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Jojo’s Story Antoinette Moses Worksheet Answer Key Level 2 Summary The story is set in

Jojo’s Story

Antoinette Moses

Worksheet Answer Key

Level 2

Jojo’s Story Antoinette Moses Worksheet Answer Key Level 2 Summary The story is set in an

Summary

The story is set in an unspecified country where a war is raging. Although no country is mentioned, the message of the story has a universal significance. The story begins with Jojo, a ten-year-old boy, hiding in a stable. We learn that he returned from the fields to his village after an attack by ‘the people across the river’. All the inhabitants have been massacred, including his family. Jojo is confused and cannot understand such barbarity. He takes some small comfort in his dead grandmother’s wise words about the spiritual presence of the dead. Soon he hears a lorry approaching.

Soldiers arrive in the village and Jojo watches from the stable cautiously. When his chicken, Whitetail, escapes from his grasp, Jojo reveals himself to the soldiers, fearing they may kill the chicken. To his surprise, they treat Jojo kindly. They are United Nations peacekeeping forces. An English journalist, Chris, who accompanies the troops, can speak Jojo’s language. The soldiers feed the boy and Chris tells him that they cannot leave him alone in the village.

Chris tells Jojo that they will bury the dead and asks him to name the victims. Jojo insists they are buried in family groups in the cemetery, according to tradition. Chris explains to Jojo that he takes photographs of the dead to publicise their fate abroad. Jojo and the soldiers walk round the village collecting the dead – there are no survivors apart from one dog. Jojo bids his grandmother’s ghost goodbye, then accompanies Chris and the soldiers on the journey to the Children’s House, an orphanage.

On the way, Jojo tells Chris stories about his family, and his grandmother’s belief in the spirits of the dead. But he is too traumatised to speak about the massacre. He tells Chris that his mother told him the village was safe from attack because of the river. Now he realises the village was vulnerable. Travelling alongside the river, Chris and Jojo swap stories. Jojo talks about conversations with his father, who never answered his questions about the threat from the people across

the river. Gradually, Jojo is losing his innocence. He becomes disillusioned when Chris says he cannot take him back to England.

At the Children’s House, Jojo is left in the care of Doctor Nicky, who works for Médecins Sans Frontières. Jojo quickly notices how disturbed many of the children are. Doctor Nicky tells Jojo that she would treat any children, even those from across the river. Jojo cannot understand this. Doctor Nicky asks Jojo to discover the identity of Red, a boy so traumatised that he has become mute. Jojo fails, and Red leaves. Afterwards, a rumour spreads that he has stepped on a landmine.

Chris returns with the UN peacekeepers. Jojo now vaguely understands what the role of the UN is, but fails to see why the UN forces cannot attack the people who wiped out his village. Jojo is now feeling rootless and isolated, cut off from what was his community and family, especially after Chris again tells him that he is unable to take him back to England.

Meanwhile, the fighting has been getting closer and a bomb falls near the Children’s House. Troops from Jojo’s country arrive, hungry and tired. They tell the children it is their duty to fight as soon as they are old enough. Jojo is delighted to meet a soldier who knew his brother. At last, Jojo has a sense of belonging again. On impulse, he steals the boots and gun of a UN soldier to give to his brother’s friend, who then persuades Jojo to leave the Children’s House and go with them. The story concludes with Jojo marching off to become a child soldier, another victim of war. His innocence has gone. Now, gun in hand, he feels he has achieved manhood.

Before reading

4.

c

Chapter 1

e

Chapter 2

a

Chapter 3

d

Chapter 4

b

Chapter 5

Cambridge English Readers

© Cambridge University Press 2009

www.cambridge.org/elt/readers

PHOTOCOPIABLE

Jojo’s Story Antoinette Moses Worksheet Answer Key Level 2 Check your reading ChapterChapter 11 1.

Jojo’s Story

Antoinette Moses

Worksheet Answer Key

Level 2

Jojo’s Story Antoinette Moses Worksheet Answer Key Level 2 Check your reading ChapterChapter 11 1. 1

Check your reading

ChapterChapter 11

1. 1 e, 2 a, 3 d, 4 f, 5 c, 6 b

2. Student’s own answer.

3. Student’s own answer.

ChapterChapter 22

1. c, b, e, a, f, d

2. Sky-blue hats are worn by United Nations peacekeeping forces.

3. Student’s own answer.

ChapterChapter 33

1. Chris

a

b

Jojo

c

the soldiers

d

Dog

e

the soldiers

f

Jojo’s grandmother

2. Student’s own answer.

3. Student’s own answer.

ChapterChapter 44

1. Chris drove Jojo away from his village to the Children’s House. Jojo asked Chris why men fight/fought, but Chris didn’t know the answer. Jojo told Chris that his grandmother often told him stories. Then, he told Chris about his family but he couldn’t talk about the men from across the river. Jojo’s mother told him walls stopped people coming in. She also told him that the river was their wall because it was so big. She thought the village was safe from the people on the other side. Now, Jojo knew that his mother was wrong. The noise from the guns was getting louder.

2. Student’s own answer.

3. Student’s own answer.

ChapterChapter 55

1. 1 c, 2 e, 3 b, 4 a, 5 d

2. Student’s own answer.

3. Student’s own answer.

ChapterChapter 66

1. Doctor Nicky to Jojo

a

b

Chris to Jojo

c

Jojo to Doctor Nicky

d

Doctor Nicky to Jojo

e

Red to Jojo

2. In the morning, Chris and Jojo arrived at the Children’s House but Chris had to leave again. Jojo knew that the older children were unhappy. Jojo asked Doctor Nicky about the letters on her T-shirt. One day, Doctor Nicky asked Jojo to talk to a very quiet boy called Red. Jojo didn’t want to but he agreed. Jojo told him stories about his family/mother/brother. Red began to talk about his goat then stopped. The next day Red ran away. Later, Jojo learnt that Red stepped on a landmine. Now, the fighting was getting closer, and Jojo wanted to be with Chris.

3. Student’s own answer

ChapterChapter 77

1. 1 e, 2 c, 3 d, 4 b, 5 a

2. Student’s own answer.

3. Student’s own answer.

ChapterChapter 88

1. f, d, h, g, a, c, e, b

2. Student’s own answer.

3. Student’s own answer.

Cambridge English Readers

© Cambridge University Press 2009

www.cambridge.org/elt/readers

PHOTOCOPIABLE

Jojo’s Story Antoinette Moses Worksheet Answer Key Level 2 Additional background information for teacher reference

Jojo’s Story

Antoinette Moses

Worksheet Answer Key

Level 2

Jojo’s Story Antoinette Moses Worksheet Answer Key Level 2 Additional background information for teacher reference All

Additional background information for teacher reference

All wars involve children. In today’s wars 90% of the casualties are civilians, compared to 50% in World War II. In the past ten years, 2 million children have been killed in wars throughout the world. (Figures from www.childreninwar.com)

According to Amnesty International, around the world today, there are more and more child soldiers. Around 300,000 children under the age of 18 are currently taking part in wars in more than 30 different countries on nearly every continent. While most child soldiers are in their teens, some are as young as seven years old. (Information from www.amnestyusa.org)

Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) offers help to populations who are the victims of wars, disasters and neglect. It is the world’s largest independent organisation for emergency aid and helps all those who need help, without discrimination. Help is given to those who have most need, whatever their race, religion, ethnic origin or politics. All the work of MSF

is based on the belief that everyone has a right to

humanitarian help and medical care and every year some 2,500 volunteers work for MSF in over 80 countries around the world. (Information from www.msf.org)

The cover picture was supplied by Visual Impact International. The photograph was taken by a 17-year-old boy, Hussein, in South Lebanon. The

primary aim of Visual Impact International is to offer

a voice to children, young people and communities

affected by conflict in order to raise awareness of their plight. This is achieved by providing visual, audio and written methods of communication during journalism workshops so that these individuals may tell their own story.

Current media formats including photography, text and video are utilised in order to reach this objective. The information gained from these workshops i.e. stories/testaments and visual records are offered to humanitarian organisations where appropriate and to publishers and broadcasters. (Information from VISUALIMPACTHQ@aol.com)

Cambridge English Readers

© Cambridge University Press 2009

www.cambridge.org/elt/readers

PHOTOCOPIABLE