will thereafter not be able to move
from your

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WR: MYSTERIES OF THE ORGANISM


PAN'S LABYRINTH
August 25, 2007 | by Roger Ebert
"Pan's Labyrinth" is one of the greatest of all fantasy
films, even though it is anchored so firmly in the reality
of war. On first viewing, it is challenging to comprehend
a movie that on the one hand provides fauns

July 15, 2007 | by Roger Ebert


"Maybe it is like a mirror," Makavejev told me late one
night in Chicago. "People hold it up to themselves and
see reflected only what they are most offended by." That
has a way of happening with his work. "Sweet
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MOOLAADE
ACE IN THE HOLE
August 12, 2007 | by Roger Ebert
There's not a soft or sentimental passage in Billy Wilder's
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July 1, 2007 | by Roger Ebert


"Moolaade" is the kind of film that can only be made by
a director whose heart is in harmony with his mind. It is a
film of politics and anger, and also a film of beauty,
humor, and a deep
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KILLER OF SHEEP
July 29, 2007 | by Roger Ebert
Surely I should have seen that what Burnett chooses to
show is, in fact, a larger statement. In this poetic film
about a family in Watts, he observes the quiet nobility of
lives lived with values but without opportunities. The
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CABIRIA
July 2, 2006 | by Roger Ebert
On my last night at Cannes 2006, I climbed to the fifth
floor of the Palais du Cinema to see a 180-minute silent
epic made in 1914. Giovanni Pastrone's "Cabiria" was
famous in its day, a global box-office success, but

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THE SHINING
June 18, 2006 | by Roger Ebert
Stanley Kubrick's cold and frightening "The Shining"
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AU REVOIR LES ENFANTS


May 7, 2006 | by Roger Ebert
There is such exhilaration in the heedless energy of the
schoolboys. They tumble up and down stairs, stand on
stilts for playground wars, eagerly study naughty
postcards, read novels at night by flashlight, and are
even merry as they pour
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CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT
June 4, 2006 | by Roger Ebert
There live not three good men unhanged in England.
And one of them is fat and grows old.
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THE LONG GOODBYE


April 23, 2006 | by Roger Ebert
Robert Altmans The Long Goodbye (1973) attacks film
noir with three of his most cherished tools: Whimsy,
spontaneity and narrative perversity. He is always the
most youthful of directors, and here he gives us the
youngest of Philip Marlowes, the
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ARMY OF SHADOWS
May 21, 2006 | by Roger Ebert
Jean-Pierre Melville's "Army of Shadows" is about
members of the French Resistance who persist in the
face of despair. Rarely has a film shown so truly that
place in the heart where hope lives with fatalism. It is not
a
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RIPLEY'S GAME
April 9, 2006 | by Roger Ebert
That's OK. I didn't expect thanks. -- Tom Ripley, wiping
spit from his face

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NIGHT MOVES

THE RIVER (LE FLEUVE)

March 26, 2006 | by Roger Ebert


Arthur Penn's "Night Moves" is about an old-fashioned
private eye who says and does all the expected things
while surrounded by a plot he completely fails to
understand.

February 12, 2006 | by Roger Ebert


Jean Renoir's "The River" (1951) begins with a circle
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INHERIT THE WIND

CAT PEOPLE

January 28, 2006 | by Roger Ebert


History repeats itself, the first time as tragedy, the
second time as farce.

March 12, 2006 | by Roger Ebert


"Cat People" is constructed almost entirely out of

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CHUCK JONES: THREE CARTOONS


SAMURAI REBELLION
February 26, 2006 | by Roger Ebert
The tension in "Samurai Rebellion" is generated by deep
passions imprisoned within a rigid social order. The
words and movements of the characters are dictated to
the smallest detail by the codes of the time, but their
emotions defy the

January 15, 2006 | by Roger Ebert


A film director, like an orchestra conductor, is the lord of
his domain, and no director has more power than a
director of animated films. He is set free from the rules
of the physical universe and the limitations of
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MY FAIR LADY

CRUMB

January 1, 2006 | by Roger Ebert


"My Fair Lady" is the best and most unlikely of musicals,
during which I cannot decide if I am happier when the
characters are talking or when they are singing. The
songs are literate and beloved; some romantic, some
comic,

November 20, 2005 | by Roger Ebert


"Crumb" is a meeting between two eccentrics in
sympathy with each other. The artist R. Crumb created
such bizarre images in his underground comic books
that the art critic Robert Hughes named him "the
Brueghel of the last half of

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FORBIDDEN GAMES
December 18, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
We must turn to the past for a film as innocent as
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DARK CITY
November 6, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
"Dark City" by Alex Proyas resembles its great silent
predecessor "Metropolis" in asking what it is that makes
us human, and why it cannot be changed by decree.
Both films are about false worlds created to fabricate
ideal societies, and
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ATLANTIC CITY
December 4, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
I might have thought "Atlantic City" was more of a
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TOP HAT
October 23, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
There are two numbers in "Top Hat" where the dancing

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THE DEAD
October 9, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
John Huston was dying when he directed "The Dead."
Tethered to an oxygen tank, hunched in a wheelchair,
weak with emphysema and heart disease, he was a
perfectionist attentive to the slightest nuance of the
filming. James Joyce's story, for
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NANOOK OF THE NORTH


September 25, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
There is an astonishing sequence in Robert J. Flaherty's
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FITZCARRALDO
August 28, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
Werner Herzog's "Fitzcarraldo" is one of the great visions
of the cinema, and one of the great follies. One would
not have been possible without the other. This is a movie
about an opera-loving madman who is determined to
drag
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THE AGE OF INNOCENCE


August 14, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
"It was the spirit of it -- the spirit of the exquisite
romantic pain. The idea that the mere touching of a
woman's hand would suffice. The idea that seeing her
across the room would keep him alive for another
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CRIMES AND MISDEMEANORS


September 11, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
I remember my father telling me, "The eyes of God are
on us always."
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LEOLO
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE
July 31, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
I came in after a midnight screening this year at Cannes,
and found Richard Corliss leaning over a yellow legal
pad in the dining room of the Hotel Splendid. He was, he
said, working on the list of the 100

June 19, 2005 | by Roger Ebert


"You're tearing me apart! You say one thing, he says
another, and everybody changes back again."
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THE TERRORIST

HOWARDS END

July 17, 2005 | by Roger Ebert


Malli is only 19, a young woman who has spent all of her
life within the closed world of a movement. She accepts
its values without question. Her brother died for the
cause. She has killed for it, comfortable with

June 5, 2005 | by Roger Ebert


There are two conversations in "Howards End" (1992)
between Henry Wilcox, a wealthy businessman, and
Margaret Schlegel, who becomes his second wife. The
first is amusing, the second desperate, and they express
the film's buried subject, which is the impossibility

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SAFETY LAST
July 3, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
It is by general agreement the most famous shot in silent
comedy: a man in a straw hat and round horn-rim
glasses, hanging from the minute hand of a clock 12
stories above the city street. Strange, that this shot

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WOODSTOCK
May 22, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
Abbie Hoffman: "I live in Woodstock Nation." Defense
attorney: "Will you tell the court and the jury where it
is?"Hoffman: "Yes, it is a nation of alienated young

people. We carry it around with us as a state of mind,


in

in its mouth. The town seems deserted until a nervous


little busybody darts out and offers to act

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FAUST
May 8, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
The greatest master of horror in the silent era was a
cheerful
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THE MARRIAGE OF MARIA BRAUN

THE BAND WAGON


March 27, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
The opening credits of Vincente Minnelli's "The Band
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AFTER DARK, MY SWEET

April 24, 2005 | by Roger Ebert


Bombs fell as Maria was married to a soldier named
Hermann Braun, with the wedding party scrambling for
safety. Then came more years of the war. Whatever
happened to Maria Braun during those years created a
woman who is strong

March 13, 2005 | by Roger Ebert


There is something wrong with Collie, but it's hard to put
your finger on it. He tells the bartender he pours a good
glass of beer, and the bartender feels like throwing him
out of the bar. He looks like

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YOJIMBO

PATHS OF GLORY

April 10, 2005 | by Roger Ebert


Almost the first thing the samurai sees when he arrives is
a dog trotting down the main street with a human hand

February 25, 2005 | by Roger Ebert


Stanley Kubrick's "Paths of Glory" (1957) closes with a
scene that doesn't seem organic to the movie. We've
seen harrowing battlefield carnage, a morally rotten

court-martial, French army generals corrupt and cynical


beyond all imagining, and now what do we

January 16, 2005 | by Roger Ebert


"It is a relentless excursion into style," Josef von

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LATE SPRING

THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA

February 13, 2005 | by Roger Ebert


Shukichi is a professor, a widower, absorbed in his work.
His unmarried daughter, Noriko, runs his household for
him. Both are perfectly content with this arrangement
until the old mans sister declares that her niece should
get married. Noriko is,

December 19, 2004 | by Roger Ebert


It has always been a question whether "The Phantom of
the
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FANNY AND ALEXANDER

GROUNDHOG DAY
January 30, 2005 | by Roger Ebert
"Groundhog Day" is a film that finds its note and
purpose so precisely that its genius may not be
immediately noticeable. It unfolds so inevitably, is so
entertaining, so apparently effortless, that you have to
stand back and slap yourself

December 5, 2004 | by Roger Ebert


Ingmar Bergman's "Fanny and Alexander" (1982) was
intended to be his last film, and in it, he tends to the
business of being young, of being middle-aged, of being
old, of being a man, woman, Christian, Jew, sane, crazy,
rich,
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THE BIG RED ONE


THE SCARLET EMPRESS

November 21, 2004 | by Roger Ebert


Eventually the veterans in the rifle squad stop bothering
to

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population. Bombs planted by civilians, often women


and children, have served as deadly weapons in this war.
The
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A WOMAN'S TALE
November 7, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
"Beauty in life may come from makeup, or what have
you, but in death, you have to fall back on character."
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3 WOMEN
September 26, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
And so I descend once more into the mysterious depths
of "3 Women," a film that was imagined in a dream.
Robert Altman's 1977 masterpiece tells the story of three
women whose identities blur, shift and merge until
finally, in
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EASY RIDER
October 24, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
Nobody went to see "Easy Rider" (1969) only once. It
became one of the rallying-points of the late '60s, a road
picture and a buddy picture, celebrating sex, drugs, rock
'n' roll, and the freedom of the open road. It
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PIXOTE
September 12, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
Fathered by strangers, abandoned by their mothers,
thrown away
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THE BATTLE OF ALGIERS


October 10, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
The most common form of warfare since 1945 has
involved irregular resistance fighters attacking
conventional forces and then disappearing back into the

PLAYTIME
August 29, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
Jacques Tati's "Playtime," like "2001: A Space Odyssey" or
"The Blair Witch Project" or "Russian Ark," is one of a

kind, complete in itself, a species already extinct at the


moment of its birth. Even Mr. Hulot, Tati's alter ego,

Most crime movies begin in the present and move


forward, but

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LAST TANGO IN PARIS

THE LAST PICTURE SHOW

August 15, 2004 | by Roger Ebert


Reviewing "Last Tango in Paris" in 1972, I wrote that it
was one of the great emotional experiences of our time,
adding: "It's a movie that exists so resolutely on the level
of emotion, indeed, that possibly only Marlon Brando,

July 4, 2004 | by Roger Ebert


The best scene in "The Last Picture Show" takes place
outside town at the "tank," an unlovely pond that briefly
breaks the monotony of the flat Texas prairie. Sam the
Lion has taken Sonny and the retarded boy Billy fishing

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EL NORTE

JULES AND JIM

August 1, 2004 | by Roger Ebert


At the dawn of the U.S. independent film movement, two
of its founders made what Variety called its first epic. "El
Norte" told the story of a Guatemalan brother and sister
who fled persecution at home and journeyed north the

June 20, 2004 | by Roger Ebert


Franois Truffaut's "Jules and Jim" opens with carousel
music and a breathless narration that tells of two young
men -- one French, one Austrian -- who meet in Paris in
1912 and become lifelong friends: "They taught each
other their

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OUT OF THE PAST


July 18, 2004 | by Roger Ebert

THE BIG HEAT

June 6, 2004 | by Roger Ebert


Glenn Ford plays a straight-arrow police detective
named Bannion
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Mike Figgis' "Leaving Las Vegas" (1995) is not a love


story, although it feels like one, but a story about two
desperate people using love as a form of prayer and a
last resort against their pain. It is also
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VICTIM
SUNRISE
May 23, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
Recent critics find "Victim" timid in its treatment of
homosexuality, but viewed in the context of Great Britain
in 1961, it's a film of courage. How much courage can be
gauged by the fact that it was originally banned from

April 11, 2004 | by Roger Ebert


The camera's freedom to move is taken for granted in
these days
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UGETSU
May 9, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
Two brothers, one consumed by greed, the other by
envy. In a
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THE COLOR PURPLE


March 28, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
Returning to "The Color Purple" after almost 20 years, I
can see its flaws more easily than when I named it the
best film of 1985, but I can also understand why it
moved me so deeply, and why the
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LEAVING LAS VEGAS


April 25, 2004 | by Roger Ebert

AU HASARD BALTHAZAR
March 19, 2004 | by Roger Ebert

Robert Bresson is one of the saints of the cinema, and


"Au Hasard Balthazar" (1966) is his most heartbreaking
prayer. The film follows the life of a donkey from birth to
death, while all the time living it the dignity
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February 15, 2004 | by Roger Ebert


Although "West Side Story" was named the best picture
of 1961 and won 10 Academy Awards, it is not much
mentioned by movie fans these days, and the old
warhorse "Singin' in the Rain" is probably more seen and
certainly
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THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW


March 14, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
Pier Paolo Pasolini was stuck in St. Francis' hometown of
Assisi. He had come there in 1962 to attend a seminar at
a Franciscan monastery. Although it was well known that
Pasolini was an atheist, a Marxist and a homosexual,
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THE RULES OF THE GAME


February 29, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
I've seen Jean Renoir's "The Rules of the Game" in a
campus film society, at a repertory theater and on
laserdisc, and I've even taught it in a film class -- but
now I realize I've never really seen it

TOUCHEZ PAS AU GRISBI


February 1, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
Growing older is a balancing act between skills that have
never
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THE MAN WHO LAUGHS


January 18, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
Movie villains smile so compulsively because it creates a
creepy
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AMARCORD
WEST SIDE STORY

January 4, 2004 | by Roger Ebert

If ever there was a movie made entirely out of nostalgia


and joy, by a filmmaker at the heedless height of his
powers, that movie is Federico Fellinis Amarcord. The
title means I remember in the dialect of Rimini, the

Martin Scorseses Mean Streets is not primarily about


punk gangsters at all, but about living in a state of sin.
For Catholics raised before Vatican II, it has a resonance
that it may lack for other audiences. The film recalls

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THE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE


STRANGERS ON A TRAIN
January 1, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
The abiding terror in Alfred Hitchcock's life was that he
would
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December 7, 2003 | by Roger Ebert


The title of "The Manchurian Candidate" has entered
everyday speech as shorthand for a brainwashed sleeper,
a subject who has been hypnotized and instructed to act
when his controllers pull the psychological trigger. In the
movie, an American patrol is
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TAXI DRIVER
LE BOUCHER
January 1, 2004 | by Roger Ebert
Are you talkin' to me? Well, I'm the only one here. -Travis Bickle in "Taxi Driver"
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November 23, 2003 | by Roger Ebert


She is a school mistress, he is a butcher, their everyday
lives obscure great loneliness, and their ideas about sex
are peculiarly skewed. They should never have met each
other. When they do start to spend time together, their
relationship
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MEAN STREETS
December 31, 2003 | by Roger Ebert

TOKYO STORY

SCARFACE

November 9, 2003 | by Roger Ebert


No story could be simpler. An old couple come to the
city to

September 28, 2003 | by Roger Ebert


"Me, I want what's coming to me." "What's coming to
you?" "The world, Chico, and everything in it."

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ALIEN

THE LEOPARD

October 26, 2003 | by Roger Ebert


At its most fundamental level, "Alien" is a movie about
things that can jump out of the dark and kill you. It
shares a kinship with the shark in "Jaws," Michael Myers
in "Halloween," and assorted spiders, snakes, tarantulas
and

September 14, 2003 | by Roger Ebert


"The Leopard" was written by the only man who could
have written it, directed by the only man who could have
directed it, and stars the only man who could have
played its title character. The first of these claims
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SANTA SANGRE
THE TREASURE OF THE SIERRA MADRE
October 12, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
When John Huston came back from the war and
Humphrey Bogart was
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August 31, 2003 | by Roger Ebert


To call "Santa Sangre" (1989) a horror film would be
unjust to a film that exists outside all categories. But in
addition to its deeper qualities, it is a horror film, one of
the greatest, and after waiting patiently through
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A YEAR OF THE QUIET SUN


THE ADVENTURES OF ROBIN HOOD
August 17, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
"The Adventures of Robin Hood" was made with sublime
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July 6, 2003 | by Roger Ebert


When the actor Scott Wilson went to Poland to make "A
Year of the Quiet Sun" (1984), he found the country still
slowly rebuilding from World War II. "The war was a
fresh memory for them," he says, and poverty
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THE GOOD, THE BAD AND THE UGLY


August 3, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
A vast empty Western landscape. The camera pans
across it. Then the shot slides onto a sunburned,
desperate face. The long shot has become a closeup
without a cut, revealing that the landscape was not
empty but occupied by a
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MOONSTRUCK
June 22, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
When Ronny Cammareri sweeps Loretta Castorini off her
feet in "Moonstruck," he almost, in his exuberance,
throws her over his shoulder. "Where are you taking
me?" she cries. "To the bed!" he says. Not to bed, but to
the bed.
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BREATHLESS
July 20, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
When we talked, I talked about me, you talked about
you, when we should have talked about each other. -Michel to Patricia
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MON ONCLE
June 8, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
Jacques Tati is the great philosophical tinkerer of
comedy, taking meticulous care to arrange his films so
that they unfold in a series of revelations and effortless

delights. Consider a shot early in "Mon Oncle," where the


camera regards the

a closed system from which there is no escape, and life is


ruled

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BOB LE FLAMBEUR
May 25, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
Flamber (verb, French): To wager not only the money
you have, but the money you don't have.
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THE BIRTH OF A NATION


March 30, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
He achieved what no other known man has achieved. To
watch
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A SUNDAY IN THE COUNTRY


May 11, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
In a country house near Paris, toward autumn of 1912, an
old man sings to himself as he prepares for the day. He
brushes his teeth, shines his shoes, seems happy.
Downstairs, his housekeeper sings a song of her own
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FIVE EASY PIECES


March 16, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
"Easy Rider" proved in 1969 that Jack Nicholson was a
great character actor. "Five Easy Pieces" proved in 1970
that he was a great actor and a star. This is the film, more
than 10 years into his career, where
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RAISE THE RED LANTERN


April 27, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
The Chinese film "Raise the Red Lantern" (1991), like the
Japanese film "Woman in the Dunes" (1960), is about
sexual enslavement. In both films, the protagonist enters

THREE COLORS TRILOGY: BLUE, WHITE, RED


March 9, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
After he completed "Red" (1994), the final film in his
"Three Colors" trilogy, Krzysztof Kieslowski announced

that he would retire. This was not a man weary of work. It


was the retirement of a magician, a Prospero who was
now
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January 5, 2003 | by Roger Ebert


In a small room on a courtyard off Dry Well Lane in
Beijing, a marriage is celebrated and a child is born. The
people of the courtyard all know one another, and share
joys and sorrows and food. They are
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ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST


February 2, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
There is a curiously extended closeup of Jack Nicholson
about four-fifths of the way through "One Flew Over the
Cuckoo's Nest." We notice it because it lingers
noticeably. It shows his character, R.P. McMurphy, lost in
thought. It comes at
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THE THIN MAN


December 22, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
William Powell is to dialogue as Fred Astaire is to dance.
His delivery is so
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SOLARIS
PARIS, TEXAS
January 19, 2003 | by Roger Ebert
The films of Russian director Andrei Tarkovsky are more
like environments than entertainments. It's often said
they're too long, but that's missing the point: He uses
length and depth to slow us down, to edge us out of the
velocity
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December 8, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


The man comes walking out of the desert like a Biblical
figure, a penitent who has renounced the world. He
wears jeans and a baseball cap, the universal costume of
America, but the scraggly beard, the deep eye sockets
and
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THE BLUE KITE

GOODFELLAS

DON'T LOOK NOW

November 24, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


As far back as I can remember, I always wanted to be a
gangster. To me, being a gangster was better than being
President of the United States.So says Henry Hill in the
opening moments of Martin Scorseses GoodFellas, a

October 13, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


The hero of Dont Look Now is a rational man who
does not believe in psychics, omens or the afterlife. The
film hammers down his skepticism and destroys him. It
involves women who have an intuitive connection with
the supernatural,

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THE FILMS OF BUSTER KEATON


THE WILD BUNCH
November 10, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
The greatest of the silent clowns is Buster Keaton, not
only because of what he did, but because of how he did
it. Harold Lloyd made us laugh as much, Charlie Chaplin
moved us more deeply, but no one had
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September 29, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


In an early scene of "The Wild Bunch," the bunch rides
into town past a crowd of children who are gathered
with excitement around their game. They have trapped
some scorpions and are watching them being tortured
by ants. The
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THE LIFE AND DEATH OF COLONEL BLIMP


October 27, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
One of the many miracles of "The Life and Death of
Colonel
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12 ANGRY MEN
September 29, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
In form, "12 Angry Men" is a courtroom drama. In
purpose, it's a crash course in those passages of the
Constitution that promise defendants a fair trial and the
presumption of innocence. It has a kind of stark
simplicity: Apart
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KIND HEARTS AND CORONETS

THE FIREMEN'S BALL

September 15, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


In the years after World War II, there emerged from the
Ealing

August 4, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


Milos Forman's "The Firemen's Ball" was banned
"permanently and forever" by the Communist regime in
Czechoslovakia in 1968, as Soviet troops marched in to
suppress a popular uprising. It was said to be a veiled
attack on the Soviet system

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RIFIFI
September 1, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
The modern heist movie was invented in Paris in 1954 by
Jules Dassin, with "Rififi," and Jean-Pierre Melville, with
"Bob le Flambeur." Dassin built his film around a 28minute safe-cracking sequence that is the father of all
later movies in
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UNFORGIVEN
July 21, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
Clint Eastwood's "Unforgiven" takes place at that
moment when the old West was becoming new.
Professional gunfighters have become such an
endangered species that journalists follow them for
stories. Men who slept under the stars are now building
themselves houses.
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CRIES AND WHISPERS


August 18, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
Cries and Whispers envelops us in a tomb of dread,
pain and hate, and to counter these powerful feelings it
summons selfless love. It is, I think, Ingmar Bergmans
way of treating his own self-disgust, and his envy of
those

STROSZEK
July 7, 2002 | by Roger Ebert

Who else but Werner Herzog would make a film about a


retarded ex-prisoner, a little old man and a prostitute,
who leave Germany to begin a new life in a house trailer
in Wisconsin? Who else would shoot the film

Shortly before filming was to begin on "Rashomon,"


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ANNIE HALL

THE HUSTLER
June 23, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
Bert: You got talent.
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IN COLD BLOOD

May 12, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


"Annie Hall" contains more intellectual wit and cultural
references than any other movie ever to win the Oscar
for best picture, and in winning the award in 1977 it
edged out "Star Wars," an outcome unthinkable today.
The victory marked
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JFK

June 9, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


In the years since Truman Capote published In Cold
Blood in 1966, the true crime genre has expanded to fill
whole sections of the book stores. Factual accounts of
crime were common enough before, but Capote
combined in-depth reporting with

April 29, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


I don't have the slightest idea whether Oliver Stone
knows who killed President John F. Kennedy. I have no
opinion on the factual accuracy of his 1991 film JFK. I
don't think that's the point. This is not a film

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RASHOMON

UMBERTO D

May 26, 2002 | by Roger Ebert

April 28, 2002 | by Roger Ebert

Umberto is upright, neat, exact, and the cut of his clothes

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THE RIGHT STUFF


AMADEUS
April 14, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
Happy people are pleased by the happiness of others.
The miserable are poisoned by envy. They vote with Gore
Vidal and David Merrick, both credited with saying, "It is
not enough that I succeed. Others must fail." Milos
Forman's "Amadeus"

March 16, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


Two men haunt Philip Kaufman's "The Right Stuff"
(1983), the story of America's first steps into space. One
speaks little, the other hardly at all. The laconic one is
Chuck Yeager, generally acknowledged as the best test
pilot of all
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THE FALL OF THE HOUSE OF USHER


THE GRAPES OF WRATH
March 31, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
John Ford's "The Grapes of Wrath" is a left-wing

March 3, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


The great hall in Jean Epstein's "The Fall of the House of
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SAY ANYTHING
PATTON
March 17, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
I love it, God help me, I do love it. I love it more than my
life.

February 17, 2002 | by Roger Ebert


Then first time Lloyd Dobler calls Diane Court to ask her
out on a date, he dials all but one digit of her phone
number, then looks in the mirror and brushes his hair
with his hand before dialing the

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KING KONG
February 3, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
On good days I consider "Citizen Kane" the seminal
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MY NEIGHBOR TOTORO
December 23, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
Here is a children's film made for the world we should
live in, rather than the one we occupy. A film with no
villains. No fight scenes. No evil adults. No fighting
between the two kids. No scary monsters. No
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LAURA
January 20, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
I've seen Otto Preminger's Laura three or four times,
but the
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A TALE OF WINTER
December 9, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
Eric Rohmer is the romantic philosopher of the French
New Wave, the director whose characters make love with
words as well as flesh. They are open to sudden flashes
of passion, they become infatuated at first sight, but
then they
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CHILDREN OF PARADISE
January 6, 2002 | by Roger Ebert
All discussions of Marcel Carne's Children of Paradise
begin
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THE SEARCHERS
November 25, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
John Ford's The Searchers contains scenes of
magnificence, and

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THE EARRINGS OF MADAME DE...

LAWRENCE OF ARABIA

November 11, 2001 | by Roger Ebert


Unhappiness is an invented thing.

September 2, 2001 | by Roger Ebert


What a bold, mad act of genius it was, to make
Lawrence of

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BRING ME THE HEAD OF ALFREDO GARCIA


THE SEVEN SAMURAI
October 28, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
I think I can feel Sam Peckinpah's heart beating and head
pounding in every frame in ''Bring Me the Head of
Alfredo Garcia'' (1974), a film he made during a period of
alcoholic fear and trembling. I believe its hero,

August 19, 2001 | by Roger Ebert


Akira Kurosawa's "Seven Samurai" (1954) is not only a
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SNOW WHITE AND THE SEVEN DWARFS


October 14, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
If Walt Disney's Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs had
been
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JULIET OF THE SPIRITS


August 5, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
Fellini lore has it that the master made Juliet of the
Spirits
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parallel character studies--one of a con man, the other of


a psychopath.
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THE APARTMENT
July 22, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
There is a melancholy gulf over the holidays between
those who
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PULP FICTION
June 10, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
Dialogue drives Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction,''
dialogue of such high quality it deserves comparison
with other masters of spare, hard-boiled prose, from
Raymond Chandler to Elmore Leonard. Like them, QT
finds a way to make the words humorous without ever
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HOOP DREAMS
July 8, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
There is a point in ''Hoop Dreams'' where the story,
about two inner-city kids who dream of playing pro
basketball, comes to a standstill while the mother of one
of them addresses herself directly to the camera.
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DO THE RIGHT THING


May 27, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
I have been given only a few filmgoing experiences in my
life to equal the first time I saw Do the Right Thing.
Most movies remain up there on the screen. Only a few
penetrate your soul. In May of
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SCHINDLER'S LIST
June 24, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
"Schindler's List" is described as a film about the
Holocaust, but the Holocaust supplies the field for the
story, rather than the subject. The film is really two

THE MALTESE FALCON

May 13, 2001 | by Roger Ebert


Among the movies we not only love but treasure, The
Maltese
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MANHATTAN
March 18, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
I had forgotten what perfect pitch Woody Allen brought
to ''Manhattan"-- how its tone and timing slip so
gracefully between comedy and romance. I hadn't seen it
in years, and remembered mostly the broad outlines, the
one-liners, the romance between
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FARGO
April 5, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
The telephone rings at 3 a.m. and a pregnant woman
puts on her police uniform to go out into the Minnesota
winter and investigate a homicide. Eggs, her sleepy
husband says. He'll make her eggs. We see the them
eating
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THE APU TRILOGY


March 4, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
The great, sad, gentle sweep of "The Apu Trilogy"
remains in the mind of the moviegoer as a promise of
what film can be. Standing above fashion, it creates a
world so convincing that it becomes, for a time,
another
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MY LIFE TO LIVE
April 1, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
Godard. We all went to Jean-Luc Godard in the 1960s.
We stood in the rain outside the Three Penny Cinema,
waiting for the next showing of "Weekend" (1968). One
year the New York Film Festival showed two of his
movies,
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THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS


February 18, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
A fundamental difference between The Silence of the
Lambs and its sequel, Hannibal, is that the former is
frightening, involving and disturbing, while the latter is
merely disturbing. It is easy enough to construct a geek
show if you start
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THE CONVERSATION
February 4, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
His colleagues in the surveillance industry think Harry
Caul is such a genius that we realize with a little shock
how bad he is at his job. Here is a man who is paid to
eavesdrop on a conversation in
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A CHRISTMAS STORY
December 24, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
One of the details that "A Christmas Story" gets right is
the threat of having your mouth washed out with
Lifebouy soap. Not any soap. Lifebouy. Never Ivory or
Palmolive. Lifebouy, which apparently contained an
ingredient able to nullify bad
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THIS IS SPINAL TAP


January 21, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
Guitarist Nigel Tufnel is explaining his amplifier to
documentary filmmaker Marty DiBergi:
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THE BANK DICK


December 10, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
You mustn't make fun of the gentleman, Clifford. You'd
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PERSONA
January 7, 2001 | by Roger Ebert
Shakespeare used six words to pose the essential human
choice: "To be, or not to be?" Elizabeth, a character in
Ingmar Bergman's "Persona," uses two to answer it: "No,
don't!" She is an actress who one night stopped
speaking in

BEAT THE DEVIL


November 26, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
The village band pounds out an oompah-pah tune, as
police march four disreputable characters across the
square. Already we're smiling. One is tall and round, one

is tall and cadaverous, one is short and round and the


fourth is a
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October 15, 2000 | by Roger Ebert


To live happily ever after with the one you love, you
must be
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PLANES, TRAINS AND AUTOMOBILES


November 12, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
"Planes, Trains and Automobiles" is founded on the
essential natures of its actors. It is perfectly cast and
soundly constructed, and all else flows naturally. Steve
Martin and John Candy don't play characters; they
embody themselves. That's why the comedy,
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RAN
October 1, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
Akira Kurosawa's "Ran" is inspired by "King Lear," but
may be as much about Kurosawa's life as Shakespeare's
play. Seeing it again in a fine new 35mm print, I realized
the action doesn't center on the old man, but has
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NETWORK
October 29, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
Strange, how Howard Beale, "the mad prophet of the
airwaves," dominates our memories of "Network." We
remember him in his soaking-wet raincoat, hair plastered
to his forehead, shouting, "I'm mad as hell and I'm not
going to take this anymore."
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L'ATALANTE

ROMEO AND JULIET


September 17, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
"Romeo and Juliet" is always said to be the first romantic
tragedy ever written, but it isn't really a tragedy at all. It's
a tragic misunderstanding, scarcely fitting the ancient
requirement of tragedy that the mighty fall through their
own
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SHANE
September 3, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
Looked at a certain way, the entire story of "Shane"
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Zero Mostel and Gene Wilder have a scene in "The


Producers" where they roll on the floor so ferociously we
expect them to chew on one another. Mostel is so manic
and barbarian, Wilder so panicked and hysterical, you
wonder
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JAWS
August 20, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
"You're going to need a bigger boat."
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DUCK SOUP
July 9, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
My father loved the Marx Brothers above all other
comedians or,
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NASHVILLE
August 6, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
Taking down Pauline Kael's 1976 collection Reeling to reread her famous review of "Nashville," I find a yellow
legal sheet marking the page: my notes for a class I
taught on the film. "What is this story about?" I wrote.
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THE DISCREET CHARM OF THE BOURGEOISIE


June 25, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
All movies toy with us, but the best ones have the nerve
to admit it. Most movies pretend their stories are real
and that we must take them seriously. Comedies are
allowed to break the rules. Most of the films
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THE PRODUCERS
July 23, 2000 | by Roger Ebert

ALL ABOUT EVE

June 11, 2000 | by Roger Ebert


Growing older was a smart career move for Bette Davis,
whose

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UN CHIEN ANDALOU

8 1/2
May 28, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
The conventional wisdom is that Federico Fellini went
wrong when he abandoned realism for personal fantasy;
that starting with "La Dolce Vita" (1959), his work ran
wild through jungles of Freudian, Christian, sexual and
autobiographical images. The precise observation in

April 16, 2000 | by Roger Ebert


Luis Bunuel said that if he were told he had 20 years to
live and was asked how he wanted to live them, his reply
would be: "Give me two hours a day of activity, and I'll
take the other
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THE SEVENTH SEAL

ORPHEUS

April 16, 2000 | by Roger Ebert


A knight returning from the Crusades finds a rude church
still
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May 14, 2000 | by Roger Ebert


"Orpheus" is a Greek myth about a musician who
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THE DECALOGUE

RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK


April 30, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
Steven Spielberg's "Raiders of the Lost Ark" plays

April 2, 2000 | by Roger Ebert


Ten commandments, 10 films. Krzysztof Kieslowski sat
for months in his small, smoke-filled room in Warsaw
writing the scripts with a lawyer hed met in the early
1980s, during the Solidarity trials. Krzysztof Piesiewicz
didnt know how to write, the

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GRAVE OF THE FIREFLIES

CHINATOWN

March 19, 2000 | by Roger Ebert


In the waning days of World War II, American bombers
drop napalm canisters on Japanese cities, creating fire
storms. These bombs, longer than a tin can but about as
big around, fall to earth trailing cloth tails that flutter
behind

February 6, 2000 | by Roger Ebert


Are you alone? the private eye is asked in Roman
Polanskis Chinatown. Isnt everybody? he replies.
That loneliness is central to a lot of noir heroes, who
plunder other peoples secrets while running from their
own. The tone was set

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THE LAST LAUGH


March 5, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
The old man is proud beyond all reason of his position
as a
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REAR WINDOW
February 20, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
The hero of Alfred Hitchcock's "Rear Window" is
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BROKEN BLOSSOMS
January 23, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
Lillian Gish told D.W. Griffith she was too old to play the
girl
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SOME LIKE IT HOT


January 9, 2000 | by Roger Ebert
What a work of art and nature is Marilyn Monroe. She
hasn't aged into an icon, some citizen of the past, but

still seems to be inventing herself as we watch her. She


has the gift of appearing to hit

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MCCABE AND MRS. MILLER

December 26, 1999 | by Roger Ebert


Before Disney's 1991 film and long before the Beast
started

November 14, 1999 | by Roger Ebert


It is not often given to a director to make a perfect film.
Some spend their lives trying, but always fall short.
Robert Altman has made a dozen films that can be called
great in one way or another, but

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GREED

HOUSE OF GAMES

December 12, 1999 | by Roger Ebert


Erich von Stroheim's "Greed" (1925), like the Venus de

October 31, 1999 | by Roger Ebert


Almost all of David Mamet's movies involve some kind of
con game. Sometimes it is a literal con, as in "House of
Games," where a character is deliberately deceived by
fraudsters. Sometimes it is an inadvertent con, as in
"Things

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

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APOCALYPSE NOW
November 28, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
Francis Ford Coppola's film "Apocalypse Now" was
inspired by Heart of Darkness, a novel by Joseph Conrad
about a European named Kurtz who penetrated to the
farthest reaches of the Congo and established himself
like a god. A boat sets

THE SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION


October 17, 1999 | by Roger Ebert

It is a strange comment to make about a film set inside a


prison, but "The Shawshank Redemption" creates a warm
hold on our feelings because it makes us a member of a
family. Many movies offer us vicarious experiences

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GREAT EXPECTATIONS
GRAND ILLUSION
October 3, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
Apart from its other achievements, Jean Renoir's "Grand

August 22, 1999 | by Roger Ebert


One of the great things about Charles Dickens is the way
his
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THE 400 BLOWS


DRACULA
September 19, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
Movie lore has it that Bela Lugosi could barely speak
English
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YELLOW SUBMARINE
September 5, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
Once upon a time, or maybe twice, there was a land
called Pepperland. Eighty thousand leagues beneath the
sea it lay, or lie (I'm not too sure).

August 8, 1999 | by Roger Ebert


I demand that a film express either the joy of making
cinema or the agony of making cinema. I am not at all
interested in anything in between.--Francois Truffaut
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BELLE DE JOUR
July 25, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
In the days after I first saw Stanley Kubrick's "Eyes Wide
Shut," another film entered my mind again and again. It
was Luis Bunuel's "Belle de Jour" (1967), the story of a
respectable young wife who secretly works in a

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DR. STRANGELOVE
July 11, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
Every time you see a great film, you find new things in it.
Viewing Stanley Kubrick's "Dr. Strangelove" for perhaps
the 10th time, I discovered what George C. Scott does
with his face. His performance is the funniest thing in

MY DINNER WITH ANDRE


June 13, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
Someone asked me the other day if I could name a
movie that was
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LAST YEAR AT MARIENBAD

STAR WARS
June 28, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
To see "Star Wars" again after 20 years is to revisit a
place in the mind. George Lucas' space epic has
colonized our imaginations, and it is hard to stand back
and see it simply as a motion picture, because

May 30, 1999 | by Roger Ebert


How clearly I recall standing in the rain outside the CoEd
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PEEPING TOM

SUNSET BOULEVARD
June 27, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
Billy Wilder's "Sunset Boulevard is the portrait of a
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May 2, 1999 | by Roger Ebert


The movies make us into voyeurs. We sit in the dark,
watching other people's lives. It is the bargain the
cinema strikes with us, although most films are too wellbehaved to mention it.
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March 19, 1999 | by Roger Ebert


"The Bicycle Thief" is so well-entrenched as an
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THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI


April 18, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
The last words in David Lean's "The Bridge on the River
Kwai" are "Madness! Madness ... madness!" Although the
film's two most important characters are both mad, the
hero more than the villain, we're not quite certain what is
intended
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SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER


March 7, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
"Saturday Night Fever'' was Gene Siskel's favorite movie,
and he watched it at least 17 times. We all have movies
like that, titles that transcend ordinary categories of
good and bad, and penetrate straight to our hearts. My
own short
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AGUIRRE, THE WRATH OF GOD


April 4, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
On this river God never finished his creation.
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SINGIN' IN THE RAIN


February 14, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
There is no movie musical more fun than "Singin' in the
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ON THE WATERFRONT
March 21, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
Conscience. That stuff can drive you nuts.
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GOLDFINGER

THE BICYCLE THIEF

January 31, 1999 | by Roger Ebert


Not every man would like to be James Bond, but every
boy would. In one adventure after another, he saves the

world, defeats bizarre villains, gets to play with neat


gadgets and seduces, or is seduced by, stupendously
sexy women
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DOUBLE INDEMNITY
THE MUSIC ROOM
January 17, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
Satyajit Ray's "The Music Room" (1958) has one of the
most evocative opening scenes ever filmed. A middleage man, his face set into deep weariness, sits on the
wide, flat roof of his house in an upholstered chair that
has

December 20, 1998 | by Roger Ebert


No, I never loved you Walter -- not you or anybody else.
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PSYCHO
December 6, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
"It wasn't a message that stirred the audiences, nor was
it a great performance...they were aroused by pure film."
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BRIDE OF FRANKENSTEIN
January 3, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
To a new world of gods and monsters.
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PINOCCHIO
November 22, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
When the Russian director Sergei Eisenstein saw Disney's
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IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE
January 1, 1999 | by Roger Ebert
The best and worst things that ever happened to "It's a
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BLOW-UP
November 8, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
Michelangelo Antonioni's "Blow-Up" opened in America
two months before I became a film critic, and colored my
first years on the job with its lingering influence. It was
the opening salvo of the emerging "film generation,"
which quickly lined up

TOUCH OF EVIL
September 13, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
Come on, read my future for me.You haven't got any.
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NIGHTS OF CABIRIA
THE UP DOCUMENTARIES
October 25, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
The "Up" documentaries, they're called. Every seven
years, the British director Michael Apted revisits a group
of people whose lives he has been chronicling since they
were children. As he chats with them about how things
are going, his films

August 16, 1998 | by Roger Ebert


Cabiria's eyebrows are straight, black horizontal lines,
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BONNIE AND CLYDE


August 3, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
There is a moment in "Bonnie and Clyde" when Bonnie,
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TROUBLE IN PARADISE
October 11, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
When I was small I liked to go to the movies because
you could

PICNIC AT HANGING ROCK

GONE WITH THE WIND

August 2, 1998 | by Roger Ebert


On a drowsy St. Valentine's Day in 1900, a party of girls
from a strict boarding school in Australia goes on a day's
outing to Hanging Rock, a geological outcropping not
far from their school. Three of the girls and

June 21, 1998 | by Roger Ebert


"Gone With the Wind presents a sentimental view of the
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THE BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN

DETOUR

July 19, 1998 | by Roger Ebert


"The Battleship Potemkin has been so famous for so
long

June 7, 1998 | by Roger Ebert


"Detour" is a movie so filled with imperfections that

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YANKEE DOODLE DANDY

CITIZEN KANE

July 5, 1998 | by Roger Ebert


There is a story that James Cagney stood on his toes
while

May 24, 1998 | by Roger Ebert


I don't think any word can explain a man's life, says one
of

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RAGING BULL
May 10, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
Raging Bull is not a film about boxing but about a man
with
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RED RIVER
March 1, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
When Peter Bogdanovich needed a movie to play as the
final
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SWING TIME
PANDORA'S BOX
April 26, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
Louise Brooks regards us from the screen as if the screen
were

February 15, 1998 | by Roger Ebert


Of all of the places the movies have created, one of the
most
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WOMAN IN THE DUNES


WINGS OF DESIRE
April 12, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
The angels in Wings of Desire are not merely guardian
angels, placed on Earth to look after human beings. They
are witnesses, and they have been watching for a long
time--since the beginning. Standing on a concrete river
bank in

February 1, 1998 | by Roger Ebert


"I love staying at local homes, the man says, accepting
an
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WRITTEN ON THE WIND


CITY LIGHTS
January 18, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
Opinion on the melodramas of Douglas Sirk has flipflopped since
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December 21, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


If only one of Charles Chaplin's films could be preserved,
City
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DAYS OF HEAVEN
A WOMAN UNDER THE INFLUENCE
January 14, 1998 | by Roger Ebert
John Cassavetes is one of the few modern directors
whose shots, scenes, dialogue and characters all instantly
identify their creator; watch even a few seconds of a
Cassavetes film, and you know whose it is, as certainly as
with Hitchcock

December 7, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


Terrence Malick's "Days of Heaven'' has been praised for
its painterly images and evocative score, but criticized for
its muted emotions: Although passions erupt in a deadly
love triangle, all the feelings are somehow held at arm's
length. This observation
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THE LADY EVE


DAY FOR NIGHT
December 26, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
Producer: Arent we one big happy family? Actor: So
are the people in Greek tragedies.

November 23, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


If I were asked to name the single scene in all of
romantic
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GATES OF HEAVEN

NOSFERATU

November 9, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


"There's your dog; your dog's dead. But where's the
thing that made it move? It had to be something, didn't
it?"

September 28, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


To watch F.W. Murnau's "Nosferatu" (1922) is to seethe
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E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL


MY DARLING CLEMENTINE

September 14, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


Dear Raven and Emil:

October 26, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


"What kind of town is this? Wyatt Earp asks on his first

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NOTORIOUS
THE SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS
October 21, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
The two men in "The Sweet Smell of Success" relate to
each other like junkyard dogs. One is dominant, and the
other is a whipped cur, circling hungrily, his tail between
his legs, hoping for a scrap after the big
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August 17, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


Alfred Hitchcock's Notorious is the most elegant
expression of
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THE BIG SLEEP

August 3, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


The horror of the faces: That is the overwhelming image
that

June 22, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


Two of the names mentioned most often in Howard
Hawks' "The

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BODY HEAT
July 20, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
Like a tantalizing mirage, film noir haunts modern
filmmakers.
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LE SAMOURAI
June 8, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
An empty room. No, not empty. In the shadows we can
barely see a man on the bed. He lights a cigarette, and
smoke coils up toward a wisp of light from the window.
After a time the man gets
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PICKPOCKET
July 6, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
One of the early images in Robert Bresson's Pickpocket
(1959)shows the unfocused eyes of a man obsessed by
excitement and fear. The man's name is Michel. He lives
in Paris in a small room under the eaves, a garret
almost
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THE GENERAL
May 31, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
Buster Keaton was not the Great Stone Face so much as
a man who
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bar and takes a seat at the table inside the door. The
barmaid, an insolent blond in a low-cut dress,
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BEING THERE
May 25, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
On the day that Kasparov was defeated by Deep Blue, I
found myself thinking of the film "Being There'' (1979).
The chess champion said there was something about the
computer he did not understand, and it frightened him.
There were
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WALKABOUT
April 13, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
Is "Walkabout" only about what it seems to be about? Is
it a parable about noble savages and the crushed spirits
of city dwellers? That's what the film's surface seems to
suggest, but I think it's also about something deeper
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THE EXTERMINATING ANGEL


May 11, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
The dinner guests arrive twice. They ascend the stairs
and walk through the wide doorway, and then they
arrive again--the same guests, seen from a higher
camera angle. This is a joke and soon we will understand
the punch line:

FLOATING WEEDS
March 30, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
Sooner or later, everyone who loves movies comes to
Ozu. He is
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2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY


ALI: FEAR EATS THE SOUL
April 27, 1997 | by Roger Ebert
The first shots set up the theme: them against us. An
older woman, dumpy and plain, walks into an unfamiliar

March 27, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


The genius is not in how much Stanley Kubrick does in
"2001: A Space Odyssey," but in how little. This is the

work of an artist so sublimely confident that he doesn't


include a single shot simply to keep our

Tell me you love me. I love you. Tell me you don't. I don't
love

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THE GODFATHER

LA DOLCE VITA

March 16, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


The Godfather is told entirely within a closed world.
Thats why we sympathize with characters who are
essentially evil. The story by Mario Puzo and Francis Ford
Coppola is a brilliant conjuring act, inviting us to
consider the Mafia entirely

January 5, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


I have heard theories that Federico Fellini's "La Dolce
Vita" catalogs the seven deadly sins, takes place on the
seven hills of Rome, and involves seven nights and seven
dawns, but I have never looked into them, because that
would

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THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC

THE WIZARD OF OZ

February 16, 1997 | by Roger Ebert


You cannot know the history of silent film unless you
know the

December 22, 1996 | by Roger Ebert


As a child I simply did not notice whether a movie was in
color or

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L'AVVENTURA

THE THIRD MAN

January 19, 1997 | by Roger Ebert

December 8, 1996 | by Roger Ebert

Has there ever been a film where the music more


perfectly suited
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VERTIGO

THE NIGHT OF THE HUNTER

October 13, 1996 | by Roger Ebert


Did he train you? Did he rehearse you? Did
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November 24, 1996 | by Roger Ebert


Charles Laughton's "The Night of the Hunter (1955) is
one
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IKIRU

MR. HULOT'S HOLIDAY

September 29, 1996 | by Roger Ebert


The old man knows he is dying of cancer. In a bar, he
tells a
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November 10, 1996 | by Roger Ebert


The first time I saw Jacques Tati's Mr. Hulot's Holiday, I
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CASABLANCA

A HARD DAY'S NIGHT


October 27, 1996 | by Roger Ebert
When it opened in September, 1964, "A Hard Day's
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September 15, 1996 | by Roger Ebert


If we identify strongly with the characters in some
movies, then
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