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Grade 1

Science
Unit: 03
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 10 days

Science
Grade
Unit
Lesson
02: Investigating
How Objects
Move Move
Science
Grade
0101
Unit
0303
Exemlar
Lesson
02: Investigating
How Objects
This lesson is one approach to teaching the State Standards associated with this unit. Districts are encouraged to customize this lesson by
supplementing with district-approved resources, materials, and activities to best meet the needs of learners. The duration for this lesson is
onlyarecommendation,anddistrictsmaymodifythetimeframetomeetstudentsneeds.Tobetterunderstandhowyourdistrictmaybe
implementingCSCOPElessons,pleasecontactyourchildsteacher.(Foryourconvenience,pleasefindlinkedtheTEACommissionersListof
State Board of Education Approved Instructional Resources and Midcycle State Adopted Instructional Materials.)

Lesson Synopsis
Students will predict and describe how a magnet can be used to push or pull an object, describe the change in the location of an object such
as closer to, nearer, and farther from and demonstrate and record the ways that objects can move such as in a straight line, zigzag, up and
down, back and forth, round and round, and fast and slow.

TEKS
The Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) listed below are the standards adopted by the State Board of Education, which are required
by Texas law. Any standard that has a strike-through (e.g. sample phrase) indicates that portion of the standard is taught in a previous or
subsequent unit. The TEKS are available on the Texas Education Agency website at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=6148.
1.6

Force, motion, and energy. The student knows that force, motion, and energy are related and are a part of
everyday life. The student is expected to:

1.6B Predict and describe how a magnet can be used to push or pull an object.
1.6C Describe the change in the location of an object such as closer to, nearer to, and farther from.
1.6D Demonstrate and record the ways that objects can move such as in a straight line, zig zag, up and down,
back and forth, round and round, and fast and slow.

Scientific Process TEKS


1.2

Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student develops abilities to ask questions and seek answers in
classroom and outdoor investigations. The student is expected to:

1.2B Plan and conduct simple descriptive investigations such as ways objects move.
1.2C Collect data and make observations using simple equipment such as hand lenses, primary balances, and non-standard
measurement tools.

1.2D Record and organize data using pictures, numbers, and words.
1.2E Communicate observations and provide reasons for explanations using student-generated data from
simple descriptive investigations.
1.4

Scientific investigation and reasoning. The student uses age-appropriate tools and models to investigate the
natural world. The student is expected to:

1.4A Collect, record, and compare information using tools, including computers, hand lenses, primary balances, cups, bowls, magnets,
collecting nets, notebooks, and safety goggles timing devices, including clocks and timers non-standard measuring items such as
paper clips and clothespins weather instruments such as classroom demonstration thermometers and wind socks materials to
support observations of habitats of organisms such as aquariums and terrariums.

GETTING READY FOR INSTRUCTION


Performance Indicators
Grade 01 Science Unit 03 PI 02
Create a four-page booklet to teach another student about force and motion. Include pages on how a magnet can be used to push an object and pull an object,
anddescribeanobjectslocation,suchascloserto,nearerto,andfartherfrom.
AND
Create a page for a class book that records the ways that objects can move, such as straight, zigzag, up and down, round and round, back and forth, and fast and
slow. Use labels to show the motion of the object.

Standard(s): 1.2C , 1.2D , 1.2E , 1.6B , 1.6C , 1.6D


ELPS ELPS.c.1E , ELPS.c.5B

page1of25

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 10 days

Key Understandings
Magnets can be used to make some things move without being touched.
Whatdoyouuseamagnetfor?
The way to change how something is moving is to give it a push or a pull.
Inwhatwaysdoyouthinkamagnetcanmoveobjects?
Things move in many different ways, such as straight, zigzag, round and round, back and forth, and fast and slow.
Inwhatwayscanyouchangethepositionofanobject?
The location of an object can be described as closer to, nearer to, and farther from.
Whatarewaysthelocationofanobjectcanbedescribed?

Vocabulary of Instruction
force
motion
push
pull

magnetism
magnet
location
position

speed
motion

Materials
book (about magnets, for Station 5, 1)
book (any, for demonstration, 1 per class)
chairs (student, in classroom, per class)
chart paper (per class)
crayons or colored pencils (per class)
lid (of shoebox or paper plate instead, see Advance Preparation, 1 per group)
magnets (bar ,with clearly marked poles (S,N), for Station 3, 2)
magnets (different sizes, for Station 4, variety)
magnets (ring, for Station 1, 2 or more)
marker (for demonstration, 1 per class)
markers(dryerase,pergroup)Optional
objects(movement,seeAdvancePreparation,1ofeachpergroup)
objects (from classroom that students can observe pushes and pulls, see Advance Preparation, 1 per group)
objects (magnetic and non-magnetic)
objects (small, classroom object, see Advance Preparation, 1 per 2 students)
paper(drawing,1sheetperstudent)Optional
paper clips (large or small, for Station 2, several - at least 5)
pencil
resealable plastic bags (gallon-size, to hold materials, see Advance Preparation, 1 per group>
resealableplasticbags(gallonsize,toholdmovementobjects,1bagpergroup)
sticky notes
T-chart (on chart paper or classroom science notebook, 1 per class)
yarn (to make circles, see Advance Preparation, 2 pieces per group)
Attachments
All attachments associated with this lesson are referenced in the body of the lesson. Due to considerations for grading or student
assessment, attachments that are connected with Performance Indicators or serve as answer keys are available in the district site and are
not accessible on the public website.
Handout: Card Sort: Push or Pull? (1 set per group)
Teacher Resource: Card Sort: Push or Pull? KEY
Handout: Magnetic or Non-Magnetic (1 per student)
Teacher Resource: Instructions for Magnet Stations KEY
Handout: Explore Station Cards (1 per student)
Handout: Movement Cards for Performance Indicator (1 set per class)
Handout: How Objects Move: Performance Indicator (1 per student)
Handout: How Things Move, Class Book: Performance Indicator (1 per student)
Teacher Resource: Instructions for Performance Indicator

page2of25

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 10 days

Resources

None Identified

Advance Preparation
1. Prior to Day 1, create a Push and Pull T-chart for the Engage activity. Draw this on chart paper or in the classroom science notebook.
2. Gather objects that students can explore that have pushes and/or pulls (1 per table group) for the Engage activity. These should be
objects from the classroom such as, but not limited to, a pencil, glue stick, paper clip, etc.
3. Make copies of the Push or Pull? Card Sort. Cut the cards out (laminate if possible). Create one set per group of four students. For
each set, cut two pieces of yarn and tie the ends to create two circles large enough to create a Venn diagram (to place the cards inside
of).
4. Prior to Day 2, locate a video about pushes and pulls. It might be helpful to use these key words in your search: videos for children,
pushes, and pulls.
5. Prior to the lesson, find 10 objects total, per group of four students. Five of the objects will need to be magnetic, and five objects will
need to be non-magnetic.
6. FortheExploreMagneticObjectsAreAllAroundUssection,findobjectsthataremagneticandnonmagnetic.(Eachgroupoffour
studentswillneedfiveofeachtypeofobjectmagneticandnonmagnetic,10itemstotal.)Someobjectscaninclude,butarenot
limited to: a pencil, an eraser, a paper clip, a butter knife, keys, coins, a piece of cloth, a piece of paper, a small comb or other plastic
object, a nail, an aluminum can, a tin can, and a marble. Place these items in a bag (Gallon-size, plastic, storage bags work well.) along
with a shoebox lid or paper plate to place the items on. Bar magnets will need to be collected for several activities throughout this
lesson. Horseshoe magnets are an alternative that can be used, as they work well too.
7. Asatimesaver,youcanfillouttheseobjectsnamesintheblankwordbankboxontheHandout:Magnetic or Non-Magnetic?
8. PriortoDay5,setupthestationsfortheExplore/ExplainMagnetsCanPushorPull.Thestationsareforstudentstoexploretheways
magnets can be used to push and pull. Print the Handout: Explore Station Cards, and place the cards at the five stations.
9. Prior to Day 5, locate an appropriate book on magnets and magnetism.
10. FortheExplore/ExplainHowObjectsMovesection,preparethebagsforthegroupactivitywherestudentswillexploremovementat
their tables/desks. In each gallon-size, plastic bag, include one of each of the following: plastic linking cubes, golf balls, cone-shape
object(geometricwoodenshapeorpapercones),pencils,toycars,oryoyos.
11. GatherobjectsfortheElaborateactivityabook,pencil,marker,andsmallclassroomobjectsofyourchoice(suchaspaperclips,
pennies, plastic linking cubes, etc.).
12. Make copies of the Handout: Performance Indicator: Movement Cards. Cut into individual pieces, fold, and place in a container for
students to draw from. There should be one set for the class.
13. Prepare attachment(s) as necessary.

Background Information
According to the TEKS introductory materials for Grade 1, students should explore the world by using their senses to investigate the properties of everyday objects. In
this lesson, students investigate the motion and location of objects in addition to how magnets and various materials interact.

GETTING READY FOR INSTRUCTION


Teachers are encouraged to supplement and substitute resources, materials, and activities to meet the needs of learners. These lessons are
one approach to teaching the TEKS/Specificity as well as addressing the Performance Indicators associated with each unit. District personnel
maycreateoriginallessonsusingtheContentCreatorintheToolsTab.AlloriginallyauthoredlessonscanbesavedintheMyCSCOPETab
withintheMyContentarea.

INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES
Instructional Procedures

Notes for Teacher

ENGAGEPushesandPulls

NOTE: 1 Day = 30 minutes


Suggested Day 1

1. In order to gain an understanding of how a magnet can push and pull an object,
thestudentmustfirstunderstandtheconceptsofpushandpull.
2. Instruct students to stand up by their chair. Ask them to copy your motions.
Push your chair.
Ask:
Was the movement I used a push or a pull? (A push)
3. Now, pull the chair toward you (have students copy your action).
Ask:

Materials:
T-chart (on chart paper or classroom science
notebook, 1 per class)
chartpaper(perclass)Optional
objects (from classroom that students can
observe pushes and pulls, see Advance
Preparation, 1 per group)
chairs (student, in classroom, per class)

Was the movement I used to move the chair a push or a pull? (A pull)

page3of25

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 10 days

Safety Note:

4. Distributeanobjectfromtheclassroomoneachgroupstable,suchasbutnot
limited to a pencil, glue stick, or paper clip.

Discuss classroom safety as appropriate.

5. Allow12minutesforstudentstoexplorehowtheycanpushorpulltheirobject
(discuss classroom expectations as needed).

Instructional Notes:
As students go to lunch or walk outside to recess, have them

6. CreateaTchart.LabeltheTchartwithPushesandPulls(seebelow).

observe evidence of pushes and pulls on the playground.

ExtendthisactivitytoP.E.workalongwithyourschoolsP.E.
coach to emphasize the importance of forces in his/her
lessons.
7. Record findings on the T-chart. Save the T-chart throughout this lesson as new
understandings are gained.

Science Notebooks:
The T-chart could be placed in the interactive classroom
notebook.

ENGAGEPushorPullCardSort

1. Review important ideas from the previous section. Discuss what pushes and
pulls are. Some key concepts:
Pushmoveobjectsaway(farther)
Pulls move objects closer (nearer)
2. Students can share ideas they added to the T-Chart.

Suggested Day 2

Materials:
yarn (to make circles, see Advance Preparation,
2 pieces per group)
markers(dryerase,pergroup)Optional

3. Studentswillworkinsmallgroups(34students).
4. Set behavior expectations and group member roles (see instructional notes).
5. Distribute Push or Pull? Card Sort (1 card set per group) and two yarn circles
per group. (See instructional notes for guidance and time saving alternatives.)
6. Model the following procedures for the card sort:
Overlap the yarn circles creating a Venn diagram. Place the labels on the
Venn Diagram:
onthelefthandsidePush
inthemiddlewherethecirclesintersect Both
ontherighthandside Pull

Attachments:

Handout: Card Sort: Push or Pull? (1 set per


group)
Teacher Resource: Card Sort: Push or Pull?
KEY
Instructional Notes:
Who goes first? Establishing group roles and behavior
expectations is essential for effective group work. Prior to the
activity, take time to set up norms. For example, student with the
longest hair will go first, and then students will rotate turns in a
clockwise motion. Students can also have group roles such as
the encourager, team leader, materials manager, and time
keeper.

Card sets can be laminated for reuse. For each card set, two

Shuffle the cards.


Place cards face down on the table top. (not inside the Venn)
Spread cards out on the table keeping the cards face down.
The student, who is first, will draw a card. Explain and model to students that
for each card, they will cooperatively readit,actit,placeit together.
The student will show the card to the team.
The team will say the name of the action on the card.
For example: Mowingthelawn
Theteamwillactitoutholdingouttheirhandsliketheyweremowing
the lawn. In order to make the lawnmower to move, students must
decide if a push, pull or both is being used.
A Push and a Pull can be used to move the lawn mower.
The student will place the lawn mower card inside the circle
labeled Both on the Venn diagram.
The next student will repeat the procedures, taking turns in the group
until all the cards are placed. Each student will have three turns.

pieces of yarn will be needed. If available, two different colors of


yarn could be utilized. Cut the yarn long enough so that each
piece can be tied at the ends to create a circle. The two circles
will create the Venn diagram. Place the cards and the yarn
circles in a plastic bag.

A time saver and alternative to using yarn is to use low-odor dry


erase makers. Simply have students draw two circles directly
on the desk. You can easily wipe it off at the end of the lesson
with wet-wipes or paper towels.

Throughinterpretingthecard,saying,actingandplacing
students will experience verbal and kinesthetic learning to help
internalize knowledge.

7. Close the activity by discussing the big ideas learned about pushes and pulls.

page4of25

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 10 days

8. Optional: If a computer and projector are available, show students a video about
pushes and pulls.(see Advance Preparation)
EXPLOREPushandPullClassroomScavengerHunt

1. Reviewthepreviouslessonsmainconcepts.(pushes and pulls)

Suggested Day 3

Materials:

2. Inform students that they will be participating in a scavenger hunt.


3. Introduce the activity:
Does anyone know what a scavenger hunt is? Allow for various
responses and explain to students what a scavenger hunt is. For example; a
scavenger hunt is an activity where we use our eyes to look for different
things around the room.
4. Students will be working in groups of two. Explain to students that they will be
working with their partner to find objects that can be pushed or pulled.

sticky notes (2 different colors,1 color of each


per group)
Tchartfrompreviousactivity(onchartpaper
or classroom science notebook, 1 per class)

Check For Understanding:


Usethestrategyticketoutthedoorasaformative
assessment and gain an understanding of what students have

5. For the scavenger hunt activity, each pair of students will need two different
color sticky notes.

learned from the activity. As each student leaves the room, ask

6. Decide prior to the lesson which color will represent a push and which color will
represent a pull.

misconceptions.

7. Explain to the students the color coding (which color represents a push and
which color represents a pull) and that they will travel around the classroom
together looking for evidence of objects that can be pushed or pulled.

thequestionWhatisonethingyoulearnedaboutpushesand
pullstoday?Acceptallresponses,butlistenforany

This strategy was also referenced in Unit 03 Lesson 01 so that


students will be familiar with the steps.

8. Groups will place the notes on objects as appropriate.


9. Guide the class in making observations of the sticky notes placed around the
room. Students will be able to quickly gain a sense of objects that can be
pushed or pulled. Discuss with students if there was an object that could be
pushed or pulled in order to be used. Objects might include, but are not limited
to; doors, cabinets, drawers, staplers, chairs, books on a shelf, etc.

Misconception:
Students may think an object either has a push
or a pull, it cannot have both.

10. In this part of the 5E Instructional Model, students should feel safe to share any
ideas. The teacher can guide understandings of pushes and pulls and address
any major misconceptions.
11. Add the objects discussed on the classroom T-Chart, under the Push and Pull
categories. If they are both, circle the object with a different colored marker.
12. Close the activity with the ticket-out-the door strategy. (See the Check for
Understanding for detailed instructions.)
EXPLOREMagneticObjectsareAllAroundUs

1. The study of magnets will begin with an open exploration of magnetic and nonmagnetic objects.
2. Explain to students that they will be exploring magnets today by observing
objects in the classroom. Some objects will be magnetic, meaning they attract to
the magnet, and some objects will be non-magnet, meaning the magnet will not
pick up (or attract) the object.
3. Ask :
What is a magnet? Answers will vary, accept all answers.
What do you use a magnet for? Answers will vary, accept all answers.
4. In this lesson, the teacher can choose if this will be a cooperative group activity
or an individual activity followed by a whole-group discussion. If students work
individually first, they will need to share the materials at their tables.
5. Set expectations of how to work cooperatively and how to share materials. If
working in small groups of 4, set roles of group members, such as, team leader,
materials manager, encourager, time keeper.
6. Give each group one bar magnet (horseshoe magnets also work well). Each
student should have a turn to hold the bar magnet and then pass to the next
student in the group.

Suggested Day 4

Materials:
objects (magnetic and non-magnetic, see
Advance Preparation, 5 of each per group)
resealable plastic bags (gallon-size, to hold
materials, see Advance Preparation, 1 per
group)
lid (of shoebox or paper plate instead, see
Advance Preparation, 1 per group)
magnets (bar, see Advance Preparation, 1 per
group)
Attachments:

Handout: Magnetic or Non-Magnetic? (1 per


student)
Instructional Notes:
If time allows, students can extend the hunt around the room,
looking for magnetic objects.

page5of25

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 10 days

7. When all students have experienced the bar magnet;


Ask:
In what ways do you think a magnet can move objects? Answers will
vary, accept all answers.
8. Have a variety of objects in a large gallon sized plastic bag, with the lid of a
shoebox (or similar lid), or a paper plate can be substituted for the lid for each
group. Some objects should be attracted to a magnet, some should not. Objects
can include but are not limited to: a pencil, eraser, paper clip, butter knife, keys,
coins, piece of cloth, piece of paper, small comb or other plastic object, nail, an
aluminum can, tin can, and a marble.
9. Askeachtablegroupsmaterialsmanagertocollectthebagofobjects.
Say:

Safety Note: Share with students objects they should not test
with magnets, i.e. computer screens, computer disks, audio
cassette tapes, etc.

Magnetsareattractedtothreetypesofmetalsonlynickel,
iron, and cobalt. Magnets are present in most electronic
devices. Motors, televisions, computers, fax machines and
microwave ovens all operate with magnets. Magnets are used
to keep refrigerator doors closed, are mounted on trucks that
clean roadways, and are even placed in the stomachs of cows
tocatchmetals!Youllalsofindmagnetsinmedicaldevicesto
create a magnetic picture, in trains, and in the systems used to
slow down roller coasters and subways.

Yourteamwillbesearchingforobjectsthatmagnetscanpickup.

Science Notebooks:

10. Allow time for students to place the lid, or plate, on the desk. Each student in the
Record student predictions and ideas in the classroom
group will have a turn to pull one of the objects out of the bag and place it on
science notebook.
the plate. As students observe the materials,
Ask:
As you look at the objects from the bag, as a group, predict what
objectsthemagnetwillpickupandwhichobjectsthemagnetwill
not.Whenanobjectcanbepickedupwecallthatobject
magnetic.
11. If time allows, record predictions in classroom science notebook.
12. Model the steps for this activity:
Studentswilltaketurnstestingobjectstoseeiftheyaremagneticornot.
StudentswillrecordtheirfindingsontheHandout:MagneticorNon
Magnetic?
13. When students have completed the activity. Lead a classroom discussion on
which objects they found to be magnetic and which ones were not magnetic.
Say:
In what ways can you use the magnet to push or pull the objects in
the box? Allow time to investigate this question.
14. After students have had time to explore this question, lead a class discussion
and allow students to share their thoughts.
EXPLORE/EXPLAINMagnetsCanPushandPull

1. Dividethelcassintogroupsof34.Studentsareexpectedtoworkcooperatively
at the stations. Set behavior expectations, and model the stations for students.
The Teacher Resource: Instructions for Magnet Station KEY includes
information on each station.
2. After students have had time to explore at each of the stations, discuss and
record their observations.
4. Facilitate a class discussion about the push and pull of magnets, and include
the following:
Magnets can pull objects that have iron in them.
The poles are where the pull of the magnet is strongest. (Show students
where the poles of a magnet are, north and south.) It might be helpful to
provide the opportunity for students to look at the poles of the magnets.
Magnets can move things without touching them.

Suggested Days 5 and 6

Materials:
magnets (ring, for Station 1, 2 or more)
pencil (dull or unsharpened, for Station 1, 1)
magnets (bar, for Station 2, 2 or more)
paper clips (large or small, for Station 2, several
- at least 5)
magnets (bar ,with clearly marked poles (S,N),
for Station 3, 2)
magnets (different sizes, for Station 4, variety)
objects (magnetic and non-magnetic, for Station
4, variety)
book (about magnets, for Station 5, 1)
Attachments:

Teacher Resource: Instructions for Magnet


Stations KEY

page6of25

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 10 days

Instructional Notes:
This discussion covers a very important concept that magnets
can push and pull objects. Emphasize this concept, as
students will continue to build on this understanding.
EXPLORE/EXPLAINHowObjectsMove

1. In this activity, students will gain an understanding of how objects move and can
change in position or location. Students will also describe the movement.
2. Stand in front of the class, and ask students to observe as you move.
Demonstrate moving back and forth, zigzag, straight line, fast, and slow. As the
teacher models this movement, have students describe the movement they see.
3. Introduce the lesson:
Today, we will explore how objects move and how to describe their
movement.Letsstartbylearninghowyoucanmove.

Suggested Day 7

Materials:
resealable plastic bags (gallon-size, to hold
movementobjects,1bagpergroup)
objects(movement,seeAdvancePreparation,
1 of each per group)
chart paper (per class)
Instructional Notes:

4. Have students stand up, and find a space near their desk that will allow for room
to move.
5. Explain to students that you will call out directions on how to move. Each student
will act out these motions. Review behavior expectations and safety procedures
before students start moving.
6. Have students:

Position is the location of an object.


Motion is the change in position.
Speed is how fast or slow an object is moving

The objects used in this activity could also be the same objects
from the previous Engage lesson. Students will be working with

Walk straight forward


the materials in table groups, set behavior expectations as well
Walk back and forth
as group member roles prior to exploration.
Walk around in a circular pattern (round and round)
Walk in a zigzag pattern (Explain to students that a zigzag is movement from
side to side with sharp turns such as this pattern:
Circle Maps (a form of graphic organizer) are effective learning
tools and can be utilized in brainstorming ideas or fostering
idea generation from exploration of lesson activities
experienced.

7. Instruct students to go back to their tables so they can explore how various
objects move.
8. Elicit prior knowledge:
In what ways can you change the position and location of these
objects? Allow for various responses.
9. Explain to students that they will explore how objects move. Give each group a
bagofthemovementobjects.Providetimeforonestudenttoplacetheobjects
on the table. As he/she places objects, group members will make predictions on
how these objects will move.
Say:
As a table group, you will test these objects by gently pushing them
on the tabletop.
10. Modeltostudentshowtogentlypushanobject.Setrolesofgroupmembers,
and behavior expectations prior to groups starting the activity.
11. Provide time for groups to explore with the materials and discuss observations.
12. Draw a large circle, with a small circle in the center on the chalkboard, an
interactive whiteboard, chart paper, or in the classroom notebook.
LabeltheinnercircleWaysObjectsMove.
Leave the outer (larger circle) for recording student responses.
13. Discuss the ways an object can move: straight, zigzag, up and down, round and
round, back and forth, and fast and slow. Record descriptions of how the
objectsmovedonthechart.Ifobjectsdidnotzigzag,refertowhenyouasked

page7of25

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 10 days

students to move around the room in order to have all examples of movements
for the Circle Map. (see instructional notes.)

14. Lead students in a group discussion. Allow students time to communicate their
observations and provide reasons for their explanations on how they were able
to move their objects in those ways. (straight, zigzag, up and down, round and
round, back and forth, and fast and slow).
15. Ask:
Is it important that we are able to move objects in different
directions? Why? Allow for responses.
What kind of objects move in a zigzag pattern? Allow for various
responses. Responses may include: people can zigzag when dancing.
Drawings can have zigzag lines. People can ski in zigzag patterns. Sewing
machines can create zigzags. Boats can move in zigzags.
Which direction are humans most likely to move the most? straight
forward
What are objects that move back and forth? Allow for various
responses.
What are objects that move up and down? Allow for various responses
such as yo-yos or a bouncing ball.
What are objects that move fast? What are objects that move slowly?
Allow for various responses.
16. Explain to students that we use direction (straight, zigzag, up and down, back
and forth, etc.) and speed (slow, fast) to describe the motion of an object.
ELABORATESimonSaysChangeThatLocation

1. Review pervious lesson about movement.


2. In front of the class, or at a location that students can observe from, place a
book on top of a table. Then, place a pencil on top of the book. Put a marker on
the table to the right of the book. And an object of your choice to the left of the
book. Facilitate a discussion:
Can you describe the location of the book? Allow for responses. A
typicalresponsewouldbeontopofthedesk
Can you describe the location of the pencil? Allow for responses.
Responses could include: on top of the book. On top of the table and book,
etc.
Which object, the pencil or the book is closer, or nearer, to the table
top? (The book)
That would make the pencil farther from the tabletop than the book.

Suggested Day 8

Materials:
book (any, for demonstration, 1 per class)
pencil (for demonstration, 1 per class)
marker (for demonstration, 1 per class)
objects (small, classroom object, see Advance
Preparation, 1 per 2 students)
Instructional Notes:
In this activity, students will extend their learning of the position
of objects. The position of an object is also called location.

In kindergarten, the location words included: above, below,

3. Repeat the same questions for the marker and object of your choice.
4. Review words that describe location such as; right, left, above, below, under,
over, etc. Write these words in the classroom interactive science notebook.
5. Push the pencil off the book so that it rolls on to the tabletop. Flick (thump) the
marker so that it moves on the tabletop as well.
6. Say:

behind, in front of, and beside.

Science Notebooks:
As the teacher guides students in whole group discussion on
the position of objects, record findings in the classroom
science notebook.

page8of25

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 10 days

How would you describe how the pencil moved? Allow for responses.
Describethechangeinlocationofthepencil.Allow for responses.
Now describe the change in location of the pencil and marker in
relation to the book. Answers will vary depending on the position of the
marker and pencil, responses might includethepencilisnowfartheraway
than the marker to the book. The marker is closer or nearer to the book
than the pencil, etc. Guide students with this question, the abstractness
could call for assistance in formulating ideas.
7. ExplaintostudentsthattheywillplaySimonSaysasawholegroup.Goover
expectations and procedures of the game.
8. The teacher will call out sets of instructions such as:
Stand to the left of your desk.
Sit under your desk.
9. After each movement allow students to formulate a statement to describe the
changeinlocation.Forexample,withstandtotheleftofyourdesk,an
exampleofastudentresponsemightbeIamnowclosertothewhiteboard,but
fartherawayfromthedoor.
10. Call out several rounds of instructions. Then ask if some of the students would
like to be Simon and call out a change in location.
11. Toclosethisactivity,askstudentstositontopoftheirchairs(tositdown).
12. Distribute a small object (such as a paperclip, a penny, a plastic linking cube- 1
per student). Inform students they will be working in pairs. Safety Note: Remind
students of safety rules, such as keeping small items out of their mouths.
13. Students will take turns moving the object on the desktop, and asking their
partner to describe the change in location of the object
EVALUATEPerformanceIndicator

Grade 01 Science Unit 03 PI 02


Create a four-page booklet to teach another student about force and motion. Include pages on
howamagnetcanbeusedtopushanobjectandpullanobject,anddescribeanobjects
location, such as closer to, nearer to, and farther from.
AND
Create a page for a class book that records the ways that objects can move, such as straight,
zigzag, up and down, round and round, back and forth, and fast and slow. Use labels to show
the motion of the object.

Standard(s): 1.2C , 1.2D , 1.2E , 1.6B , 1.6C , 1.6D


ELPS ELPS.c.1E , ELPS.c.5B
1. Refer to the Teacher Resource: Instructions for Performance Indicator for
information on administering the performance assessment.

Suggested Days 9 and 10

Materials:
sticky notes (if not using Handout: Movement
Cards for Performance Indicator, per class)
Optional
paper(drawing,1sheetperstudent)Optional
crayons or colored pencils (per class)
chart paper (per class)
Attachments:

Handout: Movement Cards for Performance


Indicator (1 set per class)
Handout: How Objects Move: Performance
Indicator (1 per student)
Handout: How Things Move, Class Book:
Performance Indicator (1 per student)
Teacher Resource: Instructions for
Performance Indicator

page9of25

Card Sort: Push or Pull?

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

push
both

Microsoft. (Designer). (2010). Doorbell [Web Graphic]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images/.

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

pull

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

Card Sort: Push or Pull KEY

Pull

Push

Push and Pull

Push

Pull

Pull or Push

Pull

Pull

Push

Push

Push

Pull

Microsoft. (Designer). (2010). Doorbell [Web Graphic]. Retrieved from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/images

/.

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

Magnetic or Non-Magnetic
Name:_______________________

Todays Date: _________________

1. Test the objects to see whether they are magnetic or non-magnetic.


2. Use the word bank to write the name of the object in the chart below.

Magnetic

Non-Magnetic

Word Bank:

page 1 of 1

Instructions for Magnet Stations KEY

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

Station 1 - Floating Magnets


Materials: circular (ring) magnets (2 or more) and a pencil (dull or unsharpened).
Purpose: Students will discover the different poles on the magnet.
Hold the pencil upright, and place one of the ring magnets onto the pencil. Follow the first magnet with the second
one, until the two magnets attract or repel.
If the magnet repelled when pushed towards the other, remove fingers and the magnet will float above the bottom
magnet. If the magnet does not repel, slide it off the pencil, flip it, and place it back on to the pencil, sliding it down
until the repel is felt.
Hold the pencil steady, and the bottom magnet in place with your finger, remove your hand from the top magnet.
The top magnet will float above the bottom magnet.
* Ring magnets look similar to washers.
Station 2
Materials: bar magnets and paper clips.
Purpose: Students will explore how magnets can attract objects such as paperclips.
Station 3
Materials: bar magnets (2) with clearly marked poles (S, N)
Purpose: Students will practice putting the poles of each magnet together, to experience attracting and repelling.
Station 4
Materials: Different sizes of magnets and a variety of objects. (some attracted to a magnet, some not)
Purpose: Students will explore different kinds of magnets and strengths of magnets.
Station 5 - Teacher Guided Station
Materials: a book about magnets and magnetism
Purpose: The teacher reads a book about magnets/magnetism in order to enhance student knowledge. It might be
helpful to preview a book:
Model a think aloud starting with the cover, title page, and turning the pages one by one.
Have students observe the bold text, titles, and pictures in the book.
Students can predict what content will be covered in the book.

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

--------------------------------------------------------------------fold here-------------------------------------------------------------------

Station 1 Floating Magnets


Materials
1. Follow teacher directions.
2. Test your materials.
pencil
3.
Talk about what you saw (observed).
ring magnets
page 1 of 5

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

--------------------------------------------------------------------fold here-------------------------------------------------------------------

Station 2- Measuring Magnets


Materials

bar magnets

paperclips

1. Follow teacher directions. How long is the bar


magnet? Measure the length with paperclips.
2. How many paperclips can the magnet hold?
Test your materials.

3. Talk about what you saw (observed).


page 2 of 5

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

--------------------------------------------------------------------fold here-------------------------------------------------------------------

Station 3 Exploring with Bar Magnets


Materials
1. Follow teacher directions.
2. Test your materials.

bar magnets

3. Talk about what you saw (observed).

page 3 of 5

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

--------------------------------------------------------------------fold here-------------------------------------------------------------------

Station 4 Testing Magnets


Materials
4. Follow teacher directions.
5. Test your materials.
magnets
and other objects

6. Talk about what you saw (observed).

page 4 of 5

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

--------------------------------------------------------------------fold here-------------------------------------------------------------------

Station 5 Reading About Magnets


Materials
1. The teacher will read a book on magnets.
2. Discuss the big ideas from the book.
book on magnets

3. What questions do you have? What do you wonder about?

page 5 of 5

Movement Cards for Performance Indicator

straight

zigzag

straight

zigzag

straight

zigzag

straight

zigzag

straight

zigzag

straight

zigzag

back
and
forth
back
and
forth
back
and
forth
back
and
forth
back
and
forth
back
and
forth

up
and
down
up
and
down
up
and
down
up
and
down
up
and
down
up
and
down

round
and
round
round
and
round
round
and
round
round
and
round
round
and
round
round
and
round

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

fast

nearer slow farther

fast

nearer slow farther

fast

nearer slow farther

fast

nearer slow farther

fast

nearer slow farther

fast

nearer slow farther

Describe the movement.

How Objects
Move PI

Name:

Complete the picture. Have objects


that are: under, above, closer,
farther, right, and left of the desk.
Label these objects.

Draw a picture of an object


being pushed.

Draw a picture of an object


being pulled.

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

How Things Move, Class Book Performance Indicator

This is a picture of ___________________________________,


and it moves ________________________________________.

Written and Illustrated by:

Instructions for Performance Indicator

Grade 1
Science
Unit: 03 Lesson: 02

Students will create individual four-page booklets.


Performance Indicator
Create a four-page booklet to teach another student about force and motion. Include pages on how a magnet can
be used to push an object, pull an object, and describe an objects location, such as closer to, nearer to, and
farther from. (1.2C, 1.2D, 1.2E; 1.6B, 1.6C)
1.
2.
3.
4.

Distribute the Handout: How Objects Move Performance Indicator, a four-page booklet, to each student.
Explain to students they will be working on this individually.
Model, through a talk aloud, the instructions on each page of the booklet.
When students complete their four-page book, have them pair up and share their book with each other.

AND
Performance Indicator
Create a page for a class book that records the ways objects can move (such as straight, zigzag, up and down,
round and round, back and forth, and fast and slow). Use labels to show the motion of the object. (1.2D; 1.6D)
1E; 5B
1. Either pass out cards from the Handout: Movement Cards for Performance Indicator, (or) write on sticky-notes the
following movements: straight, zigzag, up and down, round and round, back and forth, fast, and slow. Create several
sticky-notes with the same movement.
2. Copy the Handout: How Objects Move Performance Indicator, or gather drawing paper (1 per student).
3. Place movement cards or sticky notes in a container so that students can draw a card.
4. Instruct students that the word on the card they picked will be the movement they will draw and label to create a class
book.
5. Distribute the Handout: How Things Move Class Book: Performance Indicator or a piece of drawing paper to
students.
6. Write the following sentence stems on an overhead, chart paper, an interactive white board, or the chalkboard:
This is a picture of ______ and it moves _______. (This sentence stem is also on the Handout: Class Book
Performance Indicator.
7. Sketch a quick picture of a snail, or show a picture you sketched prior to the activity. Guide students to fill out the
sentence stem. The stem could include a response such as: This is a picture of a snail and it moves slowly.
8. Provide time for students to create their page for the book. The page will contain the picture, and the sentence stem
filled in by the student. Remind students that they are illustrators/authors and will need to sign their name to their
page.
9. When students complete their work. Put together the pages according to movement categories. For example, all of
the round and round pages will be in a section (chapter) of the book, and then follow with another movement such
as back and forth.
10. When the book is completed, share with students by reading to the class
Attachments:
Handout: Movement Cards for Performance Indicator (1 set per class)
Handout: How Objects Move Performance Indicator (1 per student)
Handout: How Things Move, Class Book: Performance Indicator (1 per student)
Instructional Notes:
To save on copying, students could create a four page book from folding drawing paper.
Do you have a big buddy program with another grade level? The book your class creates is great for sharing knowledge
with others. The class could also share the class book with your school librarian. As the class builds the book, add a title
page, table of contents (chapters are sectioned by the type of movement), and any other pages that personalize the book
for your class.