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General English

Modules 1 - 4

Teachers Guide

The Curriculum Project

General English
Units 1 - 4 Teachers Guide
Course Map for Modules 1 - 4:
Unit

Topics and Functions


Routines and habits
Friends and family
Romance
Introductions and
personal details

1
Gender
Education

Structures

Describe their daily habits and routines

Adverbs of frequency

Describe how frequently events happen

Pronunciation of -s and
-es endings
Numbers, dates, days of
the week

Accurately comprehend and record numbers, dates


and days of the week

Places and buildings

There is/are: sentences,


negatives and questions

Types of transport

Have/has got

Travelling

Adjectives

Giving and receiving


directions
Reasons for learning
English

Introduce themselves and other people

Describe a place and what is in it


Talk about facilities available in their area
Ask and answer about appropriate methods of
transport
Draw a map of their area

Syllables, word stress


and schwa

Give and follow directions to a place


Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of
different kinds of transport
Identify the reasons for learning English,
proficiencies in different skills, and priorities.

Present continuous
tense: positive and
negative sentences and
questions

Talk about what is happening at the moment and


around now

Food and drink

There is/are + -ing

Talk about things that are changing

Containers

Imperatives

Give instructions for a recipe

Healthy eating

Lik e + -ing

Describe things happening in a scene

Describing a situation
Describing change

Shopping
Likes and dislikes
Resources for language
learning
Reviewing learning

Imagine themselvesin different situations

The past

Past simple tense

Famous people

Past time phrases


Pronunciation of -ed
endings

Ask and answer about available items in a shop


Discuss their likes and dislikes
Identify the resources they have to help them learn
English
Effectively review items they have learned
Describe events that happened in the past, to
themselves and to famous people
Ask and answer questions about the past
Use time phrases to describe when something
happened

Rooms and furniture

Adverbs of degree

Talk about important events in their lives.

City and country life

Active and passive


vocabulary

Modify adjectives with appropriate adverbs of degree

Life stories
4

Ask and answer questions about factual information

Prepositions of place

Language learning skills

Ask and answer questions about habits

Discuss the importance of the different skills in


language learning, and techniques to improve their
proficiency in these skills.

Skills in language learning

Skills and Outcomes

Present simple tense:


positive and negative
sentences and questions
Wh- questions

Restaurants
Vocabulary learning

Order and pay for food in a restaurant


Distinguish between active and passive vocabulary
Decide which vocabulary items to prioritise in their
own learning

Contents
Module 1
Module 2
Module 3
Module 4
Review Section
Extra Activities
Test for Modules 1/2
Answers to Test 1/2
Test for Modules 3/4
Answers to Test 3/4
Tapescripts

page 2
page 27
page 53
page 77
page 100
page 106
page 111
page 115
page 117
page 120
page 122

What?

How (continued)?

This course is designed for people from Burma who want


to communicate in English. There are 12 modules in three
books: Modules 1-4, Modules 5-8 and Modules 9-12. They
start at pre-intermediate and finish at intermediate level.

- learners are often more accurate and fluent at


reading and writing than speaking and
listening, as written English is emphasised in
middle and high schools.
- learning tasks designed for a low-resource
environment
- must be easy to photocopy or print cheaply
- clear instructions in the teachers guides,
without too much jargon.
With these points in mind, teachers and materials writers
met to decide on topics, themes and functions to prioritise,
then the writing team wrote this draft.

Who?
General English is useful for:
- Post-10 schools
- adult education courses
- English upgrading for teachers
- teachers wanting locally-relevant material to
supplement a commercial English course (such
as Headway, Language in Use or Interchange)
It is designed for adults. Themes and topics of focus are
less appropriate for young learners.

Why?
Teachers and learners often find commercial English language teaching materials culturally irrelevant and difficult
to understand. It was felt that context-specific materials
were necessary. General English was designed targeting
the specific needs, context and learning environment of
the learners on the Burma border.

When?
Priority was given to learners at a pre-intermediate level
of English (level 3 on the English Speakers Union scale),
as high school leavers are, on average, approximating this
proficiency in oral/aural skills. Curriculum Project has plans
to develop elementary and intermediate level materials in
the future.

How?
Initially, learners and teachers from Post-10 schools were
asked about their needs and gaps. The findings were:
- more culturally relevant settings
- dont assume teachers or learners are
familiar with Western cultural norms (the
Teacher, what is a hamburger? problem)
- more practice activities

No English course can exactly match the needs


of all learners. Teachers are encouraged to use
these materials in the way that is most appropriate for their learners. Omit parts that are too easy,
spend longer on parts that are more difficult.
Supplement these materials with extra exercises
from other books - grammar and vocabulary
practice books and activity books. Add extra reading and writing tasks if learners need more of
this.
Although we have tried to reduce the amount of
teacher jargon, there are a few terms weve used
a lot in this teachers guide:
Elicit means to get learners to provide answers,
opinions or ideas (instead of the teacher supplying these to the students).
Pre-teach means to introduce new vocabulary
or ideas before students start a new topic. You
can do this by providing background information, translation, or eliciting students ideas.
Demonstrate means to perform a new task in
front of the class before getting learners to do it.
This way learners have a model to base their tasks

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 1

Before You Start...


Get your learners to read the contents page.
Discuss the things they will be learning in the module, and clarify anything they dont understand.
Ask learners to decide which part looks the most interesting, and the most difficult.
Have a class vote. Which topics look the most interesting/difficult?

1. The Present Simple Tense


This section reviews the present simple tense, positive and negative forms, in its most common uses:
- talking about repeated activities
- talking about things that are true all the time.

1.1

Love and marriage

A. Ask the class why they think people get married, e.g. love, to not be lonely, to have a family, etc.
Write their ideas on the board.
B. Learners work in groups to brainstorm free time activities. Get them to think of lists of free time
activities that use these verbs.
Examples:
listen to... music, the radio, cassettes
read...
books, newspapers, magazines
play...
football, chess, volleyball
watch... videos, television, football
visit...
friends, relatives
go...
to the cinema, swimming, to the market, etc.
Make class lists on the board.
C. Pre-teach: important, to work hard, to spend (money), band, boring, alcohol,
fashionable, to organise, to invite, teashop.
Learners read about the women. Clarify anything they dont understand.
Learners read about the men, and guess which women are married to which men.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 2

D. Play the tape. The women talk about their marriages.


Learners identify who the husbands and wives are.
Answers: Hser Hser and Aung Mon, Myint Myint San and Michael, Mi Meh and La Nan.
E. Learners read the texts on page 2, and write some examples of present simple positive and negative
in the chart. They should not try to write all the examples - there are too many!
Play the tape again a few times. Learners listen, and add more examples of present simple
positive and negative uses.
Example answers:
First person singular - positive
First person singular - negative
I have an important job
I dont watch videos
I work very hard
I dont like spending money
I sometimes watch TV
I dont like staying at home
I also play the guitar
I dont have much free time
I usually visit my parents
I always listen to the news
Third person singular - negative
Third person singular - positive
He doesnt like getting up
La Nan usually goes to bed late
He doesnt read story books
He sometimes organises football games
Aung Mon studies hard
Michael likes cooking
First person plural - negative
We dont want more than six
First person plural - positive
We dont have a TV
Sometimes we argue about money
We both like reading
We always go out at night
F. Elicit the meaning of argue.
Learners discuss and identify the topics these couples disagree or argue about.
Answers:
Hser Hser and Aung Mon argue about money. He likes to buy tea for his friends, but she
doesnt like spending money.
Myint Myint San and Michael disagree about movies. She doesnt like watching action
movies. He likes them.
Mi Meh and La Nan argue about alcohol. She doesnt drink, but he drinks a lot.
G. Pre-teach ideal (perfect; best possible - it can be real or imaginary).
Learners talk about their husband/wife (if married) or imagine their ideal partner (if single).
They complete the chart with some characteristics of their real or ideal partner.
H. Get a few learners to describe their real or ideal partner to the class.
Language/culture notes
Partner has two meanings:
1. a business partner, or someone you do an activity with
2. somebody you are in a serious, long-term romantic relationship with (but not usually married to)
Boyfriend/girlfriend usually refers to someone who you have not been together with for very long, or who
you are not having a very serious relationship with.
A couple can be either a husband and wife or two partners. It refers to two people, e.g. Tom and Cho Cho
are a couple.
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 3

1.2
2

Listening: And after that?

A. Prediction. Look at the title And after that? Ask learners: What do you think this exercise will
be about? Elicit suggestions.
Make sure learners understand the task - to listen to the people, and order the activities 1, 2, and 3.
There is one false sentence for each person.
Play the tape.
Check the answers by asking questions, e.g.
What does Eric do first? What does he do next? And after that?
Play the cassette again to check.
Answers:
1 He takes a shower, he eats breakfast, he reads the newspaper.
2 She makes coffee, she exercises, she goes to work.
3 She studies, she eats dinner, she watches TV.
4 He eats dinner, he puts his children to bed, he reads.
B. Learners write short paragraphs about their morning routine.
C. Learners work in pairs. Partner A reads her/his paragraph quickly.
Partner B listens, then writes down notes.
Partner B must not try to write Partner As exact words the important thing is the
information, not the exact wording.
Partner B reads the information back to Partner A. Is it correct?

First you brush


your teeth. Then
you get dressed.

No, I get
dressed first.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 4

1.3

The 24 hour day: Women and men

This is a thinking activity that revises the same vocabulary (daily routines, times) and structures
(present simple) that learners have been studying.
A. Introduce the topic the working day for men and women.
Discuss the question: Who does more work? Men or women?
Ask about different people farmers? Migrant workers? Rich people?
B. In groups, learners imagine a typical family from their community.
They should give them names, and decide how many children they have.
C. In groups, learners decide how the wife and the husband spend each hour of the day.
Elicit suggestions for the first hour for the husband and the wife, and put them on the board
When everyone is finished, groups present the results.
Make sure all group members do some speaking!

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 5

1.4

Interview

A. Learners think back to page 2, and try to remember information about the people.
Answers:
1. No, she doesnt.
2. No, she doesnt. She has four.
3. Yes, he does.
4. No, he doesnt. He grows vegetables.
5. Yes, they do.
6. Yes, they do.They sometimes argue about money.
B. See if learners can complete the sentence with the correct grammar terms.
Answer:
We use the auxiliary verb do , and then the subject , and then the main verb .
The main verb is in the base form (see the Language/culture note on page 24 for more details). If
necessary, learners can refer to the Grammar review on page 24 of their workbooks.
C. Learners prepare a list of yes/no questions to ask another learner.
If they like, they can look at the texts on page 2 for ideas.
Encourage learners to ask interesting questions - ones they actually want to know the answers to!
Go around the class checking that learners are accurate in their question forms.
D. In pairs, learners ask and answer their questions. They should make notes about the answers.
E. Get a few learners to tell the class about their partners.

2. Adverbs of Frequency
2.1

How do you get around?

This section focuses on adverbs of frequency, which describe how often people do activities.
A. Learners look at the picture, and put the people in order of who walks to work most often to least
often. You might want to draw a diagram on the board to help:
always

never

Answers: 3, 1, 6, 4, 5, 2
Ask learners how often they walk to work or school.
B. Learners answer the questions truthfully, using an adverb of frequency.
If they are unfamiliar with adverbs of frequency, write this information on the board. (The numbers
are only approximate, but they are a useful guide to usage.)
always - 100 %
usually - 80 %
often - 60 %
sometimes - 40%
not often - 20%
never - 0 %
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 6

2.2

On Saturdays

A. Learners think about their normal activities on Saturdays. Do they do any of these things?
Ask a few learners about these activities, e.g.
- On Saturdays, do you visit friends?
- On Saturdays, do you go to bed late?
Learners write true sentences about what they do on Saturdays, using the adverbs of frequency.
B. Learners think of some other activities, and write sentences about them.

3. Wh- Questions
This section looks at wh- questions in the present simple.
- meanings of wh- question words
- how to form questions in the present simple

3.1

General knowledge

A. Learners work in pairs, and choose the best answers to the questions.
They should use a dictionary to check any new words.
Elicit answers from the learners, and check if the class agrees before you give the correct answers.
Answers:
1. grass
2. Italy
3. April
4. bread and cakes
5. The North Pole
6. to wake up
7. watch movies
8. Russia

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 7

B. Learners work in pairs. Learner A looks at this page; Learner B looks at page 10.
Learners ask and answer the questions.
The underlined answers are correct.
C. In their pairs, learners write one or two general knowledge questions, with three possible answers.
They should know which is the correct answer.
Get each pair in turn to read their questions to the class, who write the answers.
After everyone has read their questions, check the answers.

3.2

Question words

A. Brainstorm a class list of question words. Encourage learners to think of the different questions
that you can make with how and what:
e.g. how many, how far, how long, how often, what time, etc.
B. Read the information about Khaing Win, and his English classes. Learners match the questions
and answers.
Answers:
1. e
2. g
3. d
4. f
5. b
6. a
7. i
8. c
9. h
C. Learners complete the chart about the meanings of questions and answers.
Answers:
where - a place
when - a time
how - a way
who - a person
what time - a time
how much/how many - an amount
what - a thing
why - a reason
how often - a frequency

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 8

D. Learners make questions.


Answers:
2. Where do they live?
3. What do crocodiles eat?
4. Where do you keep your rice?
5. What time do you eat breakfast?
6. Why does he read books?
7. How much (money) do you want?
8. Where do you use English?

3.3

Pairwork: Kofi Annan


NOTE
This exercise was written in 2005, when Kofi Annan was Secretary-General of the UN. He
was replaced by Ban Ki Moon in January 2007. However, the exercises in this section are
still useful for practising questions and learning vocabulary.

A. Brainstorm about the United Nations. Write learners ideas on the board.
Ask about the pictures. What are they? Elicit learners ideas.
(The United Nations logo, Kofi Annan, and Kofi Annan with his wife)
B. Pre-teach Secretary-General, member, independent, to earn, lawyer, headquarters, to retire.
Learners work in pairs. Partner A looks at this page; Partner B looks at page 10.
Learners spend some time reading the text, and thinking about what questions they need to ask to
get the missing information.
If this is too difficult, help the learners identify the questions they need, by giving them the whquestion words, or writing the questions on the board.
Learner Bs questions:
Learner As questions:
1. What does his name mean?
1. Where does Kofi Annan come from?
2. What languages does he speak?
2. What languages does he speak?
3. How many people work for the United
3. How many member countries does the
Nations?
UN have?
4. What is his wifes name?
4. What does his wife do?
5. Where does she come from?
5. How many children do they have?
6. Where do they live?
6. What do they do in their free time?
7. What do they do in their free time?
C. In pairs, learners ask and answer the questions. Dont allow them to look at each others texts!
They write the missing information in their texts. Each learner should have a complete text:
Kofi Annan is Secretary-General of the United Nations. He comes from Ghana, in Africa.
His name, Kofi, means born on a Friday. He speaks English, French and several
African languages. His job is very large The United Nations has 191 member countries,
almost every independent country in the world. 61,000 people work for the UN. He earns
227,000 dollars per year.
His wifes name is Nane Annan. Shes a lawyer from Sweden. They have three children.
They live in New York, near the United Nations headquarters. In their free time they like
dancing and walking in the mountains. After he retires as Secretary-General, he wants to
become a farmer in his home country, Ghana.
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 9

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 10

4. Pronunciation of Present Simple Verb Forms


This section focuses on pronunciation of the present simple - particularly the endings.

4.1
3

Syllables

A. Learners read the text, and circle the verbs.


Play the tape; learners listen.
B. Check that learners understand syllables. Learners classify the verbs into one and two syllables.
Answers:
One syllable: come, live, teach, start, walk, go, dress, wear, try, watch, fix
Two syllables: finish, study, practise
C. Learners write about Khaing Win. They need to use the third person.
Answers:
He comes from Arakan State, but now he lives in Australia. He teaches Burmese at a
university near his house. He starts work at 8.30 and finishes at 4.00. He usually walks to
work, but sometimes he goes by car. He dresses well for work - he always wears a tie. On
Mondays he studies English at night classes. He tries hard with his English - he practises
every day. In the weekends, he watches videos and fixes his old car.
D. Learners practise saying the paragraph, and identify which verbs add an extra syllable in the
third person.

E. Play the tape. Learners check which verbs add a syllable.


Answers: teaches, dresses, practises, watches, fixes
F. Play The Disappearing Paragraph.
Write the paragraph on the board. Learners read the paragraph out loud.
Rub off about fifteen words. Learners say the paragraph, remembering the missing words.
Rub off another ten-fifteen words. Learners say the paragraph.
Continue removing words until learners are saying the whole paragraph from memory.
G. Learners complete the rule about pronunciation of third person verb endings.
Answer:
If a verb ends in a ch , sh , x , or s sound, add another syllable.

4.2
5

Doesnt and dont

A. Play the tape. Learners listen to the sentences.


They should notice the pronunciation of doesnt and dont.
B. Learners listen to the sentences, and repeat.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 11

5. Friends, Lovers and Family


In this section, learners look at the relationships that are important in their lives:
- family relationships
- friendships
- romantic relationships

5.1

Whos who?

A. Learners look at the picture of Saw Rehs family. In pairs, they guess who is who.
6

B. Play the tape. Learners listen, and decide who is who in the picture.
Answers:
back row, left-right: Saw Reh, his friend, his younger sister, his older sister, his niece,
his sisters husband
front row, left-right: his mother, his father, his brother, his grandfather, his uncle,
his cousin, his aunt
Play the tape a few more times. Learners listen to the tape and write any information they can in
the chart about Saw Rehs grandfather, older sister and friend.
Possible answers:
his grandfather:
- about 80 years old
his older sister:
- a doctor
- husband is a doctor
- they have a one year old daughter
his friend:
- his name is Ko Naing
- lives in Saw Rehs house
- goes home to his village in school holidays
C. Learners answer the questions:
Answers:
1. his friend
2. his brother-in-law

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 12

5.2

Family tree

A. Learners write the family members on the family tree, and idenfity which family member is not on
the tree.
k. sister
Answers:
b. grandfather
l. brother-in-law
c. aunt
m. nephew
d. uncle
n.
niece
e. mother
o. daughter-in-law
f. father
p. son
g. mother-in-law
q. daughter
h. father-in-law
r. son-in-law
i. sister-in-law
s. grandson
j. brother
t. granddaughter
cousin is not used
B. Learners classify the family members into female, male or both.
Answers:
female: grandmother, aunt, mother, mother-in-law, sister-in-law, sister, niece,
daughter-in-law, daughter, granddaughter
male: grandfather, uncle, father, father-in-law, brother, brother-in-law, nephew, son,
son-in-law, grandson
both: cousin
Get learners to add more relatives, or brainstorm a class list of other relatives on the board.
Suggestions:
female: great-grandmother, great-aunt
male: great-grandfather, great-uncle,
both: parents, children, grandparents, grandchildren, second cousin
C. In pairs, learners ask each other about their families.
Encourage learners to give extra information about family members, e.g. where they live, or what
they do.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 13

5.3

Your people

A. Learners make a list of their relatives.


B. Learners list all the other people who are important in their lives. Encourage them to think of the
people they see often, e.g. classmates, flatmates (people they share a flat or house with, who
are not relatives), neighbours, boyfriend/girlfriend, friends.
C. Learners work in pairs. They tell each other about the person who has been most important in their
lives, either a relative or non-relative. Tell learners to remember the information about their partners
person, as they will tell the class about them. They should not make written notes!
D. One by one, learners tell the class about their partners important person.

5.4

Khaing Win and Mi Lwin - a love story

A. Discuss the verbs about love and marriage, and clarify anything learners dont understand.
get engaged - to formally decide that you plan to marry
go out together - to be boyfriend/girlfriend
Learners put them in order of what happens. There is no one correct answer to this, as different
people have different ideas on when, for example, people fall in love.
When people have decided on an order, get learners to compare their answers with other learners,
in groups of four or five.
Get each group to write their answers on the board. Are there many different answers?
B. Learners read the story, and fill the gaps with the words and phrases in the box. The story is written
in the present simple, so learners should use present simple structures.
Answers:
Its 1965. Khaing Win and Mi Lwin meet at a training. They fall in love , and go
out together . At the end of the training, they get engaged . Unfortunately, her
father doesnt agree, and sends Khaing Win away. In 1970, he meets a Chinese
woman. They fall in love and get married . In 1971, Mi Lwin gets married to
her neighbour. He drinks and beats her. She leaves him in 1975, and they get divorced .
In 1992, Khaing Wins wife dies, and he moves to Australia. One day, he is walking down
the street, and he meets Mi Lwin! They fall in love again, and in 2004, they
get married .
Language/culture notes
Love and marriage. Different cultures have different ideas
about these, and within each culture there are many different
opinions about what is OK. In some cultures, people dont
usually meet each other before they marry - marriages are
arranged by the families. In other cultures, it is normal to
have many girlfriends/boyfriends and lovers throughout your
life, and people believe marriage is unnecessary. This is an
interesting discussion topic!

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 14

C. Learners turn over their workbooks so they cant see the story, then retell it to their partner from
memory, using their own words.

5.5

Twins

A. Discuss the questions as a class.


Twins are brothers and/or sisters born at the same time to the same parents.
Ask if anyone in the class has a twin brother or sister, or if there are twins in their family. Are they
very similar to each other? Ask learners to talk about their experience of twins.
B. Look at the pictures. For each picture, elicit a brief description, and key vocabulary.
For example:
.
1. play football
2. study Japanese
3. open a present
4. wear rings
5. write, hold a pen
6. play
7. read a magazine
8. beard, moustache, glasses
9. brush teeth, toothpaste
10. open a present

C. Explain the background to the texts: these paragraphs are about twins who were separated when
they were young, and brought up by different people. When they met as adults, they discovered that
they had developed similar habits.
Learners read the texts, and match the twins with the pictures.
Answers:
Saw Gay Moo and Hser Nei 5, 9
Myint Myint San and Ma Ma Aye 4, 6
Ali and Mahmoud 2, 8
Hpa Nu and Roi Ji 3, 10
Bu Reh and David 1, 7
Go through the text together, and discuss any new vocabulary.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 15

6. Introductions
This sections deals with introductions:
- how to introduce yourself
- how to introduce other people
- polite small talk people use in a social situation

6.1

An introduction to introductions

A. Discuss the pictures. Ask some questions about each picture, e.g.
Where is this? What are the people doing? Who are they?
Establish that the second party is more formal than the first.

B. Learners work in pairs to fill the conversation gaps.

C. Play the tape two or three times. Learners check their answers.
Answers:
1. Im OK. Very busy!
2. Hi, Saw Doe. Hi, Po Kwa Lay.
3. OK. Thanks.
4. Yes, please.
5. Yes, please.
6. Pleased to meet you, Ms Green.
7. How do you do?

Language/culture notes
First names and surnames. Nowadays, it is fairly unusual to call someone Ms Spears or Mr
Beckham - people usually the first name only (e.g. Britney, David), even in relatively formal
situations. The main use of title + surname is in the media, with officals (e.g. at an immigration
office, or when you buy airline tickets) and in formal letters. To use a title + first name (e.g. Ms
Britney or Mr David) is incorrect.
Titles. Mr (pronounced mister) can be used for all men. Master was traditionally used for boys,
but now is almost never used. Men are addressed Mr + surname, or using their first name only,
or with their first name + surname and no title. If you use a title for a woman, be careful what
you choose. Mrs (missiz) is still a common title for married women, and Miss is often used for
unmarried young women and girls. However, these are seen by some people as old-fashioned
and sexist because they define women according to their relationship to men, whereas Mr does
not tell you anything about a mans relationship to a woman. Ms (pronounced miz) is a title that
all women can use, married and single, and is used whenever you do not know the marital status
of the woman who you are writing/speaking to. It is often easier to use only the first name, or
both the first and last names without a title.
Formal greetings. Very formal greetings like How do you do? are unusual in modern English.
Most people, of all ages, use the less formal How are you?

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 16

D. Learners decide whether each conversation is in formal or informal English.


Answers: Formal Would you like a drink?
Yes, please.
This is U Tin Maung from the NHEC. And this is Di Green from the BBC.
Pleased to meet you, Ms Green
Please, call me Di.
How do you do? Im David Johnson. How do you do?
Informal Hi Mi Chan. How are you?
Im OK. Very busy!
Jane, this is Saw Doe. And this is Po Kwa Lay.
Hi, Saw Doe. Hi, Po Kwa Lay.
Have some cake.
OK. Thanks.

E. Learners work in pairs to put the conversation in order.


Play the tape two or three times. Learners check their answers.
Answers:
1 - f This is U Tin Maung from the NHEC. And this is Di Green from the BBC.
2 - b Pleased to meet you, Ms Green.
3 - i Please, call me Di. Im sorry, what is your name?
4 - e Im Tin Maung.
5 - h Ton Mun sorry, can you say that again please?
6 - a Tin Maung.
7 - d Can you spell that, please?
8 - g T-i-n M-a-u-n-g. How do you spell your name?
9 - c D-i.

6.2 Introducing yourself


A. Learners write the answers to the questions.
B. In pairs, learners practise the conversations.
Dont allow them to read from their books!
Get some pairs to perform their conversations to the class.
Encourage them to act the conversation, as well as speak it.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 17

6.3 Social English


Language/culture notes
When English speakers ask How are you? they dont really want to know about your health.
It is a basic greeting, used similarly to the Burmese xrif;pm;+yD;+yDvm; It is not usual to reply
about your health or feelings. Fine, thanks; Alright, thanks; OK, thanks; or Very well,
thanks is normal, unless youre talking to very close friends or family.

A. Discuss this topic. You may want to discuss it in L1 (learners first language).
Find out learners ideas and opinions about greetings.
What do they say in their language(s)?
Learners decide whether each conversation is formal (talking to an important visitor) or
informal (talking to a good friend) English.
Answers:
Formal
- Fine thanks. And you?
- Very well, thank you
Informal
- Not so good. I dont have a job and my dog died.
- OK.
- Ugghhh...
- Really great!
B. In pairs, learners rank the sentences from very informal to very formal.
Answers:
most formal - Very well, thank you.
then
- Fine thanks. And you?
then
- Really great!
- Not so good. I dont have a job and my dog died.
- OK.
most informal - Ugghhh...
C. Look at the picture and discuss it. What is happening? (an informal introduction)
Brainstorm possible replies.
Look at the four replies. Which ones are appropriate? Elicit suggestions.
Answer:
It would be best to say Hi Jane or Pleased to meet you, or both of them together: Hi
Jane. Pleased to meet you. You could say How do you do? but it is not common in
modern English except in very formal situations (meeting a queen or president?). Also, we
do not normally say How are you? when meeting someone for the first time. We say it
when we see someone who we have already met before.
Extra Idea
Do the Cards activity. Copy and cut the worksheet on page 106 so that there is a card for
every learner.
1) Learners are the person on the card. They identify their name, job, organisation
and country.
2) Write an example introduction on the board, e.g. This is my friend David
Beckham. Hes from England. Hes a footballer. He works with Manchester United
3) Learners work in groups of three. A introduces B to C. Then B introduces C to A,
etc.They take turns to introduce each other. Dont worry about pronunciation of names.
4) Get learners to change cards, form different groups, and repeat the activity.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 18

6.4 Introducing other people


9

This section is about introducing other people. When you introduce someone, it is good
to provide some interesting information about them.
A. Play the tape. Learners decide what information is being provided.
Answers:
a. name and organisation
b. name and family
c. name and job
d. name, family and hobbies
e. name and country
Brainstorm suggestions for other useful information you can provide, e.g.
an achievement: This is Sai Htoo. He just graduated from university.
their future plans: Meet Jenny. Shes going to get married next month.
their past: This is William Shakespeare. He wrote Romeo and Juliet.
The best information is information that other people will find interesting.
B. Roleplay. In groups of three, learners practise introducing each other.
After they have spent some time practising, get each group to perform one introduction to the class.
The class can vote on the best introduction.

7. Listening Fluency: Numbers and Dates


This section has listening exercises about dates and numbers. If your learners are very confident
with their dates and numbers, you may decide not to teach this section. The language should be
quite easy for learners, but they have to listen carefully for the necessary information. Before you
begin, you may like to revise ordinal numbers (first, second, third...), especially the pronunciation.
A. Answers:
10

1. 10/9
2. 8/6
3. 12/3

4. 1/6
5. 22/2
Language/culture notes

B. Answers:
11

Freddy. 10/2
Surijak. 1/8
Gloria. 2/10
Michiko. 4/3

C. Answers: 1. c 2. b 3. d 4. a
12

13

The dates here are written in British English (BrE). There are many
differences between the British and American systems of saying and
writing dates. Most importantly, in American English (AmE) the month
is written before the date. Thus, 10/9 is the 9th of October, 8/6 is the
6th of August, etc. In both BrE and AmE, when speaking or writing the
dates in full, you can can put either the day or the month first, so both
The first of April and April the first are correct. When using the second
way, Americans usually omit the article: April first.

D. Answers: born 7/1/68


first day of school 10/9/74
last day of school 19/6/86

married 12/6/87
first child 10/2/89

E. Answers:
Monday

Tue sday W edne sday Thursday

Frida y

Party

14

Park

Bank

Class
W ork
Supermarke t

Sa turda y Sunday

X
X
X

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 19

15

F. Answers: 1. Thursday 1
2. Sunday 11
3. Monday 19

4. Friday 16
5. Thursday 22
6. Friday 30

16

G. Answers: 1. October 31
2. February 4
3. 5/12

4. 2/7
5. 12/3/56
6. 30/9

17

H. Learners follow the instructions on the cassette. Pause the tape after each one to give them time to
write.
Check that they put the correct information in the right place. You may want to write an example
card on the board.
Example card:
Personal Information Card
Than, Zin_________________________________________________
House 16, Section 11, Mae La Oon Camp, Thailand________________
044563927_______________________________________________
24/5/82__________________________________________________
Than Zin_____________________________________________

8. Thinking about Learning


This learner training section aims to make learners aware of the language learning process. They think
about the reasons why they are learning English, and how they can improve their learning.

8.1

Your opinion of education

A. Learners complete the mind map about education.


A mind map is a way to organise thoughts and ideas. It is a type of brainstorm activity, where
learners are encouraged to think of things they can put in different categories and sub-sections of a
general topic.
Learners can do this individually, or you can put them in groups and get them to do this on big
pieces of paper.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 20

B. Look at the picture. Ask learners what is happening, where it is, etc.

18

Introduce the song. This song is about some learners who dont like going to school.
Pre-teach: thought control people controlling the way you think.
sarcasm saying the opposite of what you mean, often to hurt someone. If you say
Youre REALLY clever when someone does something stupid, this is sarcasm.
leave someone alone dont annoy someone.
Play the tape. Learners listen, and put the words in the right order.
Play it again so learners can check.
Answer:
We dont need no education
We dont need no thought control
No dark sarcasm in the classroom
Teacher leave them kids alone
Hey, teacher! Leave the kids alone
All in all its just another brick in the wall
All in all youre just another brick in the wall

C. Ask learners if they like the song. Get opinions in English or L1.
Check that learners understand the multiple choice options.
Answer: b a way to control people (the wall is like a prison for your mind; a brick is part of it)
The singer believes education is a way to control people; to prevent people from thinking for
themselves, having their own ideas and opinions. Ask the learners if they agree with this.

8.2

Think about your language learning

A. Learners make lists of the important things in English. They should think of this themselves, not
compare with other learners yet.
B. Learners rank the things they listed in A in order of priority, according to their own opinions. For
example if they think that speaking is the most important, they would give speaking a 1.
Learners then discuss their lists in pairs.
Ask a few learners to explain their lists to the class, and encourage discussion.
C. Learners give themselves a score out of 5 for each of these skills and topics.
1 is the highest score, 5 is the lowest.

8.3

How can you improve?

A. Learners brainstorm ways to improve speaking. Write all their suggestions on the board.
Encourage them to be creative with their suggestions!
B. Learners work in groups. Each group chooses one or two of the items from 8.2 C, and brainstorms
a list of suggestions for improvement. Groups present their ideas to the class.
Here are some ideas:
Vocabulary

Grammar

Listening
radio news
program m es

vocabulary books

gram m ar books

cross words

wide reading,
looking out for
m us ic tapes
exam ples of
different structures

Speaking

Reading

Writing

talking to other
people

graded readers

letters

talking to yours elf

news papers

personal, group or
clas s news letter

journals

reading with a
dictionary

convers ations

helping other
s tudents

m agazines

vocabulary cards

videos

s inging

videos with
s ubtitles

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 21

9.

Review

This section has three parts:


- exercises so learners can practise the items learned in the module
- a grammar review where learners can look at tables outlining grammar structures
covered in the module
- a vocabulary review where learners can focus on the words they encountered in the
module.

9.1

Exercises

A. Write the verb


Answers:
I have a sister and a brother. My brother has three children. They live in the city. They
sometimes visit me. My brother drives a truck.
My sister works for an NGO. She never visits me - she lives very far away. She often
flies to Bangkok, and goes to meetings. She speaks five languages.
Im a learner. I always study for three hours every evening, and then I sometimes watch
videos, or listen to the radio. In the weekends, I usually play volleyball and football with my
friends. We sometimes go to the next village, and play against their school.
B. Positive and negative
Answers:
1. They listen to news programmes, but they dont listen to rock music.
2. She goes to parties, but she doesnt go to the theatre.
3. They use a typewriter, but they dont use a computer.
4. She speaks English, but she doesnt smoke.
5. They play chess, but they dont play volleyball.
6. She likes dogs, but she doesnt like cats.
C. Wh- questions
Answers:
2. How does Somchai feel when he speaks English?
3. Why does Somchai feel this way?
4. What does Somchai want to be?
5. How often does Somchai speak English?
6. Why does Somchai feel angry?
D. Whats the question?
There are many possible answers to this exercise.
Some possible answers:
2. What languages do you speak?
3. Why do you learn English?
4. Who do you live with?
5. Where do you live?
6. What do you do after school?
7. How do you get to school?

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 22

E. Dates
Answers:
1. The fifteenth (15th) of August, 1999 / August (the) fifteenth (15th), 1999
2. The first (1st) of January, 2006 / January (the) first (1st), 2006
3. The eighth (8th) of September, 1989 / September (the) eighth (8th), 1989
4. The twenty-fifth (25th) of December, 1955 / December (the) twenty-fifth (25th), 1955
5. 29/2/00
6. 6/7/82
7. 22/11
F. Conversation
There are many possible answers to this exercise.
Some possible answers:
2. Whats your name?
3. How do you spell that?
4. Where do you come from?
5. I come from Burma. What do you do?
6. Do you want some cake?
7. Nice to meet you.
G. Crossword
Answers:

r
a

a
t
e

n
e

w
a

o
a

e
s

s
e

i
t

s
l

n
e

d
u

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 23

n
e

9.2

Grammar review

This page is a summary of the main grammar structures focused on in this module.
If you like, do some practice activities using the structures, e.g.
- gap-fill
- matching
- word order
- right or wrong sentences

Language/culture notes
For clarity, we have used the term base to mean the infinitive without
to, e.g. be, run, go. In later modules, we use infinitive to mean to
+ the base, e.g. to be, to run, to go. However, some people call be,
run, go, etc. the infinitive or the bare infinitive, and some people
use infinitive both for verbs with to and verbs without to. When you
are teaching, make sure the learners know the terminology you
are using or they will become very confused!

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 24

9.3

Vocabulary review

A. This is a page of explicit vocabulary learning using words from the module plus other words that the
learners will find useful.
Help learners if they have problems with any of the words.
Learners can write translations next to the words they know, and look up the words they dont
know in their dictionaries.
For homework, learners should focus on the words they have difficulty with.
B. Answers:
1. subject
2. engaged
3. wake up
4. decide, imagine, think
5. money
6. simple
7. alcohol
8. kids
9. sorry
10. relatives
11. neighbour
12. syllable

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 25

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 26

1. What is Where?
This section looks at ways to describe places, and what is in them:
- there is/are
- have/has got

1.1

Behind the door

A. Pre-teach shelf, map, blanket


Look at the first two doors. Elicit learners guess about what kinds of doors they are.
Answers: a classroom (left), a bedroom (right)
B. Read the sentences in the box, and establish which rooms they describe.
Possible answers:
1. classroom
2. classroom
3. both
4. both
5. classroom
6. bedroom
7. bedroom
8. classroom
Check that the learners understand the structure by eliciting sentences about things in the two
rooms from the pictures, e.g.
Classroom: there are students, its got bamboo desks, there are some schoolbags
Bedroom: theres a bed, there are blankets, its got mosquito nets
C. Look at the other doors. What is behind them? Discuss; get learners ideas.
Answers: A shop, a UNHCR office, a prison
D. Using dictionaries if necessary, learners classify the things into each room.
Some things can go into more than one room. There are many possible answers.
Possible answers:
Prison: police officer, bucket, toilet, cell, prisoners, chair, lock
UNHCR: computer, telephone, toilet, photocopier, calculator, chair, lock
Shop: bucket, drinks, cigarettes, calculator, money, sweets, chair, lock
Learners write sentences about each room, using there is/are and its got.
Encourage learners to write sentences using other things in these rooms.
Learners compare sentences in pairs.
Choose each door in turn, and get some learners to read their sentences to the class.
Did any learners write different, interesting sentences?

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 27

1.2

Whats in your classroom?

A. Working individually or in pairs, learners list all the things in the classroom.
Encourage them to give quantities, e.g. 32 students, where possible.
Get a few learners to read their lists to the class.
B. Learners make lists of the things they want in their classroom. Get learners to think of an ideal
classroom - if they could have everything they want in the classroom, what would they have?
Encourage them to give quantities, e.g. 12 computers, where possible.
Get a few learners to read their lists to the class.
1

C. Play the tape. Learners listen, and write what there is and isnt in Paw Paws classroom.
Answers:
X

a
a blackboard
25 students
14 desk s

a cassette player
about 20 cassettes
a world map
some posters
30 plastic chairs

computers
a whiteboard
a video
a teacher

D. Learners write sentences with correct information about Paw Paws classroom.
Answers:
1. There are 14 desks in her classroom.
2. There is a blackboard.
3. There isnt a whiteboard.
4. There arent any computers.
5. There are about 20 cassettes.
6. There is a map.
7. There isnt a teacher in the classroom.
You might like to review forms of there is / are:
- there is + singular, there are + plural
- there are + some, there arent + any

Or refer learners to the grammar review on page 52.


E. Learners write six true and six false sentences about the classroom, using there is / are.
Check that they understand true and false.
F. In pairs, learners read their sentences to each other. When a learner hears a false sentence, they say
false, and make a correct sentence instead.
You may need to demonstrate this activity in front of the class first.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 28

1.3

Going to the city

A. Establish the situation: a boy is moving to the city to live with his uncle.
Ask learners why they think he is going there - elicit their ideas. Work? Study?
He doesnt know anything about the city, so he wants to ask his uncle some questions.
Learners brainstorm some questions he might ask before he moves there.
It might help to get learners to imagine they are in this situation, and ask them what they
would want to know if they were going to move to a city.
B. Learners read Kyaw Kyaws letter to his uncle. Clarify anything they dont understand.
C. The information in the table shows what there is in the city. Learners use this information to write
Uncles reply letter. Encourage them to add extra, interesting information.
You might like to get learners to check each others letters.
The letters should contain the following information:
There are (some) animals
There are dogs
Theres a cinema
There isnt a football field
Theres a swimming pool
There arent any bicycles
There are buses
There isnt a train
If you mark learners letters, mark them for interesting extra information, as well as grammatical
correctness. Read a few of the more interesting letters to the class.
D. In pairs, learners ask and answer questions about their home towns.
If they need help, brainstorm some questions and write them on the board, e.g.
Is there a cinema in your home town?
Are there any mountains?
How many schools are there?
If necessary, review short answers, and make sure they use them correctly during the exercise.
Yes, there is. / No, there isnt.
Yes, there are. / No, there arent.
As learners are getting information, they should make notes.
One by one, learners tell the class about their partners home towns.
Extra Idea
Do a Roleplay in pairs. One learner is a tourist
visiting your place. The other learner answers
the tourists questions, e.g.
A - Is there a hotel here?
B - No, there isnt.
Encourage the tourist to ask very stupid
questions!

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 29

1.4

In the city

A. Learners look at the picture. Time exactly three minutes, then tell them to stop.
B. They turn to page 8, and answer the questions without looking back at the picture.
Answers:
1. five
2. two
3. No, there arent.
4. five
5. Yes, there is.
6. A cat
7. one
8. two

2. Have got
This section focuses on have got to indicate possession.

2.1

Song: Ive got exams

A. Discuss the picture. Elicit learners ideas and predictions about the song.
Pre-teach feeling, flu (an illness similar to a very bad cold), orangutan (a type of
ape, as in the picture), cares (worries), space (area, place).

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 30

B. Play the song two or three times. Learners put the words in order.
C. Play the song again. Learners check.
Answers:
Ive got exams in the afternoon
Ive got a lot of homework too
Ive got a feeling Ive got flu
Why cant I be like you?
Youve got a tree there in the zoo
You havent got any work to do
Youve got a bunch of bananas too
Why cant I be like you?
Youre just an orangutan
Sitting in your tree all day
Have you got any space for me
Up in your tree today?
Youve got a lot of friends up there
You sit around and you comb your hair
You havent got any worries or cares
Why cant I be like you?

D. This is a slower, karaoke version of the same song. Play it; learners sing.
E. Dont let learners look back at page 30!
Give them 5 minutes to list as many differences in the picture, without looking.
Make a class list on the board. Then look and check.
Answers:
The boys got dark hair.
Hes got a bicycle.
He hasnt got a watch.
He hasnt got any books.
Hes got a cassette player / walkman / earphones / headphones
The orangutans got a watch.
Its got a hat.
Its got sunglasses.
Its got two bunches of bananas.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 31

2.2

Complaining learners

A. Pre-teach the vocabulary.


B. Establish the situation: some students have just arrived at their new school, and they are complaining
that there are not enough facilities.
has/have/hasnt/havent got, and there is/are/isnt/arent.
Remind them to use contractions where possible; if necessary, review them briefly:
have not got = havent got
has not got = hasnt got
it has got = its got
etc...
L

a r n

r s

f i l l

t h

a p

i t h

C. Play the tape. Learners check their answers. If you like, get some learners to write the answers on
the board so you can be sure they have used the correct form.
Answers:
1. The girls dormitorys got __ a lot of mosquitos, and I havent got a mosquito net.
2. The boys dormitory hasnt got a television or a video.
3. We havent got a swimming pool. I want a swimming pool.
4. The school hasnt got a computer teacher, so we cant learn computers.
5. There arent any computers in the school.
6. Theres a big rat in the kitchen. I hate rats.
D. Play the tape. This time, the teacher is complaining about the students.
One of the students had wrong information when she was complaining - learners identify which
one was wrong.
Answer: The student complaining about the mosquito net. The school has enough mosquito nets.

E. Learners try to answer from memory. If necessary, play the tape again so they can check.
Answers:
1. There are no computer teachers near here
2. They havent got any money for computers
3. The cat died and they havent got a new one yet
Ask the learners who they support (whose side they are on; who they agree with) - the teachers or the
students? Do the students have good reasons to complain?

2.3

Pairwork: The office

The pictures of the offices on pages 32 and 33 are similar, but there are eight differences.
Learners identify the differences without looking at each others pictures.
If this is difficult, go through questions they can ask:
How many ...... are there?
Is there / Have you got a ..... in your picture?
Wheres the ......?
Is the ..... next to / on / under the .....?
Answers:
- Theres a computer on page 32, and a typewriter on page 33.
- Theres one person in the picture on page 32, and two people on page 33.
- Theres isnt a window on page 32 (but there is on page 33).
- There are three drawers on page 32, and five drawers on page 33.
- There are two flowers on page 32, and four flowers on page 33.
- Theres isnt a telephone on page 32 (but there is on page 33).
- There are some bananas on page 32 (but there arent (any) on page 33).
- There are two chairs behind the desk on page 32 (but there arent any on page 33).
- There are six books on page 32, and three books on page 33.
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 32

2.4

Describe the people.

Learners look at the picture of Kofi and Nane Annan, and write correct information about them.
Answers:
1. Mr Annans got a beard.
2. He hasnt got black hair. or Hes got grey hair.
3. He hasnt got a small nose. or Hes got a big nose.
4. Ms Annan hasnt got black hair. or Ms Annans got blonde / light-coloured hair.
5. She hasnt got a moustache.
6. Shes got a necklace.
7. Mr and Ms Annan havent got hats on.
8. They havent got big ears. or Theyve got small ears.
Language/culture notes
We have used Mr and Ms Annan here. If you ever met them, they
might say Call me Kofi and Call me Nane. In the media, Nane
Annan would probably be called Mrs Annan because she is married,
but some women do not like that title.
See the Language/culture notes in Module 1, page 16, for more
details about introductions and appropriate forms of address.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 33

2.5

Find someone who...

A. In this activity, learners have to go around the class asking questions until they find someone who
has got each thing.
Before they do this activity, clarify that learners know every question they have to ask.
When they find someone whos got one of the things, they write down the persons name.
B. Get a few learners to read their lists out to the class of whos got what.

3. More about There


This section introduces another form commonly used with there, in the negative.
There is / are no... is very common in English, especially in spoken English. It has the same meaning as
There isnt / arent any...

3.1

In the bedroom

A. Learners look at this picture of a bedroom, and read the description. They identify the mistake in
the description.
Answer:
Theres a radio on the desk.
Go through the grammar table together.
B. Learners look around their class and write true sentences about the things.
Likely answers:
1. Probably Theres a teacher.
2. Theres some chalk. or Theres no chalk.
3. Probably Theres some paper.
4. Theres a map. or Theres no map.
5. Theres electricity. or Theres no electricity.
6. Probably Theres some furniture.
7. Probably There are no chickens.
8. Probably There are some books.
9. Probably Theres no snow.
10. Probably Theres no coffee.
11. Probably There are no bananas.
12. Theres some food. or Theres no food.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 34

3.2 The town of Utopia


A. Pre-teach free (doesnt cost anything), playground, pollution, noise, entertainment,
public transport (anyone can use it, such as buses, trains and linecars; the opposite is private
transport, that individual people own, such as cars and motorbikes).
Learners write sentences about Utopia, using the information in the table.
Answers:
Language/culture notes
1. In Utopia, there are no guns.
2. In Utopia, there is free transport.
Utopia (you-toe-pee-ah) is a name that
means a perfect place. Here, this is one
3. In Utopia, there are no police.
persons idea of a perfect place.
4. In Utopia, there are playgrounds.
5. In Utopia, there is no pollution.
6. In Utopia, there are universities.
7. In Utopia, there is no noise.
8. In Utopia, there are good jobs.
9. In Utopia, there are parks.
10. In Utopia, there are no poor people.
B. Learners complete the gap-fill, using there is/are and there is/are no

C. Play the tape. Learners listen, and check their answers.


Answers:
1. there are 10,000 people
2. There are no problems
3. There are good jobs
4. There are good schools
5. There are nice houses
6. There are no police
7. there is no crime
8. There are no guns
9. There is no rubbish
10. There are many parks
11. There is entertainment
12. there is free public transport
13. There are many reasons
14. There is a good life
Discuss Utopia. Do learners agree that this would be a perfect place?
What other things would they have in a perfect town?

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 35

4. Transport and Travel


This section deals with transport issues
- types of transport, and their advantages and disadvantages
- questions and answers used when finding out about transport

4.1

Vocabulary

A. Learners identify each type of transport. They should use their dictionaries, and help each other,
if necessary.
Learners write the appropriate preposition that is used with these types of transport.
Answers:
a. by bicycle
b. by boat
c. by elephant
d. on foot
e. by bus
f. by taxi
g. by train
h. by plane
i. by camel
j. by van / minivan / minibus
k. by horse / on horseback
l. by motorcycle / motorbike
m. by truck
Brainstorm other types of transport, and write a list on the board, e.g.
helicopter, canoe, car...

B. Learners list the transport types that they have used.


Ask a few learners to tell the class about the transport types they have used, and where they went
on them.
In pairs, learners make three lists, ranking the transport types in order from fastest to slowest,
most expensive to cheapest, and most comfortable to most uncomfortable.
There is no single correct order; it depends on learners experiences and opinions.
After each pair has finished their lists, put pairs together so learners are working in
groups of four. Each group negotiates (discusses and tries to agree on) three ranked lists.
If possible, get each group to put their ranking charts on a big piece of paper and put their results on
the wall, so other groups can compare their opinions.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 36

4.2 How to get there


A. Look at the map. If any of your learners have been to these areas, ask them what they know about
travelling there what types of transport do they use? How much does it cost?
Learners read the texts, and fill the gaps using the verbs in the box.
Answers:
The plane leaves Mingaladon airportIt arrives in / gets to Moulmein
the journey takes less than one hourit costs
about $50
which arrives in / gets to Moulmeinit costs $25 people from Burma
_ pay 8,000 kyat. The journey takes a long timeit only costs 3,000 kyat.
B. Pre-teach advantages and disadvantages.
Using the information in the texts, learners complete the chart.
Answers:
Aeroplane
- Advantages: fast / quick
- Disadvantages: expensive
Bus
- Advantages: cheap
- Disadvantages: slow, uncomfortable, crowded
Train
- Advantages: fast, comfortable, cheap, can see the countryside
- Disadvantages: foreigner prices

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 37

4.3

Trains, buses and planes

A. Learners match the sentence halves to make sentences, which they make into a paragraph.
Answers:
I usually go by train. It costs 300 baht. I always catch the night train. It
leaves Hualompong railway station at 6.00. It arrives in Chiang Mai at about eight
oclock in the morning. The whole journey takes about fourteen hours.
B. Learners put the information in the boxes into paragraphs, adding extra information if they like.
Possible answers:
I often go by bus. It costs 180 baht. I always catch the morning bus. It
leaves the Northern Bus Terminal at 5.15. It arrives in Chiang Mai at about
4.15 in the afternoon. The whole journey takes about eleven hours.
I always go by plane. It costs 2200 baht. I catch the afternoon plane. It
leaves Don Muang Airport at 3.30 and arrives in Chiang Mai at about 4.30 in the
afternoon. The whole journey takes about one hour.

4.4 How do I get there?


A. Learners brainstorm a list of questions they might ask if they need to go somewhere.
It might be useful to get them to imagine they need to go somewhere, e.g. Bangkok, and to think of
how they would find out information they need to get there.
B. Learners order the questions.
Answers:
1. How do I get there?
2. How long does it take?
3. How much does it cost?
4. What is the best way?
5. Where is the office?
6. What time does it leave?
7. How often does it go?
8. What time does it arrive?
C. Play the tape. Pause after each question, so learners can repeat.
7

D. Learners match the answers with the questions.


Answers:
1. How often does it go?
Every hour.
2. How much does it cost? 200 baht.
3. Where is the office?
In Lek Tho village.
4. What time does it arrive? At 1pm in the afternoon.
5. How do I get there?
By boat, or on foot.
6. What is the best way?
By boat is easier.
7. How long does it take?
About two hours.
8. What time does it leave? At 11 am in the morning.
E. Learners practise asking and answering the questions in pairs. Encourage them to make
different answers. If they like, they should choose a real office and give real questions and answers.
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 38

F. Establish the situation - Neil wants to go to Mae Pa to visit his friend, and rings to ask how to go
there. If learners are familiar with the Mae Sot area, ask them if they ever go to Mae Pa. How do
they get there?
Learners read the text, and write the questions to Htoo Aungs answers.
There are a few possible questions, here are the most likely:
Probable answers:
1. How do I get to your house?
2. What is the best way?
3. How much does it cost?
4. How long does it take?
5. What time does it leave? / What time does the first linecar leave?
6. Where does the linecar stop?
7. How do I get to your house from there? / How do I go from there?

4.5 A Trip to Umpang


A. If you live near Mae Sot, ask if any learners have been to Umpang.
Ask them how they got there, and to talk about their journey.
Look at the map, and elicit information from the map:
- Umpang is on the Burma border
- Its in the same area as Mae Sot
B. Learners read the text, and guess the missing information.
Elicit a few guesses, and write them on the board.

C. Play the tape. Learners listen, and check their guesses.


Were any guesses right?
Answers:
Umpang is a beautiful little town about 160 kilometres from Mae Sot in Thailand.
The best way to get there is by linecar . It takes about four hours to get there, and
costs 120 baht . You cant get there by train because theres no train line . You can
also go by car . That costs about 2000 baht .

Extra Idea
Do the Remember the Picture activity. Copy the worksheets on page 107 so that there
enough copies for every learner (or one between two learners).
1) Give each learner a picture. They can look at the picture for two minutes.
2) Collect the pictures. Tell the learners to list every type of transport in the picture.
3) Elicit answers.
4) Give the pictures back to the learners to check.
Answers: buffalo cart, elephant, sidecar / trishaw, motorcycle, walking, bicycle, car, taxi,
bus, truck, train, aeroplane, helicopter
If you like, take the pictures away again, and ask them some other questions, for example,
How many people are on the motorbike?
You could also use this picture to do Keep Talking or Behind the Picture from Activate!

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 39

4.6

Adjectives to describe transport

A. Pre-teach remark (comment), and check understanding of the words in the speech bubbles.
Let learners use dictionaries to check the meanings of the words in the box, or you can tell them.
Learners read the opinions of different types of transport, and match the adjectives in the box with
the opinions. There are two adjectives for each opinion.
Answers:
1. uncomfortable, reliable
2. crowded, slow
3. expensive, comfortable
4. cheap, dangerous
5. unreliable, unpopular
B. Elicit the meaning of journey.
Learners think of some journeys they make often. They can be long (e.g. Mae Sot to Chiang Mai)
or short (e.g. home to school), but they must be ones they make regularly, like habits, because the
exercise is in the present simple.
They write down the information about these journeys in the chart.
If they cant remember, or dont know, some of the details such as costs, they can guess or imagine
the information - it doesnt matter if they are not exactly right.
C. Explain/review the question Whats it like? (see box below).
Learner A asks B questions to get the information needed to fill in one row, and B answers, as in the
example dialogue. Then B asks A the same questions, and fills in one blank row of their table.
(Make sure they dont look at each others tables while they are doing this!)
This is repeated until both learners have filled their tables.
Then they check each others tables to make sure the information matches.
Language/culture notes
Whats it like? means describe it. The like in this
sentence is a preposition, not a verb. The appropriate
answer is a description. For example, if someone says
Whats Mary like? you might reply: Shes kind, hardworking, quite tall and has dark hair.
The question is very different from What does s/he like?
which is asking about things s/he likes, e.g. She likes
chocolate and rich men.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 40

5. Prepositions and Directions


This section reviews prepositions of place, especially as they are used to direct people to places.
It also reviews common vocabulary of places in a town or city.

5.1 Prepositions crossword


Answers:
Across:

Down:

3. opposite
4. on
5. beside
6. above
10. between
11. next
12. inside
2. outside
7. below
8. against
9. under
10. behind
13. in

5.2 Around the neighbourhood


A. Go through the places, and elicit explanations, descriptions or definitions of them, e.g.
- You can rent movies from a video shop.
- You get a haircut in a hairdresser.
- A greengrocer is a shop that sells fruit and vegetables
Dont worry about correct grammar; just check that they understand the purpose of each place,
and what people do there.
B. In pairs, learners ask and answer questions about each place.
Where there is a place in the neighbourhood, they should briefly describe where it is.
After they have practised this, ask a few learners about some of the places.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 41

C. Establish the situation: Paw Paw is moving to the city, and Lu Lu Aung has sent her a map of the
neighbourhood.
Learners read the text and dialogue. If you like, they can do this out loud in pairs, with one person
being Paw Paw and the other Lu Lu Aung.
Clarify anything they dont understand.
D. Learners look at the map and identify where the places are, based on the information in
the dialogue.
Answers:
a. bookshop
b. hospital
c. teashop
d. clinic
e. greengrocer
f. hairdresser
g. high school
h. bus stop
i. teashop
j. cinema
k. restaurant
l. market
m. video shop
n. house
o. park
p. factory

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 42

E. Check that learners understand the phrases for giving directions. Tell them they can use other words
and phrases that they know too.
Get two learners to read the text in speech bubbles.
Then demonstrate the activity: choose a starting place on the map and give directions to another
place. Learners identify where they are, e.g.
- You are at the bookshop on the corner of Smith Street and Union street. Go down Smith
Street, past the hospital, and turn left into Bergen Street. Then take the first right.
Where are you? (at the high school)
- You are at the high school at the corner of Court Street and Bergen Street. Go up
Court Street, cross Warren Street and turn right into Union Street. Where are you?
(at the teashop)
To do the activity, learners work in pairs. Partner A chooses a place on the map to start from, tells
their partner where that is, and then gives directions to another place. Learner B has to identify
where s/he is. Then B gives directions to another place, and A works out where that is.
Learners may need some time to work out their places and directions. Go around and help them
if necessary. You may want to let them write the first few instructions down, until they can use the
phrases fluently. And make sure the know that they cannot tell their partner where theyre going they have to work it out.
Do this activity for a few turns per learner.
F. This activity is more like a real-life situation. Learners take turns asking for and giving directions.
Elicit the question, How do I get to......? and give an example, e.g.
A: Im at the bookshop. How do I get to the market?
B: Go down Smith Street and turn left at the bus stop. Go straight on, and its on your left.

Extra Ideas
1. Do the same as F, except using an area which everyone knows well, e.g.
A: Im in the library. How do I get to the pagoda?
B: Go up 22nd street, past the bookshop, and turn left at the traffic lights. Go straight on for
about half a mile, and its on the right, opposite the post office.
2. Make a map. Learners work in groups of three or four.
Each group decides on a place to make a map of. (The easiest place is probably the area around
the classroom, but encourage creativity!)
Groups list the buildings and places they want to include on their map.
They draw maps, putting the main locations on it.
Get some or all groups to present and explain their map to the class. Other learners can ask them
questions, e.g.
How do I get to the volleyball court from the classroom?
Is the teashop next to the teachers office?
If you like, put the maps on the walls. They can be used for revision in later lessons.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 43

6. Focus on Pronunciation
In this pronunciation section, learners focus on three closely related topics: syllables, word stress and
schwa (shwaa). Schwa is written in phonetic script as an upside down e: / / . It is pronounced
uh, like the a in again (uh-GEN), and is the most common vowel sound in English. It is used in many,
but not all, unstressed (weak) syllables. Correct use of it greatly helps comprehension.

6.1

Syllables

A. Check that learners know the meaning of these words.


Learners try to identify how many syllables are in each word, and write them in the correct columns.
9

B. Play the tape. Learners listen, and check their answers.


Answers:
2 syllables: culture, mountain, clinic, afraid, cupboard, corner, prisoner, extra
3 syllables: advantage, pollution, interview, negative
4 syllables: environment, information, disadvantage

6.2

Word stress
Get the learners to read the explanation of word stress.
If you like, as a class practise saying teacher and learner with the correct stress (on the first syllable).

Play Tapescript 9 again. This time, learners underline the stressed syllables.
Answers:
information
advantage
environment
corner
pollution
interview
prisoner
culture
afraid
disadvantage
mountain
cupboard
extra
clinic
negative

6.3 /
9

/ Schwa

A. Play the tape. Learners listen carefully and identify the schwa sounds. They should circle them on the
word list in 6.2.
Answers:
information
advantage
environment
corner
pollution
interview
prisoner
culture
afraid
disadvantage
mountain
cupboard
extra
clinic
negative
The word with no schwa is clinic. The word with two schwas is environment. (Some people also use
a second schwa sound in information.)
B. Learners look at sentences 1-4 and the words in 6.2 and try to work out the rules.
Answers: 1. false 2. true 3. true 4. false
C. Play the tape again. Learners repeat. Listen to some individuals separately as well as the whole
class.

10

D. Learners look carefully at the stresses and schwas, and practise saying the words a few times to
themselves. Then Partner A says the first word to B, and B says the same word to A. Play the first word
on the tape. Learners compare their partners pronunciation with the tape and give them a mark out of
ten (10 is excellent; 1 is terrible). Continue like this for all the words, pausing to allow learners to write.
Then learners add up the score out of 100 and tell their partner. If you like, play all the words one more
time at the end.
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 44

7. Thinking about Learning: Needs and Priorities


This section builds on the material covered in Module 1, getting learners to think about the reasons why
they are learning English. It introduces the idea of language needs analysis, and takes learners through a
process of prioritising their learning needs.
The language in this section is quite difficult - you may need to explain it in L1.

7.1
11

Why do you want to learn English?

A. Introduce the recording explain that learners are going to listen to a tape of different learners
talking about why they are learning English.
Play the tape two or three times.
Learners listen, and match each speaker with their reason for learning English.
Answers:
1. Maria Elena (Columbia) b. She wants to be an English teacher.
2. Ana (Spain)
g. To help her studies in history of art.
3. Beliyou (Ethiopia)
e. In her country, everyone has to learn English.
4. Paz (Spain)
c. Shes interested in English culture.
5. Chen (China)
a. Because she thinks it will help her get into university.
6. Yuen (Hong Kong)
f. Because hes studying in England.
7. Marisol (Spain)
d. So she can communicate all over the world.
B. Learners discuss which people they are like - which of the people above have similar reasons to
your learners for learning English?

7.2

Analyse your needs 1

A. Discuss needs analysis (see box) with


the learners.
Read the information in the box, and
clarify anything the learners dont
understand.

Language/culture notes
Needs analysis (also called needs assessment) is a
process used to identify what people need. If people want
to start a new project, they often do a needs analysis first,
so they know what are the most useful things to do. In
language learning, things a needs analysis can focus on
include:
- why s/he needs to learn the language
- what situations s/he will use the language in
- what topics and skills s/he should prioritise

B. Establish the situation: Min Zaw needs


English for his work with an HIV
prevention organisation.
Learners read the text and complete the chart about Min Zaw.
Specific situations - what does he need to do in English?
Skills - what skills does he need to do these?
Answers:
specific situations
read labels and instructions
talk to NGOs and doctors
skills
speaking
listening

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 45

C. Demonstrate the activity. Write the chart on the board. Ask one learner:
- what is her/his main purpose in learning English?
- what specific situations will s/he use it in?
- what skills does s/he think are most important for this?
Write the results on the chart.
Each learner completes a chart for him/herself.
For most school or college learners, their main purpose is study. Some of them might
be thinking about working in a business or community organisation encourage different
answers and creative thinking.

7.3

Analyse your needs 2


A. Get learners to imagine working in a hotel or guesthouse.
When would they need English? Who would they use it with?
Would they need to read, write, listen and/or speak English?
Is correct grammar and wide vocabulary important?
Discuss the example. Stig is Swedish, and he works in a guesthouse. Go through Stigs list of
specific situations, and the skills he needs for these situations.
B. Demonstrate the activity. Write the chart on the board. Ask one learner:
- to list her/his specific situations from 7.2 C
- what skills are important in each situation?
Each learner completes a chart for themselves.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 46

C. Check learners understand quantify, and that they realise it is only how much they need a skill, not
how good they are at it already, that they are measuring. Then they look at Stigs chart.
D. They fill in their own chart.

7.4

How much can you do already?

A. Explain the scale, and check the meaning of ability. Learners think only about their ability in
each skill, not how much they need it.
They look at Stigs chart.
B. Learners do their own.

7.5

Priorities

A. Pre-teach priority and prioritise (to decide what the priorities are).
Look at Stigs table. Check learners understand how it is completed: the numbers from his needs
chart go in the need column; the numbers from his ability chart in the ability column; and the
total of the two (need + ability) goes under total. Then they are then given a priority ranking
according to the total, with the lowest total getting the highest ranking (1).
B. They do their own. Check the learners realise that the skills with the smallest numbers under
PRIORITY are the ones that they need to practise the most.
C. Help them make study plans to improve their English. In Module 1 they looked at some ways of
improving each skill, so you can use ideas from that. The plans will depend heavily on what
resources the learners have access to, but there are some ideas in the box.
Language Improvement Strategies
Speaking
- Find a friend or friends who are also learning English, and agree to only speak English to each other
for a fixed period, e.g. an hour a day or two days a week.
- Read simple English books to your younger siblings.
- Speak English whenever you can, e.g. to your teachers, to your parents (if they speak English)
- Sing English songs.
Listening
- Watch English language movies.
- Listen to the audio of graded readers while reading them (if available).
- Listen to English language programmes on the radio, and watch English language TV.
- Listen to English songs and try to write down the words, or read the words while listening.
Reading
- Get some graded readers (books written in simplified English) from a library or bookshop.
- Watch movies with English subtitles.
- Read the text in other textbooks, e.g. Headway, New Interchange, Language in Use.
Writing
- Write letters in English to your friends or classmates.
- Write stories from your culture that you know well.
- Write a journal (diary) of what you do and what you think every day/week.
Vocabulary and grammar are improved by using English in the above situations, but extra
exercises can also help.
Vocabulary
- When reading anything, make a note of new words and look up the meanings in a dictionary.
- Think of a topic (e.g. transport) and look in a bilingual dictionary for words and phrases on that topic
that you dont know (e.g. fare, trishaw, on time).
- Ask a classmate or friend to read your writing and correct your vocabulary mistakes.
- Do exercises in vocabulary practice books.
Grammar
- When reading or listening, pay attention to the structures they use (tenses, word order, etc.). Think
about why the writer/speaker chose that structure for that situation.
- Ask a classmate or friend to read your writing and correct your grammar mistakes.
- Do exercises in grammar practice books.
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 47

8.

Review

This section has three parts:


- exercises so learners can practise the language points learned in the module
- a grammar review where learners can look at tables outlining structures covered in
the module
- a vocabulary review where learners can focus on the words they encountered in
the module.

8.1

Exercises

A. Whats in the room?


Example answers:
1. Theres a television on the small table.
2. Theres a baby/child under the small table.
3. There are some books on the shelf.
4. There are some flowers in the vase.
5. There isnt a dog in the room.
6. There arent any bananas on the television.
7. Theres no video player in the room.
8. There are no chickens in the room.
B. Is there a...?
Answers:
1. Yes, there is.
2. No, there isnt.
3. No, there arent.
4. Yes, there are.
5. Yes, there is.
6. Yes, there are.
7. Yes, there are.
8. Seven.
C. Whats he got?
Answers:
Inside pocket of jacket wallet, notebook, ID cards and bus ticket
Top pocket of jacket pens, photograph of his family
Other pocket of jacket comb, glasses
Back pocket of jeans handkerchief
Front pocket of jeans car keys and house keys

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 48

D. There is / Have got


Learners use the name of their city/town/village/camp in the questions.
Questions:
1. Has
got a swimming pool?
2. Is there a museum in
?
3. Has
got any teashops?
4. Are there any restaurants in
?
5. Are there any mountains in
?
6. Has
got a hotel?
7. Has
got a disco?
8. Are there any shops in
?
Answers:
1. No, it hasnt. or Yes, it has.
2. No, there isnt. or Yes, there is.
3. Yes, it has. or No, it hasnt.
4. No, there arent. or Yes, there are.

5. Yes, there are. or No, there arent.


6. Yes, it has. or No, it hasnt.
7. Yes, it has. or No, it hasnt.
8. Yes, there are. or No, there arent.

E. Transport vocabulary
Answers:
human: foot, bicycle, boat
animal: elephant, horse, camel, buffalo cart
motor: motorbike, car, truck, bicycle, aeroplane, taxi, linecar, train, bus, tuk tuk, boat
F. Complete the conversation
Answers:
1. Where do you live? / Wheres your office? / Where can we meet?
2. How do I get there?
3. How often does it go?
4. How long does it take?
5. How much does it cost?
G. Prepositions
Answers:
1. The ball is above the line.
2. The ball is between the lines.
3. The ball is against / beside / next to the line.
4. The ball is behind the line.
5. The ball is in the box.
6. The ball is under / below the line.
7. The ball is amongst / among the lines.
8. The ball is in front of the line.
9. The ball is beside / next to the box.
H. Pronunciation
Answers:
1. motor
2. syllable
3. human
4. complain

2
3
2
2

5. buffalo
6. analyse
7. ticket
8. neighbourhood
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 49

3
3
2
3

8.2

Grammar review

This page is a summary of the main grammar structures focused on in this module.
If you like, do some practice activities using the structures, e.g.
- gap-fill
- matching
- word order
- right or wrong sentences

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 50

8.3

Vocabulary review

A. This is a page of explicit vocabulary learning using words from the module, plus other words that
the learners will find useful.
Help learners if they have problems with any of the words.
Learners can write translations next to the words they know, and look up the words they dont
know in their dictionaries.
For homework, learners should focus on the words they have difficulty with.
B. Answers:
1. guesthouse, hotel
2. dangerous
3. motor
4. human
5. directions, map
6. storybooks
7. dormitory
8. buffalo, camel, horse
9. glasses
10. mosquito
11. on time
12. ethnic
Test
On page 111 there is a test of the language and skills
from Modules 1 and 2. Use this test so you and your
learners can see how much they can understand and
use these. Copy enough tests so there is one for each
learner. There is a marking guide on page 115.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 51

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 52

1. Whats Happening Now?


This section focuses on two uses of the present continuous:
- talking about events at the moment of speaking
- talking about events going on around now

1.1

Imagining

A. Ask learners if they have ever travelled on a linecar. If some learners have, get one or two to
describe their experience - where did they go? What was it like?
Pre-teach excited, afraid, cheroot
Establish the situation. Kyaw Kyaw is sitting in the linecar, on his way to the city where he will live
with his uncle. While hes sitting in the linecar, hes writing his journal.
Learners read his journal entry, and decide if hes enjoying himself.
Possible answer:
Not really - hes feeling excited, but a little afraid, and a little sick, too. He probably isnt
enjoying himself.
B. Demonstrate the activity, with the picture of the linecar.
Tell the learners to imagine that they are in this linecar.
Look at the sentences below. Learners complete these sentences, using their imaginations, e.g.
Im travelling to Mandalay. Im wearing jeans and a white shirt. Im eating fish curry and
rice. Im drinking orange juice. Im feeling excited.
Learners read out their sentences.
Brainstorm other sentences about this situation, using I + present continuous, e.g.
Im looking out the window. Im reading a book.
Im sleeping.
Im
Write a chart on the board to show the form of present
eat
You're
continuous sentences.
Theyre
Learners choose one of the pictures: the bus, plane or bicycle.
read
ing
Hes
They imagine they are in this picture, going on a journey, and
Shes
work
complete the sentences.
It's
C. Elicit question forms for the present continuous, and
write a chart on the board.
Brainstorm a list of questions learners can ask
about someones journey, and write them on the
board. In pairs, learners ask each other questions
about their journeys from B.

Where

are

What

is

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 53

you
they
she
it

reading?
going?
doing?
raining?

1.2

Naughty people

A. Look at the pictures and elicit what the people are doing wrong.
Possible answers:
a. One baby is crying. The other baby is throwing food.
b. Theyre not listening to the teacher. Theyre not studying. One student is drinking.
One student is smoking. One student is reading a comic. The girls are talking.
c. Shes talking on the phone / shes telephoning. She isnt listening.
1

B. Look at Picture c, and establish the situation. Ma Win, one of the people in the picture, is
complaining about the woman on the telephone.
Play the tape. Learners listen, and guess which woman is Ma Win in the picture. Ask why they
think that.
Answer:
Ma Win is probably either the woman on the bottom left or the woman on the bottom
right, because they look annoyed/angry and the woman on the phone is in front of them.
C. Play the tape again. Learners answer the questions.
Answers:
1. Daw Lay Lay
2. Education issues in Burma
3. Talking on her telephone
4. Trying to listen to Daw Lay Lay
5. No, they are angry with the woman on the telephone
D. Learners do a Keep Talking activity with Picture b.
Learners can do this in groups, or as a class.
The first learner says a sentence about the picture, then the next learner says a different sentence
about the picture. Learners take turns making sentences about the picture, until nobody can think
of any new sentences.
E. Learners do a Write yourself in activity with Picture b. They imagine they are in the picture - either
a naughty student, or the teacher, or one of the other students. They write a paragraph about what
they are doing, thinking, feeling, and what is happening around you.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 54

1.3 True or false?


A. Learners decide whether the sentences are true or false.
Answers:
3. false
4. true
5. false
6. false
7. true
8. true
9. true
10. false
11. false
12. true
13. false
14. true
15. false
B. In pairs, learners ask and answer yes/no questions about the picture.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 55

1.4

Whats happening in your life?


This exercise uses the present continuous to to talk about things that are happening around now a little different from talking about things that are happening exactly now. We look at this
difference later in the module.

A. Brainstorm possibilities for each situation on the board.


There are many possible answers, but here are some suggestions:
Example answers:
Ive got three big examinations this week. Im studying every day. Im not going out a
lot. Im reading all the time. Im working hard. Im not visiting my friends. Im
writing notes.
Mi Mis ill in bed. Shes got malaria. Shes sleeping a lot. Shes taking medicine. She
isnt playing football. She isnt having fun. Shes going to the doctor every day.
Its the water festival in our town. Were throwing water at people. Were drinking a
little. Were dancing. Were visiting our friends. Were not sleeping very much.
Were having fun. Were practising for a stage-show.
After students have written their paragraphs, get a few to read them to the class.
Brainstorm possibilities for each situation on the board.
B. Students tell the class what is happening (and not happening) in their lives around now.

1.5

Listening: Were busy


A. Pre-teach TB (the disease tuberculosis) and novel.
Play the tape. Students listen, and tick or cross as they hear the information.
Play the tape again, students check.
Answers:
Is s/he
very busy?
studying for an exam?
getting ready for visitors?
reading a novel?
moving mats?
looking after a sick relative?
looking for a new house?
looking for a job?

Woman

Man

a
a

a
a
a
a

B. Students answer the questions.


Answers:
1. some friends - a large family - are coming to stay with her.
2. her house is too small - she needs a bigger house.
3. study materials for the exam.
C. Students read the answers, and decide what the questions are.
Answers:
1. Who is staying at the womans house?
2. What house is the woman looking for?
3. Why is the man working hard?
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 56

1.6

Present simple and continuous

A. There are many possible answers, but here some suggestions:


Possible answers:
b. He writes for a newspaper. At the moment, he isnt working. Hes sleeping.
c. She repairs cars. At the moment, shes working. Shes repairing a car.
d. She teaches science. At the moment, she isnt working. Shes reading.
e. He steals things. At the moment, hes working. Hes stealing a necklace.
Extra Idea
Get students to design similar exercises draw pictures of people doing things,
and saying what their jobs are. They then exchange with other students, and say
what the person does at work, and what they are doing now.

B. In pairs, students ask and answer questions about habits (in the present simple), and current
activity (in the present continuous). Encourage students to give creative answers, not just
Yes, I am and No, I dont etc.
C. After students have practised these questions and answers, get them to think of their own
questions, and perform short dialogues to the class.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 57

1.7

Song: Toms Diner

A. Introduce the song. A woman is sitting in a diner (a type of cheap restaurant in America). She is
singing about what is happening around her.
Students predict what she will sing about. Elicit ideas what do they think is happening in the
diner? Write their suggestions on the board.
Students match these words with their definitions.
Answers:
1. reflection - e. what you see when you look in a mirror
2. shake - d. to quickly move something side to side
3. pour - h. to put water, or other liquid, in something
4. argue - b. to disagree with someone
5. pretend - a. to make people think wrong things about you
6. horoscope - j. a type of fortune-telling, often printed in newspapers and magazines
7. funnies - c. comics in newspapers
8. cathedral - g. a large church
9. hitch - f. to lift something
10. straighten - i. to make something tidy
3

B. Look at the pictures. What is happening? Are they the same ideas as students predicted?
Play the tape twice.
Students decide which pictures a or b are described in the song.
Answers:
1. a
2. a
C. Students find the differences in the pictures. There are five differences in each picture.
Answers:
date
window
1.
2.

ear-ring

headline

dog

no cigarettes

shirt collar
bag,
no umbrella

Students provide sentences explaining the differences, e.g.


Picture 1:
- In picture a, its May 1. In picture b, its May 3.

Picture 2:

sugar
no newspaper

- In picture a, a woman is looking in the window. In picture b, a dog is looking


in the window.
- In picture a, the newspaper headline says Actor dies while drinking. In
picture b, it says Actor wins prize.
- In picture a, the woman isnt wearing an ear-ring. In picture b, shes wearing
an ear-ring.
- In picture a, there are some cigarettes. In picture b, there are no cigarettes.
- In picture a, theres no window in the door. In picture b, theres a window.
- In picture a, the womans shirt has a collar. In picture b, it hasnt got a collar.
- In picture a, the womans got an umbrella. In picture b, shes got a bag.
- In picture a, the woman is pouring milk into her coffee. In picture b, shes
putting sugar in it.
- In picture a, theres no newspaper. In picture b, theres a newspaper.
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 58

D. Learners fill the gaps with appropriate verbs in the present continuous.
You might want the learners to look at the tapescripts to do this activity.
Answers:
1. The weather is bad. It is raining .
2. The woman is reading the newspaper.
3. The woman outside the diner is looking at her reflection.
4. The waiter is pouring the coffee.
5. The waiter is talking to the woman at the door.
6. The woman at the door is shaking her umbrella.
7. The waiter and his friend are kissing to say hello.
8. The woman is listening to the cathedral bells.
E. Play the tape again. Learners read these verses, and add punctuation.
Answers:
I am sitting in the morning at the diner on the corner. I am waiting at the counter for
the man to pour the coffee. A nd he fills it only half way , and before I even argue, he is
looking out the window at somebody coming in .
T heres a woman on the outside looking inside. D oes she see me? N o she does not
really see me cause she sees her own reflection. A nd I m trying not to notice that hes
hitching up her skirt, and while shes straightening her stockings her hair is getting wet .

2. Theres something happening


This exercise focuses on describing scenes, and what people are doing in them.
It introduces the structure there is / are + -ing.

2.1

Theres a boy reading a comic

A. Look at the picture, and the sentences underneath.


Discuss the grammar point: using there is / are with an -ing word (which in this case is an adjective,
not a verb or a noun). You might like to make a chart on the board. Note that in informal writing and
speaking you can contract there is to theres, but you cannot shorten there are.
There's

a boy

reading a comic

There are

some girls

talking

Learners make sentences about the other people in the picture, using there is / are + -ing.
Answers:
1. Theres a boy drinking beer.
2. Theres a girl smoking a cigarette.
3. Theres a teacher holding a stick.
4. There are a two girls and a boy laughing.
5. There are some learners looking at the situation.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 59

B. Demonstrate this activity first. Here is an example - this is from page six, the picture on the top left.
Theres a woman selling vegetables. Shes giving a bag to a man. Theres a man buying
some vegetables.
Can they guess what picture you are describing?
Each learner looks through Module 3, and selects a picture. They write sentences about their
sentence using there + -ing.
In groups, learners read their description. Other group members identify the picture.
Get some learners to read their descriptions to the class, and have the class identify the pictures.

2.2

Buildings you know

A. Learners look around the class, and decide whether these sentences are true or false.
B. Learners write a paragraph about the classroom at the moment, using there is/are + ing.
4

C. Establish the situation. This woman is remembering back to when she was a child, and talking about
what is happening around her. Play the tape two or three times, learners listen.
D. Get learners to close their eyes and imagine a house they lived in when they were young.
What can they see in that house? What people are there? What are the people doing?
Learners work in pairs. They describe the house to their partner.
Get some learners to describe their house to the class.

2.3

Pairwork: Listen and draw


Learners work in pairs. Partner A looks at page 60, partner B looks at page 61. Each partner has
different sections with drawings.
Partner A describes a section to Partner B, who draws it.
Then Partner B describes a section to Partner B, who draws it.
They continue until they have the same picture, which should look a little like this.
If learners find this difficult, elicit descriptions:
1
2
3
1. There are two girls throwing a ball.
2. There are two birds flying over a house.
3. Theres a man sleeping under a tree.
4. There are three fish reading a newspaper.
4
5
6
5. Theres a woman sitting on a chair.
The news
6. There are three people talking.
7. Theres a man running after a bus.
8. Theres a computer sitting on a desk.
7
8
9
9. Theres a teacher writing on a board.
Feugjae GF HT TH JH
GH JH J GHTGJK F
HFGKFG GF GT T
YT DFY RTY Y RT T
TY R RT ER Y TY
YR RT UYU U I G
HG YYUT YU YU
dfkwf
FSDKLJFGE
FASEKF DFKDS GG

BLAH BLAH
BLAH

Dont worry about the quality of the drawing!


Extra Ideas
1. Get learners to make their own Listen and Draw activities. Each learner makes a 2 x
2 grid, and draws a simple picture in each section. Learners work in pairs each
learner describes their pictures to their partner, who draws them.
2. Do a Match the Description activity from Activate! If possible, cut pictures out of
magazines and newspapers for this.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 60

3. More about the Present Continuous


In this section, learners review the two uses of the present continuous used in the previous sections:
- things that are happening right now
- things that are happening around now
And look at another use for this structure: to describe things that are changing.

3.1

Things are changing


Read the usage explanation with the learners, and clarify anything they dont understand.
Write some examples on the board, e.g.
These days, rice is getting more expensive.
Nowadays, more children are attending school.
Today, more people are buying televisions.
Nowadays, its raining more.
This year, more people are coming to the cities to find work.

A. Learners read the text about the changing roles of men and women in the USA.
Do learners think that this is similar to their community, or different?

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 61

B. Learners write the sentences.


There are a few possible answers learners can use different time phrases.
Possible answers:
2. Nowadays, women are working outside the home.
3. These days, women are earning more money.
4. Today, husbands are helping their wives.
5. Nowadays, men are sharing housework.
6. These days, fathers are spending more time with their children.
7. Today, family life is changing.
Discuss this topic. Are these sentences also true about your community?
C. In groups, learners write a list of things that are changing in their communities, and tell them to
the class.

3.2

Think about language

A. Learners look at the examples, and decide which use goes with which example.
Answers:
i. 3 - things that are changing.
ii. 1 things that are happening at the moment.
iii. 2 things that are happening around now.
B. Learners read the text, and look at the different examples of present continuous.
They classify each example into 1, 2 and 3 from exercise A.
Answers:
Type 1 - Im weaving leaves together for the roof.
Type 2 - Were building a new high school in my town.
- Were putting the roof on.
Type 3 - These days, more learners are attending high school.
- Some learners are coming from other towns.
C. Learners write personal examples of each of the three types of present continuous usage.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 62

4. Eating and Drinking


This sections looks at food, both familiar food and food from other countries:
- vocabulary for common foods
- processes for food preparation

4.1

What do you eat?

A. Learners look at the picture, and identify the items on the right.
Answers:
Back - cooking oil, bananas, cabbage
Middle - yellow beans, carrots, fish
Front - fishpaste, pork, eggs, salt
B. Learners classify the food from A into food they eat often, and food you dont eat often.
They should add other food items to the lists as many as they can.
C. Pre-teach natural (comes from nature) and manufactured (made in a factory).
Learners classify the food from B into natural and manufactured.
Answers:
Natural - (most of the food from A): bananas, cabbage, yellow beans,
carrots, salt, pork, eggs, sometimes fishpaste
Other examples are rice, chicken, all fruit and vegetables
Manufactured - cooking oil, sugar, sometimes fishpaste.
Other examples are ma ma noodles, MSG (ajinomoto), sweets, bread, biscuits
D. Learners work in groups of four or five. Each group appoints one writer.
Allow groups exactly three minutes to list as many foods as possible.
The group with the most items on their list after three minutes is the winner.
E. In groups, learners brainstorm a list of all the questions they know that they can ask about food.
If they have difficulty, give them some suggestions.
Write the questions on the board.
Language/culture notes
Suggestions:
Most foods can be a countable or uncountable
Whats your favourite food?
noun: we can say a potato, some potatoes, or
Do you like (fishpaste)?
some potato. We say some potato if the potato
How do you make (mohingya)?
is made into a mixture, or cut up into small
What do you eat for breakfast?
pieces. We say some potatoes if the potatoes
Do you often eat (cake)?
are whole.
How often do you eat?
F. In pairs, learners ask and answer the questions about food.
They should try to remember the answers, or take notes, as they will tell the class about
their partner.
G. Learners tell the class about their partners food habits and opinions.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 63

4.2

Pizza and pasta


This listening exercise presents two very common dishes in Western countries pizza and
pasta. Both originally come from Italy.

A. Look at the pictures, and read the text. Ask learners about pizza and pasta. Have any learners
eaten these dishes? If someone has, did they like it? What did it taste like?
B. Using their dictionaries if necessary, learners match the words and the pictures.
Answers:
a. tomatoes
h. onion
b. noodles
i. mushrooms
c. oil
j. eggplant
d. spices
k. pepper
e. meat
l. garlic
f. flour
m. egg
g. carrots
n. cheese
Note: Eggplants are also called aubergines, especially in the UK.

C. Play the cassette. Learners listen, and identify which ingredients are in which dish.
Answers:
Pizza: flour, egg, tomatoes, carrots, onion, garlic, eggplant, cheese.
Pasta: noodles, garlic, spices, onion, oil, meat, tomatoes, mushrooms, pepper, cabbage.
D. Learners answer the questions.
Answers:
1. Both pizza and pasta, if you dont include any meat - neither has to include meat. In
this example the pizza is vegetarian, but the pasta includes meat.
2. Pizza. Some types of pasta can take this long as well, but usually pasta cooks in
5-20 minutes.
3. Pasta. You can eat pizza with a knife and fork too, but most people just use
their hands.
4. Pizza.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 64

4.3

Recipes

A. Learners look at the picture. They try to guess what ingredients are in the hamburger.
Brainstorm a list of possible ingredients.
Theres no exact answer, as some hamburgers have different sauces, but heres list of
common ingredients:
Possible answers:
Bread rolls (big, round pieces of bread), meat, tomato, lettuce, onion, egg, garlic, flour, oil.
B. Learners put the recipe in order.
Answer:
e. Chop the meat, onions, and garlic.
d. Mix them together with an egg, and a little flour.
c. Make them into small, flat cakes. Cook these in a little oil.
a. Cut the bread rolls in half, and cook them a little.
f. Put the meat cakes in between the two halves of the bread rolls.
b. Add some tomato, lettuce and onion. Its ready to eat!
C. Learners match the verbs with the noun phrases.
Answers:
mix - the oil and the onions, three eggs and some sugar, the flour with the chilli
and potatoes
chop - the onions, the fish
cook - the oil and the onions, the fish, the water in the pot, the flour with the chilli and
potatoes, bean curry, small round cakes
add - the oil and the onions, the fish, three eggs and some sugar, the lemon juice,
some salt, the water in the pot, the flour with the chilli and potatoes, the garlic
to the sauce
put - the water in the pot, the flour with the chilli and potatoes
make - small round cakes, bean curry
D. Learners make their own recipes. If this is very difficult, they should do it in pairs.
First, they think of a dish that they know how to make.
They list all the ingredients, think of the cooking process, and instructions of how to make it.
They write this down in preparation for the pair dictation next.
E. Learners do a pair dictation. Partner A explains their recipe to Partner B, who writes it down.
Encourage learners to ask for clarification if they dont understand something their partner is saying.
After they have written the recipe, they should write it out properly, and check for mistakes.
They then show it to their partners to see if it is correct. Then partners A and B swap roles.
Extra Idea

Do the Poster Presentations activity from Activate!


Use the recipe to make a poster. Draw pictures and
include them with the instructions.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 65

5. Containers
This section focuses on containers - things we keep food and other things in.
It also discusses health, and provides practice in buying things in shops.

5.1

Food and containers

A. Learners brainstorm a list of containers. Write them on the board.


B. Learners match the food or drink that can go in these containers.
There are many possible answers, as many things can go into many containers, but here are the
more common combinations:
Language/culture notes
Answers:
A jar is usually made of glass.
A bottle of oil, milk, beer, fishpaste
A bag is made of plastic, paper or
A can of oil, beer, fish
cloth.
A packet of biscuits, flour, coffee, tea, sweets, salt
A carton is like a box, made of
A bag of biscuits, flour, rice, tomatoes, tea, sweets cardboard or plastic.
A jar of oil, fishpaste, sweets
A packet is a small container made
of paper, plastic or cardboard.
A carton of biscuits, milk, cigarettes, sweets

A can is made of metal.


A bottle is made of glass or plastic.

5.2

Food and health

A. If possible, send learners to a nearby shop to write down


some of the things that are in the shop. They should also
record the container.

Language/culture notes
Brand names. Names like CocaCola, Sprite and Fanta are proper
nouns; they are names of products
or companies, not words for types of
drinks. The common noun for this
type of drink is soft drink (BrE) or
soda (AmE).

B. Learners classify their food into healthy, not very healthy


and unhealthy.
There are many possible answers to this - usually foods that
are more natural (such as rice, fruit, vegetables and eggs) are
healthy. Many manufactured foods such as ma ma noodles, sweets and soft drinks are unhealthy.
Many foods such as meat and sugar are unhealthy if you eat too much of it.
C. Learners write four sentences or short paragraphs about their eating habits, e.g.
I eat rice, fishpaste and yellow beans every day. I also drink tea and coffee every day.
D. Learners decide whether they are healthy eaters or not, and give themselves a score out of 10.
1 = very unhealthy eater, 10 = very healthy eater.
Get a few learners to explain their scores, and why they gave themselves that score.

5.3

Roleplay: In the shop

A. Put learners in groups of three or four, with one shopkeeper per group and the rest customers.
Shopkeepers write ten things they are selling in their shop.
Each learner writes three things they need to buy (and the container or quantity).
They should not show each other what they have written!
B. Customers try to buy the things on the list. If it is also on the shopkeepers list, they can buy it. If
not, they should go to another shopkeeper. Learners keep trying until they have bought all their
things. Encourage learners to have conversations: How much does it cost? Thats 100 baht
etc.After a few minutes, stop them, and get some other learners to be shopkeepers.
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 66

6. Likes and Dislikes


In this section, learners talk about degrees of liking or disliking things.

6.1

What does Mel like?

A. Learners predict what Mel likes from the list. Clarify anything they dont understand.
6

B. Play the tape. Learners listen and check their predictions.


Answers:
Mel likes walking, travelling, coconut juice, spending time with her Mum, dogs
C. Play the tape two or three more times. Learners write the phrase Mel uses to say whether she likes
each thing or not.
Answers:
I like walking
I really like travelling
I love coconut juice
I love spending time with my mum
I like dogs
I dont like selfish people
I hate durian
I hate pollution
I dont mind washing dishes
Draw a chart on the board, explaining the structure:
noun
I like
She doesn't like
He hates
W e don't mind

walking.
fishpaste.
cats.
driving.

Note: The -ing words in this type of sentence are gerunds, a type of noun, not verbs or adjectives.
D. Learners rank these things on the chart.
Answers:
spending time with her mum
walking
travelling
coconut juice
washing dishes
dogs

selfish people

love

6.2

pollution
durian
hate

What do you like?

A. Learners match the faces to the phrases.


Answers:
1. hate
2. love
3. dont like
4. like
5. dont mind
B. Learners write true sentences about themselves, and the objects on the list.
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 67

6.3

Katies problem
In this exercise, learners discuss a real problem that many foreigners experience when they go to
other countries - some people have the idea that Hey! or Hey you! is a polite greeting, and shout it
at foreigners. Actually, this is very rude. The problem is it is common in violent Hollywood movies,
so some people think it is OK in real life.

A. Learners read about Katies problem. Have they ever heard the words Hey you!? Do they think
these are polite or rude things to say?
Have they seen many Hollywood movies? Do they think real life is like that?
B. In groups, learners discuss this situation. They identify what the problem is.
Answer:
People shout rude words at her in the street. They dont know these words are rude.
Learners try to think of some solutions to this problem. Encourage creative solutions!

6.4

Questionnaire: What type of person are you?

A. Discuss the adjectives with the learners. Learners decide if any of the adjectives apply to them.
B. You may want to demonstrate how to answer the questions:
Write the first question on the board - Do you like studying?
Answer it for yourself - explain your opinion of studying, and give yourself the appropriate score.
Ask a couple of learners their opinions of studying, and elicit their scores.
In pairs, learners answer the questions. They should use their dictionaries if necessary.
C. Learners add up their scores in each coloumn.
If they have a high score (over 18) in a column, they can say they are that type of person, e.g. if
their score in the right column is 22, they are a relaxed person. They may be more than one type!
D. Learners tell the class about their partners score, and what type of person they are.
Extra Idea

Do the Sentences in a Bag activity from page 108 of this teachers guide.
1) Demonstrate the activity write on the board: I like cooking... and elicit ways to complete
the sentence.
e.g. meat, on Fridays, for my friends.
2) Cut enough worksheets so there are three sentences for each learner. Give each learner
three of the sentences.
3) The learners complete the sentences. They should be creative! They mustnt write their
names on the paper.
4) Collect all the sentence papers, and put them in the bag. Give each learner a sentence.
5) Learners go around the room trying to find who wrote the sentence.
They do this by asking yes/no questions. e.g. If they have the sentence, I enjoy playing
chess, the learner goes around asking, Do you enjoy playing chess?
6) When they find the person who wrote the sentence, they write the persons name on the
paper, and get another sentence from the bag.
7) The person with the most sentences with names on is the winner.
8) Afterwards, they can read out their slips of paper to report back to the class.
e.g. Mi Mon doesnt mind cleaning the house. Sai Sai loves singing traditional music...

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 68

7. Thinking about Learning


This section focuses on two topics:
- Resources - what things are available to help the English language learning process
- Reviewing - reasons to review, and useful reviewing techniques

7.1
7

Resources for language learning

A. Establish the situation - this learner is describing what resources are available to her, both at school
and outside school.
Pre-teach broken, internet, monolingual, bilingual
Play the tape two or three times.
Learners listen, and tick the resources that this learner can use, at school and outside school.
Copy the chart onto the board.
Play the tape line by line. Get learners to listen carefully for each bit of information.
Together, complete the chart on the board.
Answers:
At school - story books, video camera, video player, English language movies,
grammar books
Outside school - radio programmes, books, newspapers, English-English dictionary,
cassette player, English music cassettes, people to speak English with
B. Learners complete the chart for themselves.
Ask two or three learners to complete the chart on the board.
Do all learners answer the same, or do they have different resources?
C. Learners think about their use of time for learning English.
They count the number of hours they spend per week on each activity, and add up the total.
Ask some learners about their answers, and write them on the board.
Are most learners the same, or do they spend different amounts of time on each activity?
Extra Idea

Do a class survey. Find out the average amount of time learners spend
on each activity, and the average total.

7.2

A good use of time: Reviewing your work


In this exercise, learners discuss the advantages of regular reviews.
Read the introduction, and clarify anything learners dont understand.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 69

A. Learners look at the chart. The chart shows how quickly you can forget information that you learn.
Discuss this chart with the learners. Check that they understand it.
The chart represents what happens if you study something once, and never look at it again.
After 24 hours, you can forget 80% of this information. After 2 days, you can forget nearly 90%.
B. The second chart shows that with regular reviews, you can remember most of the information.
Discuss this chart with the learners. Check that they understand it.
Go over the information after 10 minutes, 24 hours, 1 week and 1 month.
Background Information

Researchers have found that in order to transfer information from short-term memory to
long-term memory, regular reviews are necessary. Usually in the class, reviews are
built into the course by various techniques such as asking questions after reading a
text, writing an essay for homework and revision pages in a coursebook all of these
things help transfer information from short-term to long-term memory.

7.3

How do you review?

A. This exercise suggests different review techniques.


Different techniques work best for different learners, and a good learner is one who finds a range
of appropriate techniques that suit their learning style.
Look at the examples.
B. Learners rank these techniques in order of most useful to least useful for them.
Ask a few learners for their answers, and write them on the board.
C. Do most learners have the same ideas, or different ones?
Ask learners which of these techniques they use.
Brainstorm a list of other review techniques. Which ones do learners use?

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 70

8.

Review

This section has three parts:


- exercises so learners can practise the items learned in the module
- a grammar review where learners can look at tables outlining grammar structures
covered in the module
- a vocabulary review where learners can focus on the words they encountered in
the module, and in earlier modules

8.1

Exercises

A. Present continuous
Answers:
1. Sally isnt looking after the children today.
2. Shes working.
3. Bobs looking after the children.
4. Hes staying at home. He isnt going to work.
5. Alice isnt helping her father.
6. Shes lying on the floor.
7. Bob isnt answering the telephone.
8. Bob isnt smiling.
9. Sallys arriving home now.
10. Shes smiling.
B. Present simple or continuous?
Answers:
Alice usually helps her parents. But she isnt helping now. She s watching television.
Frankie is a quiet baby. He usually sleeps in the afternoon. However, he isnt sleeping
now. He s fighting with the dog. Jimmy doesnt usually kick his father. Hes a polite boy.
But not at the moment! All the children usually behave at home. But now they are very
naughty! Sally usually cooks dinner. She enjoys cooking, and shes a good cook. But shes
not cooking tonight. Bob s cooking . He doesnt usually cook. He usually washes the
dishes after dinner.
C. Write the questions
Answers:
2. Whats Jimmy doing?
3. What are Frankie and the dog doing?
4. What does Sally do?
5. Is she looking after the children? / Is she at home today?
6. Whats the time?
7. How many children do Bob and Sally have?

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 71

D. Crossword: Verb + -ing


Answers:
Across:
2. going
4. staying
7. making
9. talking
11. getting
14. riding
15. having
16. running

Down: 1. doing
3. lying
5. taking
6. smoking
8. waiting
10. reading
12. washing
13. driving

E. There is/are + -ing


Possible answers:
2. There are a man and a woman eating in the kitchen.
3. There are two people dancing on the table.
4. Theres a man reading a book.
5. There are some people singing.
6. There are two people sitting - theres a man sitting on a chair, and a woman sitting
at the piano.
7. There are some people swimming in the swimming pool.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 72

E. Food search
Answers: fishpaste cabbage bread chicken pork rice garlic fish cake potato salt
tomato chilli onion noodles bean carrot mushroom pepper papaya goat
F. Classify the food
Answers:
vegetables: cabbage, garlic, potato, tomato, chilli, onion, bean, carrot,
mushroom, pepper
meat: chicken, pork, fish, goat
other: bread, rice, cake, salt, noodles, papaya
G. Pronunciation
Answers:
1. 4
2. 2
3. 3
4. 3
5. 1
6. 3
7. 2
8. 3
9. 2
10. 1
11. 3
12. 2
H. Containers
Possible answers:
1. oil, water, petrol, juice (any liquid)
2. In a bag, usually
3. In a bottle, usually
4. fish, some drinks
5. rice, biscuits, fruit, vegetables (most things can go in bags)
6. In a bottle, usually
I. Likes and dislikes
Answers:
2. She loves living in the city.
3. She doesnt like her job.
4. She doesnt mind cleaning her house.
5. She likes papayas.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 73

8.2

Grammar review

This page is a summary of the main grammar structures focused on in this module.
If you like, do some practice activities using the structures, e.g.
- gap-fill
- matching
- word order
- right or wrong sentences.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 74

8.3

Vocabulary review
A. This is a page of explicit vocabulary learning using words from the module, plus other words that
the learners will find useful.
Help learners if they have problems with any of the words.
Learners can write translations next to the words they know, and look up the words they dont
know in their dictionaries.
For homework, learners should focus on the words they have difficulty with.
B. Answers:
1. healthy
2. carrot, garlic, mushroom, onion
3. vegetarian
4. naughty
5. mirror
6. hammock
7. milk
8. recipe
9. joke
10. durian, lemon, papaya, pineapple
11. at the moment, nowadays
12. can, carton, jar, packet

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 75

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 76

1. What Happened?
This section focuses on the past, and using the past simple:
- postive and negative sentences
- questions

1.1

Famous people

A. Learners look at the pictures, and the names. Do they know any of these people?
What do they know about them? Elicit their ideas, and write them on the board.
Learners match the names with the pictures.
Answers:
1. Wangari Maathai
2. Muhammad Ali
3. Marie Curie
4. Nelson Mandela
5. San C. Po
6. Che Guevara
7. Sirimavo Bandaranaike
8. Britney Spears
B. Pre-teach struggle, fight, championship, receive, discover, boxing (heavyweight is a category
of boxing competition)
Go through the sentences, and clarify anything the learners dont understand.
Learners match the people with their achievements.
Answers:
1. Britney Spears
2. Che Guevara
3. San C. Po
4. Muhammad Ali
5. Nelson Mandela
6. Wangari Maathai
7. Sirimavo Bandaranaike
8. Marie Curie
C. Learners identify the tense of the verbs used in B. (past simple)
Elicit the base form of the verbs.
Answers:
sing
fight
write
win
struggle
receive
become
discover
Learners decide which verbs are regular, and which are irregular?
Answers:
Regular - struggle, receive, discover
Irregular - sing, fight, write, win, become
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 77

1.2
1

Song: What a Crazy Day!

A. Pre-teach crazy.
Play the song. Ask learners why they think this was a crazy day.
B. Play the song again. Learners put the pictures in order.
Answers:
f, d, b, h, e, c, a, g
C. Play the song again. Learners put the lyrics in order.
Answers:
I woke up this morning and got into bed
Then I ate a cup of tea and drank a slice of bread
I went to the bus stop and caught a train to school
Then I rode my bicycle in the swimming pool
Someone broke the telephone so then I rang my friend
We went to the football field and swam from end to end
I came home this evening and watched the radio
I lay down on the ceiling and read a video
D. Learners complete the gap-fill, using verbs from the song.
If they have difficulty with forming the negative structures, refer them to the grammar review
on page 95.
Answers:
a. get, got
b. drink, drank
c. eat, ate
d. catch, caught
e. ride, rode
f, g. There are a few other possible sentences from the song, e.g.
You didnt swim in the football field, you swam in the swimming pool!
You didnt watch the radio, you watched the television!
You didnt lie down on the ceiling, you lay down on the floor!

E. Play the karaoke version of the song. Learners sing.


F. Learners work in groups. They think of more crazy verses for the song.
Give a prize to the group with the best verse.
You may need to give some examples of possible extra verses, e.g.
I washed my face with toothpaste
I drove my motorbike around the living room etc.
Extra Idea

Have a team verb competition. Divide the class into two teams.
Give one member of each team a pen.
Call out a verb in its base form, e.g. go.
The teams representatives come to the board, and write the past simple form, e.g. went.
The first person to write the correct form gets a point for their team.
Continue until all team members have had two or three turns.
The team with the most points is the winner.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 78

1.3 An interview about yesterday


Introduce the activity. Explain that learners are going to do some research about what
people did yesterday. This research will be in the form of interviews.
A. Demonstrate the activity: Write exercise 2 on the board.
b. drink: tea, coffee, water, beer .
Get a learner to choose an option. Underline it.
Did you drink
Elicit the question.
Did you drink
Get another learner to give an alternative
beer yesterday?
option. Elicit the question.
Learners choose eight options from the list.
B. Make them into eight yes/no questions, e.g.
Did you wake up before 6 oclock yesterday?
Did you drink beer yesterday?
3

C. Explain that the tape is a recording of learners performing this task - doing an interview.
Play the tape two or three times.
D. Look at the example at the bottom of the page for a way to start an interview:
Excuse me, Im doing some research. Could you answer some questions please?
Get two learners to go through their questions in front of the class.
The interviewer writes down the answers.
Each learner interviews four other learners.
Extra Idea
After learners have finished interviewing, they can present their
results. Get them to add up how many people answered yes to
each question. They make this into a percentage, e.g. 75% ate
beans yesterday, 25% played caneball
They then read out their results to the class.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 79

1.4

Listening: A man and a penguin

A. Look at the pictures. Ask learners what they think is happening.


Write their suggestions on the board.
4

B. Play the tape two or three times.


Answers: D, B, A, C
C. In groups of four of five, learners retell the story. The first learners says a sentence about
what happened fiest. The second learner says what happened next, etc.

1.5

Prediction: Nelson Mandela

A. Individually or in pairs, learners study the words and phrases with a dictionary.
B. Learners predict - try to guess - what the text will say about Nelson Mandela.
Write sentences about Nelson Mandela using the words and phrases.
C. Learners turn to page 86 and read the text. Check their predictions.
Learners should compare their sentences to the ones in the text.
They check whether the meanings of their sentences are similar - dont worry if the exact wording
or grammar is not the same.
Here is a copy of the text. Read it out sentence by sentence, and ask learners what their sentences
say. Do they have similar meanings?
Nelson Mandela struggled to end Apartheid in South Africa. He studied law in the 1940s,
and participated in student action against apartheid. He started South Africas first black
law firm in 1952. He joined the military wing of the ANC (African National Congress), an
illegal organization. The police arrested him in 1962, and he spent nearly 30 years in
prison. He got out of prison in 1990. Apartheid ended in 1994, and black people voted for
the first time. Nelson Mandela became South Africas first black president.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 80

2. Questions and Answers about the Past


This section focuses on wh- and yes/no questions in the past, and provides practice in asking and
answering questions. It also looks at time phrases in the past.

2.1 San C Po
A. Ask learners if they have heard of Dr San C Po, a Karen leader and historian from colonial times.
What do learners know about him? Discuss learners prior knowledge.
Learners read the text - there are some gaps in the text. Elicit the type of information that is missing
from the text.
B. Learners put the questions in the right order.
Answers:
1. What did he write?
2. Where did he study?
3. What did he do in America?
4. When did he return to Burma?
5. What did he want?
C. Get learners to ask you the questions, and give them the answers.
If you like, answer very quietly, so that only the learners nearby you can hear. Then learners on the
other side of the room will have to ask, too.
Answers:
1. Burma and the Karens.
2. At mission schools in Burma.
3. He attended medical school.
4. In 1894.
5. An independent Karen State.

2.2

Wangari Maathai

A. Learners read about Wangari Maathai, and decide why she won the Nobel Peace Prize.
Elicit their suggestions, and write them on the board.
B. Learner work in pairs or groups of three. They make a list of more questions they could ask about
Wangari Maathai. You might want to elicit a few example questions, e.g.
What did she teach at university?
5

C. Play the tape two or three times. Did learners hear the answers to their questions?
D. Ask again why they think she won the Nobel Peace Prize - do they have the same opinions as
they did in A?
Answer:
For her work in environmental, human rights and womens rights issues.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 81

2.3

Pairwork: Asking about Che Guevara

Partner A

This is a pairwork activity - Learner A looks at this page; Learner B looks at page 11.

A. Learners read their text, using a dictionary to help if necessary.


They identify the missing information, and think of questions they can ask to get the information.
Answers:
Partner A - 1. Where did he fight revolutions?
2. When did he take up guerilla warfare?
Extra Idea
3. Who did he work with?
Look on a world map. Learners
4. Where did he go in 1966?
identify where these South
Partner B - 1. Where did he train as a doctor?
American countries are.
2. What did he want?
3. When did he leave Cuba?
4. Who did he teach guerilla warfare skills to?
B. Learners ask each other their questions, and write the information in the text.
Both learners should have the complete text:
Che Guevara fought revolutions in South America. He trained as a doctor in Argentina, but took
up guerilla warfare in the 1950s. He wanted better conditions for poor people of the world. He
worked with Fidel Castro, and they created a communist government in Cuba. He left Cuba in
1966, and went to other South American and African countries. He taught guerilla warfare skills
to local groups in these countries. The Bolivian government caught and killed him in 1967.

C. Discuss ways learners could get more information about Che Guevara. Do they know any sources
of information? Brainstorm a list of sources, and write it on the board. Encourage learners to think
of some creative ways to get information!
Suggestions:
Books, films, encyclopaedias, the internet, go to South America and visit museums, write
letters to his friends and relatives...

2.4

More information
A. These sentences are about Sirimavo Bandaranaike, Britney Spears and Marie Curie. Learners look
back at the information about them on page 77, and decide which sentence is about which woman.
B. There are texts about these women on page 110. Chose six learners, and give them
each a handout about one of the women.
Other learners ask them the yes/no questions, to test whether their guesses are correct.
Answers:
1. Marie Curie
7. Britney Spears
2. Britney Spears
8. Sirimavo Bandaranaike
3. Britney Spears
9. Marie Curie
4. Sirimavo Bandaranaike
10. Sirimavo Bandaranaike
5. Marie Curie
11. Britney Spears
6. Britney Spears
12. Marie Curie

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 82

2.5 When did you last...


6

A. Establish the situation. Bee Bee is going to be interviewed about when he last did these things.
Play the tape, learners listen, and write the information in the chart.
Answers:
1. when he was 16
2. yesterday
3. last week
4. this morning
5. in March
6. three days ago
Discuss these phrases. They are all ways to mark past time.
B. In this exercise, learners decide how sociable Bee Bee is - how often does he go out? If they think
he goes out a lot, they mark the scale towards the right. If they think he doesnt go out much, they
mark the scale towards the left. There is no correct answer to this.
Possible answer:
I think hes about average - he goes out sometimes, but not all the time. Id mark him
in the middle.
goes out
a lot

never
goes out

C. In pairs, learners interview each other, using the questions from A. They write their partners
answers on the chart.
They decide where their partner would be on the scale, and make a mark.
They can also make a mark on the scale for themselves.
Ask who learners think is the most sociable person in the class.
Extra Idea

Do the When did you Last? activity at the back of this Teachers Guide. Copy the worksheets
on page 109 so that there enough for each group of 6-11.
1) Learners work in groups of 6-11. Give a set of cards to each group. The groups distribute
the cards so they have one or two cards each.
2) Each person in the group is responsible for finding the answers on their cards. They do
this by asking each group member: When did you last(eat ice-cream)? They can make
notes on the back of each card.
3) The aim is to find the person in the group who did the thing most recently.
4) After the group has all the answers, they report back to the class, e.g.
Nang Si was the last person to eat ice cream. She ate it on Monday.

2.6

Past time expressions

A. Pre-teach diary (two meanings: a book where you can record future appointments, or a journal.
In this case it means a book to record future appointments)
Learners read the diary parts explain that today is Friday the 15th of September.
Learners work out an appropriate time expressions for when the man did these things.
Answers:
2. six days ago
3. one week ago / last week
4. six months ago / last March
5. two days ago
B. In pairs, learners ask and answer questions about each others past activities, using the time
expressions from A, e.g.
What did you do yesterday afternoon?
There is a comprehensive explanation of past time expressions in the Grammar review on page 97.
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 83

3. Focus on Pronunciation
This section focuses on pronunciation of past simple verb endings, and contains fluency practice
exercises using structures from Module 4.

3.1

Pronouncing the past

A. Pre-teach roll, trust, punish, revenge


Look at the pictures. Elicit learners ideas about where it is, who the people are, and what is
happening in each picture.
In pairs, learners read the sentences, and put the pictures in order.
Answers: C, D, A, E, B
B. Learners write the correct past simple verb forms.
Answers:
1. liked
2. worked
3. finished
4. answered
5. remembered
6. talked
7. hated
8. decided

9. rolled
10. waited
11. landed
12. shouted
13. asked
14. pointed
15. trusted
16. punished

C. Explain that some regular past simple verbs end with a /t/ sound, e.g. walked, some end with
a /d/ sound, e.g. loved, and some end with an extra syllable /ed/ sound, e.g. wanted.
In pairs, learners decide which endings the verbs in the sentences have.
They put a tick in the box with the right ending.
Answers:
Benny was a good student.

1. Teachers always __________ (like) Benny.

2. He __________ (work) hard at school.

a
a

3. He always __________ (finish) his work first.

4. He always __________ (answer) questions correctly

5. He __________ (remember) all his lessons.

6. He never __________ (talk) out of turn.

ed

7. The other students __________ (hate) Benny.

8. One day, they __________ (decide) to get revenge.

9. They __________ (roll) a piece of paper into a ball.

10. They __________ (wait) for the teacher to turn his back.

11. They threw the paper ball at the teacher. It __________

(land) on the teachers head.

12. The teacher was really angry. He __________ (shout) at the class.
13. WHO DID THAT ? He __________ (ask).

a
a

14. All the students __________ (point) at Benny.

15. But the teacher __________ (trust) Benny.

16. The teacher __________ (punish) the other students.


General English Teachers Guide 14: page 84

D. Play the tape. Learners listen and check.


Answers: t - liked, worked, talked, asked
d - finished, answered, remembered, rolled, punished
ed - hated, decided, waited, landed, shouted, pointed, trusted
Play the tape line by line. Learners repeat the past simple verb.
E. Learners work in groups of three or four. From memory, they retell the story.
They take turns to give some information.
They should use their own words, not try to use exactly the same sentences as in the story.

3.2

Two truths, one lie

A. Demonstrate this activity - think of three sentences about yourself in the past. Two should be true,
and one should be a lie.
Say your sentences to the class. Can they guess the lie?
Learners write three sentences about themselves in the past. Two sentences should be true, one
sentence should be a lie.
B. Learners tell their sentences to another learner. Can the other learner guess the lie?
C. Learners change partners, and repeat the activity a few times.

3.3

3-2-1: Your life story

This is a speaking fluency activity. The aim is to get learners saying as much as possible about an easy
topic themselves. It is very important that you dont correct grammar or vocabulary in this exercise, as
the aim is to get learners to speak fluently and confidently.

A. Introduce the activity. Tell learners they will speak for three minutes about themselves.
Learners spend about five minutes making a mind-map, writing down all the things they
could talk about. They should not write out a speech, only brief notes.
If this is very difficult for them, do a mind-map on the board with one learner as an example.
B. Learners work in pairs. One learner talks about their life story. The other listens.
After exactly three minutes, they change roles.
C. Tell learners they are going to talk about themselves for two minutes, to a different partner.
Give them a minute to decide what information they will include, and what they will leave.
Put them with different partners.
One learner talks for two minutes while the other listens, then they change roles.
D. Tell learners they are going to talk about themselves for one minute, to a different partner.
Give them a minute to decide what information they will include, and what they will leave out.
Put them with different partners.
One learner talks for a minute, the other listens, then they change roles.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 85

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 86

4. In the House
This section deals with rooms: how to describe them, and what is in them.

4.1

Vocabulary: Whats in your house?

A. Learners identify the furniture.


Answers:
mirror, shelves/bookshelves, television, shower, picture, toilet, lamp,
chair/armchair, desk, stove/cooker, sofa, drawers, sink, cupboard
B. Learners classify the furniture into rooms. Some furniture can go in more than one room!
(Very few answers here can be wrong, as you can put almost anything anywhere possible
exceptions would be stove and shower.)
Possible answers:
kitchen - shelves, stove/cooker, drawers, sink, cupboard
bedroom - shelves, mirror, lamp, drawers, cupboard
living room - shelves, mirror, television, picture, lamp, chair, desk, sofa, cupboard
bathroom - shelves, mirror, shower, toilet, sink, cupboard
What other rooms do learners know? Elicit some more rooms, e.g. study, dining room,
storeroom, toilet, etc.
C. Learners continue the lists by writing all the other things they can put in these rooms.
Make a class list on the board.
D. Learners classify the furniture by what it is made of. Use the furniture from A and C.
Most furniture can be made of more than one thing.
Possible answers:
wood/bamboo - shelves, drawers, chair, desk, cupboard, sofa, picture,
mirror, toilet
metal - shelves, stove/cooker, mirror, lamp, sink, television, shower
plastic - drawers, shelves, mirror, chair
other - shelves, mirror, shower, toilet, sink, cupboard, sofa, lamp, picture, television

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 87

4.2

Describing rooms

A. Elicit definitions of the adjectives for describing rooms. They should use their dictionaries if
necessary. Elicit opposites to the adjectives:
Answers:
cool - warm spacious - crowded messy - tidy dark - light
comfortable - uncomfortable large - small clean - dirty
B. Learners decide which adjective can describe which item.
Answers:
1. room - all of them: cool, spacious, messy, tidy,
dark, comfortable, large, light, clean
2. table - messy, tidy, large, clean
3. cooker - large, clean
C. Pre-teach study (a room in your home you use as an office or study area) and wooden.
Learners read the texts.
8

D. Play the tape. Learners listen, and identify what information is different between the written texts
and the spoken texts. There are five differences in each text.
Answers: 1. - daughters bedroom is large
- five daughters
- bamboo shelf
- photographs of their grandparents
- window opposite the door.
2. - small room
- one chair
- shelf full of old books
- sit and read my books
- not very tidy

4.3
9

Listen and draw

A. Play the tape two or three times. Learners listen, and draw the room they hear.
Good drawing is not important; they should try to include all the things in the description.
Give them a few minutes to do their drawing, then play the tape again to check.
Answers: The picture should look a bit like this:

oil
oil
oil

oil

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 88

B. Learners spend a couple of minutes thinking of a short description of a room they know well.
C. Learners work in pairs. Partner A describes the room: Partner B draws it.
When they have finished, they look at the picture together. Is it the same as the description?
Then they change roles: Partner B describes; Partner A draws.

5. Adverbs of degree
This section looks at adverbs of degree - adverbs that modify adjectives.

5.1

How short are they?

A. Learners look at the pictures, read the text and identify the people.
Answers:
left to right - Dennis, Ni Ni, Roi Ja, Johnny, U Zagara
B. Learners read through the text, and decide which words and phrases are adverbs of degree.
Answers:
really, very, a little, quite, fairly, a bit, not very.
Ask learners if they know any other adverbs of degree.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 89

C. Learners rank the phrases from A in order of height.


Answers:
not very tall, a bit short (these meanings are very similar)
quite short, fairly short (these meanings are very similar)
very short, really short (these meanings are very similar)
Elicit any other adverbs of degree that learners might know, e.g. extremely, rather, much (with
comparative adjectives) etc. Write them on the board.
Rank any other adverbs of degree on the scale, too, e.g.
rather is similar to quite and fairly (but is more formal)
extremely is at the bottom of the scale, below very and really
Language/culture notes
Not very is commonly used as a polite expression. For example, saying He is
not very clever is much more polite than saying He is stupid, and Your garden
isnt very tidy is much softer than Your garden is messy.

D. Explain the structure of these questions: how + adjective.


Learners answer the questions, mostly about themselves.
Extra Idea

Do the Speaking Stick activity from Activate!


Use how + adjective questions.

5.2

Relatives from the city

A. Learners look at the picture. Elicit their ideas:


- Where is this?
- Who are the people?
B. Learners read the text and check their predictions.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 90

C. Establish the situation. The visitors have left, and Sai Htoo and his wife are talking about them.
Learners read the conversation. Clarify anything they dont understand.
Learners fill the gaps with an adverb or an adjective. There are many correct answers.
Example answers:
Nang Si: That was a really large car. I think it was very expensive!
Nang Si: His wife is quite pretty.
Sai Htoo: Shes very young - Dennis told me she is only 25.
Nang Si: She was fairly rude. She said our house is very dirty !
Sai Htoo: Shes a bit beautiful, but not very nice .
Sai Htoo: Shes really clever.
Sai Htoo: Yes, but really naughty !
Sai Htoo: Not ever! I like our beautiful farm! We are very happy here.
D. Dennis and his wife, Fifi, are driving home. Write their conversation about Sai Htoos house.

6. Restaurants
In this section, learners practise language they need if they are in a restaurant.

6.1

In a restaurant

A. Discuss restaurants. Have any learners been to a restaurant?


Do they go to restaurants often? What sort of food do they get?
How much does it cost?
B. Learners look at the pictures, and the vocabulary.
Get learners to identify the waiter, customer, menu and bill.
10

C. Listen to the tape. Learners identify which picture goes with which conversation.
Answer:
Picture 1 - Conversation 1
Picture 2 - Conversation 2

Language/culture notes

A restaurant may be expensive or


cheap. Noodle shops, teashops and
cafes are all cheap types of restaurant.
In some restaurants, you can get food
either to take away or eat in.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 91

D. Play the tape, pausing after each line. Learners repeat.


In pairs, they practise the conversations.
E. Learners translate the conversations into their L1.

6.2

Whats on the menu?

A. Learners read the menu. Do they know all the food? Clarify anything they dont understand.
Learners decide what food on the menu they like best, and what they dont like.
Get them to tell the class. What is the classs favourite item on the menu?
B. Learners answer the questions.
Answers:
1. All the soups, green salad, plain rice, fried rice with tofu
2. Everything except pork (most Muslims dont eat pork - also see the box below)
3. A bottle of water
4. water, fruit juice, sometimes tea (without much milk and sugar)
Language/culture notes

Muslims, Jews and Seventh Day Adventists dont


eat pork. Also, many Muslims will only eat halal
food. For meat to be halal, it must be slaughtered
(killed) according to traditional Muslim guidelines.

C. In pairs, learners make conversations like 6.1: Learner A is a waiter; Learner B a customer.
They order food from the menu and pay the bill.

6.3 Roleplay
A. In groups, learners design a menu. They choose their own dishes for it, and give them prices.
Encourage learners to be as creative, funny and interesting as possible.
B. Learners do a roleplay, with a waiter and some customers. They make a dialogue about
ordering food and paying the bill, practise it and perform it to the class.
Get learners to vote on the best (funniest? most accurate? best acted?) roleplay, and give a
small prize.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 92

7. Thinking about Learning: Vocabulary 1


In this learner training section, learners focus on vocabulary: what knowing a word means, and the
difference between active and passive vocabulary. Some of the language is quite difficult, so you may
want to explain it in L1.

7.1

How do you feel about learning vocabulary?

A. Pre-teach express (to say something so that people can understand your meaning),
get around (to find a way to manage a problem)
Read what the people say about learning vocabulary.
Match the person with the sentences.
Answers:
Aung Mon doesnt need so many words, He uses the words he knows in all situations.
Leah wants a wide vocabulary, so she can say exactly what she means.
Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each opinion.
B. Try to elicit or explain these points:
Leah: - enjoys learning vocabulary, wants to make meaning clear
- tries to learn all words, wont be successful. Should also practise other skills
Aung Mon: - probably has better communication strategies
- maybe lack of vocabulary affects his comprehension
C. In groups, learners discuss their feelings about vocabulary learning. For example, do they find it
easy or difficult? Do they think it is very important or not? Is it interesting or boring?
D. One group member reports to the class about everyone in the groups opinions.

7.2

Active and passive vocabulary

A. Explain the difference between understanding a word when you hear or see it in context and
using a word (being able to use it appropriately in speaking and writing). If you
can understand a word, it is part of your passive vocabulary. If you can use a word, it is part of
your active vocabulary.
Learners discuss the questions.
Answer:
Estimates of the passive vocabulary of an educated native speaker vary between 50,000
and 250,000 words. This includes members of the same word family, e.g. advise, advice,
advisor, advisory, advisable, inadvisable, etc.
B. Answer: Approximately 10,000.
C. Answer: Probably about 10,000 for their native language(s).

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 93

7.3

Knowing a word

A. Go through the points as a class, giving examples.


Draw this chart on the board use your own, better examples than these if you can.
Point

Example

1. To understand it when it is written or spoken.


2. To recall it when you need it.
3. To use it with the correct meaning.

not calling a table a chair.

4. To use it with the correct grammar.

She sang very well, not 'She sang very good.

5. To pronounce it correctly.

comfortable = k umf-ta-bal, not k om-for-tay-bul

6. To know which other words you can use with it.

An interesting table not An exciting table; A goodlook ing person not A delicious person.

7. To spell it correctly.

Spelling can alter meaning: wait or weight? sore or saw?

8. To use it in the right situation.

Especially with slang: Yum! or That was delicious.

B. Learners each think of a word in English that they have recently learned.
Read the quotations. Check that learners understand.
They go through points 1-8, deciding if each one is important for their word.
Ask a couple of learners for their words, and go through each point with them on the board.
C. In groups, learners find out the meanings of these six words and phrases, in their dictionaries if
possible.
If that isnt possible, they can ask you:
a spanner is a tool used for tightening screws
a twerp is a slang word for a stupid person (it is not very rude - people often use it to joke
with their friends - but you dont use it formally)
D. Learners discuss their decisions in groups, and agree as a group on which points (1-8) are useful for
each word. Discuss this in class.
E. Learners think of what type of words they should learn. Ask this around the class.
They might suggest words about their interests (e.g. sports, reading, music), useful words for
future study (e.g. medical words if they want to be a medic) or words that are very common in
everyday English (which is mostly what they are learning in this course).

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 94

8.

Review

This section has three parts:


- exercises so learners can practise the items learned in the module
- a grammar review where learners can look at tables outlining grammar structures
covered in the module
- a vocabulary review where learners can focus on the words they encountered in the
module, and in earlier modules

8.1

Exercises

A. Mini-crosswords
Answers:
a.
1. swam 2. were 3. rode 4. made
b.
1 across. was 1 down. wrote 2. slept 3. woke
c.
1. threw 2. had 3. went 4. drank
d.
1. bought 2. sent 3. wore 4. gave 5. taught
B. Present simple or continuous?
Answers:
1. Hser Hser had a shower.
2. Aung Mon didnt go to the shops.
3. Hser Hser didnt make a cake.
4. Aung Mon watched television.
5. Hser Hser read the newspaper.
6. Aung Mon lost his umbrella.
7. Hser Hser didnt take the dog for a walk.
8. Hser Hser rode the motorbike to work.
9. Aung Mon wore green trousers.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 95

4. left
6. felt

C. Conversation gap-fill
Answers:
Paw Paw: I went to Bangkok last month.
Nai Linn: Really? Did you have a good time?
Paw Paw: Yes, it was very interesting.
Nai Linn: Where did you stay ? In a hotel?
Paw Paw: No, I stayed in a friends flat.
Nai Linn: And What did you do ?
Paw Paw: Well, she took me to the palace, but we didnt see the king.
D. Questions and answers
Answers:
1. What time did you eat? / When did you eat?
2. Where did you eat?
3. What did you eat?
4. Who did you eat with?
5. How much did it cost?
6. What did you do after dinner?
7. How did you get home?
8. What time did you get home? / When did you get home?
E. Past time
Answers:
Any grammatically correct sentences in the past simple.
F. Sentences about houses
Answers:
1. There are two bedrooms in my house.
2. Our bedroom is spacious and comfortable.
3. Weve got a large bed made of wood.
4. Theres a metal bookshelf under the window.
5. I usually put a vase of flowers on the table.
6. The room is always very tidy.
G. In the restaurant
There are many correct answers.
Possible answers:
Customer: Excuse me, have you got any fish today?
Waiter: Yes, we have . We have fried fish, fish soup and fish curry.
Customer: Ill have the fish curry.
Waiter: Anything to drink ?
Customer: A small bottle of beer, please.
Waiter: Is that all?
Customer: Mmm, how much is the cake?
Waiter: 50 baht.
Customer: OK, Ill have some chocolate cake.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 96

8.2

Grammar review

This page is a summary of the main grammar structures focused on in this module.
If you like, do some practice activities using the structures, e.g.
- gap-fill
- matching
- word order
- right or wrong sentences

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 97

8.3

Vocabulary review

A. Learners can write translations next to the words they know, and look up the words they dont
know in their dictionaries. For homework, learners should focus on the words they have
difficulty with.
B. Answers:
1. president, prime minister
2. lie
3. darling
4. logging
5. million
6. funny
7. goat, penguin
8. metal
9. research
10. trust
11. dialogue
12. shout
C. Learners work in pairs. Partner A chooses a word from the vocabulary list.
Partner B writes a sentence that contains the word I and the chosen word.
Partner A decides if it is correct or not, then they change roles.
Be available to help learners decide whether a sentence is OK.

Test

On page 117 there is a test of the language and skills


from Modules 3 and 4. Use this test so you and your
learners can see how much they can understand and
use these. Copy enough tests so there is one for each
learner. There is a marking guide on page 120.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 98

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 99

Review 1: Interview with a cassette player


A. Play the tape. Learners reply to the tape player.

Extra Idea

B. Learners ask and answer the questions in pairs.


Encourage them to speak quickly and fluently.

Do a Roleplay. Learners choose a


situation where people ask and answer
personal questions (e.g. job interview,
interrogation) and perform it for the class.

11

Review 2: Family
Answers:
a. grandmother
b. son
c. sisters
d. niece
e. husband
f. wifes
g. uncle
h. father
i. daughter
j. nephew

Review 3: What do they do?


A. Learners identify the jobs of the people in the pictures.
Answers:
cook, pastor, soldier, queen, monk, journalist
Learners match the jobs with the characteristics. Encourage them to use correct subject/verb
agreement, and to use sometimes for situations that are not true all the time.
Possible answers:
cook: uses her hands, makes things, sometimes wears a uniform
pastor: meets a lot of people, sometimes wears special clothes, discusses religion
soldier: wears a uniform, sometimes gives orders, sometimes travels, sometimes wears
special clothes, walks a lot, works outside, sometimes lives in a special building
queen: gives orders, wears special clothes, lives in a special building
monk: wears special clothes, discusses religion, lives in a special building
journalist: sometimes travels, uses a computer, meets a lot of people
What other things do these people do? Make class lists on the board.
B. In pairs, learners ask and answer yes/no questions about the people, using Does she / he ...?
C. In pairs, learners ask and answer questions about each other, using Do you...?
They can use the ideas in A, and their own ideas.

Extra Idea

Play Guess the Job. Think of a job. Learners


ask yes/no questions to try to guess your job.
Get a learner to think of a job. Other learners
ask them questions.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 100

Review 4: Song: Who, Where, When?


A. Learners look at the pictures. Elicit sentences about each picture.
12

B. Play the song. Learners number the pictures in the correct order.
Answers:
E, C, I, B, A, H, G, F, D

13

C. Learners write the missing questions in the song lyrics.


Play the tape, learners check their answers.
Answers:
Where does he come from?
When does he come home?
Who does he play with?
Where does she come from?
When do they practise?
Where does she practise?
Who does she love, then?
D. Play the karaoke version of the tape. Learners sing.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 101

Review 5: Love - Hate


A. Learners look at the pictures, and write sentences using (not) like, love, (not) mind and hate.
Answers: a. He loves playing football
b. He likes watching television
c. He doesnt mind reading / studying / doing his homework.
d. He doesnt like washing the dishes
e. He hates washing / having a shower.
B. Learners write similar sentences about themselves, on small pieces of paper.
They dont write their names on the pieces of paper.
Collect the pieces of paper, mix them up, and give one to each learner.
Learners read out the sentences, and the class guesses who wrote it.

Review 6: Whats in the picture?


Possible answers:
Theres a woman sitting at the table. Shes eating pasta / noodles.
Theres a boy lying on the floor. Hes drinking a carton of orange juice.
Theres a girl standing on the chair. Shes eating an apple.

Review 7: Eating - which tense?


Answers:
In my family, we usually eat a lot of meat and we dont eat much fruit or
vegetables. At the moment, my cousin Tom is staying with us. Hes a vegetarian - he
doesnt eat meat, and he eats a lot of fruit and vegetables. So just now, we arent
eating any meat, and we are eating a lot of fruit and vegetables.
Two years ago, I was a vegetarian. I didnt eat chicken, pork or fish. I didnt like
eating vegetables, so I usually ate rice with yellow beans, noodles and sweets.
then I became very sick. I decided to eat meat again. Now I think I eat a lot of
meat. This is not healthy either!

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 102

Review 8: Keep Talking


A. Look at the picture.
Ask the questions to a few learners. Encourage creative answers.
B. Go around the class, each learner says a new sentence about the picture.
Continue until nobody can think of any more sentences.

Review 9: Pairwork - Myintkyina


A. Learners work in pairs. Partner A looks at page 103. Partner B looks at page 105.
Ask learners if they know about Mae Ja Yang in Kachin State.
What do they know about it? Do they know anyone who has been there?
How did they get there? There are many ways to get there from Thailand. This is one way.
If you are teaching in Kachin State, or there are a lot of Kachin learners in your class,
talk about peoples experiences travelling around that area.
B. Learners read their texts. Check that they understand everything.
Learners work out the questions they need to get the missing information.
Example questions Partner A
Where is Mae Ja Yang?
Where do you fly to first?
How do you get to Ruili?
How long does the journey take (altogether)?
Example questions Partner B
How many schools are there?
How do you get to Kunming?
How long does it take to get to Ruili?
How do you get across the border to Mae Ja Yang?
C. In pairs, they ask and answer the questions, and write the missing information in the texts.
Check the answers by writing the entire text on the board, and eliciting the missing information.
Answers:
Mae Ja Yang is in Kachin State on the Burma/China border. It is a pretty town,
with many beautiful mountains. There are two Post-10 schools there, a teacher
training college, and a busy market. It is quite difficult to get there from Thailand. First,
you fly to Kunming ,in China. Then you get on another plane and fly to Mangshe.
Next, you get a bus to Ruili, on the Burma border. This takes about 2 hours .
After that, you get a car across the border to Mae Ja Yang. Altogether, the journey
takes about 12 hours .
If you like, get the learners to put the transportation information on the map.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 103

Review 10: Listening: Elephants


A. Introduction. Learners think about the words they associate with elephants.
Pre-teach trunk, tusks, hunting, population, logging
In pairs, learners write more words on the mind map.
If this is very difficult, copy the mind map onto the board, and elicit words and phrases.
Ideas:
Places Asia, Burma, Thailand, forests, mountains...
Food plants, a lot, grass...
Description grey, big ears, trunk, tusks...
Other category Choose! Perhaps work (logging, transport, carrying...)
14

15

B. Play the tape. Learners listen and respond to the questions.


Play the tape a few times, and encourage responses.
C. Play the tape. Learners decide what is the main point of the text.
Answer:
a. Problems for Asian elephants.
D. Play the tape again two or three times, and learners answer the questions.
Answers:
a. None.
b. Elephants tusks.
c. To get more land to grow food, and for logging.
E. This gap-fill paragraph is the last paragraph of the listening text.
Learners work in pairs to fill the gaps from memory.
If this is too difficult, write the words on the board:
new, elephants, sell, eat, farms, large, and, grow, people
F. Play the tape again. Learners listen and check.
Answers:
Another problem is the environment where elephants live. Elephants need a lot of
space! Elephants eat a lot. And there is less and less for them to eat. For example
India, with a large and growing population, needs land for people to grow food.
More and more forest and jungle is cut down to make farms and paddy fields. In
Burma, logging companies are cutting down the forests to sell the expensive teak
wood. So the elephants, and the people who live there, have to find a new place
to live.
Dicuss the situation. Do learners have any suggestions to help elephants?

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 104

Review 11: Check your knowledge


A. In groups, learners brainstorm lists of things they have learned from Modules 1-4.
If possible, give each group a large piece of paper to write their lists on.
They should not look back at their workbooks or the table below, but do this from memory - get
them to close their workbooks.
Encourage them to be detailed, e.g.
Information about famous people
- Che Guevara
- Asking questions about people
- etc.
Give them about ten minutes to think of ideas.
Groups present what they have learned to the class, or put their pieces of paper up on the wall,
and encourage groups to look at each others lists.
B. Learners look through this list of items, and score themselves out of five.
After they have completed this, get a few learners to tell the class what they feel most confident
about, and what they think are their weaker points.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 105

Handouts to the Cards activity on page 18.


Copy this page, and cut out enough cards so there is one for each learner.

Leslie Smith
Ambassador
British Embassy
Embassy Road
Beijing
China

WIREMU POMARE
Computer Programmer
177 Queen Street
Auckland, New Zealand

Telephone: (87) 837-3456 ex. 42

Email: lesliesmith@embassy.uk.ch

computerbank@westpac.org
64 9 285 6975

Human Right s Educat ion


Cent re of Japan
HRECJ

Terry Jones
Office Manager

Koji Fujimori
Journalist
kojif@hrecj.org
94 5969 93656

Prach Chan Devi

Golden Bell

Education Minister

Assistant Medic

Zindzi Tutu
Photographer
Mya Lwin
Translator

26 Mandela Road, Cape Town, South Africa


email: rhammond@photo.co.sa

phone: 356 5037

Public
Hospital

Sal Moosejaw
Nurse

Beautiful Hair
Haircuts for men and women
Zaza Paz
Hairdresser
Rio De Janeiro
Brazil

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 106

019 867 9476


zazapaz@ yahoo.com

Worksheets to Remember the Picture on page 39.


Give one copy to each learner, or every two learners

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 107

Worksheets to Sentences in a Bag on page 68.


Copy and cut these so there are three sentences for each learner.

I like cooking

I dont like cooking

I enjoy singing

I love playing

I dont mind cleaning

I hate working

I dont mind doing

I love listening to

I enjoy watching

I hate listening to

I dont like going to

I love eating

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 108

Worksheets to When did you Last? on page 83.


Divide the class into groups of 6-11 and copy one worksheet for each group.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 109

Handouts to Exercise 2.4 More information on page 82.


Make two copies of these texts, and give one each to six learners.

Sirimavo Bandaranaike
Sirimavo Bandaranaike became the worlds first woman Prime Minister. The people
of Sri Lanka first voted her Prime Minister in 1960, again in 1970, and once more in
1994. After she retired from politics, her daughter, Chandrika Bandaranaike
Kumaratunga, became president of Sri Lanka and continued her mothers policies.

Marie Curie
Marie Curie discovered radium. In the 1890s, she studied physics at the Sorbonne
University in Paris. At university, she met her husband Pierre, and together they set
up a research laboratory. He died in 1906, and she took over his job as head of
physics at the university. She received two Nobel Prizes - the prize for physics in
1903, and chemistry in 1911.

Britney Spears
Britney Spears sang Oops I did it again. When she was a child, she performed in
the TV show Mickey Mouse Club. When she was 17, she made a record called
Baby One More Time. People all over the world bought this record, and she made
three other successful records. In 2002, she starred in a movie Crossroads She
got married twice. Her first marriage only lasted two days! She then married Kevin
Federline, a dancer, in 2004.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 110

Test for Modules 1/2


Exercise 1.
(20 marks)
Write a wh- question for each question in this exercise.
example: Does it cost fifty kyat? One hundred kyat? Two hundred kyat?

a. Does he play football for exercise?


Because he enjoys it? Because his friends play?
b. Do you do your homework after school?
In the early morning? At night?
c. Do your parents live in Thailand?
In Burma? In South Africa?
d. Do you learn English to talk with foreigners?
To listen to the radio? For work?
e. Do you get up at 5.00?
At 6.00? At 8.30?
f. Is the box under the table?
On the chair? In the cupboard?
g. Do you go to school by bus?
On foot? By elephant?
h. Is your sister a doctor?
A teacher? A student?
i. Would you like some tea?
Some coffee? Some fruit juice?
j. Is your brother 10 years old?
6 years old? 3 years old?

How much does it cost ?

__________________________________?
__________________________________?
__________________________________?
__________________________________?
__________________________________?
__________________________________?
__________________________________?
__________________________________?
__________________________________?
__________________________________?

Exercise 2.
(8 marks)
Complete the sentences.
example: Your mothers mother is your grandmother.

a. Your fathers sister is your __________ .

e. Your sons son is your __________ .

b. Your daughters husband is your __________ .

f. Your brothers wife is your __________ .

c. Your mothers brother is your __________ .

g. Your wifes mother is your __________ .

d. Your fathers brothers son is your __________ . h. Your father and mother are your __________ .
Exercise 3.
(9 marks)
Complete the sentences with the correct verb form.
example: I like football, but I dont like volleyball. (like / not like)

a. What do elephants ________? (eat)


b. My baby daughter ________ milk. She ________ rice. (drink / not eat).
c. On Sundays, Mi Meh ________ to church, and her sisters ________ their parents. (go / visit)
d. Does your brother usually ________ his homework? (do)
e. Ko Oo never ________ by motorbike. He often________ the bus. (travel / take)
f. Saw Htoo and Elizabeth ________ from Pa-an. (come)
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 111

Exercise 4
(6 marks)
This is a description of a trip from Mae Sot to Chiang Mai
Match the parts of the sentences. Number 1 has been done for you.

a. I usually go

240 baht

b. It costs

the fast bus

c. I usually try to catch

for 20 minutes on the way

d. It leaves Mae Sot

by bus

e. It arrives at the Chiang Mai Bus Station

about 6 hours

f. It stops for lunch


g. The whole journey takes

at 8 oclock in the morning


around 2 in the afternoon

Exercise 5.
(12 marks)
Min Min is introducing Naw Moo to Zaw Zaw.
Complete the conversation. The first one has been done for you.

Min Min:

Naw Moo, this is my brother Zaw Zaw.


Zaw Zaw, (a)

this is Naw Moo

Zaw Zaw:

(b)______________________________.

Naw Moo:

Pleased to meet you, too. (c)_______________________________?

Zaw Zaw:

Im a teacher.

Naw Moo:

(d)_______________________________?

Zaw Zaw:

I usually teach high school students.

Naw Moo:

(e)_______________________________?

Zaw Zaw:

Yes, I do I like it very much. And what about you? What do you do?

Naw Moo:

(f)___________________________________, but I want to find a job with an NGO.

Zaw Zaw:

Oh, I see, (g)________________________________________?

Naw Moo:

No, thanks. I dont smoke.

Exercise 6.
(8 marks)
How many syllables are in these words?
example:
banana
3 .

a. mistake

_____

e. convenient

_____

b. passenger

_____

f. partner

_____

c. twins

_____

g. introduction

_____

d. government

_____

h. business

_____

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 112

Exercise 7.
(15 marks)
Match the words with their definitions. Not all the words are used.
example:
tea
airport
your mothers mother
dog
a hot drink
grandmother

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

opportunity
title
boring
advantage
public
lamp

a. you use this when it is dark


b. not interesting
c. the name of a book, picture or text

interview
mechanic
worry
prison
chart
twins

d. a diagram
e. brothers or sisters born at the same time
f. a person who repairs cars

trouble
get up
flatmate
identical
analyse
convenient

g. someone who shares a flat with you


h. exactly the same
i. to think about something carefully, to try to
understand it

imitate
nervous
specific
toothpaste
translate
pollution

j. to pretend to be something
k. a little afraid
l. you clean your teeth with it

fluency
foolish
passenger
retired
linecar
suggest

m. someone who travels on a vehicle, who is not the driver


n. not intelligent; silly
o. a type of public transport

Exercise 8.
(12 marks)
Answer these questions about you. Write 2 or 3 sentences.

a. What do you usually do in the morning?

b. Whats in your classroom?

c. How do you get to class?

d. Why do you learn English?


General English Teachers Guide 14: page 113

Exercise 9.
(10 marks)
Describe this picture. Write 5 sentences.

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 114

Test for Modules 1/2 - Answers


Exercise 1
Give two points for each correct question. Take one point off for a minor mistake. Take two points off
for a mistake in the wh-question structure.
Answers:
a. Why does he play football?
b. When do you do your homework?
c. Where do you parents live? or Which country do your parents live in?
d. Why do you learn English?
e. When do you get up?
f. Where is the box?
g. How do you go to school?
h. What does your sister do? or Whats your sisters job? or Who is your sister?
i.. What would you like to drink?
j. How old is your brother?

Exercise 2
Give one point for each correct answer
Answers:
a. aunt
b. son-in-law c. uncle
e. grandson f. sister-in-law g. mother-in-law

Exercise 3
Give one point for each correct answer.
Answers:
a. eat
b. drinks, doesnt eat c. goes, visit
e. travels, takes
f. come

d. cousin
h. parents

d. do

Exercise 4
Give one point for each correctly matched sentence
Answers:
b. It costs 240 baht.
c. I usually try to catch the fast bus.
d. It leaves Mae Sot at 8 oclock in the morning.
e. It arrives at the Chiang Mai bus station around 2 oclock in the afternoon.
f. It stops for lunch for 20 minutes on the way
g. The whole journey takes about 6 hours.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 115

Exercise 5
Give two points for each correctly completed sentence. Give full points even if there are some minor
mistakes. Take one or two points off for more important mistakes. Dont give any points for answers
that dont make sense in the conversation.
Possible answers:
b. Pleased to meet you. or Nice to meet you.
c. What do you do?
d. Who do you teach? or Where do you teach? or Who are your students?
e. Do you like your job? or Do you like teaching?
f. I dont work at the moment. or I dont have a job now. or I am a Post-10 student. or I work
with KWO. or I take care of my baby daughter. Etc.
g. Would you like a cigarette? or Do you want a cigarette?
Exercise 6
Give one point for each correct answer.
Answers:
a. 2
b. 3
c. 1
d. 3
e. 3
f. 2

g. 4

h. 2

Exercise 7
Give one point for each correctly matched word.
Answers:
a. lamp
b. boring
c. title
d. chart
g. flatmate
h. identical
i. analyse
j. imitate
m. passenger n. foolish
o. linecar

e. twins
k. nervous

f. mechanic
l. toothpaste

Exercise 8
Give three points for each answer that answers the question. Take one point off for very short answers.
Take one or two points off if the answer has major mistakes, or doesnt answer the question, or doesnt
make sense.

Exercise 9
Give two points for each correct sentence that describes the picture. This is a both accuracy- and
meaning-focused exercise. Dont take too many points off for minor mistakes, if a sentence makes
sense and describes the picture.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 116

Test for Modules 3/4


Exercise 1.
(12 marks)
What is changing in your community? Write four sentences.
Example:

The education system is getting worse.

a. ______________________________________________________________________
b. ______________________________________________________________________
c. ______________________________________________________________________
d. ______________________________________________________________________
Exercise 2.
(6 marks)
Fill the gaps with appropriate words.

In the restaurant
Last night I ate dinner in a small a. restaurant near my house. The b.
________ was a nice young man with a friendly smile. He couldnt speak much
English, but I speak quite good Thai, so this wasnt a problem. I c.________ the
chicken soup and the fish d.________. I also got a e.________ of cigarettes.
After I finished eating, he brought the f.________. It was 1,200 baht! I thought
this was a mistake. I looked at the g.________ again - the soup was 25 baht and
the fish cost 35. The cigarettes cost 60. So the bill was really 120 baht. The
extra 0 was a mistake.

Exercise 3.

(8 marks)

Hser Hser went to Pa-an last week. She is talking to her friend Sue. Write the questions.

Sue

Hi Hser Hser! I visited your house last week, but you werent home.
Did you go to Bangkok? to Myitkyina? to Laos?
Where did you go?
Oh, I went to Pa-an.
.

Hser Hser
Sue
Hser Hser
Sue
Hser Hser
Sue
Hser Hser
Sue

Did you go by train? by elephant? by plane?


a. ___________________________________?
By bus.
Did you go alone? with Aung Mon? with your parents?
b. ___________________________________?
My sister and her husband.
Did you go for a holiday? to work? because you wanted to visit people?
c. ___________________________________?
My sister and her husband.
Did you stay in a hotel? with relatives? with friends?
d. ___________________________________?
General English Teachers Guide 14: page 117

Exercise 4.
(15 marks)
Match the words with their definitions. Not all the words are used.
example:
tea
airport
your mothers mother
dog
a hot drink
grandmother

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

furniture
instructions
bill
suck
passenger
complete
shout
drop
biscuit
alcohol
add
terrible
review
perhaps
spokesperson
pour
look up
surprise
double
herbs
go out with
shelf
monolingual
appearance
crazy
opinion
healthy
escape
revenge
clue

a. a person on a train, plane or bus


b. you pay this after you eat in a restaurant
c. information about how to do something

d. very bad
e. beer, wine and whisky
f. speak very loudly, scream

g. to find information in a book


h. to move liquid from one place to another
i. maybe

j. can speak only one language


k. you can keep books on it
l. you use these to make food delicious

m. this helps you to guess the answer


n. something you do to hurt someone who has hurt you
o. run away

Exercise 5.
(8 marks)
Did you do these things? Write three sentences. Use past simple tense.
example: go to the market
I went to the market OR I didnt go to the market .

a. eat chicken

____________________________

b. play football

____________________________

c. do homework

____________________________

d. speak Chinese

____________________________

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 118

Exercise 6.
(6 marks)
Look at the picture, and read the description.
Are the sentences true or false?
example: Theres a lamp next to the bed. T .

a. There are two men sleeping in the bed.


b. Theres a woman sitting in front of
the mirror.
c. The womans got long hair.
d. Theres a cupboard in the middle of
the room.
e. The cupboards got three doors.
f. Theres a suitcase on top of the cupboard.

___
___
___
___
___
___

Exercise 7.
(30 marks)
Complete these sentences and questions.

a. At the moment, Im ___________________________________________________________


b. Outside the classroom, there are some people _______________________________________
c. My favourite food is __________________________________________________________
d. I dont mind ________________________________________________________________
e. Yesterday, I _________________________________________________________________
f. Did you ____________________________________________________________________?
g. In my house, ________________________________________________________________
h. My bedroom is ______________________________________________________________
i. Can I please have _____________________________________________________________?
j. What did ___________________________________________________________________?

Exercise 8.
(15 marks)
Write a recipe of your favourite dish.Use at least five of the following verbs for cooking.
Write about 5 sentences.

chop

mix

cook

add

put

make

shake

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 119

slice

Test for Modules 3/4 - Answers


Exercise 1
Give 3 marks for each sentence that describes a change in the community, written in the present
continuous. Take one mark off for minor mistakes. Take two or three marks off for major mistakes,
especially if it doesnt make sense.

Exercise 2
Give 1 point for each correct answer. Some other answers might be possible, too.
Answers:
b. waiter c. ordered d. curry / fried rice e. packet / box
f. bill g. menu (bill is possible)

Exercise 3
Give 2 marks for each correct question. Give 1 point for sentences that dont use the past simple tense,
or use the wrong question word. Give no points for a question that does not make good sense. There
are a few correct options for each.
Possible answers:
a. How did you get there? How did you travel?
b. Who did you go with? Who did you travel with?
c. Why did you go there? What did you go for?
d. Where did you stay? Who did you stay with?

Exercise 4
Give one point for each correctly matched word
Answers:
a. passenger b. bill
c. instructions
d. terrible
g. look up
h. pour
i. perhaps
j. monolingual
m. clue
n. revenge
o. escape

e. alcohol
k. shelf

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 120

f. shout
l. herbs

Exercise 5
Give two marks for each correct sentence. Give 1 mark for sentences with minor mistakes.
Answers:
a. I ate chicken or I didnt eat chicken.
b. I played football or I didnt play football.
c. I did homework or I didnt do homework.
d. I spoke Chinese or I didnt speak Chinese.

Exercise 6
Give 1 mark for each correct choice.
Answers:
a. F b. T c. T
d. T

e. F

f. T

Exercise 7
Give 3 marks for each correct sentence in the correct tense. Take off one mark for minor mistakes.
Take off two or three marks for major mistakes, or if the sentence doesnt make sense. Many sentences
are possible.
Possible answers:
a. sitting a test / thinking about English / in the classroom
b. carrying firewood / eating their lunch / wearing longyis
c. fishpaste / pork curry with beans / ice-cream
d. cleaning my house / doing lots of homework / dogs
e. went to the shops / met my friends / didnt do any homework
f. like the movie? / go to the class? / pass the exam?
g. there are two bedrooms / we have pictures / you can meet my mother
h. large and untidy / near the bathroom / my favourite room
i. a cup of tea? / a sack of rice? / the fried rice with pork?
j. you do yesterday? / the head teacher say? / you eat for breakfast?
Exercise 8
Give a score out of 15 for this. Take off more points if it is very short, if it doesnt make sense or if there
are many major mistakes. Take off a few points for minor mistakes.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 121

Tapescripts for Module 1


Tapescript 1 - Whos who?
HSER HSER: Aung Mon and I want a good life
with enough money. I work for a NGO, and hes
studying to be a lawyer. Sometimes we argue
about money. He goes to teashops and buys tea
for his friends, but I never go out - I dont like
spending money. We both like reading - he reads
law books and I read books about people in
different countries.
MYINT MYINT SAN: We have a large family.
We want to have six children. We have four now.
We dont want more than six - our house is too
small! Michael likes cooking but I dont. He is an
excellent cook. He usually cooks in the
weekends.We both like gardening, and we make
extra money when we sell fruit and vegetables.
We dont have a TV. Michael wants to buy one.
He likes watching TV, especially action movies - I
hate action moves!
MI MEH: La Nan and I dont have children we are too busy. We always go out at night. We
both love music and dancing. We go shopping on
Saturday afternoons - we spend a lot of money on
clothes. I have 25 pairs of shoes, and La Nan has
20. He is very handsome! We sometimes argue
about alcohol - I dont drink, but La Nan drinks a
lot. I want him to stop drinking.
Tapescript 2 - And after that?
Listen to these people.
In what order do they do things?
Write the numbers one to three.
There is one extra item for each.

NUMBER 1:
What does Eric do in the morning?
ERIC: I usually get up at about seven. The first
thing I do is take a shower. And lets see ... . After
I take a shower, I eat breakfast. When I finish
breakfast, I usually read the newspaper. I only
have about twenty minutes to read the paper.
Then I have to leave for school.

NUMBER 2:
What does Anne do in the morning?
ANNE: I make coffee as soon as I get up. I really
need my cup of coffee in the morning. I dont eat
breakfast - I just have a cup of coffee. Anyway,
after that I usually exercise. I like lifting weights for
fifteen or twenty minutes. Then Ive got to go to
work. I have to be at the office by about nine.
NUMBER 3:
What does Karen do after school?
KAREN: After class, I usually study. I like to
finish all my homework reading, everything
before I eat dinner. So yeah, I study and then eat
dinner. And after that I usually watch TV. I like
watching the news and maybe a movie or a
dramaor something.
NUMBER 4:
What does Joel do in the evening?
JOEL: I get home from work at about seven, so
we eat dinner right away. After dinner, its time for
my children to go to bed. I usually put them to bed
at about ... uh ... about eight oclock. Then what?
Usually I just read. I read to relax. I enjoy it.
Tapescript 3 - Khaing Win: Part 1
I come from Arakan State, but now I live in
Australia. I teach Burmese at a university near my
house. I start work at 8.30 and finish at 4.00. I
usually walk to work, but sometimes I go by car. I
dress well for work - I always wear a tie. On
Mondays I study English at night classes. I try
hard with my English - I practise every day. In the
weekends, I watch videos and fix my old car.

Tapescript 4 - Khaing Win: Part 2


He comes from Arakan State, but now he lives in
Australia. He teaches Burmese at a university near
his house. He starts work at 8.30 and finishes at
4.00. He usually walks to work, but sometimes he
goes by car. He dresses well for work - he always
wears a tie. On Mondays he studies English at
night classes. He tries hard with his English - he
practisses every day. In the weekends, he watches
videos and fixes his old car.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 122

Tapescript 5 - Sentence practice


He doesnt like staying at home.
She doesnt speak French.
They dont go out very often.
I dont play the piano.

Tapescript 6 - Whos who?


Im Saw Reh, and this is my favourite photo of my
family. My grandfather is in the middle. Hes really
old - about 80. My parents are next to him, with
my little brother. My brother is three. Hes really
naughty. My aunt and uncle are on the other side,
with my cousin. My younger sister is behind my
grandfather. Shes 14. Thats my older sister is
next to her. Shes a doctor. Her husband is a
doctor, too. They have a one year old daughter.
The guy standing next to me is my best friend, Ko
Naing. He lives in our house, too. He goes home
to his village in the school holidays.

Tapescript 7 - Introductions
A. Hi Mi Chan! How are you?
B. Im OK. Very busy!
C. Jane, this is Saw Doe. And this is Po
Kwah Lay.
D. Hi, Saw Doe. Hi, Po Kwah Lay.

Tapescript 8 - Order the conversation


A. This is U Tin Maung from the NHEC.
And this is Di Green from the BBC.
B. Pleased to meet you, Ms Green.
C. Please, call me Di. Im sorry, whats
your name?
B. Im Tin Maung.
C. Ton MunIm sorry, could you say that
again, please?
B. Tin Maung.
C. Can you spell that, please?
B. T-i-n M-a-u-n-g. How do you spell
your name?
C. D-i.
Tapescript 9 - Introducing other people
a. This is U Tin Maung from the NHEC. And
this is Di Green from the BBC.
b. This is Lu Reh. Hes Mi Mehs son. You
know Mi Meh, Mu Bis sister.
c. James, this is Sarah. Sarahs an English
teacher. James is a maths teacher.
d. This is my brother Kyaw Kyaw. He likes
playing the guitar and singing.
e. This is Mei Tze. Shes from China.
Tapescript 10 - Circle the correct date

E. Have some cake.


F. OK. Thanks.
G. Would you like a drink?
H. Yes, please.
I. No, thank you.
J. This is U Tin Maung from the NHEC.
And this is Di Green from the BBC.
K. Pleased to meet you, Ms Green.
L. Please, call me Di.
M. How do you do? Im Jack Mumford.
N. How do you do?

1. A:
B:
A:
B:

Whats the date?


Its September tenth.
September what?
September tenth.

2. A:
B:
A:
B:

Whats todays date?


Its June eighth.
The eighth?
Uh-huh.

3. A:
B:
A:
B:

When are you going to the doctor?


On March twelfth.
March what?
March twelfth.

4. A:
B:
A:
B:

Whats the date today?


Its the first of June.
Excuse me?
June first.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 123

5. A:
B:
A:

Is today February twenty-second?


Yes, its the twenty-second.
Good, tomorrow is a holiday!

Tapescript 11 - Tick the birthday


1. A:
B:
A:
B:

Whens your birthday, Martha?


April third.
April what?
April third.

2. A:
B:
A:
B:

Whens your birthday, Freddy?


My birthday is in February.
What day?
February tenth.

3. A:
B:
A:
B:

Whens your birthday, Surijak?


Its on the first.
The first of what?
The first of August.

4. A:
B:
A:
B:

Whens your birthday, Gloria?


Its on October second.
The second of what?
Of October. My birthdays October
second.

5. A:
B:
A:
B:

Whens your birthday, Michiko?


Its in March.
March what?
March fourth.

Tapescript 12 - Write the letter


Four students in my class have the same birthdays.
They were all born on December third, but in
different years.

1. Helen was born on December 3, 1952.


2. Mike was born on December 3, 1958.
3. Yasu was born on December 3, 1973.
4. Leona was born on December 3, 1969.

Tapescript 13 - Dates on the timeline


A: Tell me about yourself, Ed.
B: Uh..... well. I was born on January 7, 1968.
A: Oh, your birthday is in January. Thats nice. Do
you remember any special days in your life?
B: Uh ... my first day of school was on
September 10, 1974. I was happy on that day.
And my graduation day was special. It was my
last day of school. That was June 19, 1986.
Those were special days for me.
A: Yes, Im sure they were. Are you married, Ed?
B: Yes, I was married on June 12, 1987, to
Magda, and our first child, Rita, was born on
October 2, 1989.
A: Do you have just one child?
B: Yes, just one.
A: OK Ed, now how can I help you?
B: Well, Im worried about the future, I dont
know ...
Tapescript 14 - Make a X
1. Its Sunday. Im going to the park.
2. Its Saturday night. Im going to a party.
3. Its Tuesday night. Im going to class again.
4. Its Thursday. Im going to the supermarket.
5. Its Friday. Im going to the bank.
6. Its Monday morning. Im going to work.
Tapescript 15 - Dates on the calendar
1. Its November. The first is on a
Thursday. Thursday is the first of
November
2. The eleventh is a Sunday. The eleventh is the
second Sunday in November.
3. The nineteenth is a Monday. The nineteenth is
the third Monday in November.
4. The sixteenth is a Friday. The sixteenth is the
third Friday in November.
5. The twenty-second is a Thursday. The twentysecond is the fourth Thursday in November.
6. The thirtieth is a Friday. The thirtieth is the fifth
Friday in November.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 124

Tapescript 16 - Circle the date


1. A:
B:

When is Halloween?
Its October thirty-first.

2. A:
B:

Is your birthday in February?


Yes, on February fourth.

3. A:
B:

Whats the date?


December fifth.

4. A:
B:

What day is it?


Tuesday, July second.

5. A:
B:

Whens your birthday?


March twelfth, 1956.

6. A:
B:

Whens your birthday?


September thirtieth.

Tapescript 17 - Listen and do


Write your last name on the first line.
Write your first name next to your last name, on
the right.
Write your address on the second line, under your
name.
Write your telephone number on the third line,
under your address.
Write your birthday on the fourth line, under your
telephone number.
Sign your name on the last line.

Tapescript 18 Song: Another Brick in the Wall


We dont need no education
We dont need no thought control
No dark sarcasm in the classroom
Teacher leave them kids alone
Hey, teacher! Leave the kids alone
All in all its just another brick in the wall
All in all youre just another brick in the wall

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 125

Tapescripts for Module 2


Tapescript 1 - Paw Paws classroom
There are 14 desks in my classroom. Weve got
25 students, so most students share their desks.
Theres a blackboard, but there isnt a
whiteboard. There arent any computers. I want a
computer! There isnt a video, either, but there is a
cassette player, and there are about 20 cassettes.
Theres a world map on the wall, and there are
some posters, too. Oh yeah and there are about
30 plastic chairs. And a teacher - theres usually a
teacher! Shes not here at the moment, so there
arent any teachers in our classroom now.

Tapescript 4 - Complaining students


A: The girls dormitorys got a lot of mosquitos,
and I havent got a mosquito net.
B: The boys dormitory hasnt got a television or
a video.
C: We havent got a swimming pool. I want a
swimming pool.
D: The school hasnt got a computer teacher, so
we cant learn computers.
E: There arent any computers in the school.
F: Theres a big rat in the kitchen. I hate rats.

Tapescript 2 - Song: Ive Got Exams


Ive got exams in the afternoon
Ive got a lot of homework too
Ive got a feeling Ive got flu
Why cant I be like you?
Youve got a tree there in the zoo
You havent got any work to do
Youve got a bunch of bananas too
Why cant I be like you?
Youre just an orangutan
Sitting in your tree all day
Have you got any space for me
Up in your tree today?
Youve got a lot of friends up there
You sit around and you comb your hair
You havent got any worries or cares
Why cant I be like you?

Tapescript 3 - Song: Ive Got Exams


Karaoke Version
This is the same music as Tapescript 2, but
does not have words.

Tapescript 5 - Complaining teacher


Ugggh - weve got some new students and they
like to complain! Complain complain complain!
They want a swimming pool. Of course there isnt
a swimming pool here! We havent got computers.
Well, there are no computer teachers near here,
and we havent got any money for computers. Or
televisions. Or videos. There isnt any money.
They say there arent any mosquito nets. Thats
wrong. Weve got a lot of mosquito nets. They
dont like the rats. Well, the cat died, and we
havent got a new cat.

Tapescript 6 - Utopia
Good evening, ladies and gentlemen. I am the
mayor of Utopia. I am here tonight to talk to you
about our wonderful town.
Today there are 10,000 people in our
beautiful town. We are all happy. There are no
problems in our town. There are good jobs for all
our people. There are good schools for all our
children. There are nice houses for all our families.
These houses are large and comfortable. They
arent expensive. There are no police here. We
dont need them, because there is no crime. There
are no guns. Our streets are clean. There is no
rubbish, and no pollution. There are many parks,
theatres and cinemas in our town. There is
entertainment for everyone. And there is free
public transport buses and linecars.
There are many reasons why Utopia is a
great town! There is a good life for you here in
Utopia! Come and live in our wonderful town!

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 126

Tapescript 7 - How do I get there?


How do I get there?
How long does it take?
How much does it cost?
Whats the best way?
Wheres the office?
What time does it leave?
How often does it go?
What time does it arrive?

Interviewer: Why do you want or need to learn


English?
Maria Elena (Columbia): Er... I think its
because er we have very few English teachers.
Um I would like to be a teacher. If... My mother is
a teacher and I think I...I...I also...that
encouraged me to carry on with this profession.

Tapescript 8 - A trip to Umpang


Umpang is a beautiful little town 160 kilometres
from Mae Sot, in Thailand. The best way to get
there is by linecar. It takes four hours to get there
and costs 120 baht. You cant get there by train
because there isnt a train line. You can also go by
car - that costs about 2,000 baht.

Tapescript 9 - Pronunciation 1
advantage
pollution
culture
mountain
clinic
environment
interview
afraid
cupboard
negative
information
corner
prisoner
disadvantage
extra

Ana (Spain): Um, well, there are few reasons. ...


Originally, my my er, my first aim was to
complement my my studies. I...Id done um...
history of art at the university and I er thought I
could sort of because um...like a tourist guide or
um sort of work in tourism and er I though that,
with art and languages, thatd be the perfect
mixture, but, eventually, I thought it was a boring
profession anyway.
Beliyou (Ethiopia): Er, well um the whole world
operates in English mostly and er its very
important in in Ethiopia - right, everybody has to
do it.
Paz (Spain): Er... because...um...when...when
I...when I...learnt English it was...er... when I
was 17 ...it was because I was very, very, very
interested on er...on English er...culture.
Chen (China): Well, Im afraid Im no good at
mathematics and chemistry and physics and I
would love to go to university. So, my only choice
- either to take Chinese as my subject or English
and I thought, there are a lot of people who take
Chinese so English might be well, maybe easier for
me to get a chance to go to university. Thats all.

Tapescript 10 - Pronunciation 2
taxi
welcome
transport
mosquito
motor
hotel
analyse
wonderful
item
toilet

Tapescript 11 Why do you want to learn English?

Yuen (Hong Kong): Im studying in England, so


I have to speak English.
Marisol (Spain): Er I am learning English
because I think is er...an important language in
the world...um because you
can...um...commun... communicate er everything
you need not only in your country, in all the
countries. Is very important.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 127

Tapescripts for Module 3


Tapescript 1 - Naughty people
Im trying to listen to Daw Lay Lay. Shes talking
about education issues inside Burma, its really
interesting. But the woman in front of me is talking
on her telephone. Shes talking really loudly. All
the other people are looking at her, but she wont
be quiet. Why doesnt she go away? Shes
standing and talking in the middle of a lecture!
Everyone is trying to listen to the speaker!

Tapescript 2 - Were busy


Some friends are coming to stay with us for two
months. Theyre quite a big family, and at the
moment were moving furniture around, and
putting mats and blankets in all the rooms. Therell
be 13 of us altogether - no, 14. And my uncle has
TB, so no-one can sleep in his room. So some
people will sleep in the living room, some people
in our bedroom, and some people in the kitchen!
We are looking for a new house at the moment
because we dont find our house big enough if we
have people to stay all the time.
Well, at the moment Im working really hard for
my exams. Theyre in about three months time, so
Im reading a lot at the moment but its all for my
exams. Itll be really nice to read a good novel
when the exams are over. And then Im going to
start looking for a job. I dont know whatll
happen then.

Tapescript 3 - Song: Toms Diner


I am sitting in the morning
at the diner on the corner
I am waiting at the counter
for the man to pour the coffee
And he fills it only half way
and before I even argue
He is looking out the window
at somebody coming in
It is always nice to see you
says the man behind the counter
To the woman who has come in
she is shaking her umbrella
And I look the other way
as they are kissing their hellos
And pretending not to see them
and so I pour the milk
I open up the paper
theres a story of an actor
Who had died while he was drinking
it was no-one I had heard of
And Im turning to the horoscope
and looking for the funnies
When Im feeling somebody watching me
and so I raise my head
Theres a woman on the outside
looking inside does she see me
No she does not really see me
cause she sees her own reflection
And Im trying not to notice
that shes hitching up her skirt
And while shes straightening her stockings
her hair is getting wet
Oh this rain it will continue
through the morning as Im listening
To the bells of the cathedral
I am thinking of your voice

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 128

Tapescript 4 - My house
Im closing my eyes now. OKOKIm five
years old. Im in the living room. Im reading a
book. Theres a woman reading a book in a chair
its my grandmother. Shes wearing a brown
dress with flowers on it. OK, there are two girls
lying on the floor, playing a game. Theyre my
sisters. Theres a large dog sleeping beside the
door. There are a lot of books in the room. All my
family likes reading. Wheres my father? Oh,
theres a man walking into the room now. Yes, its
my father. Hes picking me up and kissing me.

Tapescript 5 - Italian dishes


Well, what have we got to eat here?
Well, this is a vegetarian pizza. To make pizza, all
you need is flour, water and an egg, and some
things to put on top. First you mix the flour and
egg together with a little water. Mix them until
youve got a soft dough. Make this dough into a
flat, round shape and put it on a cooking pan.
Chop the tomatoes, carrots, onions, garlic and
eggplant, and put them on top of the dough. Then
chop the cheese, and put it on top. Cook it in the
oven for about 30 minutes.
Ive got pasta with meat here. You can use any
type of meat. First, cook the noodles. Then cook
the garlic, spices and onions in some oil with the
meat. After ten minutes, add some vegetables
tomatoes are the most important, maybe some
mushrooms, peppers or cabbage. Cook this for
about twenty minutes, you may need to add more
oil. Then put it on top of the noodles. You need to
eat it with a fork.

Tapescript 7 What resources do you have?


Ive got a radio at home, and I always listen to the
BBC News. At school theres a television, but
there arent any English programmes. We
sometimes watch English movies on video.
Theres a video camera there, too. Sometimes we
get to make our own videos. Last year the first
year students made a video of the school. It is
very funny to watch. There are no computers at
school at the moment last year we had one but
its broken now. Maybe well get a new one. I
hope we can get a computer because I want to
use the internet. Ive never seen the internet. But
actually we couldnt get internet anyway because
you need a telephone and theres no telephone at
the school.
Sometimes I go to my friends house and listen to
English songs on his cassette player. Thats really
fun and useful, too. I can sing about 20 English
songs. He has some English books, too there
are also a lot of books at school, story books and
grammar books. I like to read newspapers in
English, sometimes theyve got English
newspapers in the shop. I want to get English
music magazines but I dont know where to get
them. Oh also Ive got an English-English
dictionary. I want to get a dictionary in my
language too. Probably I learn the most English
when I talk to my neighbour. Shes from India and
she likes to speak English with me. This is very
useful practice.

Tapescript 6 - What does Mel like?


I like walking, especially in cold weather. I really
like travelling - going to different places. I love
coconut juice. I love spending time with my mum,
but I dont get to see her very often. I like dogs. I
dont like selfish people. I hate durian, and I hate
pollution. I dont mind washing dishes - its very
boring, but its OK.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 129

Tapescripts for Module 4


Tapescript 1 - Song: What a Crazy Day!
I woke up this morning
And I got into bed
Then I ate a cup of tea
And drank a slice of bread
Oh, what a crazy day!
Oh, what a crazy day!
I went to the bus stop
And caught the train to school
Then I rode my bicycle
In the swimming pool
Oh, what a crazy day!
Oh, what a crazy day!
Someone broke the telephone
So then I rang my friend
We went to the football field
And swam from end to end
Oh, what a crazy day!
Oh, what a crazy day!
I came home this evening
And watched the radio
I lay down on the ceiling
And read a video
Oh, what a crazy day!
Oh, what a crazy day!

Tapescript 2 - Song: What a Crazy Day!


Karaoke Version
This is the same as Tapescript 1.

Tapescript 3 An interview about yesterday


A. Excuse me, Im doing some research. Could
you answer some questions please?
B. Yes, of course.
A. Did you drink coffee yesterday?
B. Umm, no, I didnt.
A. OK, and did you visit your aunt?
B. No, I didnt. I havent got any aunts here, they
all live in Pa-an.
A. Aha. Did you eat fishpaste?
B. Yes, I ate fishpaste for breakfast.
A. Did you listen to the news?
B. YesNo, I didnt. Not yesterday.
A. Did you go shopping?
B. No, I didnt.
A. Did you speak Karenni?
B. Yes, I did.
A. OK. And did you play table tennis?
B. No, I didnt. I really enjoy playing table
tennis, though.
A. One last question. Did you come to school by
elephant?
B. Of course not! I came to school on foot, as
usual.
A. Thank you very much.

Tapescript 4 - A man and a penguin


A man found a penguin outside his front door. He
took the penguin to the police station. The
policeman told him to take the penguin to the zoo.
That evening, the policeman saw the man with the
penguin again, at a bus stop. The policeman said
I told you to take that penguin to the zoo. The
man said, I took him the zoo he really enjoyed
it. Now were going to the cinema.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 130

Tapescript 5 - Wangari Maathai

Tapescript 7 - Benny

Wangari Maathai received the Nobel Peace Prize


in 2004. She was born in Kenya in 1940. She
taught biology at university, and joined the
National Council of Women of Kenya. In 1976
she founded the Green Belt movement. The
Green Belt movement encouraged poor women in
Africa to plant 30 million trees. She spoke at the
United Nations about environmental issues several
times, and became an MP in 2002.

Benny was a good student. Teachers always liked


Benny. He worked hard at school. He always
finished his work first. He always answered
questions correctly. He remembered all his
lessons. He never talked out of turn. The other
students hated Benny.

Tapescript 6 - When did you last...


Interviewer: Hey Bee Bee, when did you last go
on holiday?
Bee Bee: Holiday...when I was 16 I went to
Papun for my sisters wedding. I think that was
the last time.
Interviewer: When did you last go to a restaurant?
Bee Bee: Ummm, theres a small noodle shop
near the house, I often eat lunch there. I ate lunch
there yesterday.
Interviewer: When did you last go to the
movies?
Bee Bee: Last week. I saw a Kyaw Hein movie
at the cinema. It was very funny.
Interviewer: When did you last play sport?
Bee Bee: This morning I played caneball before
class.
Interviewer: And when did you last go to a
party?
Bee Bee: We had a school closing party in
March. I went to that.
Interviewer: When did you last visit friends or
relatives?
Bee Bee: Mmmm - I visited my friends in Zone A
three days ago.
Interviewer: Thanks, Bee Bee!

One day, they decided to get revenge. They rolled


a piece of paper into a ball. They waited for the
teacher to turn his back. They threw the paper
ball at the teacher. It landed on the teachers head.
The teacher was really angry. He shouted at the
class. WHO DID THAT? He asked. All the
students pointed at Benny. But the teacher trusted
Benny. The teacher punished the other students.

Tapescript 8 - Describing rooms


My daughters bedroom is large and spacious
its the biggest room in the house. We have five
daughters, so they need a lot of space! Its got
two sleeping mats and two mosquito nets and a
bamboo shelf for their clothes. Theyve got
posters on the wall of their favourite actors and
pop singers, and photographs of their
grandparents. Its a cool, comfortable room, with
a window opposite the door.
My favourite room is my study I go there for
peace and quiet, as there are many people living in
my house! Its quite a small room, with a chair, a
shelf full of old books, a cassette player and a
desk. I sit there every evening and read my
books. Its not very tidy, I never clean it. I dont
mind a bit of dirt, it makes it more comfortable.

Tapescript 9 - Listen and draw


My favourite room is the kitchen, because I love
cooking. Theres a cooker on the left, and a shelf
with pots and pans above the cooker. We keep
our plates and cups in a cupboard next to the
cooker. In the middle of the room theres a small
round table. On the right theres our food supplies
- some bags of rice, some bottles of oil, some tins
of fish, and vegetables. Theres a picture of some
mountains on the wall.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 131

Tapescript 10 - In the restaurant


Conversation 1
Customer: Can I have a menu, please?
Waiter: Here you are. Would you like to order?
Customer: Ill have the mushroom soup, and a
green salad.
Waiter: Anything to drink?
Customer: Mmmm... a lemon juice.
Waiter: Mushroom soup, green salad and
lemon juice. OK.
Conversation 2
Customer: Excuse me...
Waiter: Is everything OK?
Customer: Can I have the bill, please?
Waiter: Mushroom soup...green salad...
lemon juice. Thats 75 baht.
Tapescript 11 Interview with a cassette player
Hello, welcome to the interview.
How are you?
Whats your name?
How old are you?
What do you do?
Do you like it?
Where do your parents come from?
How did you get here today?
How many brothers and sisters have you got?
Have you got any children?
What time did you get up this morning?
What did you do last Saturday?
What did you have for breakfast?
Was it good?
Do you like cooking?
Where are you sitting at the moment?

Tapescript 12 - Who, Where, When?


Who, where, when?
Who, where, when?
Ive got a friend and his names John
Where does he come from?
Hong Kong!
John goes to school at half past nine
When does her come home?
At five!
John plays football some weekends
Who does he play with?
With friends!
Johns got a girlfriend, her names Jill
Where does she come from?
Brazil!
Jill has a band with a group of friends
When do they practise?
Weekends!
Jill plays the trumpet and the trombone
Where does she practise?
At home!
John loves Jill but she doesnt love him
Who does she love, then?
Jim!

Tapescript 13 - Who, Where, When?


Karaoke Version
This is the same as Tapescript 11.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 132

Tapescript 14 - Elephants: Part 1

Tapescript 15 - Elephants: Part 2

You are going to hear a text about elephants. How


many elephants are there in Burma?

Unfortunately, the elephant population is getting


smaller. In China, there are no wild elephants now.
The 200 elephants in China are all in zoos and
parks. There are only 70 elephants in Nepal. In
Laos, which was known as the Land of a million
elephants, there are now only 2,500.

100,000? 50,000? 10,000? 1,000?


People do not know exactly, but there are
between 3,000 and 10,000 elephants in Burma.
What about Thailand? How many elephants are
there in Thailand?
Has Burma or Thailand got more elephants? What
do you think?
Thailand has got about 1,500 elephants. Burma
has more. In fact, there are more elephants in
Burma than any other Asian country, except India.
How many elephants are there in Asia?
1 million? 100,000? 50,000? 10,000?
There are about 50,000 Asian elephants.

There are many reason for this. Elephants tusks


are made of ivory, which is very expensive.
Hunters can make a lot of money from elephant
tusks. Hunting elephants is illegal in most Asian
countries, but it happens a lot.
Another problem is the environment where
elephants live. Elephants need a lot of space!
Elephants eat a lot. And there is less and less for
them to eat.
A country like India, with a large and growing
population, needs land for people to grow food.
More and more forest and jungle is cut down to
make farms and paddy fields. In Burma, logging
companies are cutting down the forests to sell the
expensive teak wood. So the elephants, and the
people who live there, have to find a new place
to live.

General English Teachers Guide 14: page 133