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UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 4392 Computer Animation

COURSE SYLLABUS Spring 2005 Instructor Rafael Lacambra

CATALOG DESCRIPTION: CS 4392 Computer Animation (3 semester hours) Introduction to traditional animation. Kinematics of motion. Key framing. Coordinate systems and transformations (review), Euler angles and Quaternions, Catmull Rom and B-Splines, Advanced Key framing, articulated figures (forward kinematics), human and animal modeling (soft tissue, skin, etc.). Facial animation (parametric). Physically based modeling (rigid, collision detection). Physically based modeling (deformable). Behavioral and heuristic models. Algorithmic animation. Optimization techniques. Animation languages and systems. Motion capture and real time control. Virtual reality and animation. Rendering and temporal aliasing. 2D and 3D morphing. 3D modeling.

INSTRUCTOR:

Rafael Lacambra

E-MAIL

Use WebCT e-mail tool only

WWW

It is important to visit the course web page and WebCT frequently to check announcements, homework, activities, tips, FAQ, links, etc. http://www.utdallas.edu/~Rafael.Lacambra http://webct.utdallas.edu

OFFICE:

ECSS 3.704

OFFICE HOURS:

Wednesday 2:00 – 5:00 PM (in my office. East side of building, 3 rd floor) Monday and Friday 2:00– 4:00 PM OUGA ECS South (this building) - Suite 2.502 (NW entrance)

PREREQUISITE:

MATH 2418 (Linear Algebra) and CS 2336 (CS2) or CS/SE 3345 (Data Structures & Alg. Analys)

TEXTBOOK:

Computer Animation: Algorithms and Techniques by Rick Parent Publisher: Morgan Kaufmann ISBN: 1558605797

OBJETIVES:

After successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

Understand the role of the CS/SE major in Computer Animation Understand different animation techniques to automate movement Program animation techniques using software standards in industry and research Know the “behind the scenes” look of animation by programming Understand the Mathematics of computer animation

 

METHOD OF

Homework programming assignments Project (including presentation):

40%

EVALUATION:

20%

Exams (must have a 60% average):

30%

Quizzes (available through WebCT Labs

4%

6%

LETTER

(97-100 A+), (92-96 A), (90-91 A-), (88-89

B+), (82-87 B), (80-81 B-)

GRADES:

(78-79 C+), (72-77 C), (70-71 C-), (68-69 D+), (62-67 D), (60-61 D-) Below 60 F.

AUDITING:

No auditing of courses is allowed in the School of Engineering and Computer Science.

DATES

Classes Begin:

MLK day:

Spring Break:

Classes End:

Final examinations:

January 10 January 17 (University Closed) March 7–12 (Classes Suspended/University Open) April 25 Tuesday, April 26 - Monday, May 2

Spring 2005

Semester:

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 4392 Computer Animation

COURSE SYLLABUS Spring 2005 Instructor Rafael Lacambra

CLASS

HOMEWORK and ACTIVITIES

 

POLICIES

- Read the rules and specifications in the web page for every homework and activity.

- You must upload and submit your homework using WebCT.

- Homework is due on the specified date no later than 11:00 PM (WebCT time).

- Homework will be accepted one day late (24 hours) with a 10% penalty.

- After one day (24 hours), if not submitted, assignments will receive a grade of zero.

- Every time you submit homework through WebCT, WebCT will send you an e- mail acknowledgement. You must keep this e-mail for your records until the end of the semester and the final grade has been assigned. You will use it in case any homework submittal issue arises. Note: If you do not receive an acknowledge e-mail, WebCT has not received your homework and it will be considered as not submitted. The e-mail address requested by WebCT for confirmation is your own, not the professors’

- No extra homework/projects for bonus points.

EXAM

- The student must have a 60% average between the two exams and final project. If the student fails to meet this requirement, the student will receive a grade of F in the class even if he/she has a passing grade (including homework, quizzes and labs).

- Exam dates are fixed. I will not change these dates for any circumstance. I will not move up any exam date. No makeup exams at a later/earlier date will be scheduled for any student unless a written medical note is provided.

- Two exams, no final, project presentations instead on that date

GENERAL

I expect the student to come to class, study the materials and textbook and do the homework, activities and exams.

It is the student’s responsibility to check what we covered in class and the announcements during class if he or she did not attend.

The best way of learning Computer Animation Techniques is by programming them. You can acquire a good programming level by doing many examples from the textbook, homework and attending the labs.

The course is very

time demanding. Plan ahead

all your activities and if you have

any problem with your homework or your study, do not hesitate to ask questions to the TA or the Instructor. Do not wait until you have a bad grade.

It is important to read The University of Texas System Policy on Academic Honesty that appears in the Regents Rules and Regulations. , Part One, Chapter VI, Section

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 4392 Computer Animation

COURSE SYLLABUS Spring 2005 Instructor Rafael Lacambra

3, Paragraph 3.22. “ Any student who commits an act of scholastic dishonesty is subject

3, Paragraph 3.22. “Any student who commits an act of scholastic dishonesty is subject to discipline. Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts”.

Important dates

Homework

Due Dates

Homework 1 (4%): Object and Camera Transformations using OpenGL

Friday, January 28th

Homework 2 (9%): Key Framing and interpolation techniques

Friday, February 11th

Homework 3 (9%): Physically based

Friday, March 4th

Homework 4 (9%): Articulated figures

Friday, March 25th

Homework 5 (9%):

Friday, April 7th

Behavioral/Algorithmic/Parametric

Labs

Due Dates

Lab 1 (2%): OpenGL basics

Friday, January 14th

Lab 2 (2%): Articulated figures

Friday, March 4th

Lab 3 (2%): Creating a plug-in for Maya

Friday, April 22

Final Project

Due Date

 

Due: Friday, April 29 th

Project (20%) Live presentation required Use at least two techniques covered

Presentations:11:00 AM Monday, May 2 Verify official final date at:

http://www.utdallas.edu/student/class/spring/final.htm

Exams:

Due Dates

Exam 1 (15%)

Friday, March 2

Exam 2 (15%)

Friday, April 13

Important:
Important:

The dates in this schedule may change due to the class level. If the class needs more

time and examples to understand a concept I will modify the schedule. If the class is ready to skip a chapter or go faster I will modify the schedule. Therefore, it is the student’s responsibility to check what we covered in class and the changes in the schedule announced during class.

UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT DALLAS DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 4392 Computer Animation

COURSE SYLLABUS Spring 2005 Instructor Rafael Lacambra

Table of contents

 

1. Intro

8.3. Catmull Rom and B-Splines

1.1.

Rules, requirements and dates (syllabus)

8.4. Moving/animating the camera, adding noise

1.2.

Prerequisites (what you should know)

8.5. Moving/animationg objects in scene

1.3.

Tools – compiler, graphic library, rendering language, time

Animating attributes (color, transparency, non-uniform

scaling)

1.4.

Why and where (CS/SE majors doing Computer Animation)

9. Advanced Key framing

 

9.1. Mixing interpolation techniques

2. Animation pipeline (art + science + technology)

9.2. Collision detection and reaction

2.1. Art – Storyboard (“Story is King”)

9.3. Hard vs. soft “collision”

2.2. Science – Modeling + Motion Control + Render

2.3. Technology – Post production

10. Articulated figures, Forward kinematics

10.1. Hierarchical animation (dependencies)

3. Intro to traditional animation

10.2. Moving endpoints by controlling intermediate angles

3.1. Kinematics of motion

3.2. Timeline

10.3. Human and animal modeling (soft tissue, skin, , walk gait, etc)

3.3. Disney’s twelve principles (anticipation, follow through, etc)

3.4. Pencil test

11. Articulated figures, Inverse kinematics

4. Basic Rendering Concepts

11.1. Controlling intermediate angles by moving endpoint

4.1. Lights, Camera, and Materials

11.2. Physical restrictions

4.2. Color

4.3. Depth Z-buffer

12. Facial animation (parametric)

4.4. Ray Tracing/casting

12.1. Muscles and regions

4.5. Radiosity

12.2. Relating feelings to muscle movements

4.6. Image-Based Rendering

4.7. Hardware Rendering

13. Physically based (rigid, collision detection)

13.1. Point of contact + “radius”

5. Coordinate systems and transformations (review)

13.2. Resulting rotation

5.1. Homogeneous coordinates

5.2. Compounding transformations (sequence matters)

14. Physically based (deformable)

14.1.

Mass, elasticity and rupture

5.3. Basic Transformations:

 
 

Translation, Scaling and Rotation

15. Behavioral and heuristic models 15.1.Automation vs. control 15.2.Setting the rules 15.3.Learning models 15.4.Particle systems 15.5.Flocking behavior

5.4. Euler angles

5.5. Quaternions

5.6. Non ambiguous (unique) rotations

6. Modeling techniques

6.1. Creating objects

 

6.2. Primitives

16. Algorithmic animation

6.3. Patches/tessellation

16.1. Fractals- self repetition

6.4. Splines and soft curves

16.2. Plants

16.3. Mountains

7. Aids to Motion Specification

7.1. Interpolation

17. Optimization techniques

7.2. The Appropriate Function

17.1.

Cleaning the animation

7.3. Controlling the Motion Along a Curve

 

7.4. Computing Arc Length

18. Animation languages and systems

7.5. Speed Control

18.1. Libraries

7.6. Ease-in/Ease-out

18.2. Standards

7.7. Constant Acceleration: Parabolic Ease-In/Ease- Out

18.3. Programming languages

18.4. Compatibility

7.8. General Distance-Time Functions

7.9. Curve Fitting to Position-Time Pairs

19. Motion capture and real time control

7.10. Interpolation of Rotations using Quaternions

7.11. Path Following

20. Output (rendering)

7.12. Orientation along a Path

20.1. Checking motion (low level)

7.13. Smoothing a Path

20.2. Rendering the final frames

7.14. Determining a Path along a Surface

20.3. Temporal aliasing

8. Keyframing (basic animation)

21. Virtual Reality, Gaming and Animation

8.1. Key frames plus interpolation

21.1.

Quality vs. movement

8.2. Types of interpolation (linear, square, etc