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Rhetoric 1302 (Section 002) and Rhetoric 1302 (Section 005)

Spring 2006

Mrs. Dorley Abelee


University of Texas at Dallas
School of Arts & Humanities

MONDAYS-WEDNESDAYS-FRIDAYS 9:00 a.m. – 11:50 p.m.


CLASS ROOM: JO 4.124

Office Hours: Monday and Wednesdays 11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon


Office hours also by Appointment
Office JO 4.118

Office Phone: 972-883-2018

Email: bcd013000@utdallas.edu

The following course syllabus is subject to change at the discretion of the Instructor

Course Description
The course presents an integrated approach to writing, reading, and critical thinking by
developing the grammatical, logical, and rhetorical skills necessary for university writing.
All classes work in a computerized learning environment. Students are taught basic
computer literacy and submit all work electronically and on paper.

Student Learning Objectives


1. Students will be able to practice and apply different approaches to and modes of
written exposition as appropriate to a variety of theses and subjects.
2. Students will be able to write using effective technical requirements, including
organization, mechanics, and thesis development.
3. Students will develop sensitivity to written language by being able to employ and
apply effective and appropriate rhetorical devices directed at a defined audience.
4. Students will be able to demonstrate an ability to conduct research, apply source
material, discuss general information, and apply logical process when writing.

Specific Assessments
1. Students will write a minimum of three (3) major argumentative essays in
addition to responses, thematic exercises, and other assignments, each focusing on
different theses and/or subjects and each written for different rhetorical purposes.
2. Students will write extended arguments as well as shorter responses, observations,
and critical evaluations, each utilizing effective organization, mechanics, and
thesis development.
3. Students will read and discuss selected examples of effective written
communication with an emphasis on determining how and why effectiveness is

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achieved by the original authors. Additionally, students will share their writing in
open peer-review sessions conducted during class meetings or outside of class in
selected electronic contexts.
4. Students will document their claims and statements with credible source material
obtained through a combination of online and hands on research using appropriate
and approved materials. The inclusion of such research in student writing(s) will
be cited and documented using correct and complete styles approved by the
Modern Language Association.

Criterion for Success


1. For each assigned essay, 75% of students are able to compose an error free,
cogent, and logical written exploration of the given thesis and subject. Each essay
will demonstrate knowledge of proper use of an introduction, a body, and a
conclusion in constructing an effective essay. Each essay will present a cogent
thesis, which in turn is supported by concrete evidence, documented as necessary.
Each essay will show the author's attention to her audience, and the
communication wants and needs of that audience. Successful students will also
demonstrate the ability to adapt their writing yet still satisfy the above criterion
when writing for multiple and different audiences, or for different rhetorical
purposes.
2. For each assigned writing, and generally throughout all course-related writings,
75% of students are able to demonstrate knowledge and effective utilization of
techniques like organization, mechanics, and thesis developments. Each writing
will demonstrate effective strategies for organizing the thesis and supporting
details, of leading the reader through a cogent, ordered series of thoughts
supporting the thesis, and for summarizing that thesis and supporting details at the
conclusion. Additionally, such writing will demonstrate and knowledge of and
concern for the correct utilization of the mechanics of effective writing such as
grammar, spelling, etc.
3. For each assigned writing, 75% of students will demonstrate their awareness of an
audience for their work beyond themselves. Furthermore, their audience
awareness will demonstrate analysis of that audience to determine audience
subject knowledge, need for information, and projected or hoped for outcome
from acquisition of said knowledge. In short, students will demonstrate
understanding of the actions or outcomes resulting from their writing as directed
to a specific audience for a specific purpose.
4. For each assigned writing, and specifically for those requiring research, 75% of
students will demonstrate an ability to conduct research, both online and in library
contexts, for the purpose of identifying and utilizing appropriate and credible
source material meant to support their claims and/or theses. Students will
demonstrate a knowledge of the level of detail and credibility necessary to support
their claims, and their ability to find such material through active research.

Required Textbooks

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The Aims of Argument: A Rhetoric and Reader
by Timothy Crusius and Carolyn Channell
Fifth Edition. McGraw-Hill, 2006
ISBN 0-07-321761-1

A Writer's Resources: A Handbook for Writing and Research


by Elaine P. Maimon, Janice H. Peritz, and Kathleen Blake Yancey
Second Edition. McGraw-Hill, 2007
ISBN 978-0-07-325938-3

Assignments and Academic Calendar


NOTE: All matters associated with this course are subject to change at the instructor's
discretion. Any changes will be communicated to students.

All assignments are due by the next class period unless noted otherwise. Assignments
from The Aims of Argument textbook will be denoted by AA; Assignments from A
Writer's Resource will be denoted by AWR

Fri 8/18: In-class: Course introduction and overview; Register for AWR and AA companion
websites (the AWR website includes an e-book)

Assignments: Read AA Ch 1 and AWR Ch. 4; Send email to me by ***

Mon 8/21: In-class: Intro to Portfolio; Discussion of AA Ch. 1 and AWR Ch. 4

Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; Read Ch. 2 in AA

Wed 8/23 In-class: Discussion of AA Ch. 2 and demo of AWR electronic resources

Fri 8/18: In-class: Course introduction and overview; Register for AWR and AA companion
websites (the AWR website includes an e-book)

Assignments: Read AA Ch 1 and AWR Ch. 4; Send email to me by ***

Mon 8/21: In-class: Intro to Portfolio; Discussion of AA Ch. 1 and AWR Ch. 4

Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; Read Ch. 2 in AA

Wed 8/23 In-class: Discussion of AA Ch. 2 and demo of AWR electronic resources

Assignments: Read AA Ch. 4 (pp. 60-86) and bring a magazine to class on *** (see
Response #2 on p. 76)

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Fri 8/25: In-class: Discuss AA Ch 4; Small group rhetorical analysis of emotional appeal in
magazine ads

Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; Read [2 essays from AA reader]

Mon 8/28: Discuss [the 2 argument essays from AA reader]

Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; Read AA Ch. 3

Wed 8/30: In-class: Discuss AA Chs. 3

Assignments: Read [1 essay from AA reader]

Fri 9/1: In-class: Discuss AA Ch 3; Class Toulmin analysis of [the argument essay from AA
reader]

Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; Read AA Ch. 6; Essay #1 assigned

Mon 9/4: LABOR DAY HOLIDAY

Wed 9/6: In-class: Discussion of AA Ch. 6.

Assignments: Read AA Ch. 5 (Assessing and using Sources, Documenting Sources) [Ch. 5
can be assigned as reference chapters and students held responsible for understanding and
putting into practice the principles therein]

Fri 9/8: In-class: Discussion of AA Ch. 5 and general discussion of sources; students log in to
AWR online (Catalyst 2.0); Demo of Catalyst electronic resources for Research

Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; Read [3-5 essays from one of the
clusters in the reader section of AA]

Mon 9/11: In-class: Discussion of [assigned readings on evaluation arguments]

Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; [optional readings from AA]

Wed 9/13: [Possible library tour day or further discussion of readings from 9/12…you
decide]

Assignments: Read AWR Handbook on MLA format and how to cite and create a works
cited page

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Fri 9/15: In-class: Class discussion of grammar, format, mechanics, evidence, fallacies, and
plagiarism discussion (bring AWR Handbook)

Assignment: Record an observation in your Portfolio; Work on draft of Essay #1, due ***

Mon 9/18: In-class: First draft of Essay #1 due today. Peer reviews [students exchange
their paper with another student and respond to peer review questionnaire to be
provided]

Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; Work on essay #1 peer review


revision suggestions

Wed 9/20: In-class: Teacher conference and in-class writing on Essay #1.

Assignments: Continue work on Essay # 1

Fri 9/22: In-class: Teacher conference and in-class work on Essay #1 revisions

Assignments: Continue work on Essay #1; Bring Visual Exercises CD to class Monday

Mon 9/25: Final draft of Essay #1 due; In-class: Work in Visual Exercises application in
class [you decide what sections of the CD you want them to explore]

Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; Research image(s) to use for Essay
#2 and bring some to class

Wed 9/27: In-class: Small group discussions of images and analysis of arguments in images

Assignments: Examine images in United Benetton ads


(http://www.benetton.com/html/whatwesay/campaigns/photogallery.shtml) and
Adbusters.org (http://adbusters.org/home/) website and note various arguments

Fri 9/29: In-class: Discuss United Benetton and Adbusters.org images

Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; decide on image(s) for your Essay #2
and bring to class on Monday [If you are linking to the image elsewhere on the Internet, BE
SURE TO NOTE EXACT SOURCE OF IMAGE and OBTAIN PERMISSION TO LINK
TO IT IF IT IS NOT ON A PUBLIC SITE].

Mon 10/2: In-class: Using the technology [Introduction to using MS Word and images or
Catalyst]

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Assignments: Record an observation in your Portfolio; Work on format and media decisions
for Essay #2

Wed 10/4: In-class: [media workshop]

Assignments: Start sketching main visual project components and argument analysis

Fri 10/6: In-class: Moderation readings.

Assignments: Record an Observation about moderation readings in your Portfolio; Continue


work on Essay #2

Mon 10/9: In-class: Individual work on Essay #2 in class

Assignments: Complete first draft of Essay #2 due ***; Bring hard copy of first draft to
class on ***

Wed 10/11: In-class: First draft of Visual argument due; Peer reviews in class

Assignments: Work on revision of Essay #2 based on peer review suggestions

Fri 10/13: In-class: Teacher-student conferences on Essay #2


Assignments: Complete final draft of Essay #2 due ***

Mon 10/16: In-class: In class work on Essay #2

Assignments: Record an Observation in your Portfolio


[choose some site for students to read arguments in electronic environments, such as some
Blogs or web forums related to a topic of your choice]

Wed 10/18: In-class: Final draft of Essay #2 due; Discussion of assigned online readings
Assignments: [you decide]
**Thursday, October 19 is the last day to drop with a WP/WF.**
Fri 10/20: In-class: Continued discussion of online reading

Assignments: Record an Observation in your Portfolio; Read AA Ch. 7 and [3-5 essays from
clusters in the reader section of AA]

Mon 10/23: In-class: Discussion of AA Ch. 7 and assigned readings; Discuss Essay #3
project, due ***

Assignments: Record an Observation in your Portfolio; Start thinking about your topic for
Essay #3

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Wed 10/25: In-class: Continued discussion of AA Ch. 7 and assigned readings

Assignments: [Read some sections of AWR, or require students to do some exercises on the
AWR website]

Fri 10/27: In-class: Bring AWR; discussion of assignments from Handbook

Assignments: Record an Observation in your Portfolio; Read AA Ch. 8 and [3-5 essays from
clusters in the reader section of AA]

Mon 10/30: In-class: Discussion of AA Ch. 8 and assigned readings

Assignments: Record an Observation in your Portfolio; Choose possible topics for Essay #3

Wed 11/1: In-class: Continued discussion of AA Ch. 8 and assigned readings; Small group
discussions of paper topics

Assignments: Refine paper topic and begin work on first draft

Fri 11/3: In-class: Teacher conference on paper topics


Assignments: Work on first draft of Essay #3 due *** in Portfolio

Mon 11/6: In-class: Writing in class on first draft of Essay #3

Assignments: Continue working on first draft; Bring hard copy of first draft to class on ***

Wed 11/8: In-class: First draft of Essay #3 due in Portfolio; Peer reviews of first draft of
Essay #3

Assignments: Continue working on Essay #3 using peer feedback

Fri 11/10: In-class: Work on revisions of first draft of Essay #3

Assignments: Continue working on Essay #3

Mon 11/13: In-class: Discussion of revision techniques and elevating style (bring AWR
Handbook); In-class writing on Essay #3

Assignments: Continue work on Essay #3

Wed 11/15: In-class: In-class writing on Essay #3; Second draft of Essay #3 due in
Portfolio by end of class period

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Assignments: prepare for conference with instructor

Fri 11/17: In-class: Conference with instructor

Assignments: Work on revisions of 2nd draft of Essay #3

Mon 11/20: In-class: Conference with instructor

Assignments: Complete final draft of Essay #3 in Portfolio for ***

Wed 11/22: In-class: Final draft of Essay #3 due in Portfolio; student evaluations of course

Assignments: ***you decide***

Fri 11/24: Thanksgiving Holiday

Mon 11/27: LAST DAY OF CLASSES!

Grading Policy
Your course work, and demonstrable acquisition and utilization of competencies in
written communication will be assessed holistically over the course of the semester. Your
projects will not receive individual grades, but will receive individual attention from the
course instructor and your classmates. Midterm and final grades will be based on a
portfolio of written observations, assigned essays, and other activities, as well as your
attendance and participation. At both midterm and end of the semester you will present a
written argument for what you feel your grade should be based or your specific
assessment of the quality of your learning, especially with regard to your attendance,
participation, promptness, level of writing, effective use of argumentation, creativity,
collaboration, sound rhetorical skills, and competent use of technology.

Evidence supporting your claim(s) must be drawn from your portfolio and should
specifically demonstrate mastery of five course strands (rhetoric, research, technology,
collaboration, and critical thinking)you're your development across five dimensions of
learning (confidence and independence, skills and strategies, knowledge and
understanding, use of prior and emerging experience, and reflectiveness).

The final interpretation and assessment of your grade(s), however, remains the
responsibility of the course instructor.

The following grade criteria describe very general indicators for assessing your work and
progress in the course.

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A: Represents outstanding participation in all course activities (including attendance and
promptness); all assigned work completed on time, with very high quality in all work
produced for the course. Evidence of significant and sustained development across the
five dimensions of learning and five course strands.

B: Represents excellent participation in all course activities (including attendance and


promptness); all assigned work completed on time, with consistently high quality in
course work. Evidence of marked and above average development across the five
dimensions of learning and five course strands.

C: Represents good (but average) participation in all course activities; all assigned work
completed, with generally good quality overall in course work. Evidence of some
development across the five dimensions of learning and five course strands.

D: Represents uneven participation in course activities; some gaps in assigned work


completed, with inconsistent quality in course work. Evidence of development across the
five dimensions of learning and five course strands is partial or unclear.

F: Represents minimal participation in course activities; serious gaps in assigned work


completed, or very low quality in course work. Evidence of development is not available.

Course and Instructor Policies

Attendance and Participation


Both regular and active attendance and participation are required for the successful
completion of this course. If you miss any class for any reason, you remain responsible
for class expectations, requirements, and/or changes. Alternative assignments are
generally not given, nor will missed classes be "re-taught" for absent students. After three
absences your final course grade will be negatively affected and/or you may be
encouraged to drop the course. Chronic tardiness is unacceptable and will also negatively
affect your final grade.

Participation IN THIS COURSE does not include doing work that is not for this course
during class, sleeping in class, or using the computers or other personal electronic devices
for personal messaging, research, or entertainment. Please turn off cellular/mobile
phones, pagers, and other personal electronic devices during class.

Major Assignments
Essay #1
An essay that presents an inquiry argument using the principles and criteria in The Aims of
Argument (Chapter 6). Essay should be 4-5 double-spaced pages using MLA format for
Works Cited.

First draft due: ***


Final draft due: ***

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Essay #2
An integrated textual and visual essay that examines and analyzes the argument of a visual
image (or images) using the criteria in Chapter 4 of The Aims of Argument. Your image may
come from the visuals in The Aims of Argument, other publications, Internet, or other media.
This project should be 5-6 double-spaced pages and should cite all sources using MLA
format for online sources.

First draft due: ***


Final draft due: ***

Essay #3
An essay that presents a convincing or motivating argument using the principles and
criteria in The Aims of Argument (Chapter 7 or 8). This essay should be 6-7 double-
spaced pages and should use MLA format for all works cited.

Brief for essay due: ***


First draft due: ***
Second draft due: ***
Final draft due: ***

Late Work
All drafts, including final, must be submitted when and as required in order to
successfully complete this course. Late assignments will suffer grade deductions, or may
not be accepted.

Personal Communication Devices


Turn off all cell phones, pagers, and other personal communication devices before the
start of class. Do not use them during class.

Student Conduct and Discipline


The University of Texas System and The University of Texas at Dallas have rules and
regulations for the orderly and efficient conduct of their business. It is the responsibility
of each student and each student organization to be knowledgeable about the rules and
regulations which govern student conduct and activities. General information on student
conduct and discipline is contained in the UTD publication, A to Z Guide, which is
provided to all registered students each academic year.

The University of Texas at Dallas administers student discipline within the procedures of
recognized and established due process. Procedures are defined and described in the
Rules and Regulations, Board of Regents, The University of Texas System, Part 1,
Chapter VI, Section 3, and in Title V, Rules on Student Services and Activities of the
university's Handbook of Operating Procedures. Copies of these rules and regulations are
available to students in the Office of the Dean of Students, where staff members are
available to assist students in interpreting the rules and regulations (SU 1.602, 972/883-
6391).

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A student at the university neither loses the rights nor escapes the responsibilities of
citizenship. He or she is expected to obey federal, state, and local laws as well as the
Regents' Rules, university regulations, and administrative rules. Students are subject to
discipline for violating the standards of conduct whether such conduct takes place on or
off campus, or whether civil or criminal penalties are also imposed for such conduct.

Academic Integrity
The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty.
Because the value of an academic degree depends upon the absolute integrity of the work
done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that a student demonstrate a high
standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work.

Scholastic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, statements, acts or omissions related
to applications for enrollment or the award of a degree, and/or the submission as one's
own work or material that is not one's own. As a general rule, scholastic dishonesty
involves one of the following acts: cheating, plagiarism, collusion and/or falsifying
academic records. Students suspected of academic dishonesty are subject to disciplinary
proceedings.

Plagiarism, especially from the web, from portions of papers for other classes, and from
any other source is unacceptable and will be dealt with under the university's policy on
plagiarism (see general catalog for details). This course will use the resources of
turnitin.com, which searches the web for possible plagiarism and is over 90% effective.

Email Use
The University of Texas at Dallas recognizes the value and efficiency of communication
between faculty/staff and students through electronic mail. At the same time, email raises
some issues concerning security and the identity of each individual in an email exchange.
The university encourages all official student email correspondence be sent only to a
student's U.T. Dallas email address and that faculty and staff consider email from
students official only if it originates from a UTD student account. This allows the
university to maintain a high degree of confidence in the identity of all individual
corresponding and the security of the transmitted information. UTD furnishes each
student with a free email account that is to be used in all communication with university
personnel. The Department of Information Resources at U.T. Dallas provides a method
for students to have their U.T. Dallas mail forwarded to other accounts.

Withdrawal from Class


The administration of this institution has set deadlines for withdrawal of any college-level
courses. These dates and times are published in that semester's course catalog.
Administration procedures must be followed. It is the student's responsibility to handle
withdrawal requirements from any class. In other words, I cannot drop or withdraw any
student. You must do the proper paperwork to ensure that you will not receive a final
grade of "F" in a course if you choose not to attend the class once you are enrolled.

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Student Grievance Procedures
Procedures for student grievances are found in Title V, Rules on Student Services and
Activities, of the university's Handbook of Operating Procedures.

In attempting to resolve any student grievance regarding grades, evaluations, or other


fulfillments of academic responsibility, it is the obligation of the student first to make a
serious effort to resolve the matter with the instructor, supervisor, administrator, or
committee with whom the grievance originates (hereafter called “the respondent”).
Individual faculty members retain primary responsibility for assigning grades and
evaluations. If the matter cannot be resolved at that level, the grievance must be
submitted in writing to the respondent with a copy of the respondent's School Dean. If the
matter is not resolved by the written response provided by the respondent, the student
may submit a written appeal to the School Dean. If the grievance is not resolved by the
School Dean's decision, the student may make a written appeal to the Dean of Graduate
or Undergraduate Education, and the deal will appoint and convene an Academic
Appeals Panel. The decision of the Academic Appeals Panel is final. The results of the
academic appeals process will be distributed to all involved parties.

Copies of these rules and regulations are available to students in the Office of the Dean of
Students, where staff members are available to assist students in interpreting the rules and
regulations.

Incomplete Grade Policy


As per university policy, incomplete grades will be granted only for work unavoidably
missed at the semester's end and only if 70% of the course work has been completed. An
incomplete grade must be resolved within eight (8) weeks from the first day of the
subsequent long semester. If the required work to complete the course and to remove the
incomplete grade is not submitted by the specified deadline, the incomplete grade is
changed automatically to a grade of F.

Disability Services
The goal of Disability Services is to provide students with disabilities educational
opportunities equal to those of their non-disabled peers. Disability Services is located in
room 1.610 in the Student Union. Office hours are Monday and Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to
6:30 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; and Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30
p.m.

The contact information for the Office of Disability Services is:


The University of Texas at Dallas, SU 22
PO Box 830688
Richardson, Texas 75083-0688
(972) 883-2098 (voice or TTY)

Essentially, the law requires that colleges and universities make those reasonable
adjustments necessary to eliminate discrimination on the basis of disability. For example,
it may be necessary to remove classroom prohibitions against tape recorders or animals

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(in the case of dog guides) for students who are blind. Occasionally an assignment
requirement may be substituted (for example, a research paper versus an oral presentation
for a student who is hearing impaired). Classes enrolled students with mobility
impairments may have to be rescheduled in accessible facilities. The college or university
may need to provide special services such as registration, note-taking, or mobility
assistance.

It is the student's responsibility to notify his or her professors of the need for such an
accommodation. Disability Services provides students with letters to present to faculty
members to verify that the student has a disability and needs accommodations.
Individuals requiring special accommodation should contact the professor after class or
during office hours.

Religious Holy Days


The University of Texas at Dallas will excuse a student from class or other required
activities for the travel to and observance of a religious holy day for a religion whose
places of worship are exempt from property tax under Section 11.20, Tax Code, Texas
Code Annotated.

The student is encouraged to notify the instructor or activity sponsor


as soon as possible regarding the absence, preferably in advance of
the assignment. The student, so excused, will be allowed to take the
exam or complete the assignment within a reasonable time after the
absence: a period equal to the length of the absence, up to a
maximum of one week. A student who notifies the instructor and
completes any missed exam or assignment may not be penalized for
the absence. A student who fails to complete the exam or assignment
within the prescribed period may receive a failing grade for that exam
or assignment.

If a student or an instructor disagrees about the nature of the absence


[i.e., for the purpose of observing a religious holy day] or if there is
similar disagreement about whether the student has been given a
reasonable time to complete any missed assignments or examinations,
either the student or the instructor may request a ruling from the chief
executive officer of the institution, or his or her designee. The chief
executive officer or designee must take into account the legislative
intent of TEC 51.911(b), and the student and instructor will abide by
the decision of the chief executive officer or designee.

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Attendance Policy
Regular attendance is required. Your grade may be lowered down to a letter grade of F (Fail)
for poor attendance. This is University Policy. You are permitted three [3] absences only. If
you miss more than three classes, your grade will be negatively affected. You may be
encouraged to drop the class with more than three [3] absences. Participation is vital to
successful completion of Rhetoric 1302. If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to get
assignments, class notes and course changes from fellow classmates. The professor reserves
the right to change the course syllabus as deemed necessary. Class work such as quizzes,
group presentation and collaboration, class discussion, daily observation into LRO cannot be
made up. Attend every class! Much of the work is done collaboratively in class.
Alternative assignments will not be given for absences. The professor will not “re-teach”
missed classes for individual students. Two instances of tardiness will count as one
absence. Chronic tardiness will receive the same penalty as three [3] or more absences.
Coming to class unprepared, doing work that is not for this course during class, sleeping in
class, or using the computers or other personal electronic devices for personal messaging,
research, or entertainment is unacceptable. Turn off cellular or mobile phones, pagers, and
other personal electronic devices during class.

Drop Policy
See here for details on deadlines and procedures for dropping:
http://www.utdallas.edu/student/class/current/newpolicywpwf.htm
http://www.utdallas.edu/student/registrar/lookup/dropadd.html

The last day to withdraw from a course without a letter grade of W or WP or WF is Census
Day September 21, 2006. Students are responsible for withdrawing from academic courses.

Holidays: Monday, September 4, 2005 Labor Day Friday, Friday, November 25, 2005.
Thanksgiving Day is Thursday, November 24, 2005. Last Day of Class is Monday,
November 28, 2005.
Office Hours

Please note the professor’s office hours listed above. You can also schedule appointments to
meet with the professor at times other than the professor’s listed office hours. Office hours
are yours! Take advantage of them. Do not hesitate to benefit from your professor’s
accessibility and availability to be of assistance to your academic development. It is best to
contact the professor by email rather than the office phone.

Email Policy

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IMPORTANT NOTICE TO UTD STUDENTS: As of August 1, 2004, all email
correspondence with students will be sent ONLY to the student's U.T. Dallas email address.
U.T. Dallas provides each student with a free email account that is to be used in all
communication with university personnel. This allows the university to maintain a high
degree of confidence in the identity of all individuals corresponding and the security of the
transmitted information. The Department of Information Resources at U.T. Dallas provides a
method for students to forward email from other accounts to their U.T. Dallas address and
have their U.T. Dallas mail sent on to other accounts. Students may go to the following URL
to establish or maintain their official U.T. Dallas computer account: http://netid.utdallas.edu/

Grading Policy

This course offers you an approach to learning that may be different from your past
experiences because the course is concerned with your development as a critical reader and
writer. The grading strategy will track and monitor that development. Your work will be
collected in an electronic portfolio called the Learning Record Online (LRO). Your
assignments will not receive individual grades but will receive individual attention from your
classmates and professor. Your mid-term and final grades will be based on your portfolio of
written observations and assigned coursework, including collaborative work and your three
major essays, as well as completion of each component of your LRO. In the final step to
completing your LRO, you will argue for your grade by summarizing your learning and
estimating the grade that the evidence of your learning supports. In other words, you will
directly apply what you learn in this course, argumentative writing, by arguing for your own
grade. However, each component of the LRO is vital to a quality body of work. Your
attendance, participation, promptness, level of writing, effective arguments, creativity,
collaboration, sound rhetorical skills, competent use of technology will contribute to an
outstanding portfolio.

Your goal is to demonstrate your development toward mastery of five course strands
(rhetoric, research, technology, collaboration, and critical thinking) and development across
five dimensions of learning (confidence and independence, skills and strategies, knowledge
and understanding, use of prior and emerging experience, and reflective-ness). These goals
will be discussed throughout the course. Keep in mind that although we do give plus [+] and
minus [–] grades at UTD, the general criteria for grading your Learning Record Online
(LRO) is still based on the A-F grading scale.
The following grading criteria describe very general indicators that both you and your
professor may take into consideration when assessing your work and progress in the
course. Your estimation of your mid-term and final grades should be more detailed and
specific and may include a plus [+] or minus [–] if your work tilts above or below the
central grade for which you argue.

A: Represents outstanding participation in all course activities (including attendance and


promptness); all assigned work completed on time, with very high quality in all work
produced for the course. Evidence of significant and sustained development across the
five dimensions of learning and five course strands.

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B: Represents excellent participation in all course activities (including attendance and
promptness); all assigned work completed on time, with consistently high quality in
course work. Evidence of marked and above average development across the five
dimensions of learning and five course strands.

C: Represents good (but average) participation in all course activities; all assigned work
completed, with generally good quality overall in course work. Evidence of some
development across the five dimensions of learning and five course strands.

D: Represents uneven participation in course activities; some gaps in assigned work


completed, with inconsistent quality in course work. Evidence of development across the
five dimensions of learning and five course strands is partial or unclear.

F: Represents minimal participation in course activities; serious gaps in assigned work


completed, or very low quality in course work. Evidence of development is not available.

UTD GRADING SCALE


Visit the website below for the university’s grading scale
(http://www.utdallas.edu/student/catalog/undergrad02/progress.html#Grading%20Scale)

Disability and or Special Services

In order to take advantage of the services offered by the office of disability services
students must register with the disability office and immediately notify their Instructor.
Students needing academic accommodations for a disability must contact the Office of
Disability Services (972-883-2098), to verify the disability and establish eligibility for
accommodations. Students with disabilities are responsible to make their disabilities
known and to meet all course expectations, including attendance, participation,
performance, and work standards. Full range of help and services for students physically
and otherwise handicapped; Contact: Ms. Kerry Tate, 972-883-2098
More information online: http://www.utdallas.edu/student/slife/hcsvc.html
Please do not wait until your academic progress is adversely affected before alerting the
proper authorities of your individual situation as this may not improve or alter the
situation. Communication is the key.
Plagiarism Policy

Plagiarism is the representation of another person’s work as your own, whether you mean to
or not. For example, copying or paraphrasing passages from another writer’s work without
acknowledging that you’ve done so is plagiarism. Allowing another writer to write any part
of your essay is plagiarism. Copying or purchasing a paper from any source is plagiarism.

Plagiarism is a serious offense. The possible consequences range from failing the assignment
to failing the course, or possible expulsion from the university. Each incident of plagiarism at
The University of Texas at Dallas is reported to the university’s administration. If you are not

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sure how to properly cite a quote or paraphrase a source, make an appointment with your for
clarification.

If you need help with the format of a citation, check with the New Century Handbook or visit
the Penn State University website for more understanding on plagiarism.
[www.courses.psu.edu/engl] on the Index page select [engl_cjg6] once there, click on
University Plagiarism Policy.

Although you can seek help and advice from friends, classmates, tutors, and others, always
make sure that your written work is your own.
Consult the Undergraduate Catalog for information about the consequences of Scholastic
Dishonesty, or view the policy here (which is also a link on the Rhetoric Program website) at

http://www.utdallas.edu/student/slife/dishonesty.html.

Below are basic definitions and examples of plagiarism extracted from the
Penn State University’s website list above.

“Plagiarize
Verb transitive:
1. To use and pass off as one’s own (the ideas or writings of another).
2. To appropriate for use as one’s own passages or ideas from (another)

Verb intransitive:
1. To put forth as original to oneself the ideas or words of another.
(from The American Heritage Dictionary)

Plagiarism can range from submitting someone’s work as your own to using long pieces of
text or unique phrasings without acknowledging the original source. Plagiarism could also
include submitting someone else’s program or spreadsheet with minor alterations.”

Major Assignments

First Essay: An essay that presents a Definition or Evaluation Argument using the
principles and criteria in Everything’s an Argument with Readings [Chapters 9 or 10]. Essay
should be a minimum of five and a half (5 1/2) double-spaced pages using MLA format for
Works Cited. Ten (10) minutes class presentation of work.
First draft due: Monday – September 12, 2005
Final draft due: Wednesday – September 21, 2005

Second Essay: An integrated Textual and Visual Essay that examines and analyzes the
argument of a visual image or images using the criteria in [Chapter 14] of Everything’s an

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Argument with Readings. This project should be a minimum of six and a half (6 1/2) double-
spaced pages and should cite all sources using MLA format for online sources. Fifteen (15)
minutes class presentation of work.
First draft due: Monday – October 10, 2005
Final draft due: Wednesday – October 19, 2005

Third Essay: An essay that presents a Causal or Proposal Argument using the principles
and criteria in Everything’s an Argument with Readings (Chapters 11 or 12). This essay
should be a minimum of seven and a half (7 1/2 ) double-spaced pages and should use MLA
format for all works cited. Fifteen (15) minutes class presentation of work.
First draft due: Monday - November 14, 2005
Final draft due: Wednesday - November 23, 2005

Learning Record Online: This is an online resource for managing and documenting the
work and learning you do in this class. Various assignments will be due throughout the
semester, and all observations, assignments, essay drafts, and final essay draft must be
included in the LRO on the date due.

Parts A.1 and A.2 are due: Wednesday – September 28, 2005
Parts B.1 and C.1 are due: Wednesday - October 26, 2005
Parts B.2 and C.2 are due: Monday – November 28, 2005

Remember that all essay drafts, final essay drafts and assigned course work must be recorded
in your Learning Record Online (LRO). All assigned course work, essay drafts and final
essays must also be turned in to the Instructor in a traditional hard copy paper form
(using MLA format and citation that includes a separate Works Cited page) on the dates due.

1. - NO PAPER WILL BE ACCEPTED AFTER THE DUE DATE.

2. – PRESENTATION OF WORKS ACCEPTED ON ASSIGNED DATES ONLY.

3. - LETTER GRADES OF “F” WILL BE ASSIGNED TO ALL WORK NOT


TURNED IN ON TIME AND WORKS NOT PRESENTED ON SCHEDULE.

Name
Course and Section
Instructor’s name
Date
Paper Topics

Definition and Evaluation Argument.


1. Define racism. 2. What is your understanding of racism? 3. How did you arrive at this
understanding? 4. Evaluate modern America to determine if America is a racist society. 5. If yes, how
is modern America a racist society? 6. If no, how is modern America not a racist society? Explain
and support your response using any of the required texts for this course. Apply the Toulmin Analysis

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to this Essay Paper. Additional sources for this research paper should come from UTD Library
Materials such as books, journals and periodicals. No internet source is acceptable for
this assignment. A minimum of four (4) academic sources is required for this paper.

Visual and Textual Essay.


Using the movie “Diary of a Mad Black Woman” as the basis for this Visual Essay discuss the
stereotypes of the African American family addressed in the film. 2. How does the movie deal with
the social issues concerning the African American family? 3. What is the movie’s rhetoric? 4. Is the
movie effective in negating the stereotypes associated with the African American race? 5. If yes, how
is the movie’s rhetoric effective? 6. If no, how is the movie not effective? Explain and support your
response using any of the required texts for this course. Apply the Toulmin Analysis to this Essay
Paper. Additional sources for this research paper should come from UTD Library Materials such as
books, journals and periodicals. No internet source is acceptable for this
assignment. A minimum of four (4) academic sources is required for this paper. Diary of a Mad
Black Woman is performed by Tyler Perry, Kimberly Elise, Shemar Moore and Steve Harris.

Causal and Proposal Argument


1. Discuss the racial elements in the movie “Guess Who” by Bernie Mac, Ashton Kutcher and Zoe
Saldana. 2. How does the movie deal with racism? 3. What is the movie’s rhetoric? 4. Is the movie
effective in it’s address of racial conflict and racial issues in America? 5. If yes, how is the movie’s
rhetoric effective? 6. If no, how is the movie not effective in addressing racial conflicts in America?
7. What do you think is the cause of racial conflict in modern America? 8. What would you propose
to stem the racial tension in American society? Explain and support your response using any of the
required texts for this course. Apply the Toulmin Analysis to this Essay Paper. Additional sources for
this research paper should come from UTD Library Materials such as books, journals and periodicals.
No internet source is acceptable for this assignment. A minimum of four (4)
academic sources is required for this paper.

RHETORIC 1302 ITINERARY SYLLABUS

Thursday Semester Begins


8/18

EA , QA EA = Everything’s and Argument Text QA = Quick Access Text


and PH PH = Prentice Hall Pocket Reader Text

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Thursday Semester Begins
8/18
F 8/19 General Introduction
Get student net id and e-mail at the HELP DESK in JO 3.536
Student Net ID and E-mail are necessary to access the LRO website
and LRO program required for this course
Essay #1 assigned (Definition/Evaluation Argument)

M 8/22 Introduction to course and syllabus.


Introduction to Rhetoric Program Website and the LRO.
HW: Read EA Ch 1 and QA Chapters 1-3

W 8/24 Record Observation of EA chapter 1 and QA chapters 1-3 in LRO.


Discussion of readings
Register for EA companion website
HW: Read Chapters 2-3 in EA.

F 8/26 Record Observation of EA Chapters 2-3 in LRO.


Discussion of readings
Register for QA e-book online at www.prenhall.com/troyka
HW: Read EA Chapters 4 -5 and pages 515 – 517 from Cobb and Wynar.

M 8/29 Record Observation of EA chapters 4 -5 in LRO.


Discussion of readings
HW: Read EA Chapters 6-7 and also read EA pages 525-27 and
EA pages 543-545 from MonDesire and Staff at The Minnesota Daily.
Take first QA online diagnostic test.

W 8/31 Record Observation of EA chapters 6-7 in LRO.


Discussion of readings
HW: Read EA Chapter 8 (Toulmin Analysis) and read also the Essay
by Marino on pages 806 – 810 in EA.

M 9/5 Class Toulmin Analysis. Record Observation of EA ch. 8 in LRO.


Discussion of readings
HW: Read EA Chapter 10 and also read EA pages 751-752
and 755-759 from Marquez and Agosin.

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W 9/7 Record Observation of EA chapter 10 in LRO.
Discussion of readings.
HW: Read QA Handbook on MLA format and how to cite and create
a works cited page.

F 9/9 LIBRARY DAY: Using the technology: Guest Speaker: Library Tour
and Training.
HW: Work on first draft

M 9/12 Presentation
First Draft of Essay # 1 due in class and in LRO.
Peer Revision.
Essay # 2 assigned: Textual and Visual Essay.
HW: work on Essay

W 9/14 Presentation
HW: Make revisions to Draft of Essay #1 based on Peer Review and
Instructor’s suggestions. Work on first paper

F 9/16 Presentation
HW: Read student samples of LRO Parts B.1 (Analysis)
and C.1 (Evaluation) in the LRO website to prepare for
Parts B1 and C1 assignment. Work on first paper. Revise paper.

M 9/19 Presentation
HW: Complete work on first draft of Essay # 1 due 9/21/05.
Examine the images in United Benetton ads listed below.
http://www.benetton.com website and note various arguments.

W 9/21 Presentation
Final draft of Essay #1 due in class and in LRO
Discussion of Benetton Ads.
HW: Read EA pages 760-773 from Cao and Lo.

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F 9/23 Record Observation of assigned readings in LRO
Discussion of readings
HW: Read Chapters 21-22: Assessing and Using Sources,
Documenting Sources.

M 9/26 Record Observation of EA chapters 21-22 in LRO.


Discussion of sources : Grammar, format, mechanics,
evidence, fallacies, and plagiarism discussion
HW: Complete LRO parts A.1 and A.2 by 9/28/05

W 9/28 Parts A1 and A2 due in LRO and hard copy


HW: Read EA chapter 11 and also read EA pages 494-499 in Chapter 23.

F 9/30 Record Observation of Chapter 11 in LRO.


Discussion of readings.
HW: Read EA pages 500-505 and also read PH pages 1-10 from
Wendell Berry and Black Elk
Take second QA online diagnostic test.

M 10/3 Record Observation of assigned reading in LRO


Discussion of readings.
HW: Read EA chapter 15 and EA pages 509-512 as well as PH pages 50-53
from bell hooks.

W 10/5 Record Observation of EA Chapter 15 and EA pages 509-512 in LRO.


Discussion of readings.
HW: Read Pocket Reader pages 40-49 from Morgan.
Bring Visual Exercises CD to class on 10/7/05.
F 10/7 Record Observation of assigned readings in LRO.
Discussion of reading. Work on visual CD
HW: work on first draft of Essay # 2

M 10/10 Presentation
First draft of Visual Essay# 2 due.
Peer Review
HW: work on Essay # 2

W 10/12 Presentation
Peer Review
Essay #3 assigned (Causal or Proposal Essay).
HW: work on Essay # 2

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F 10/14 Presentation
HW: Revision of Essay # 2
M 10/17 Presentation
HW: work on Essay # 2
Complete final draft of Visual Essay #2 due 10/19/05.

W 10/19 Presentation
Final draft of Visual Essay # 2 due in class and in LRO
HW: Read PH pages 27-39 from Frank and Ashen.

F 10/21 Record Observation of assigned reading in LRO.


Discussion of readings
HW: Read PH pages 15-16 and 63–70 from Brady and Swift.
Complete parts B.1 and C.1 of LRO due 10/26/05

M 10/24 Record Observation of assigned readings in LRO.


Discussion of assigned readings
HW: Read EA Chapters 16.
Take final QA online diagnostic test for course

W 10/26 Parts B.1 and C.1 of LRO due in class and in LRO
Record Observation of EA chapter 16 in LRO
Discussion of readings
HW: Read PH pages 54-59 from Carson and also
Read EA Ch 18-20 on arguments in electronic environments.

F 10/28 Record Observation of Chapters 18-20 in LRO.


Discussion of readings
HW: Read EA pages 700 – 729 from Dorfman, Lee, Tan,
Troutt and Rickford.

M 10/31 Record Observation of assigned reading in LRO


Discussion of readings
HW: Read essays on Images and the Media in EA chapter 23
from pages 457 - 493.

W 11/2 Record Observation of EA chapter 23 (pages 457-493) in LRO.


Discussion of readings
HW: Read PH pages 71-85 from King.

23
F 11/4 Record Observation of assigned reading in LRO
Discussion of readings.
HW: Read EA pages 811-815 from King and also Read EA Chapter 12.

M 11/7 Record Observation of EA Chapter 12 in LRO


Discussion of readings
HW: Read EA Chapter 14.

W 11/9 Record Observation of EA Chapter 14 in LRO.


Discussion of readings
HW: Read QA handbook pages 311-58.

F 11/11 Record Observation of assigned reading


Discussion of readings
HW: Continue working on first draft of Essay # 3.

M 11/14 Presentation
First draft of Causal or Proposal Essay #3 due in class and in LRO
Peer Review
HW: Continue work on Final Semester Essay

W 11/16 Presentation
Peer Review
HW: Work on Essay # 3 due Wednesday, November 23, 2005.

F 11/17 Presentation
Peer Review
HW: work on final Essay Paper.

M 11/21 Presentation
Revision of final semester Essay
HW: Complete work on final Essay Paper.

W 11/23 Presentation
Final draft of Essay #3 due in class and in LRO
HW: Bring a magazine to class on November 28, 2005 and also
Read Response #2 on page 76 in EA.
HW: Complete LRO parts B.2 and C.2 due Monday, November 28, 2005

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F 11/25 THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY

M 11/28 Parts B2 and C2 due in class and in LRO


Group rhetorical analysis of emotional values and appeals in magazine ads.
Moderation Readings - LRO Portfolio Peer Critique

Quote
“The degrading of men by men is as old as mankind and the invention of no one race or
people. Ever have men striven to conceive of their victims as different from the victors,
endlessly different, in soul and blood, strength and cunning, race and lineage. It has been left,
however, to Europe and to modern days to discover the eternal world-wide mark of
meanness, - color!” So after all there is nothing really in theory that color means inferiority,
it is merely a convenient assumption. But assumptions, attitudes are variable, things which
may be changed.

Jessie Fauset on W.E.B. DuBois’ Darkwater


in The Crisis Reader on Literary and
Cultural Essays: New Literature on the
Negro

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