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Comprehensive Land Use Plan

2014-2020

MALABON CITY

Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) for the generosity and administrative assistance specifically on data gathering which
were used to guide the transportation plan, provide basemaps, and literatures for local and national development.
UP School of Urban and Regional Planning (UP SURP) Plan 210.1 Professor and MMDA Office of the Deputy Chairman Undersecretary
Alex Cabanilla for spearheading the revision of the Comprehensive Land Use Plan as well contributing his planning expertise and knowledge
in formulating a Land Use Plan
City Government of Malabon Department Officers, to wit; Ms. Ma. Lina D. Punzalan, Head of City Planning; Engr. Edgardo D. Yanga, City
Engineer; Mr. Reynaldo L. Moreno, Chief CUPAO; Arch. Cristy F. Aquino, Local Zoning Administrator
Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLURB) for the guidance in preparing this Land Use Plan and the approval

The City Planning Office in cooperation with the other departments of the City of Malabon would strive to uphold the mandate of the City
Government to plan, implement, and update the land use plan for the continuous development of the city. With a renewed spirit, the City of
Malabon is poised to take on the challenge of achieving resiliency amidst disruptions that would be brought about by the natural calamities
worsened by climate change.

The City of Malabon gratefully acknowledges the following individuals, agencies and organizations for their assistance in preparing this
Comprehensive Land Use Plan:

This Comprehensive Land Use Plan 2014-2020 is written in accordance with the recent guidelines in preparing the Comprehensive Land Use Plan
by the Housing and Land Use Regulatory Board (HLURB). With special regard to Mayor Antolin Lenlen Aquino Oreta III and City Administrator
Heaven Andhell for their unwavering support to the revision of land use plan of the City of Malabon. The outlined goals and strategies as well as
the proposed Land Use Plan for 2014-2020 are centered on Malabons vision to be a model city for resiliency in the Philippines, to enable them to
contribute to the growth of Metropolitan Manilas economy.

FOREWORD

1.

Profile of Malabon City


1.1. History
1.2. Human Resource
1.2.1.
Population and Growth levels
1.2.2.
Population Distribution and Densities
1.2.3.
Labor Force
1.3. Physical Features
1.3.1.
Geography
1.3.2.
Territorial Jurisdiction and Barangay Subdivision
1.3.3.
Rivers and Waterways
1.4. Physical and Infrastructure Resources
1.4.1.
Access
1.4.2.
Flood Control
1.4.3.
Others
1.5. The Economic Structure
1.5.1.
Trade and Industry
1.5.2.
Zonal Valuation
1.5.3.
Tourism
1.6. Environmental Management
1.6.1.
Geologic Hazards
1.6.2.
Solid Waste Management
1.6.3.
River/Water Quality Management
1.6.4.
Air Quality Management
1.7. Existing Land Use and Land Use Trends
1.8. Zonal Valuation
1.9. Comparative and Competitive Advantage
1.10.Weaknesses: Priority and Issues

TABLE OF CONTENTS

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2.

The Comprehensive Land Use Plan


2.1. Development Vision and Mision
2.2. Goals and Strategies
2.2.1.
Goals
2.2.2.
Strategies
2.3. Physical Framework Plan
2.3.1.
National and Regional Development Framework
2.3.2.
Conceptual Plan
2.4. Mainstreaming Disaster Risk Reduction and Climate Change Adaptation in Malabon City
2.4.1.
Background
2.4.2.
Climate Change Projections and Impacts
2.4.3.
Analyses of Strengths, Weaknesses and Recommendations
2.4.4.
Hazards Affecting Malabon City
2.5. The Land Use Plan
2.5.1.
Physical Development Goals
2.5.2.
Physical Development Objectives
2.5.3.
Land Use Strategies
2.5.4.
The Land Use Plan
2.5.5.
Land Use Zones
2.6. Priority Programs and Projects
2.6.1.
Environmental Programs and Projects
2.6.2.
Parks and Open Spaces Programs
2.6.3.
Infrastructure Projects
2.6.4.
Socio-Economic Programs and Projects
2.7. Infrastructure Programs and Projects

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Pre-Hispanic to Spanish Colonial Period

1.1 History

PROFILE OF MALABON CITY

After the revolution, by virtue of Philippine Commission Act No. 942, on June 11, 1901, Malabon and Navotas merged again into a single
municipality with the seat of government in Malabon in consonance with the Philippine Commissions economic and centralization policies.
However, it only lasted until February 16, 1859, after a grueling separation campaign initiated by the townspeople of Navotas. Also, by virtue of
Philippine Commission Act. No. 137, the towns of Malabon and Navotas were incorporated into the newly created Province of Rizal.

On 1890, Malabon joined forces with other municipalities in their quest for freedom from the Spanish rule, and eventually, the American
governance. During this period, the rivers and waterways in the town of Malabon also contributed in the countrys history. On February 6, 1899,
two days after open hostilities had broken out between the US forces and the Republican Army, the Tullahan River served as a crucial back-up
position for Filipino troops with General Antonio Luna commanding.

American Period

Malabons waterways also became vital in transporting tobacco in the early 1800 when the cultivation of tobacco was monopolized by the
Spanish government. Since all the factories relied on waterways for transporting their goods, transacting business and attending religious festivities in
the mother town became difficult. As a result, Navotas was then separated from Malabon through the initiatives of the principales of San Jose and
Bangkulasi.

During this era, Malabon served as a station for goods due to the rivers and tributaries that linked Malabon to other towns and facilitated
produce-to-market operations. Malabon became the worlds largest producer of high-quality indigo which was exported to European textile
industry from 1770 to 1789. However, when Manila opened as a Freeport after 1789, foreign vessels carried off large supplies of its precious dye.

On May 21, 1599, Malabon, then known as Tambobong, was founded by the Augustinians as a visita of Tondo and was recognized a town
in 1614.Historically, Tambobong is the official name given by Tondocabecera when the aggrupation of barrios was made into pueblo in 1670. Local
inhabitants persisted in calling it Malabon, which is also the name of Tambobongs principal barrio, the present Concepcion.

1.

Population Levels and Growth Rates

As of the last census held in 2010, the City of Malabon has a total population of 353,337, which comprises about 3% of the total
population of NCR. It currently ranks thirteenth in term of population size. Referring to Table 1.1 below, Malabon also has the second
lowest population growth rate from 2000-2010 in NCR at 0.42%. During the 20-year period, the growth rate of Malabons population also
dropped by 78%.

1.2.1

1.2 Human Resource

It was on March 5, 2001, that the President of the Republic of the Philippines signed into law the Act Converting the Municipality of
Malabon into a Highly Urbanized City to be Known as the City of Malabon or Republic Act 9019, which was ratified after the Plebiscite on April
21, 2001.

Malabon then became part of Metro Manila on November 7, 1975, through Presidential Decree No. 824 and was converted to a highly
urbanized city in December 8, 1999 upon approval of House Bill No. 8868 entitled An Act Converting the Municipality of Malabon into a Highly
Urbanized City to be Known as the City of Malabon on its Third Reading by the House of Representatives and after support for the passage of the
House Bill was shown by all the sectors of the locality in a Public Hearing conducted on September 25, 1999.

Post Second World War to the Present

ACTUAL
PROJECTED
2010
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
Population
353,337 357,808 359,311 360,820 362,335 363,857 365,385 366,920
Households
82,546
83,590
83,942
84,294
84,648
85,004
85,361
85,719
SOURCE: National Statistics Office. 2010 Census of Population and Housing

2020
368,461
86,079

Table 1.2: Projected Population and Households, 2013-2023


2021
370,008
86,441

2022
371,562
86,804

2023
373,123
87,168

Using the current growth rate of Malabon at 0.42%, the 2013 projected population of Malabon is 357,808 (Table 1.2). On the
other hand, the total number of households is at 83,590 translating to an average household size of 4.3 which is the same as Philippine norm
but lower than NCR of 4.6. In 10 years time, Malabons projected population and households would have grown an aggregate of 6%.

Table 1.1: Total Population and Growth Rates: NCR and Cities/Municipalities

Population distribution and densities

Malabons biggest barangay, Potrero has


the second largest percentage share in the
population of Malabon at 14% but a population
density of only 13,679 persons per sq. km., which
is lower than Malabons population density (Table
1.3). Overall, Malabons is one of the most
densely populated municipalities with an aggregate
density of 22,485 persons/sq. km., higher than that
of NCRs 19,137 persons/sq. km.

Table 1.3 and Figure 1.1 illustrate the huge


disparity in the distribution of population across
the different barangays in Malabon.
Bayanbayanan, Tonsuya and Longos are the most
densely populated barangays in Malabon with
densities of 86,290, 66,253, and 53,383 persons/sq.
km. respectively. On the other hand, Dampalit
and Maysilo have a density of 4,294 and 8,862
persons/sq. km. respectively, approximately 15-20
times lower than the overall density of Malabon.

1.2.2

2010 POPULATION

% SHARE

LAND AREA (in DENSITY (person/sq.


sq. km)
km.)
Acacia
5,735
2%
0.20
29,350
Baritan
11,476
3%
0.33
34,765
Bayan-bayanan
7,326
2%
0.08
86,290
Catmon
36,450
10%
0.98
37,281
Concepcion
11,806
3%
0.34
34,754
Dampalit
11,245
3%
2.62
4,294
Flores
4,282
1%
0.10
42,863
Hulong Duhat
10,466
3%
0.57
18,488
Ibaba
7,630
2%
0.17
46,075
Longos
48,039
14%
0.90
53,383
Maysilo
11,213
3%
1.27
8,862
Muzon
5,689
2%
0.50
11,444
Niugan
5,938
2%
0.31
18,923
Panghulo
12,772
4%
1.22
10,509
Potrero
41,407
12%
3.03
13,679
San Agustin
11,156
3%
0.32
35,315
Santolan
15,872
4%
0.47
33,878
Taong (Pob.)
14,620
4%
0.34
43,216
Tinajeros
17,901
5%
0.85
21,115
Tonsuya
39,354
11%
0.59
66,253
Tugatog
22,960
6%
0.55
41,549
TOTAL
353,337
100%
15.71
22,485
SOURCE: National Statistics Office. 2010 Census of Population and Housing
BARANGAY

Table 1.3: Population distribution and Gross Population


Density by Barangay, 2010