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English Language Arts Program of Studies


Overview
The English language arts (ELA) curriculum is designed to prepare students to comprehend
evolving forms of literacy and its impact on how we communicate and learn as a society. Its
primary objective is to improve language and literacy skills to create successful post-secondary
students, and contributing members of the workforce.
Language learning is a responsibility of all citizens in a society: students, parents, teachers and
the community. The development of language is a duty for all teachers, however English
language arts teachers specialize in language and apply strategies for comprehending,
composing and responding in a variety of situations. It is critical that all teachers understand
language development.
There are six strands within the English Language Arts Program of Studies. These six strands
are interrelated and interdependent; facility in one strengthens and supports the others. They
are:

Across all grade levels (K-12) there are five general learning outcomes. In the outcomes of the
program of studies, the six strands are integrated.

Kindergarten - Grade 9

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The aim of English language arts is to enable each student to understand and appreciate
language, and to use it confidently and competently in a variety of situations for communication,
personal satisfaction and learning.
Grades 10 - 12
The two aims of English language arts are:
1) To encourage understanding and appreciation of the significance and artistry of literature
2) To enable students to understand and appreciate language, and to use it confidently and
competently for a variety of purposes, with a variety of audiences, and in a variety of
situations for communication, personal satisfaction and learning.

The use of literature in high school is designed to help students acquire post secondary
and employability skills such as personal management, teamwork and other fundamental skills.
Literature also helps students to develop thoughts about the world around them, allows them to
explore new worlds and empathize with the characters living in real or fictitious worlds.
Literature is vital to students understanding writing conventions, and helps to build creative and
cognitive abilities. Canadian literature (which is required by the curriculum) benefits students
because it gives them canadian perspectives on citizenship, and cultivates respect for cultural
diversity and common values.
Language is equally important in ELA. Language is an important element of culture and
is essential to forming relationships, extending experiences, reflecting on thought and action
and contributing to society. Development of language is contextual, we draw on our own
experience and understanding to construct the world around us, and building language allows
students to further develop fluency and proficiency. Language supports students to apply
knowledge in a variety of ways, to a variety of audiences in a variety of situations. As teachers,
we want to develop students transferable skills so they can be successful in and beyond the
classroom.

Metacognition - is to be consciously aware of ones own thinking and learning processes, and
to gain greater control over these processes. For students this involves constructing the abilities
to reflect, monitor, critically analyze and reinvent. Metacognition is an important skill in high
school

The grades 10-12 program of studies has identical general outcomes for numbers 1, 3 and 5, to
the K-9 program of studies. This chart illustrates the differences between outcomes 2 and 4:

K-9 Program of Studies

9-12 Program of Studies

General Learning Outcome 1: Students will


listen, speak, read, write, view and represent
to explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and
experiences.
General Learning Outcome 2: Students will
listen, speak, read, write, view and represent
to comprehend and respond personally
and critically to oral, print and other media
texts.

General Learning Outcome 2: Students will


listen, speak, read, write, view and represent
to comprehend literature and other texts in
oral, print, visual and multimedia forms,
and respond personally, critically and
creatively.

General Learning Outcome 3: Students will


listen, speak, read, write, view and represent
to manage ideas and information.
General Learning Outcome 4: Students will
listen, speak, read, write, view and represent
to enhance the clarity and artistry of
communication.

General Learning Outcome 4: Students will


listen, speak, read, write, view and represent
to create oral, print, visual and multimedia
texts, and enhance the clarity and artistry
of communication.

General Learning Outcome 5: Students will


listen, speak, read, write, view and represent
to respect, support and collaborate with
others.

High School Streams (ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 versus ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2)
Two course sequences have been developed in order to accommodate a diverse range of
student needs, interests and aspirations.
Both course sequences are organized according to the same five general outcomes. In addition,
the specific outcomes that support General Outcomes 1, 3 and 5 are exactly the same for
students in ELA 10-1 and 10-2, for students in ELA 20-1 and 20-2, and for students in ELA 30-1
and 30-2.
Differences are found in this program of studies in the specific outcomes supporting General
Outcomes 2 and 4.
Example: In the ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 course sequence a greater degree of emphasis is given
to the study of essays and Shakespearean plays,while in the ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2 course
sequence a greater degree of emphasis is given to the study of popular nonfiction (news stories,

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feature articles, reviews, interviews and other forms of informative and persuasive text, including
technical writing) and feature films.
Students who are interested in the study of popular culture and in real-world contexts may
prefer to take the ELA 10-2, 20-2, 30-2 course sequence. Students who are interested in the
study, creation and analysis of literary texts may prefer to take the ELA 10-1, 20-1, 30-1 course
sequence.
A variety of characteristics, such as family, backgrounds, learning experiences, peer
relationships, learning styles, and the accompanying changes involved in making the
transition to Grade 10, can influence a students placement and success in a course. Teachers
need to understand the differences between the two course sequences in terms of their
students needs,interests and aspirations to ensure that appropriate placement occurs and to
accommodate student differences within each course when the classroom is blended.
Knowledge and Employability Courses
Provide students who meet the criteria with opportunities to experience success and become
well prepared for employment, further studies, citizenship and lifelong learning (Knowledge and
Employability Courses Policy 1.4.2)
Courses for grades 8 - 12 (10-4, 20-4, 30-4) to provide diverse learning experiences to students
as required. The knowledge and employability courses provide practical instruction that students
will use in daily life.
The vision for grades 10-12 (both -1 and -2 subjects) is that knowledge and employability
courses will assist students in:
- transitioning from school to the workplace and community
- preparing for responsible citizenship
- gaining recognition, respect, and value, from employers and future education providers