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Hindustan Unilever Limiteds Rexona: Repositioning Rexona


Deodorant
Unilevers INR 55 billion ($1.36 billion) brand Rexona, internationally spans across 90 markets
worldwide commanding 14.5% share of the global deodorant market. 1 In India, as one of pioneer
brands of Hindustan Unilever Limited (HUL), Rexona was worth INR 1.78 billion in 2006. 2 With an
annual growth rate of 28% 3 , Rexona constitutes a core brand in HULs brand portfolio. HULs
Rexona, as a soap brand constantly improved to keep up with the expectations of the Indian
consumers. As a deodorant brand though Rexona created a new category in the personal care
segment in India, it failed to win over the consumers. Traditionally body odour was hardly taken
seriously in India, the consumers were highly accustomed to perfumed soaps and talcum powders
to fight body odours. The deodorants at large were seen as smell-good, perfume-like products.
The hot weather conditions in India presented ideal market opportunities to the deodorants, yet
none of the major manufacturers attempted to explore the market. Until the Rexona deodorant was
launched in 1995, the market for deodorants in India was virtually non-existent. HUL faced an
uphill task of changing consumer perception towards its Rexona deodorant. HUL had been striving
hard to position its deodorant brand across mass markets in India, where consumer possessed a
different set of perception for this product. In 2007, HUL decided to reposition Rexona deodorant
from fragrant deodorant to an antiperspirant for body odour by introducing the roll-on formats.
But analysts are skeptical if Rexona can change the consumers perception towards deodorants
and gain a wider market.

Household and Personal Care Industry in India A Competitive Landscape


Indias fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) sector has been the fourth largest sector in the
economy. 4 The Indian FMCG industry grew by 22% in 2006, with food (43%) and personal care
(22%) segments being the largest contributors to the total sales. 5 The total FMCG market is
estimated to be over $17.36 billion and is expected to reach $33.4 billion in 2015. 6 The household
and personal care (HPC) industry in India comprised fabric wash, personal wash, hair care, oral
care, skin cosmetics, color cosmetics, mens toiletries and fragrances. The HPC industry is divided
into two segments premium segment and popular segment. The popular segment catered to
masses both in urban and rural markets. While the mass-market products including essential bath
and shower products and oral hygiene accounted for the bulk of value sales, premium products
were restricted to the upper middle classes and niche high-income consumers. Urbanisation, a
Kapoor Priya, On a Roll, Pitch, April 2007, pages 36-37
Ibid.
3 Ibid.
4 Consumer Markets, http://www.ibef.org/artdisplay.aspx?cat_id=114&art_id=17305, December 4th 2007
5 Ibid.
6 Ibid.
1
2

This Case was written by Thadamalla J, Sharma N, Girija P and Dadhwal V, IBS Research Center. It is intended to be used
as the basis for class discussion rather than to illustrate either effective or ineffective handling of a management situation.
The case was compiled from published sources.
2009, IBS Research Center.
No part of this publication may be copied, stored, transmitted, reproduced or distributed in any form or medium
whatsoever without the permission of the copyright owner.

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508-064-1

combination of changing lifestyles, higher disposable income, greater product awareness, and
affordable pricing had been instrumental in driving the growth across HPC industry in India
(Annexure I).
In India, among the FMCG companies, Hindustan Unilever Limited (HUL) was the first company to
introduce branded FMCG in India. Besides HUL, the other major FMCG players in the personal
care industry in India were Procter&Gamble (P&G) 7 , Colgate-Palmolive 8 , Reckitt Benckiser 9 ,
Godrej Consumer Products 10 and Nirma 11 .
Over a period of time, HUL emerged as Indias largest fast moving consumer goods company. 12 A
number of prominent brands came into the HULs fold as a result of its parent company, Unilevers
strategy to acquire international brands (Annexure II). The business portfolio of HUL comprised
five segments soaps, detergents and household care, personal products, foods, chemical
agrifertilisers and animal feeds, and others. While soaps, detergents and household care
accounted for 47% of HULs total sales, personal care products emerged as the second largest
segment for HUL in 2006.The segment accounted for 29% of the total sales (Annexure III). 13
The sales in the soaps and detergents segment which included fabric wash, dish wash and
personal wash grew by 12.9%. In the personal products segment comprising hair care, skin care,
color cosmetics, toothpaste and deodorants, sales grew by 15.7%. 14 HUL successfully emerged as
a market leader across almost all the major product categories in the Indian personal care industry
(Exhibit I). But, HUL has been struggling to capture the rapidly growing deodorant market in India.

Procter & Gamble Company is a Fortune 500, American global corporation based in Cincinnati, Ohio, that manufactures a
wide range of consumer goods. In 2007, P&G was the 25th largest US Company by revenue, 18th largest by profit, and 10th
in Fortune's Most Admired Companies list.
8 Colgate-Palmolive Company is a US diversified multinational corporation focused on the production, distribution and
provision of household, health care and personal products, such as soaps, detergents, and oral hygiene products.
9 Reckitt Benckiser Plc., is one of the worlds leading manufacturers of cleaning products. It has operations in more than
60 countries and sells its products in more than 180 countries.
10 The Godrej Group was established in 1897 and has since grown into a $1.875 billion conglomerate with a workforce of
18,000.
11 Nirma is a group of companies based in the city of Ahmedabad in western India manufacturing products ranging from
cosmetics, soaps, detergents and salt. Karsanbhai Patel, a well-known businessman, industrialist and philanthropist of
Gujarat, started Nirma as a one-man operation.
12 About Us, http://www.hll.com/knowus/present_stature.asp
13 Reports and Annual Accounts 2006, http://www.hll.com/mediacentre/annualreport2006.pdf, 2006
14 Ibid.
7

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Exhibit I
HULs Market Leadership

Source: Srinivasan S., Hindustan Unilever Limited,


http://www.hll.com/investor/presentation/2008/IR_presentation_MS_08.pdf, February 14th 2008

The dynamics of Indian deodorant market had been fast changing. While domestic deodorant
brands were struggling, the entry of foreign players significantly changed the market scenario.
While most of the chemist stores started stocking foreign brands like Brut, Fa (both national and
international versions), Cigar, Charlie and others priced in the range of INR 100-INR 200, the upmarket retailers started displaying brands like Boucheron, Avon, Burberrys, Adidas, Nivea, Joan,
One Mans Show, Haloween at prices ranging between INR 150 to INR 990.
HUL owned two global deodorant brands Axe and Rexona. Axe, which was launched in 1999,
emerged as the largest selling deodorant brand in India, with market share of over 30%. 15
However, HULs Rexona brand had been facing major challenges in penetrating into the Indian
deodorant market. Rexona, worlds largest deodorant brand in sales and market shares had been
a market leader across more than half the world 16 (Annexure IV). Though Rexona had been one
of the pioneer brands in Indian soaps and deodorant market, it struggled to establish itself in the
wake of complex market dynamics (Annexure V).

Rexona: Evolution as a Deodorant Brand


Rexona soap was launched in India in 1947. It was positioned as natural skin care soap. Initially
with its premium quality and good market communication, the brand was well received by the
Indian consumers. In 1989, the brand came out with a coconut-based ingredient which was
different from other fragrant soaps. But the soap could not leverage on its brand image and lost its
market in the wake of increasing competition.
Though, globally Rexona was known as an anti-perspirant brand, in India, it was primarily known
as a soap brand. In 1995, leveraging upon Rexonas brand image, HUL decided to launch Rexona
deodorant in the Indian market.
Challapalli Sravanthi, Set to smell success,
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/catalyst/2007/06/21/stories/2007062150220300.htm, June 21st 2007
16 What makes Rexona tick?, http://www.unilever.com/ourbrands/personalcare/Rexona.asp?linkid=dropdown
15

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Till 1995, deodorant market was virtually non-existent in India. Although some international brands
like Fa which was marketed by Chennai-based Henkel Spic and Baccarose cosmetics brands,
Copper and Chromium were available, the market in India was still in the nascent stage. The
Indian deodorant market was highly under developed and under penetrated. Though the hot
weather conditions presented a lucrative market to the deodorant marketers, the consumer
perception for deodorants posed a major challenge.
In India, the deodorants were largely perceived as smell-good, perfume-like products. The
consumers were used to fragrance-based soaps. To position its product in this category was a
critical challenge for HUL. According to Viral Oza, Marketing Manager (Personal Products), HUL,
There was no awareness of this category of products earlier. The only stuff that existed in the
organised fragrances category was the traditional attars and the local perfumes. 17
The existing marketers mainly targeted the urban segments that understood the deodorants
advantages over the traditional soap-talc combinations. These marketers targeted their products
at those market segments which were well aware about the use and properties of deodorants. The
majority of the mass markets still perceived deodorants as perfumes which posed a major
challenge for HUL. B. Nandakumar, President (Marketing & Sales), CavinKare 18 , explained, There
was a lot of confusion over the use of deodorants vis-a-vis perfume. Talcum powder has played
the same role with its multiple benefit deliveries. There is a perceived value for money issue vis-avis talcs. There aren't enough large players with money and imagination to educate and attract
consumers. Marketing to enhance appeal of the category did also not back it and awareness,
hence, was tardy at best. 19
Besides positioning its product, HUL had the major task of changing consumers frame of
reference for the category itself. So far, the marketing for existing deodorant brands kept focusing
on the fragrance factor and consumers at large considered deodorant sprays as a cheaper form of
perfumes. As the spray form was largely popular for their smell good, perfume-like attributes, HUL
extended Rexona deodorant in stick and roll-on versions to emphasise the difference between
deodorants and perfumes. The new formats strategically positioned Rexona on the functional basis
as the roll-on versions and contact sticks had body odour fighting properties and the effects lasted
much longer than the spray deodorants. With this, HUL intended to create a new customer base of
first time users in the mass markets. HUL introduced the Rexona deodorant at an attractive price
that was significantly below the competition. While the 20 gm push-up stick was priced at an
affordable INR 21, the roll-on was priced at INR 35 for 40ml. Though sticks and roll-ons were more
expensive than aerosols, these made attractive propositions for trial usage.
As the awareness level on the need to use a deodorant was lower than 10%, the company started
spreading awareness about the usage of deodorants. 20 Shrijeet Mishra, Business Head,
deodorants and talcs, HUL, commented, Consumers believed that body odour was the other
persons problem. 21 While HUL had to change consumer perception for deodorants, HUL faced
another challenge to draw markets attention towards body odour as traditionally, body odour was
not considered as serious issue in India.
Sravanthi Challapalli, By the sweat of their brow,
http://www.hinduonnet.com/businessline/catalyst/2001/05/24/stories/1924f05a.htm, May 24th 2001
18 CavinKare is the Chennai-based beauty products company which owns the Spinz brand.
19By the sweat of their brow, op.cit.
20 The Scent of The Business, http://www.magindia.com/manarch/news/man401.html, May 30th 2001
21 Ibid.
17

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To bring in awareness about body odour, HUL focussed upon the brand communication which
talked about the rational benefits of the product. The tagline for communication was har pal sath
nibhaye (with you every moment). The advertising campaigns were designed to position the
Rexona deodorant as a protection product against body odour. The first television advertisement
showed a lady sneaking up behind a small boy and clasping her hands over his eyes. The small
boy was shown guessing her to be Shilpa Aunty, only because of her body odour. The second
commercial depicted a concious boss who overhears his junior wanting to buy a deo for him as a
gift. Another advertisement showed a young girl who gets embarrassed on overhearing her
colleagues talking about her body odour problem. The campaigns successfully drew a lot of
attention towards body odour problems. The Rexona deodorant started playing an important role in
building this category and created a new demand for the market.
The roll-on and contact sticks formats for Rexona deodorant did pose another test for HUL. While
these versions of deodorants were largely seen as highly personal products, these were also
perceived to be sticky. As more than one person in the family could use the spray formats, the
spray forms got more popular as family products. In 1997, HUL relaunched Rexona in aerosol cans
and priced the product at INR 65 for 75ml and INR 95 for 150ml. In 1998, Rexona came up with
two new variants; Fresh Green and Cool Blue which were priced at INR 71 for 75 ml. 22
In 1999, HUL brands together held 67.5% market share in the Indian deodorant market. While
Rexona emerged as the market leader with 44.8% market share, Ponds with 17.2% and Denim
with 5.5% were also growing. In 2000, HUL further penetrated into the deodorant market. 23
To induce deodorant trials for first time users, HUL introduced low-unit price packs of Rexona
deodorant at INR 5.50 for 5 gm which was the lowest price for a deodorant stick product in the
world. 24 Hemant Bakshi, HULs marketing manager said, The introduction of low-unit price packs
is not a new phenomenon for HUL. By doing so in the deodorant category, we have made the
product affordable to the large populace. However, as against in shampoos where a sachet is a
convenient means of using a product and most sachet users remain sachet users; in deodorants
we expect the consumer to upgrade to using a larger pack size after testing the INR 5.50 pack. 25
The company also initiated a massive sampling exercise for the product to induce trials.
In 2001, the deodorant market in India was worth INR 750 million ($15.54 million). HUL was the
market leader with 70% market share. Rexona brand accounted for 39% market. While HULs Axe
held 20% of the market, Denim and Impulse both held the remaining 11%. The main competitors
for HUL; Fa accounted for 6% of the market and Gillette held 4%-5%. 26 The deodorant market had
been growing but penetration levels for deodorants were still low at 0.5% with hardly five million
users in India using deodorants. 27 Consumers could not distinguish between body sprays,
antiperspirant and perfumes.
In an attempt to address to Rexona brands core values, HUL launched International Rexona 24
HR Intensive, which was positioned as round-the-clock protection product. The new deodorant
was available in two variants; Rexona Activa and Rexona Gradual. It was available in aerosol cans
as well as contact sticks in different sizes (Annexure VI). The 75ml and 150 ml packs were
Ibid.
Singh Namrata, HLL pushes Rexona deo in 5gm pack to induce trials,
http://www.expressindia.com/news/fe/daily/20000119/fst19089.html, January 19th 2000
24 Ibid.
25 Ibid.
26 The scent of the business, op.cit.
27 HLL pushes Rexona deo in 5gm pack to induce trails, op.cit.
22
23

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competitively priced at INR 75 and INR 110 respectively. The deodorant sticks sold for INR 25 (for
20 gm) and INR 8 (for 5 gm). Fa was priced at INR 90 for a can of 125 ml and Gillettes range of
deodorant sprays in four variants Wild Rain, Cool Wave, Pacific Light and Arctic Ice were
available at INR 195 for 150 ml. HULs own brands; Axe and Denim which were aimed at men
were priced at INR 120 for 150 ml, and INR 110 for 150 ml respectively. 28 For its intensive range, a
40-second television commercial was created which talked about the 24 hour protection and the
baseline reinforced the brands value platform with a tagline Tan ki durgandh... bandh (a full stop
to body odour). Even the posters and the press advertising focused on the 24 hour efficacy of the
brand at length.
Deodorant market in India which initially comprised the urban elite was fast changing. The trends
like growing incomes, changing attitudes, increased exposure to international lifestyles and
increased consumers awareness initiated growth in the deodorant market in India. With brands
deciding to come out with affordable variants of deodorants, the deodorant got popular also across
mid-segment. But still the deodorant related products remained popular largely in urban areas. The
rural market remained highly under penetrated. Parmit Chadha, CEO of Chennai-based Paradigm
Management Knowhow Pvt Ltd, a market research company explained, It is more of a cultural
thing. Body odour was perceived not to be a problem at all as traditionally, Indians bathed more
than once a day and their clothing was loose. Further, talcs filled that gap. Imported deos and antiperspirants were quite horrendously priced, and in the case of some brands, there was 100 per
cent excise duty on alcohol-based products. Even today, the prices of deos from foreign
companies such as Avon and Amway are quite high. 29
The dominance of foreign brands in Indian deodorant market was unsettling Rexonas position in
the market. In 2004, HULs market share declined to 62% from 70% in 2001. HULs Axe overtook
Rexona with a 26% market share. Rexonas market share decreased to 24.4%. 30 In response to
the increasing competition, Rexona deodorant introduced a new variant in order to evade
competitors from entering the category it created. Rexona introduced a new variant, New Rexona
Free Spirit an antiperspirant deodorant that was designed specially for women. The product was
launched with a hot air balloon event and international model Juliana Rogatti Lima was featured in
Free Spirit campaigns. Rexona Free Spirit had a fresh floral feminine fragrance that had specially
been used to reinforce and reflect the free spirited image. The fragrance was combined with
Rexonas antiperspirant formula to give a superior protection from underarm sweat and body
odour. Rexona Free Spirit which was available in 75ml and 150ml aerosols packs were priced at
INR 75 and INR 125 respectively. 31
Though roll-ons were more effective against body odour, sprays remained the preferred mode of
usage. Ranju Mohan, vice president (Sales), Henkel India said, The organised market in
deodorants is estimated at INR 125 crores. Sprays account for 95% of the business. This is
because people think of deodorant as a fragrance. 32 Despite HULs focus on spray forms, in
2006, its market share was on a decline and further decreased to 58% 33 . Rexona deodorant was
positioned as a unisex brand with the baseline Wont let you down. The Rexona brand had been
Ibid.
By the sweat of their brow, op.cit.
30 Rexona launches Free Spirit antiperspirant deo for women,
http://www.exchange4media.com/trend/trend_FullStory.asp?news_id=13761, October 15th 2004
31 Rexona launches Free Spirit antiperspirant deo for women, op.cit.
32 Sravanthi Challapalli, Deos Need Underarm Tactics to Grow,
http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/2006/06/01/stories/2006060103031200.htm, June 1st 2006
33 Ibid.
28
29

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unable to beat stiff competition by foreign deodorant sprays despite its relatively low price point at
INR 30. Rexona deodorant spray was priced at INR 70 against other deodorant sprays in the
market which were priced between INR 100 and INR 150. As Rexona soap was made available
only in India, Rexona deodorant was being perceived as an Indian brand. Rexona deodorants
association with the Rexona soap and its low-pricing strategy posed major problems for HUL in
positioning its product against foreign brands.
While HULs Axe became the largest selling deodorant brand in India, Rexona still struggled to
position itself in the mass market. Rexonas international brand image of an anti-perspirant was still
missing in India. The traditional perception for deodorants posed a major hurdle for Rexona. HUL,
in an attempt to change consumers frame of reference for its deodorant brand, decided to
reposition Rexona brand as a body odour protector by focusing on the roll-on format. Rexonas
roll-on deodorant was available in two variants for both men and women; Free Spirit for women
and Ice Cool for men.

Repositioning Rexona: A Strategic Response


In 2007, HUL came up with a plan named the 30-20-10 plan for Rexona brand. According to
Lakme Levers vice president, Anil Chopra (Chopra), We intend to make Rexona a 30 million euro
brand, which is about INR 150 crore. Currently there are only 3.5 million deodorants users in the
country; it is our objective to generate 20 million users, which will help us achieve our financial
target. The last lap is reaching the 10 mark, by which we mean that we need this to happen by
2010. 34
HUL decided to reposition the brand to capture the consumers mindspace. HUL strongly believed
that the very essence of brand was ambiguous in the market. While HUL had a major challenge of
re-positioning Rexona as a basic hygiene product, the consumer awareness for the roll-on formats
and its usage posed another obstacle for HUL. With only 8% 35 of the urban consumers using
deodorants as a basic hygiene product, the market was still highly under-penetrated. FMCG major
has also changed the positioning of the product from a "fragrance category" to health and hygiene.
A larger awareness needs to be built around the roll on deo product as against the aerosol sprays.
Rexona has decided to look at the health and hygiene category instead of limiting itself to merely a
smell good product, 36 said Lakme Lever, vice president, Anil Chopra (Chopra).
HUL launched a major marketing drive to communicate the brand essence. As confusion about the
use of a spray form continued prevailing across mass segments, Rexona decided to focus on rollon formats. The company had a major task of not only repositioning the brands core values but
also changing the customers frame of reference for roll-on formats on functional basis for its
Rexona deodorants.
The biggest change that has happened at Rexona is at the product level. For the initial 10 years,
the product was in a spray form. There is a lot of confusion about the use of a spray form in the
country, where people automatically assume it is a smell-good, perfume-like product. The
confusion was whether the product was offered to make him smell good, or whether the product
was offered to protect him agianst body odour. It is this significant change in the positioning and
On a Roll, op.cit.
Ibid.
36 Rexona deo ropes in Preity Zinta as brand ambassador,
http://www.indiantelevision.com/mam/headlines/y2k7/feb/febmam79.htm, February 27th 2007
34
35

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that is why we have got into a rollon format. The idea is to make the shift from a nice smelling
product to a protection product. That has really been the big shift for us,37 explained Chopra.
To enhance its brand image, the company signed Bollywood actress Preity Zinta as the brand
ambassador for the new Be ready campaigns for Rexona roll-on deodorant. While Preity Zinta
lent a positive image to the product, the company is also planning for a 360-degree marketing
campaign. HUL is coming up with an elaborative marketing plan including public relations, radio,
SMS, on ground sampling, the print media, in shop sales and television to propagate its message.
According to HULs deodorant marketing manager Shubhranshu Singh, Apart from the television
commercial featuring Preity, the campaign will involve on ground activity like direct sampling and a
contest which allows a lucky winner to enjoy a movie date with Preity. 38 To reach its target
segment, HUL intends to market its deodorant in the malls rather than selling them in small local
shops.
Across all the household and personal care categories, deodorant market was the least penetrated
market. (Exhibit II).
Exhibit II
Penetration Rate* (%) of Various Household and Personal Care Products in 2007
Category
All India %
Urban %
Rural %
Deodorants
2.1
5.5
0.6
Toothpaste
48.6
74.9
37.6
Skin Cream
22.0
31.5
17.8
Shampoo
38.0
52.1
31.9
Utensil Cleaner
28.0
59.9
14.6
Instant Coffee
6.6
15.5
2.8
Washing Powder
86.1
90.7
84.1
Detergent Bar
88.6
91.4
87.4
Toilet Soap
91.5
97.4
88.9
*Penetration numbers based on study conducted by Indian Readership Survey, on a sample size of ~250,000 based on
usage in 6 months
Source: Srinivasan S., Hindustan Unilever Limited,
http://www.hll.com/investor/presentation/2008/IR_presentation_MS_08.pdf, February 14th 2008

In 2007, there were around 3.5 million deodorants users in India. While urban consumer generated
majority of deodorant sales, only 8% of the urban consumers used deodorant as a basic hygiene
product. 39 According to Sudarshan Singh, Brand Manager, Nivea India, Increasing penetration
would involve a combination of increasing the products relevance by educating the consumer and
by giving them low unit price packs to enable them to enter the category. Currently, deos and even
anti-perspirants are used as perfumes and sprayed on the clothes rather than the body. 40 Though
Rexona seemed to be on the right path, changing consumers frame of reference towards the
category posed the biggest challenge.

37On

a Roll, op.cit.
Rexona deo ropes in Preity Zinta as brand ambassador, op.cit.
39 On a Roll, op.cit.
40 Set to smell success, op.cit.
38

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Annexure I
GDP Growth in India Since 2000

Source: Investor Presentation: Hindustan Unilever Limited,


http://www.hll.com/investor/presentation/2008/IR_presentation_Isec_08.pdf, March 3rd 2008

508-064-1

Annexure II
HULs Brand Portfolio Home and Personal Care
Home & Personal Care Brands
Lux, Breeze, Dove, Lifebuoy, Liril, Pears, Hamam and
Rexona
Laundry
Surf Excel, Rin, Wheel
Skin Care
Fair & Lovely, Ponds
Hair Care
Sunsilk Naturals & Clinic
Oral Care
Pepsodent & Close-up
Deodorants
Axe & Rexona
Colour Cosmetics
Lakme
Ayurvedic Personal and Ayush
Health Care
Foods
Personal Wash

Tea
Coffee
Foods
Ice Cream

Foods
Brook Bond & Lipton
Brook Bond Bru
Kissan, Annapurna, Knnor
Kwality Walls

Compiled by the authors

10

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Annexure III
Performance Trends of HUL 1997-2006
Gross Sales (INR
in Crores)
By Segment % of
Sales
Soaps, detergent
and Household
care
Personal products
Foods
Chemical Agri,
Fertilisers and
Animal Feeds
Others
EBIT as % of sales
Fixed assets
turnover (times)
Working Capital
Turnover (times)
Economic value
added (EVA) (INR
Crores)
E.P.S. of INR 1
D.P.S. of INR 1
P.A.T./Sales (%)
R.O.C.E. (%)
R.O.N.W (%)

1997
8343

1998
10215

1999
10918

2000
11392

2001
11781

2002
10952

2003
11096

2004
10888

2005
11976

2006
13035

45

39

41

40

40

45

44

45

45

47

11
34
6

16
35
6

17
34
6

17
37
4

21
33
3

22
30
2

24
29
2

26
27
1

28
25
1

29
22
1

4
8.8
10.5

4
9.5
9.7

2
10.7
10.0

2
12.3
9.5

3
14.0
8.9

1
17.6
8.3

1
18.4
8.1

1
13.4
7.2

1
12.3
8.1

1
13.1
8.6

68.2

45.2

58.3

--

365

548

694

858

1080

1236

1429

887

1014

1125

2.81
1.70
7.0
51.2
46.0

3.67
2.20
8.2
49.0
48.9

4.86
2.90
9.8
51.0
50.9

5.95
3.50
11.5
53.8
52.7

7.46
5.00
13.1
52.8
53.9

8.04
5.16
15.8
51.8
48.4

8.05
5.50
16.3
53.0
82.8

5.44
5.00
11.0
40.8
57.2

6.40
5.00
11.3
62.3
61.1

8.41
6.00
11.8
61.1
68.1

Source: Reports and Annual Accounts 2006, http://www.hll.com/mediacentre/annualreport2006.pdf, 2006

11

508-064-1

Annexure IV
Rexonas Global Sales Growth Between 1996 and 2006

Source: Rozanski Gerardo, Rexona: Deodorants model for global success,


http://www.unilever.com/Images/ir_1.6_rexona_rozanski%20web_tcm13-86712.pdf, March 13th 2007

Annexure V
Rexona in Global Markets as of 2007

Source: Rozanski Gerardo, Rexona: Deodorants model for global success,


http://www.unilever.com/Images/ir_1.6_rexona_rozanski%20web_tcm13-86712.pdf, March 13th 2007

12

508-064-1

Annexure VI
Variants of Rexona Deodorant

Source: HUL to hard sell Rexona deodorant variant,


http://www.hinduonnet.com/businessline/catalyst/2001/04/26/stories/1926m05d.htm, April 26th 2001

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