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Contents
CHEM16682 Applied Chemistry 1 ....................................................................................................... 2
................................................................................................................. 2
MATH17688 Mathematics 1 .................................................................................................................. 9
................................................................................................................. 9
ENGI19282 Electricity 1 ....................................................................................................................... 14
............................................................................................................... 14
CHEM10371 Laboratory Techniques................................................................................................ 17
............................................................................................................... 17
CULT10001G The Impact of Culture on the Canadian Workplace ........................................... 21
............................................................................................................... 21

CHEM16682

Applied Chemistry 1
I: Administrative Information II: Course Details III: Topical Outline(s)
Retain during the course and for future use when applying for credit at other educational institutions

Section I: Administrative Information


Program(s): Chem Engineering Techy Env, Chemical Engineering
Techy, Chemical Technician Laboratory, Environmental Techn
Program Coordinator(s): Pauline Dykes, Terence Davison
Course Leader or Contact: Shanta Misir
Version: 11.0

Status: Approved (APPR)


Section I Notes: N/A

Total hours: 84.0


Credit Value: 6.0
Credit Value Notes: N/A
Effective: Fall 2014
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A
Equivalents: N/A
Pre/Co/Equiv Notes: N/A

Section II: Course Details


Detailed Description
This course is offered to students in the first semester of Chemical and Environmental programs. It is intended
as an introduction to the broad field of chemistry. In this course students will be introduced to applications of
chemistry and the uses of chemicals in the world around us. Students will gain insight into the relationships
between chemistry and the environment. This course covers the basics of chemical nomenclature, atomic
structure, units of measurement, physical and chemical changes, balancing chemical reactions, percent
composition, reaction stoichiometry, solubility, the activity series, solution concentration, solution stoichiometry
and the gas laws.
Program Context
Chem Engineering Techy Env
Program Coordinator: Terence Davison
Applied Chemistry 1 is a required course for first semester students in the Chemical Engineering
Technology-Environmental Program. Applied Chemistry 1 is a pre-requisite course for Applied
Chemistry 2 which is offered in the subsequent semester. This course includes both theory and
laboratory work. The skills and knowledge acquired and refined in this course will be used in
subsequent courses in this program as well as in the workplace.
Chemical Engineering Techy
Program Coordinator: Terence Davison
Applied Chemistry 1 is a required course for first semester students in the Chemical Engineering
Technology Program. Applied Chemistry 1 is a pre- requisite course for Applied Chemistry 2 which is
offered in the subsequent semester. This course includes both theory and laboratory work. The skills
and knowledge acquired and refined in this course will be used in subsequent courses in this program
as well as in the workplace.
Chemical Technician Laboratory
Program Coordinator: Terence Davison
Applied Chemistry 1 is a required course for first semester students in the Chemical Laboratory
Technician Program. Applied Chemistry 1 is a pre- requisite course for Applied Chemistry 2 which is
offered in the subsequent semester. This course includes both theory and laboratory work. The skills
and knowledge acquired and refined in this course will be used in subsequent courses in this program

3
as well as in the workplace.
Environmental Techn
Program Coordinator: Pauline Dykes
Applied Chemistry 1 is a required course for first semester students in the Environmental Technician
Program. Applied Chemistry 1 is a pre-requisite course for Applied Chemistry 2 which is offered in the
subsequent semester. This course includes both theory and laboratory work. The skills and
knowledge acquired and refined in this course will be used in subsequent courses in this program as
well as in the workplace.

Course Critical Performance and Learning Outcomes


Critical Performance
By the end of this course, students will have demonstrated the
ability to predict products of chemical reactions, solve problems
involving reaction stoichiometry, determine the concentration of
aqueous solutions and quantify the behavior of gases.
Learning Outcomes
To achieve the critical performance, students will have demonstrated
the ability to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.

Use units and conversion factors in calculations


Name cations, anions, atoms and molecules
Calculate empirical formulas from the mass percent composition of
compounds
Predict products of chemical reactions and write balanced
chemical equations
Solve problems involving reaction stoichiometry
Calculate concentrations of aqueous solutions
Apply the Ideal Gas Law and Graham's Law of Effusion to quantify
gas behavior
Safely operate laboratory equipment to perform chemical analysis

Evaluation Plan
Students demonstrate their learning in the following ways:
1.
2.
3.

Three Unit Tests at 13.33% each


Final Exam
Laboratory work

40%
25%
35%

Regardless of the final total mark, a student must obtain at least


50% on the sum of the Unit Tests and Final Exam and at least 50% on
the Laboratory component of this course in order to obtain a passing
grade in this course.
Provincial Context
The course meets the following Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities requirements:
Essential Employability Skills
Essential Employability Skills emphasized in the course:
X

Communication

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving

Interpersonal

Numeracy

Information Management

Personal

Notes: N/A

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition


PLAR Contact: Registrar's Office
Students may apply to receive credit by demonstrating achievement of the course learning outcomes
through previous life and work experiences. This course is eligible for challenge through the following
method(s):
Challenge Exam

Portfolio

Interview

Other

Not Eligible for PLAR

Notes: N/A

Section III: Topical Outline


Some details of this outline may change as a result of circumstances such as weather cancellations, College and student activities, and class
timetabling.

Effective term: Fall 2014


Professor: Shanta Misir
Textbook(s):
1. Chemistry-The Central Science, by Brown, Lemay and Bursten, 13th
Edition; Pearson Publishing.
2.

Chemical Technology Laboratory Manual, by Bill Costigane with


revisions by N. Tyrer, T. Davison and S. Misir; PublisherSheridan College

Applicable student group(s): Chemical Engineering Technology; Chemical Engineering TechnologyEnvironmental; Chemical Laboratory Technician; Environmental Technician students.
Course Details:
Module 1:
UNIT 1
-Introduction to course, grading scheme, expectations and schedules
-Recognize the importance of chemistry in society and common
applications of chemistry in Canadian life
-Describe basic relationships between chemistry and the environment
-Recognize and utilize common SI and Imperial units of measurement.
-Apply units (dimensional analysis) and unit conversion factors to
solve problems
Module 2:
UNIT 1
-Explain how matter is classified in science
-Distinguish between the various states of matter
-Define the terms: pure substance, element, compound, mixture
-Identify physical and chemical properties and physical changes of
matter
-Define density and describe how it can be measured
Module 3:
UNIT 1
-Explain the atomic theory of matter

5
-Describe the modern view of atomic structure
-Distinguish between the terms: Atomic Number, Mass Number and Atomic
Weight
-Explain what is meant by isotopes and radioactivity
-Describe the logic behind the structure of the periodic table
-Define the terms "period" and "family" as they relate to the
periodic table
-Distinguish between a molecular formula and an empirical formula
-Explain how cations and anions are created
-Distinguish between ionic and covalent compounds
Module 4:
UNIT 1
-Name cations, anions and polyatomic ions (Table 2.4 and 2.5)
-Name the various types of oxyions of sulfur, nitrogen and chlorine
-Name chemical compounds made from cations and anions
-Name common inorganic acids and bases
-Name common binary molecular compounds
Module 5:
Unit 1 Test
UNIT 2
-Define the Law of Conservation of Mass as it applies to chemical
reactions
-Explain all the symbols in typical chemical reactions
-Balance chemical reactions
-Distinguish between: combinations reactions, decomposition
reactions, combustions reactions
-Calculate formula weights (also known as molecular weights and molar
mass)
-Calculate percentage composition of a compound given its formula
-Define Avogadro's Number and the mole concept
Module 6:
UNIT 2
-For a given element or compound, convert between mass, moles and
number of atoms, molecules or ions
-Determine empirical formulas given mass percent composition of an
unknown
-Determine empirical formula given combustion data
-Calculate molecular formula from empirical formula
-In a chemical reaction, calculate mass and moles of products given a
certain mass of reactants
Module 7:
UNIT 2
-Determine by calculation the limiting reactant and excess reactant
for a reaction
-Distinguish between actual yield and theoretical yield in a reaction.
-Calculate percent yield for a chemical reaction
Module 8:
Unit 2 Test
UNIT 3
-State the general properties of aqueous solutions
-Define the terms: solute, solvent, solvation, electrolyte, non
electrolyte, strong electrolyte and weak electrolyte, conductivity,

6
dissociation
-Explain how conductivity of salts in water can be measured
-State what is meant by chemical equilibrium in an aqueous solution
-Explain how "solubility" is defined
-Use Solubility Rules to predict the solubility of a chemical
in water
-Identify reactions that produce insoluble products
-Define the term metathesis reaction or exchange reaction
-For a given chemical reaction, write the: molecular equation, the
complete ionic equation and the net ionic equation
-Explain what is meant by a "spectator ion"
Module 9:
UNIT 3
-Describe the characteristics of a typical acid and a typical base
and give examples
-Distinguish between a strong acid and a weak acid
-Distinguish between a strong base and a weak base
-Distinguish between acid strength and concentration
-Identify neutralization reactions and predict their products
-Identify reactions that produce hydrogen sulfide or carbon dioxide
-Use the Activity Series to predict products of chemical
reactions
Module 10:
UNIT 3
-Define the concentration terms: Molarity, parts per million, parts
per billion, mass percent, volume percent and mole percent
-For solutions, convert between moles and mass of solute and volume
of solution
-Solve dilution problems using the "dilution formula"
-Calculate concentrations of ions when two salt solutions are mixed
Module 11:
UNIT 4
-Solve problems involving solution stoichiometry
-Solve acid-base titration problems
-Describe the basic characteristics of gases
-Distinguish between barometric pressure, gauge pressure and absolute
pressure
Module
Unit 3
UNIT 4
-Apply
-Apply
-Apply
-Apply

12
Test
Boyle's Law to solve gas problems
Charles' Law to solve gas problems
Avogadro's Law to solve gas problems
the Ideal Gas Law to solve gas problems

Module 13:
UNIT 4
-Combine the Ideal Gas Law and reaction stoichiometry to solve
problems
-Calculate gas density
-Calculate the partial pressure of each gas in a mixture
-Use Dalton's Law of effusion to calculate leak rates through small
openings

7
-Utilize the van der Waals Equation to quantify gas behaviour
Module 14:
Final exam
Laboratory Schedule
Activity Number 1:
Introduction to the lab and equipment location; lab safety review;
discussion of schedules, lab rules and expectations, and locker checkin.
Activity Number 2:
Lab safety quiz; introduction to laboratory measurements.
Activity Number 3:
Identification of solids by physical properties.
Activity Number 4:
Identification of liquids by physical properties.
Activity Number 5:
Separation of the components of a mixture.
Activity Number 6:
Simplest Formulas
Activity Number 7:
Course review.
Activity Number 8:
Gravimetric determination of sulfate.
Activity Number 9:
Reaction of copper and percent yield.
Activity Number 10:
Determination of acid content in a cleaner.
Activity Number 11:
The activity series.
Activity Number 12:
Measurement of the general gas constant.
Activity Number 13:
Review and locker check out
Activity Number 14:
Final Exam week (no lab is scheduled)

Sheridan Policies
The principle of academic integrity requires that all work submitted for evaluation and course credit be the original, unassisted work of the student.
Cheating or plagiarism including borrowing, copying, purchasing or collaborating on work, except for group projects arranged and approved by the
professor, or otherwise submitting work that is not the student's own violates this principle and will not be tolerated. Students who have any

8
questions regarding whether or not specific circumstances involve a breach of academic integrity are advised to review the Academic Integrity
Policy and procedure and/or discuss them with the professor.
Sheridan is committed to provide a learning environment that supports academic achievement by respecting the dignity, self-esteem and fair
treatment of every person engaged in the learning process. Behaviour which is inconsistent with this principle will not be tolerated. Details of
Sheridan's policy on Harassment and Discrimination, Academic Integrity, and other academic policies are available on theSheridan policy website.
The information contained in this Course Outline including but not limited to faculty and program information and course description is subject to
change without notice. Any changes to course curriculum and/or assessment shall adhere to approved Sheridan protocol. Nothing in this
Course Outline should be viewed as a representation, offer and/or warranty. Students are responsible for reading theImportant Notice and
Disclaimer which applies to Programs and Courses.
Copyright Sheridan College. All rights reserved.

MATH17688

Mathematics 1
I: Administrative Information II: Course Details III: Topical Outline(s)
Retain during the course and for future use when applying for credit at other educational institutions

Section I: Administrative Information


Program(s): Chem Engineering Techy Env, Chemical Engineering
Techy, Chemical Technician Laboratory, Computer Engineering
Technolog, Computer EngineeringTechnician, Electromechanical Engi
Technol, Electronics Eng Technician, Electronics Eng Technology,
Environmental Techn, Internet Communic Technol Coop, Mech Eng
Techn, Mech Eng Techn Draft, Mech Eng Technology, Mech Eng
Techy Des Draft
Program Coordinator(s): Paul Kemp, Mozammel Khan, Bill Farkas,
Pauline Dykes, Srinivas Ganapathyraju, Terence Davison, Aravind
Venkatapathy
Course Leader or Contact: Sonia Gupta
Version: 35.0

Total hours: 42.0


Credit Value: 3.0
Credit Value Notes: N/A
Effective: Fall 2014
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A
Equivalents: N/A
Pre/Co/Equiv Notes: N/A

Status: Approved (APPR)


Section I Notes: N/A

Section II: Course Details


Detailed Description
Students cover fundamental concepts and operations of trigonometric functions of any angle, vectors, linear
functions, graphing of functions, systems of linear equations, factoring and fractions, and quadratic equations
which are necessary for a student in Engineering Sciences. Emphasis is placed on applying these
mathematical concepts and skills to solve technical and physical word problems. Students are expected to
use direct entry scientific calculators accurately. Graphing and solver software are used to aid students in their
application of mathematical skills to solve word problems.
Program Context
Chem Engineering Techy Env
Program Coordinator: Terence Davison
This is the first course of four mandatory mathematics courses. Many mathematics topics are taught
in order to prepare the student to apply mathematics and calculus in their other engineering courses.
This is a prerequisite for MATH13406 Applied Mathematics.
Chemical Engineering Techy
Same as above.
Chemical Technician Laboratory
Same as above.
Computer Engineering Technolog

Program Coordinator: Terence Davison

Program Coordinator: Terence Davison

Program Coordinator: Paul Kemp

10
Same as above.
Computer EngineeringTechnician
Same as above.
Electromechanical Engi Technol
Same as above.

Program Coordinator: Paul Kemp

Program Coordinator: Srinivas Ganapathyraju

Electronics Eng Technician


Same as above.

Program Coordinator: Paul Kemp

Electronics Eng Technology


Same as above.

Program Coordinator: Paul Kemp

Environmental Techn
Same as above.

Program Coordinator: Pauline Dykes

Internet Communic Technol Coop


Same as above.
Mech Eng Techn
Same as above.

Program Coordinator: Bill Farkas

Program Coordinator: Mozammel Khan

Mech Eng Techn Draft


Same as above.

Program Coordinator: Aravind Venkatapathy

Mech Eng Technology


Same as above.

Program Coordinator: Mozammel Khan

Mech Eng Techy Des Draft


Same as above.

Program Coordinator: Aravind Venkatapathy

Course Critical Performance and Learning Outcomes


Critical Performance
By the end of this course, students will have demonstrated the
ability to use critical thinking, technology, and communication
skills to solve triangular, linear, quadratic, and other
relationships in technical and physical situations using algebraic
and graphical methods to the required degree of accuracy.
Learning Outcomes
To achieve the critical performance, students will have demonstrated
the ability to:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Express diverse numeric answers using suitable unit, accuracy,


and format.
Estimate numeric solutions based on interpolation.
Solve applied right triangle and oblique triangle problems, such
as those dealing with geometry, vectors, navigation, or concurrent
forces.
Solve word problems relating to linear and radical equations.
Solve applications of linear systems using algebraic and graphical
techniques.

11
6.

Solve applied problems dealing with direct, inverse, and joint


variation.
7. Interpret and apply formulas to determine the area, perimeter, or
volume (as appropriate) of circles, triangles, quadrilaterals, and
various solid figures.
8. Simplify and solve linear, quadratic, radical, and literal
equations using the laws of exponents, factoring, or other
algebraic techniques.
9. Solve applied quadratic problems using algebraic and graphical
techniques.
10. Interpret and apply mathematical concepts to solve real world
problems related to engineering.
Evaluation Plan
Students demonstrate their learning in the following ways:
Tutorials (best 9 @ 1%)
Assignments (4 @ 4%)
Tests (3 @ 15%)
Exam

9%
16%
45%
30%

TUTORIALS
Online Wileyplus assignments will be conducted during the
tutorials. Attendance, Wileyplus access, and active participation
are essential for success.
ASSIGNMENTS
While working together is encouraged, assignments should demonstrate
the individual's understanding and knowledge of the material.
Submitted work MUST be the original work of the author. Any breach
of this will result in a grade of 0 in the assignment. Refer also
to the IMPORTANT NOTE below.
AIDS
Calculators are the only aids allowed during the tests and exams.
EXAM
The exam is a cumulative assessment of the student's understanding
of the learning outcomes for the course.
IMPORTANT NOTE
Regardless of the final mark, students must obtain at least 50% on
the exam/tests and 50% on the assignments/tutorials in order to
obtain a passing grade in this course.
Provincial Context
The course meets the following Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities requirements:
Essential Employability Skills
Essential Employability Skills emphasized in the course:
X

Communication

Numeracy

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving

Interpersonal

Information Management

Personal

12

Notes: N/A

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition


PLAR Contact: Registrar's Office
Students may apply to receive credit by demonstrating achievement of the course learning outcomes
through previous life and work experiences. This course is eligible for challenge through the following
method(s):
Challenge Exam

Portfolio

Interview

Other

Not Eligible for PLAR

X
Notes: N/A

Section III: Topical Outline


Some details of this outline may change as a result of circumstances such as weather cancellations, College and student activities, and class
timetabling.

Effective term: Fall 2014


Professor: Tba
Textbook(s):
Required Text:
Wiley PLUS Standalone Technical Math 2nd Cd Ed by Calter & Calter
John Wiley & Sons Cda Ltd
ISBN-13: 9781118344019
or
Technical Mathematics 2nd Cd. + WileyPlus5 Book Set
by Calter & Calter
John Wiley & Sons Cda Ltd
ISBN-13: 9781118462263
On-line free software: Allercalc, Graphamtica, Solver or a
scientific direct entry, two-line graphing calculator (ie., CASIO
FX300ES)
Applicable student group(s): Computer Engineering Technician/Technology, Electronics Engineering
Technician/Technology, Telecommunications Technology, Internet Communications Technology. School of
Continuing Education, Engineering Technology, Electronic and Mechanicals Studies Students. Chemical
Engineering Techy Env/Chemical Engineering Techy/Chemical Technician Laboratory/Environmental
Technician
Course Details:
Module 1:
-Introduction
-Scientific notation
-Precision and accuracy
-Conversion of units
-Linear interpolation
(Learning Outcomes 1,2,10)
Module 2:
-Angles and triangles
-Right triangles and applications

13
-Oblique triangles and applications
-Exponents and applications
-Perimeter/area/volume
(Learning Outcomes 3,7,8,10)
Module 3:
-Solving simple equations
-Applications (e.g., finance, statics)
-Literal equations & formulas
-Radical equations
(Learning Outcomes 4,8,10)
Module 4:
-Linear functions and graphs
-Applications of linear functions (e.g.statics, uniform motion)
-Systems of linear equations and applications, including mixtures
-Variation
(Learning Outcomes 4,5,6,10)
Module 5:
-Solving quadratic equations
-Graphing quadratic equations
-Applications of quadratic equations (e.g., modelling arches,
uniform motion, geometry)
(Learning Outcomes 8,9,10)

Sheridan Policies
The principle of academic integrity requires that all work submitted for evaluation and course credit be the original, unassisted work of the student.
Cheating or plagiarism including borrowing, copying, purchasing or collaborating on work, except for group projects arranged and approved by the
professor, or otherwise submitting work that is not the student's own violates this principle and will not be tolerated. Students who have any
questions regarding whether or not specific circumstances involve a breach of academic integrity are advised to review the Academic Integrity
Policy and procedure and/or discuss them with the professor.
Sheridan is committed to provide a learning environment that supports academic achievement by respecting the dignity, self-esteem and fair
treatment of every person engaged in the learning process. Behaviour which is inconsistent with this principle will not be tolerated. Details of
Sheridan's policy on Harassment and Discrimination, Academic Integrity, and other academic policies are available on theSheridan policy website.
The information contained in this Course Outline including but not limited to faculty and program information and course description is subject to
change without notice. Any changes to course curriculum and/or assessment shall adhere to approved Sheridan protocol. Nothing in this
Course Outline should be viewed as a representation, offer and/or warranty. Students are responsible for reading theImportant Notice and
Disclaimer which applies to Programs and Courses.
Copyright Sheridan College. All rights reserved.

14

ENGI19282

Electricity 1
I: Administrative Information II: Course Details III: Topical Outline(s)
Retain during the course and for future use when applying for credit at other educational institutions

Section I: Administrative Information


Program(s): Chem Engineering Techy Env, Chemical Engineering
Techy, Chemical Technician Laboratory
Program Coordinator(s): Michael Dancziger, Terence Davison
Course Leader or Contact: Tba
Version: 8.0

Status: Approved (APPR)


Section I Notes: N/A

Total hours: 42.0


Credit Value: 3.0
Credit Value Notes: N/A
Effective: Fall 2014
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A
Equivalents: N/A
Pre/Co/Equiv Notes: N/A

Section II: Course Details


Detailed Description
Students explore the fundamentals of direct and alternating current electricity, electrical components, and
electrical circuits. Students examine electrical safety, terminology and laws of electricity, series and parallel
circuits, measurement and calculation of resistance, voltage, and current, conductors, insulators, and
resistors. Students also investigate Ohm's law and power, combination (series and parallel) circuits,
magnetism and electromagnetism, capacitance and inductance, and the basic concepts of AC circuits.
Students participate in problem solving exercises.
Program Context
Chem Engineering Techy Env
Program Coordinator: Terence Davison
This course is intended for students in the first year of the Chemical Technician, Chemical
Engineering Technology and Chemical Engineering Technology- Environmental programmes.
Electrical and electronic equipment is found in all laboratory and industrial environments. A basic
knowledge of electricity and electrical circuits is required by graduates of all engineering technology
disciplines. This will provide some of the background required to understand chemical instrumentation
(CHEM25415 and CHEM29479) and common types of industrial systems (ENGI10734).
Chemical Engineering Techy
Program Coordinator: Terence Davison
This course is intended for students in the first year of the Chemical Technician, Chemical
Engineering Technology and Chemical Engineering Technology- Environmental programmes.
Electrical and electronic equipment is found in all laboratory and industrial environments. A basic
knowledge of electricity and electrical circuits is required by graduates of all engineering technology
disciplines. This will provide some of the background required to understand chemical instrumentation
(CHEM25415 and CHEM29479) and common types of industrial systems (ENGI10734).
Chemical Technician Laboratory
Program Coordinator: Michael Dancziger
This course is intended for students in the first year of the Chemical Technician, Chemical
Engineering Technology and Chemical Engineering Technology- Environmental programmes.
Electrical and electronic equipment is found in all laboratory and industrial environments. A basic

15
knowledge of electricity and electrical circuits is required by graduates of all engineering technology
disciplines. This will provide some of the background required to understand chemical instrumentation
(CHEM25415 and CHEM29479) and common types of industrial systems (ENGI10734).

Course Critical Performance and Learning Outcomes


Critical Performance
By the end of this course, students will have demonstrated the
ability to quantitatively describe the components and variables in
direct and alternating current electrical circuits.
Learning Outcomes
To achieve the critical performance, students will have demonstrated
the ability to:
1.

Use appropriate terminology when discussing electrical concepts


and applications.
2. Select proper wire sizes and explain the effects of electrical
resistance.
3. Identify the use of a variety of electrical components, such as
resistors, capacitors, and inductors in both dc and ac circuits.
4. Use Ohm's law to solve the parameters of an electrical circuit.
5. Calculate the power dissipated and energy consumed by electrical
components and circuits.
6. Calculate the parameters for series and parallel circuits.
7. Describe how a digital multimeter (DMM) can be used in electrical
circuits to accurately measure voltage, current, and resistance.
8. Describe the principles of magnetism and electromagnetism and
their application to basic devices such as solenoids and relays.
9. Describe the characteristics of ac sine waves and other ac
waveforms and describe their uses.
10. Read basic schematic diagrams and trace circuit paths.

Evaluation Plan
Students demonstrate their learning in the following ways:
Tests (3x25%)
75%
Quizzes (5x5%)
25%
Total
100%
Provincial Context
The course meets the following Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities requirements:
Essential Employability Skills
Essential Employability Skills emphasized in the course:
X

Communication

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving

Numeracy

Information Management

Notes: N/A

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition


PLAR Contact: Registrar's Office

Interpersonal
Personal

16
Students may apply to receive credit by demonstrating achievement of the course learning outcomes
through previous life and work experiences. This course is eligible for challenge through the following
method(s):
Challenge Exam

Portfolio

Interview

Other

Not Eligible for PLAR

Notes: Students must successfully complete both elements of the PLAR process in order to obtain credit.

Section III: Topical Outline


Some details of this outline may change as a result of circumstances such as weather cancellations, College and student activities, and class
timetabling.

Effective term: Fall 2014


Professor: Tba
Textbook(s):
Introduction to Electric Circuits, 9th Edition, by Herbert W.
Jackson, Dale Temple, Brian Kelly, Oxford University Press
Applicable student group(s): Chemical Engineering Technology - Environmental, Chemical Engineering
Technology and Chemical Laboratory Technician students.
Course Details:
MODULES
1.

Introduction, Safety, Charge & Current


Voltage and Voltage Sources
2. Resistors, Resistive Devices, Conductors,
Insulators, & Semiconductors
3. Schematic Diagrams and other Practical
Considerations. Measuring Electric Circuits
using the Digital Multimeter
4. Ohm's Law & Electrical Mathematics
5. Power & Energy
6. Series, Parallel, and Combination Circuits
7. Safety Devices, Wires, Switches, and
Relays
8. Magnetism, Electromagnetism, &
Applications
9. Capacitance (DC), Inductance (DC), & Time
Constants
10. Alternating Current & Voltage
11. Reactance and Impedance in AC Circuits
Sheridan Policies
The principle of academic integrity requires that all work submitted for evaluation and course credit be the original, unassisted work of the student.
Cheating or plagiarism including borrowing, copying, purchasing or collaborating on work, except for group projects arranged and approved by the
professor, or otherwise submitting work that is not the student's own violates this principle and will not be tolerated. Students who have any
questions regarding whether or not specific circumstances involve a breach of academic integrity are advised to review the Academic Integrity
Policy and procedure and/or discuss them with the professor.
Sheridan is committed to provide a learning environment that supports academic achievement by respecting the dignity, self-esteem and fair
treatment of every person engaged in the learning process. Behaviour which is inconsistent with this principle will not be tolerated. Details of
Sheridan's policy on Harassment and Discrimination, Academic Integrity, and other academic policies are available on theSheridan policy website.
The information contained in this Course Outline including but not limited to faculty and program information and course description is subject to
change without notice. Any changes to course curriculum and/or assessment shall adhere to approved Sheridan protocol. Nothing in this
Course Outline should be viewed as a representation, offer and/or warranty. Students are responsible for reading theImportant Notice and
Disclaimer which applies to Programs and Courses.
Copyright Sheridan College. All rights reserved.

17

CHEM10371

Laboratory Techniques
I: Administrative Information II: Course Details III: Topical Outline(s)
Retain during the course and for future use when applying for credit at other educational institutions
Section I: Administrative Information
Program(s): Chem Engineering Techy Env, Chemical Engineering Techy, Chemical Technician
Laboratory, Environmental Techn
Program Coordinator(s): Michael Dancziger, Pauline Dykes, Terence Davison
Course Leader or Contact: Pauline Dykes
Version: 10.0
Status: Approved (APPR)
Section I Notes: Lecture 28 hours; laboratory 28 hours.

Total hours: 56.0


Credit Value: 4.0
Credit Value Notes: N/A
Effective: Fall 2014
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A
Equivalents: N/A
Pre/Co/Equiv Notes: N/A

Section II: Course Details


Detailed Description
Laboratory work is an integral part of all of the chemical sciences. Students directly observe and measure reactions, prepare chemical species,
identify and determine chemical elements and compounds in various matrices using classical and instrumental methods. There is a wide range of
techniques and procedures which the student must learn. Accuracy, speed and safety are the prime objectives. Students accurately and efficiently
collect data and process it. Students use computer and software.
Program Context

Chem Engineering Techy Env


Program Coordinator: Terence Davison
This course is offered to students in the first semester of the Chemical Technician, Chemical
Engineering Technology and Chemical Engineering Technology - Environmental, and Environmental
Science Technician programmes. It is intended to develop the skills necessary to perform laboratory
work accurately, efficiently and safely. It will also develop the skills necessary to use micro-computers
for the presentation and processing of laboratory results. These are necessary requisites for working
professionally in any of the chemical sciences or in chemical engineering.
Chemical Engineering Techy
Program Coordinator: Terence Davison
This course is offered to students in the first semester of the Chemical Technician, Chemical
Engineering Technology and Chemical Engineering Technology - Environmental, and Environmental
Science Technician programmes. It is intended to develop the skills necessary to perform laboratory
work accurately, efficiently and safely. It will also develop the skills necessary to use micro-computers
for the presentation and processing of laboratory results. These are necessary requisites for working
professionally in any of the chemical sciences or in chemical engineering.
Chemical Technician Laboratory
Program Coordinator: Michael Dancziger
This course is offered to students in the first semester of the Chemical Technician, Chemical
Engineering Technology and Chemical Engineering Technology - Environmental, and Environmental
Science Technician programmes. It is intended to develop the skills necessary to perform laboratory
work accurately, efficiently and safely. It will also develop the skills necessary to use microcomputers for the presentation and processing of laboratory results. These are necessary requisites
for working professionally in any of the chemical sciences or in chemical engineering.
Environmental Techn
Program Coordinator: Pauline Dykes
This course is offered to students in the first semester of the Chemical Technician, Chemical
Engineering Technology and Chemical Engineering Technology - Environmental, and Environmental
Science Technician programmes. It is intended to develop the skills necessary to perform laboratory
work accurately, efficiently and safely. It will also develop the skills necessary to use micro-computers
for the presentation and processing of laboratory results. These are necessary requisites for working

18
professionally in any of the chemical sciences or in chemical engineering.
Course Critical Performance and Learning Outcomes

Critical Performance
By the end of this course, students will have demonstrated the
ability to write lab reports using computer software, based on
experiments performed using basic laboratory techniques safely,
efficiently, and accurately in the chemical labs.
Learning Outcomes
To achieve the critical performance, students will have demonstrated
the ability to:
1.

Account for their personal safety and that of others in the area
by the use of protective clothing and safety equipment.
2. Safely use laboratory equipment and conduct proper laboratory
methods.
3. Properly handle chemicals, including their use, storage, and
disposal.
4. Utilize WHMIS legislation and its applications, including the
classification and labelling of chemicals.
5. Prepare lab notebooks for data collection, including observations
tables and calculations.
6. Use chemical references, including handbooks, dictionaries, MSDS
sheets and in the internet.
7. Apply common statistics to laboratory data, including manually
graph and interpret laboratory data.
8. Use common laboratory glassware and plasticware for laboratory
techniques such as pipetting, preparing solutions, dilutions, and
titrations.
9. Calculate density and solution concentrations.
10. Perform gravity and vacuum filtration methods.
11. Measure temperature by the use of thermometers and thermocouples
as well as, control temperature using Bunsen burners, hot plates,
heating mantles, ovens, steam baths, ice baths, and dry ice.
12. Safely handle compressed gas systems, cylinders, and fitting.

Evaluation Plan
Students demonstrate their learning in the following ways:

Lecture (Theory):
Assignments
5%
Unit Test (2 @ 12.5% each) 25%
Final Exam
30%
Laboratory:
Computer Assignments
Pre-Lab Assignments
Lab Reports

10%
5%
25%

IMPORTANT NOTE:
In addition to achieving a minimum grade of 50% overall, this course
has a dual-pass provision. A minimum of 50% must be achieved in
Lecture (Theory) component of the course and a minimum of 50% must
be achieved in the Laboratory component of the course in order to
pass the course.
Provincial Context

19
The course meets the following Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities requirements:

Essential Employability Skills


Essential Employability Skills emphasized in the course:
X

Communication

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving

Interpersonal

Numeracy

Information Management

Personal

Notes: N/A

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition


PLAR Contact: Registrar's Office
Students may apply to receive credit by demonstrating achievement of the course learning outcomes
through previous life and work experiences. This course is eligible for challenge through the following
method(s):
Challenge Exam

Portfolio

Interview

Other

Not Eligible for PLAR

Notes: Students must successfully complete both elements of the PLA in order to be considered for credit.
Section III: Topical Outline
Some details of this outline may change as a result of circumstances such as weather cancellations, College and student activities, and class
timetabling.
Effective term: Fall 2014
Professor: Pauline Dykes
Textbook(s):
1. Chemical Technicians' Ready Reference Handbook, 5th Edition,
Shugar/Ballinger - McGraw Hill
2. Lab Techniques Computer Lab Manual, Latest Edition - Microinfo
3. Laboratory Techniques Laboratory Manuel, Latest Edition
Applicable student group(s): CHEMICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY - ENVIRONMENTAL, CHEMICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY,
CHEMICAL TECHNICIAN - LABORATORY AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNICIAN STUDENTS.
Course Details:
Lectures
Module 1 - WHMIS and Safety
-WHMIS legislation
-WHMIS in the lab environment
-Lab safety
Module 2 - Data and Records
-Collection of Data
-Records Keeping
Module 3 - Statistics and Graphing.
-Laboratory Math Calculations
-Graphical Data Representation
Module 4 - Laboratory Glassware and Volumetric Analysis
-Common laboratory glassware
-Mass and density
-Volumetric glassware
-Solution preparation
-Dilution
Module 5 - Laboratory Techniques
-Gravity and vacuum filtration
-Temperature measurement and control
-Compressed gases
Labs
Module 1 - Introduction to Computers

20
-File management
-Emails
Module 2 - Word
-Basic documents
-Tables
-Header and Footers
-Equations
-Styles
-Table of Contents and Table of Figures
Module 3 - Excel
-Calculations
-Formulas
-Graphing
Module 4 - Drawing
-This module is time permitting.
Please note that this schedule is subject to change. You will be
notified by your instructor of any changes.

Sheridan Policies
The principle of academic integrity requires that all work submitted for evaluation and course credit be the original, unassisted work of the student.
Cheating or plagiarism including borrowing, copying, purchasing or collaborating on work, except for group projects arranged and approved by the
professor, or otherwise submitting work that is not the student's own violates this principle and will not be tolerated. Students who have any
questions regarding whether or not specific circumstances involve a breach of academic integrity are advised to review the Academic Integrity
Policy and procedure and/or discuss them with the professor.
Sheridan is committed to provide a learning environment that supports academic achievement by respecting the dignity, self-esteem and fair
treatment of every person engaged in the learning process. Behaviour which is inconsistent with this principle will not be tolerated. Details of
Sheridan's policy on Harassment and Discrimination, Academic Integrity, and other academic policies are available on theSheridan policy website.
The information contained in this Course Outline including but not limited to faculty and program information and course description is subject to
change without notice. Any changes to course curriculum and/or assessment shall adhere to approved Sheridan protocol. Nothing in this Course
Outline should be viewed as a representation, offer and/or warranty. Students are responsible for reading theImportant Notice and
Disclaimer which applies to Programs and Courses.
Copyright Sheridan College. All rights reserved.

21

CULT10001G

The Impact of Culture on the Canadian


Workplace
I: Administrative Information II: Course Details III: Topical Outline(s)
Retain during the course and for future use when applying for credit at other educational institutions

Section I: Administrative Information


Program(s): Cross College Courses
Program Coordinator(s): Sarah Sinclair
Course Leader or Contact: Michele Lemon
Version: 10.0

Status: Approved (APPR)


Section I Notes: N/A

Total hours: 42.0


Credit Value: 3.0
Credit Value Notes: N/A
Effective: Winter 2014
Prerequisites: N/A
Corequisites: N/A
Equivalents: N/A
Pre/Co/Equiv Notes: N/A

Section II: Course Details


Detailed Description
Students investigate personal, Canadian and organizational culture and the ways in which these manifest
themselves generally and specifically in occupations and related workplaces. Students examine the impact
that language and behaviour have on their ability to communicate effectively with colleagues, managers and
clients in Canadian workplaces. Students reflect on their own values, communication styles and workplace
behaviours in order to develop and refine their ability to demonstrate appropriate workplace behaviours in a
variety of situations such as meetings, performance reviews and daily workplace interactions. In addition,
students review Canadian human rights legislation and its impact on workplace behaviour. Students acquire
the knowledge and skills to make informed choices about their own behaviour in the workplace.
Program Context
Cross College Courses
Program Coordinator: Sarah Sinclair
This course is part of the General Education curriculum which is designed to contribute to the
development of the students' consciousness of the diversity, complexity, and richness of the human
experience: their ability to establish meaning through this consciousness: and, as a result, their ability
to contribute thoughtfully, creatively, and positively to the society in which they live and work. General
Education courses strengthen students' generic skills, such as critical analysis, problem solving, and
communication, in the context of an exploration of topics with broad-based personal and/or societal
importance.

Course Critical Performance and Learning Outcomes


By the end of this course, students will have demonstrated the ability
to analyze workplace culture, social values and the expectations of
Canadian workplaces in terms of their daily interactions.

22

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

provide a critical perspective on culture as it relates to


personal, social and organizational values
explain the evolution of human rights legislation in Canada and
its effect on the workplace
explain issues of diversity and the impact of diversity on
workplace behaviour
discuss strategies for communicating with others
discuss appropriate workplace language and behaviour
collaborate effectively with peers in formal and informal
learning activities
communicate effectively orally and in writing, verbally and
nonverbally

Evaluation Plan
Students demonstrate their learning in the following ways:
Students demonstrate their learning in the following ways:
Assignments

45% (Weeks 3,4,10 15% each activity)

Quiz
Group Presentation
Final Exam

15% Week 6
20% (Weeks 11-1)
20% (Week 14)

Total

100%

TEST AND ASSIGNMENT PROTOCOL


To encourage behaviours that will help students to be successful in
the workplace and to ensure that students receive credit for their
individual work, the following rules apply to every course offered
within the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences.
1. The professor will specify in writing test dates and times and
due dates and any special instructions for submitting
assignments and projects
2. Students must write all tests at the specified times. Missed
tests, in-class activities, assignments and presentations are
awarded a mark of zero. If an extension or make-up opportunity is
approved by the professor as outlined below, the mark of zero may
be revised by subsequent performance. The penalty for late
submission of written assignments is a loss of 10% per day for
up to five business days (excluding weekends and statutory
holidays), after which, a grade of zero is assigned. Business
days include any day that the college is open for business,
whether the student has scheduled classes that day or not.
3. Students, who miss a test or in-class activity or assignment or
fail to submit an assignment on time due to exceptional
circumstances, are required to notify their professor in advance
of the class whenever possible. A make-up test may be supplied
for students who provide an acceptable explanation of their
absence and/or acceptable documentation explaining their absence

23
(e.g., a medical certificate). All make-up tests are to be
written at a time and place specified by the professor upon the
student's return. Alternately, students may be given an
opportunity to earn the associated marks by having a subsequent
test count for the additional marks. Similarly, exceptional
circumstances may result in a modification of the due dates for
assignments.
4. Unless otherwise specified, assignments and projects must be
submitted at the beginning of class.
5. Students must complete every assignment as an individual effort
unless, the professor specifies otherwise.
6. Since there may be instances of grade appeal or questions
regarding the timely completion of assignments and/or extent of
individual effort, etc., students are strongly advised to keep,
and make available to their professor, if requested, a copy of all
assignments and working notes until the course grade has been
finalized.
7. There will be no resubmission of work unless this has been
previously agreed to or suggested by the professor.
8. Students must submit all assignments in courses with practical lab
and field components in order to pass the course.
Provincial Context
The course meets the following Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities requirements:
Essential Employability Skills
Essential Employability Skills emphasized in the course:
X

Communication

Numeracy

Critical Thinking & Problem Solving

Interpersonal

Information Management

Personal

Notes: N/A

General Education
This General Education course relates to the following themes as specified by the Ministry of
Training, Colleges and Universities.

Arts In Society

Civic Life

Social and Cultural Understanding

Science and Technology

Personal Understanding

Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition


PLAR Contact: Registrar's Office
Students may apply to receive credit by demonstrating achievement of the course learning outcomes
through previous life and work experiences. This course is eligible for challenge through the following
method(s):
Challenge Exam

X
Notes: Both would be required.

Portfolio

Interview

Other

Not Eligible for PLAR

24

Section III: Topical Outline


Some details of this outline may change as a result of circumstances such as weather cancellations, College and student activities, and class
timetabling.

Effective term: Winter 2014


Professor: Multiple Professors
Textbook(s):
Recruiting, Retaining and Promoting Culturally Different Employees
Laroche,L. , Rutherford,D.
Butterworth-Heinemann, First Edition, 2007
ISBN: 13: 978.0.7506.8240.4
,
10: 0.7506.8240.X
Applicable student group(s): This course is a General Education Elective and offered in the various diploma
programs in the Faculty of Applied Science and Technology (FAST).
Course Details:
Module 1 (3 weeks)
Introduction to the Course
Distribution and Discussion of Course Outline
Requirements and Expectations
Guidelines for Presentations
Topics
Concepts and Theories
Defining Culture
Defining Canadian Culture
Dimensions of Culture
Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
Ice Berg Model of Culture
Reading differences
Personal Culture and personal values
An introduction to the Canadian workplace
Learning Activity
Assignment #1 - 15%
______________________________________________________________
Module 2 (4 weeks)
Topics
Communication and Behaviour
The function of culture
Verbal, non-verbal and para-verbal messages
Canadian social values
Cross-Cultural Communication
Behaviour and Values
Discussion Cues
Historical Perspective of Human Rights
Overview of Canadian human rights legislation
Impact of legislation on workplaces
Discrimination and Harassment
Negative workplace behaviour
Learning Activities

25
Assignment #2(Case Study on Human Rights)- 15%
Quiz - 15%
______________________________________________________________________
Module 3 (4 weeks)
Topics, Concepts and Theories
Hierarchical and Egalitarian Societies
Power Distance
Teamwork
Risk Tolerance
Organizational Culture
Workplace Negotiation
Evaluation in a workplace
Promotions and retention
Learning Activities
Assignment # 3 - 15%
Presentations Start 20%
_____________________________________________________________________
Module 4

(3 weeks)

Topics
Impact of Differences
Nuances of workplace English
Learning Activities
Presentations Continue 20%
Final Exam
20%

Sheridan Policies
The principle of academic integrity requires that all work submitted for evaluation and course credit be the original, unassisted work of the student.
Cheating or plagiarism including borrowing, copying, purchasing or collaborating on work, except for group projects arranged and approved by the
professor, or otherwise submitting work that is not the student's own violates this principle and will not be tolerated. Students who have any
questions regarding whether or not specific circumstances involve a breach of academic integrity are advised to review the Academic Integrity
Policy and procedure and/or discuss them with the professor.
Sheridan is committed to provide a learning environment that supports academic achievement by respecting the dignity, self-esteem and fair
treatment of every person engaged in the learning process. Behaviour which is inconsistent with this principle will not be tolerated. Details of
Sheridan's policy on Harassment and Discrimination, Academic Integrity, and other academic policies are available on theSheridan policy website.
The information contained in this Course Outline including but not limited to faculty and program information and course description is subject to
change without notice. Any changes to course curriculum and/or assessment shall adhere to approved Sheridan protocol. Nothing in this
Course Outline should be viewed as a representation, offer and/or warranty. Students are responsible for reading theImportant Notice and
Disclaimer which applies to Programs and Courses.
Copyright Sheridan College. All rights reserved.