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Scheme for Final Year in Mechanical Engineering

(Semester - VII)
Course plan for each week (Hrs)
Sr
No.

Lab Work
(Journal)#

Total

60

50

150

60

50

150

100

60

50

150

20

100

60

50

150

20

20

100

60

50

150

--

--

--

--

-300

50
300

50
800

Code

Lectures

Laboratory

Tutorial

Credit

Test
1

Test
2

ME401

--

20

20

100

Machine Design -II


Renewable Energy
Sources And Utilization

ME402

--

20

20

100

Finite Element Analysis

ME403

--

20

20

Industrial Engineering
and Project management

ME404

--

20

ME407
To

--

-20

-02

2
10

4
29

Subject

Evaluation Marks
End Semester
End
Semester
Mark Duration
Weightage
( Hrs)
(%)

Elective-I

ME 409
6

Project Stage I
Total

ME406

200

----

NOTE: T1&T2andendsemesterweightagemarkswillbeaddedandshownasthetheorymarksinthemarksheet.
#Distributionshallbeasfollows: Journal Work 30Marks+Attendance 10Marks+ Oral 10 Marks
Forpassing, Student must secure minimum 40%marks in each subject with all heads of passing taken together and minimum 35%
marks in the end semesterexamination
Elective-I
Sr No
Course Code
Subject Name
1
ME-407
Business Process Reengineering and TQM
2
ME-408
Computational Fluid Dynamics
3
ME-409
Power Plant Engineering

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Scheme for Final Year MechanicalEngineering


(Semester-VIII)

Course plan for each week (Hrs)


Sr
No.

Subject

Code

Lectures

Design of
Mechanical Systems

ME451

--

CAD/CAM/CIM

ME452

--

Industrial Finance &


Enterprise Resource
Planning

ME453

--

Lab
Work
(Journal)#

Test
1

Test
2

20

20

100

60

50

150

20

20

100

60

50

150

20

20

100

60

50

150

20

20

100

60

50

150

---

---

100

100

80
240
Total
300
NOTE:T1&T2andendsemesterweightagemarkswillbeaddedandshownasthetheorymarksinthemarksheet.
#Distributionshallbeasfollows:JournalWork 30Marks+Attendance 10Marks+ Oral 10 Marks
Forpassing, Student must secure minimum 40%marks in each subject with all heads of passing taken together and minimum35%
marks intheendsemesterexamination
Elective-II:
Sr No
Course Code
Subject Name
1
ME-456
Industrial Robotics
2
ME-457
Supply Chain Management
3
ME-458
Automobile Engineering

700

Elective-II

Laboratory Tutorial Credit

Evaluation Marks
End
End Semester
Marks Duration Semester
Weightage
( Hrs)
(%)

5
5

Total

ME456
to

5
4

--

-16

-02

4
10

ME458
5

Project Stage II

ME455

6
26

- 286 -

-80

Semester:- VII
Code: ME 401

CLASS: B.E. (Mechanical)


SUBJECT: MACHINE DESIGN II
Lecture
04
Practical
-Periods per week.
( each of 60 minutes )
Tutorial
02
Credits
05
Hours
In Semester
01
Theory Examination
04
Practical
-Evaluation System
Term Work
-TOTAL
*60%weightage for end semester

Marks
20 x 2
100*
-50
150

Course Objectives:
The primary objective of this course is
To develop an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics and engineering related to
different machine parts.
To analyze the stress and strain on mechanical components; and understand, identify
and quantify failure modes for mechanical parts
To develop an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs
within realistic constraints.
To develop an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
To understand the detailed design procedure of bearings as well as the effect of
stresses on it.
To understand the detailed design procedure of the different types of joints and the
effect of theories of failure on it.
To understand the analysis of shafts and the effect of theories of failure.
To understand the theory behind the selection of material for the different machine
parts.
Course Outcomes:
At the end of the course the student should be able to:
Students will be able to formulate and analyze stresses and strains in machine elements
subjected to various loads.
Students will be able to do tolerance analysis and specify appropriate tolerances for
machine design applications.
Students will be able to apply multidimensional static failure criteria in the analysis
and design of mechanical components.
Students will be able to apply multidimensional fatigue failure criteria in the analysis
and design of mechanical components.
Students will be able to analyze and design power transmission shafts carrying various
elements with geometrical features.

- 287 -

Detailed Syllabus:
Module
Details
Hrs.
No.
Module Design of spur, helical, bevels and worm gears.
12
01
Two stage Gear box consisting of spur and helical gear pair: design
Module
approach through system design, gear box housing layout and housing 04
02
design
Selection of rolling contact bearings based on constant /Variable Load &
Module
speed conditions (includes deep groove ball bearing, cylindrical roller, 04
03
taper roller and self aligning bearing)
Design of hydro dynamically lubricated bearings (Self contained)
Module Introduction to hydro Static bearings
06
04
Selection of Mechanical Seals
Module
Design of cam and follower mechanisms.
06
05
Design of main components of centrifugal pump Module
Motor selection, Suction and delivery pipe, Impeller, Impeller shaft, 08
06
Volute casing. (system design approach)
Module Design of Snatch Block assembly including Rope selection, Sheave,
08
Hook, Bearing for hook, cross piece, Axle for sheave and shackle plate
07
Term Work:
Term work shall comprise of
1)
Exercises on the above topics in the form of design calculations with sketches and
or drawings.
2)
Design and detailed assembly drawing on FULL imperial drawing sheets of Min.
two design problem, from the module 1, 4, 5 and 6
3)
Course project*
Course Projects- There will be a course project where the students will be able to apply and
integrate the knowledge gained during the course. The projects will be developed by teams of
Two to Four students and will consist of design of any system having min. 5 to 6
components.
Note:
Use of standard design data books like PSG Data Book , Design Data by Mahadevan is
permitted at the examination and shall be supplied by the institute.
Text Books:
Machine Design Exercises
- S.N. Trikha, Khanna Publications, Delhi
Design of machine elements
- V. B. Bhandari Tata McGraw Hill Pub.
Machine Design - An Integrated Approach
- Robert L. Norton - Pearson Education
Asia.
Mechanical Engineering Design
- J. E. Shigley - McGraw Hill
Machine Design Exercises
- S.N. Trikha, Khanna Publications, Delhi
Recommended Data Books
- PSG, K. Mahadevan

- 288 -

References:
Gear Design Handbook
Material handling equipmentsMaterial handling equipmentsMachine Design
Machine Design
Design of Machine Elements Design of Machine Elements Pumps

- Gitin Maitra
N. Rudenko, Peace Publication
Alexandrov, MIR Publication
Reshetov - Mir Publication
Patel, Pandya, Sikh Vol I & II, C. Jamnadas &
Co. Educational & Law Publishers
V.M. Faires.
Spotts.
Sahu

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

- 289 -

SEMESTER:- VII

CLASS: B.E. (MECHANICAL )


SUBJECT: RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES AND
CODE : ME-402
UTILIZATION
Lecture
04
Practicals
-Periods per week.
( each of 60 minutes)
Tutorials
02
Credit
05
Hours
Marks
In Semester
01
20 x 2
End Semester
03
100*
Evaluation System
Practical
--Term Work
-50
TOTAL
150
*60%weightage for end semester
Course Objectives:
To understand the importance of renewable energy and its utilization to satisfy the ever
increasing thermal and electrical energy needs of humankind. At the same time be aware of
the environmental aspects of these resources.
Course Outcomes:
At the end of the course, the student expected to understand the energy need of any specific
project and suggest methodologies / technologies for utilization of renewable energy
resources. Together with the Economics of the utilization and its environmental merits
Detailed syllabus:
Module.
Details
No.
01
ENERGY REQUIREMENT - OF INDIA AND THE WORLD :
Present energy scenario, conventional energy sources- World's
production and reserves, India's production and reserves. Demand side
management of energy. Need and role of renewable energy.
02
SOLAR ENERGY I: Terrestrial and extra terrestrial solar radiation.
Instruments for measurement of solar radiation. Analysis of liquid flat
plate collector, Use of selective coatings to enhance performance.
Selection of suitable system to satisfy hot water requirements of any
application. Concentrating collectors, solar ponds, solar distillators,
solar cooker, solar air heaters, solar driers, solar thermal power system,
solar energy storage (Focus on design for specific needs), Solar
refrigeration and air-conditioning. Economics of Solar systems
03
SOLAR ENERGY II: Photovoltaic energy conversion, solar cells,
Selection of PV system to match application.
04
WIND ENERGY: History, principle of wind power, Betz model. Wind
maps, Site selection for wind farms. Wind mills- Design parameters of
components, Electrical Power Generation Subsystem. Operational
issues, Newer designs of windmills. Application of wind energy.
05
HYDRO-POWER: Prospects of small hydropower, mini and micro
power systems, hydropower conversion devices-Turbine, status of mini
and micro hydel in India.
- 290 -

Hrs.
06

10

03
06

08

06

07

OCEAN ENERGY: Types of ocean energy sources, OTEC cyclesclosed and open. Comparison with normal thermal power cycles. Ocean
waves-Wave motion, Wave energy conversion devices. Tidal PowerFormation and causes of tides, site selection, turbines selection
GEOTHERMAL ENERGY: History and future, origin and types of
geothermal energy regions, dry rock and hot Aquifer analysis, vapor
dominated and liquid nominated geothermal systems, operational and
environmental problems.
BIOMASS ENERGY: Various forms of biomass as a potential energy
source, , Bio-fuel production processes, Gasifiers, principle,
construction and design, Types of bio gas plants individual and
community biogas plants, Sizing of biogas plants, energy plantation.
CHEMICAL
ENERGY
SOURCES:
Fuel
cells-principle,
classification, advantage and disadvantage, application and recent
development

03

08

Term Work:
Term work shall consist of a selection of any 5 experiments given below:
1. Measuring Solar radiation using Pyranometer
2. Measuring length of shadow and comparing with calculated length with reasons for
difference
3. Performance of solar liquid flat plate collector, plotting in Hottel Whillier Bliss
format
4. Use of Box type cooker and compare with concentrating type Sievert Cooker
5. Solar PV panel-characteristics
6. Measuring performance of Wind Turbine available in SPCE.
7. Survey of energy use in households
And a mini project involving fabrication of working model of device to extract energy
of the wind or wave energy
Text Books:
1. Solar Energy - Principle of thermal collection and Storage -- S.P. Sukhatme, J.K.
Nayak, Tata McGraw Hill, 3rd Edition
2. Multiple Choice Questions on Renewable Energy, Author(s): Arun K Tripathi, ear: 2007
ISBN: 9788179931288
3. Solar Energy Fundamentals Design, Modeling and applications, G.N. Tiwari, , Narosa
Publishing House, New Delhi, 2002
Websites:
www.teriin.org
www.mnre.gov.in
www.mahaurja.com

- 291 -

References
Renewable Energy Engineering and Technology Principles and Practice, Editor(s): V V N
Kishore,2009, ISBN: 9788179932216
Renewable Energy, Power for a Sustainable Future, Godfrey Boyle, Oxford University
Press, U.K., 1996.
Renewable Energy Sources, Twidell, John.W. & Weir, Anthony, Taylor and Francis, 2006
Handbook of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy-Edited by Frank Kreith and Yogi
Goswami, CRC press, 2007

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

- 292 -

Semester:-VII
Code: ME 403
Periods per week.
( each of 60 minutes )

Evaluation System

CLASS: BE (Mechanical)
SUBJECT: FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS
Lecture
04
Practical
02
Tutorial
-Credits
05
Hours
Marks
In semester
01
20 x 2
End semester
04
100*
Practical
-Term Work
50
TOTAL
150

*60%weightage for end semester


Course Objectives:
To teach the fundamentals of finite element method with emphasize on the underlying
theory.
To teach assumption, and modeling issues as well as providing hands on experience
using finite element software to model,
To analyze and design systems of mechanical and aerospace engineers.
Course Outcome:
Program objectives supported by this course include educating students to:

Comprehend quantitative and analytical methods


Understand and perform engineering analysis of machine systems
Apply mathematics, science and engineering to design
Communicate ideas graphically and in writing
Recognize the need for, and engage in lifelong learning

Detailed Syllabus:
Module
Details
Hrs.
No
Introductory Concepts: Introduction to FEM. Brief History. General
Module
FEM procedure. Applications of FEM in various fields. Advantages and 02
01
disadvantages of FEM.
Differential Equations in different fields: Types of Differential
Equations. Primary and Secondary Variables and types of Boundary
Conditions.
Module
Matrix Algebra: Matrix operations, Gauss Elimination Method to get 06
02
inverse of a Matrix. Partitioning of Matrix.1.4 Numerical Integration:
Trapezoidal rule, simpsons 1/3rd rule, Newton cotes formula, Gauss
quadranture formula, Gauss quadranture in two dimensions.
Approximate solution of differential equationsWeightaed residual
techniques, collocation, Least squares and Galerkin methods.
Module
Minimization of a functional. Principle of minimum total potential.
12
03
Piecewise Rayleigh-Ritz method. Comparison with weighted residual
method.
Piecewise approximations. Basis of Finite Element Methods.
- 293 -

Module
04

Module
05

Module
06

Module
07

Formulation of matrix methodstiffness matrix; transformation and


assembly concepts.
FEM Procedure : Definitions of various terms used in FEM like element,
order of the element, internal and external node/s, degree of freedom,
primary and secondary variables, essential boundary conditions, natural
boundary conditions, homogeneous and non-homogeneous boundary
conditions.
Example problems in one dimensional structural analysis, heat transfer
and fluid flow (Stepped and Taper Bars, Fins, Fluid Network, SpringCart systems, Plane Trusses, Beams).
Natural coordinates and coordinate transformations: Alternate methods
for deriving shape functions, Natural coordinates quadrilateral
elements, Natural coordinates triangular elements.
Isoperimetric. Algorithms for solution of equations. Convergence
criterion, patch test and errors in finite element analysis. Method of
Elimination. Sources of error. Elements of variational calculus. Bandwidth, aspect ratio, coarse and fine meshing, etc..
Two dimensional finite element formulations.
Introduction, Three nodded triangular element, four nodded rectangular
element, six nodded triangular element, compatibility, four nodded
quadrilateral element, eight nodded quadrilateral element, nine nodded
quadrilateral element.

04

List of Experiments:
At list three exercises from the following areas.
1) Structural analysis
2) Thermal analysis.
3) Fluid dynamics.
4) Mechanical vibrations
5) Coupled field/ multiphysics
Each exercise shall cover tasks like Model-preparation, Mesh generation, Simulation, Postprocessing etc. in any analysis software such as ANSYS, NASTRAN, ABACUSS etc.
Students shall attach the solution of above exercise as part of term work.

Term Work:
Term work shall consist of assignments (one on each module).

- 294 -

Text Books: .
1) The Finite Element Method its Basis & Fundamentals O.C.Zienkiewicz, R.L.Taylor &
J.Z.Zhu, Butterworth-Heinemann, Elsevier
2) Finite Element Method, Reddy J. N., McGrawHill
3) The Finite Element Method in Engineering , 4th Edition, S.S.Rao, Academic
Press, Elsevier
4) Finite Element Methods for Engineers, U.S.Dixit, Cengage Learning
5) Textbook of FE Analysis, P.Seshu, Prentice Hall
6) Introduction to Finite Elements Methods by Desai and Abel, CBS Publication.
7) Introduction to Finite Elements in Engineering by Tirupati R. Chandrupatla & Ashok
D.Belegundu.
References:
1) Introduction to Finite Element Methods by Erik Thompson, Wiley India.
2) Finite Elements Hand Book by H. Kardestuneer.
3) Concepts & Applications of Finite Element Analysis by R.D.Cook.
4) Bathe, K.J., Finite Element Procedures in Engineering Analysis, Prentice Hall of India.
5) Huebener K.H., Dewhirst D.D., Smith D.E. and Byrom T.G., The Finite Element
Method for Engineers, John Wiley, New York.
6) Concept and Application of Finite Element Methods by Robert Cook, Wiley India.

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

- 295 -

Semester:-VII

CLASS: BE (Mechanical )

Code: ME404

SUBJECT: Industrial Engineering And Project Management


Lectures
04
Periods per week.
Practicals
-(each of 60 minutes ) Tutorials
02
Credit
05
Hours
Marks
In semester
01
20 x 2
End semester
03
100*
Practical
--Evaluation System
Term Work
-50
TOTAL
150
* 60% Weightage for end semester
Course Objectives:
1. To understand knowledge areas and tool techniques for efficient Industrial
Engineering & Project Management.
2. Understand the role of Industrial Engineering & Project Management in an
organization.
3. Develop an insight as to how Industrial Engineering & Project Management
tool/techniques are used strategically for the betterment of organization.
4. To understand how it helps in customer focus, innovation, quality management,
speeding up the processes and improvement in productivity in an organization.
To understand the Life cycle and phases of project management.

Course Outcomes:
The students will be able to apply the tools and techniques of Industrial Engineering &
Project Management in real life industrial environment.
The students will be able to think logically to design the tailor made new philosophy,
principles, theories which will enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of theIndustrial
Engineering & Project Management domain of the industries.
In general the students will be able the design the Tailor made system as per the requirements
which will face the challenges of the industrial environment.

- 296 -

Module
No

Details
Industrial Engineering:
1.INTRODUCTION Introduction to industrial engineering,
history and contribution to industrial engineering, industrial
engineering approach, techniques of industrial engineering,
objectives of industrial engineering, system approach and
industrial engineering, definition and concept of productivity,
productivity measures, factors influencing productivity,
productivity improvement techniques.
2. WORK STUDY & ERGONOMICS
Work Study: Definition and objectives, importance and
advantages, work study procedure.
Method Study: Definition and objectives, scope and steps
involved in method study, job selection, recording techniques,
critical examination, development and selection of improved
method, motion economy principles, installation and maintenance
of proposed method.
Work Measurement: Definition and objectives, techniques of
work measurement, steps involved in work measurement, types of
elements, time study equipments, performance rating and
allowances, computation of standard time, predetermined motion
time standards(PMTS)
Ergonomics: Definition and objectives of human engineering,
manmachine systems and their aspects and relationship with
productivity, human factors affected by environment, methods to
improve work environment. Evaluation of cultural fit on mergers
and acquisitions of business enterprises.
ERGONOMICS: Definition and objectives of human engineering,
manmachine systems and their aspects and relationship with
productivity, human factors affected by environment, methods to
improve work environment. Evaluation of cultural fit on mergers
and acquisitions of business enterprises.
COMPUTERS IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING
Need of computers in industrial engineering, development of
integrated systems, sharing of data and information, advantages of
integrated systems, principles of integrated system design,
Introduction to MRP-I, MRP-II, JIT, BPR, SCM, EPR, Lean
manufacturing , Agilemanufacturing, etc

- 297 -

Hrs

04

14

04

(A) Project Management:

08

Introduction to Project Management, the triple constraint,


Stakeholders, Project Management Knowledge Area, tools and
techniques, Role of a Project Manager, job description, Suggested
Skills, Importance of people and leadership skills.
Project Management to theMechanical Engineering context,
Organizational Structure, Project Life Cycle, Phases and Nature of
Mechanical Engineering projects, Trends affecting Mechanical
Engineering Project Management, Globalization, Outsourcing,
and Virtual Teams.

Project Time Management, Defining and Sequencing Project


Activities and Dependencies, Developing Schedule, Gantt Chart,
Critical Path Method, Project Uncertainty PERT,
Critical
Chain Method, Resource loading and Resource Leveling,
Schedule Controlling.

Project Cost Management, Estimating Techniques, Earned Value


Management, Project Quality Management, Planning Quality,
Performing Quality Assurance, Quality Control Tools and
Techniques, Project Resource Management, Development of
Human Resource Plan, Project Organizational Chart and
Responsibility Assignment, Multi project Scheduling and
Resource Allocation, Project Communication Management,
Identifying Stakeholders, Planning Communication, Project Risk
Management, Identifying Risks ;Common Sources of Risk in
Mechanical Engineering Projects, Qualitative Risk Analysis :
Probability and Impact Matrix, Quantitative Risk Analysis :
Decision Trees, Planning Risk Response, Project Procurement
Management, Planning and conducting procurement.

10

Term work

Assignments based on above modules

Seminar based on recent advances in the subject

At least one Case study conducted at industry


Teaching Methods:
The course will use the following pedagogical tools:
A Discussion on concepts and issues on Industrial Engineering and Project Management
use of in an organization.
B Case discussion covering a cross section of gaining strategic advantage by applying
Industrial Engineering and Project Management tools and techniques.
C Projects/ Assignments/ Quizzes/ Class participation etc.

- 298 -

S.N. Author
Text books
1
Heinz Weihrich,
Harold, Koontz

2
3

Title

Publication

Management A Global Perspective , 10th


Edition

Tata McGraw Hill


Publishing Company
Ltd ,International
Edition

Benjamin W. Niebel Methods, Standards and Work Design


and Andris Freivalds
Mundel, Marvin, E
Improving Productivity and Effectiveness
Chase, Acquilano & Production and Operation Management
Jacks

4
5

6
7

Ralph M. Barnes
H.S. Sham
Samuel J. Mantel
et.al. With M.R.
Gopalan;

WCB Mc Graw
Hill(1999)
Prentice Hall,
Tata McGraw Hill
Publishing Company
Ltd

Time and Motion Study,


Work Study and Ergonomics

Dhanpatrai & Sons

Project Management Core Text Book

Wiley India Edition


Tata Mc graw -Hill
Publishing Co Ltd

James P Lewis

Reference Books
1
Clifford F Gray,
Erik W Larson

Project Planning, Scheduling And Control

, Project Management-The Managerial


Process

Tata Mcgraw-Hill
Publishing Co Ltd

I.L.O

Introduction to Work Study

Jack Meredith,
Samuel J. Mantel Jr.

Project Management- A Managerial


Approach

I.L.O., 3rd Revised


Edn., 1986
John Wiley and Sons

John M Nicholas

Project Management For Business And


Technology

Prentice Hall
Of India Pvt Ltd

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

- 299 -

Project
ME406

- 300 -

Semester:-VIII

CLASS: BE(Mechanical)
Subject: Elective I Business Process Reengineering& Total
Code: ME-407
Quality Management
Lectures
04
Practicals
-Periods per week.
(each of 60 minutes )
Tutorials
02
Credit
05
Hours
Marks
In Semester
01
20 x 2
End Semester
03
100*
Practical
--Evaluation System
Term Work
50
TOTAL
150
*60%weightage for end semester
Course Objectives
The objectives of the course are to
Understand the role of Business Process Reengineering technique in an organization.
Develop an insight as to how BPR tool/techniques are used strategically for the
betterment of organization
To understand how it helps in customer focus, innovation, quality management,
speeding up the processes and improvement in productivity in an organization.
To understand the Total Quality Management concept and principles and the various
tools available to achieve Total Quality Management.
To understand the statistical approach for quality control.
To create an awareness about the ISO and QS certification process and its need for the
industries.
Course Outcomes

The students will be able to apply the tools and techniques of Total Quality Management And
Business Process Reengineering in real life industrial environment.
The students will be able to think logically to design the tailor made new philosophy,
principles, theories which will enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the domain of Total
Quality Management Practices And Business Process Reengineering practices in the
industries.

Detailed Syllabus:
Module
Details
No
1
BPR: Introduction to BPR , Concept, Need for Reengineering,
Benefits, guiding principles, BPR and performance Improvement,
Pitfalls in BPR, Myths of BPR.
2
BPR implementation methodology, Success factors of BPR, Barriers
to BPR
3
BPR in Manufacturing industry, BPR and IT, BPR and relevant
technologies, BPR and ERP

- 301 -

Hrs
6

5
6

TQM:
Definition of quality, Dimensions of quality, Quality costs, Basic
concepts of total quality management, Principles of TQM, Quality
statements, Deming Philosophy, Juran trilogy, Crossbys Philosophy,
PDCA cycle
5S, Kaizen, Benchmarking, Benchmarking process, Quality Function
Deployment (QFD), House of quality, Taguchi quality loss function,
Total Productive Maintenance (TPM), FMEA, Stages of FMEA
The seven tools of quality, Statistical fundamentals, Measures of
central tendency and dispersion, Population and sample, Normal
curve, Control charts for variables and attributes, Process capability,
Concept of six sigma.
Need for ISO 9000 and other quality systems, ISO 9000:2000 quality
system, Elements, Implementation of quality system, Documentation,
Quality auditing, TS 16949, ISO 14000, Concept , Requirements and
benefits

11

Teaching Methods:
The course will use the following pedagogical tools:
D Discussion on concepts and issues on BPR use of in an organization.
E Case discussion covering a cross section of gaining strategic advantage by applying
BPR tools and techniques.
F Projects/ Assignments/ Quizzes/ Class participation etc.
S.N. Author
Text books
1
R. Radhakrishnan
S. Balasubramanian
2
B.R. Dey

Dale H.Besterfiled,
et al
P L Jain

Title

Publication

Business Process Reengineering

PHI

Business Process Reengineering And


change
Management
Total Quality Management,

Wiley

Quality Control and Total Quality


Management

Pearson
Education
Tata
McGraw-Hill

Reference Books
1
Henry J. Johansson

Business process reengineering: breakpoint Wiley


strategies for market dominance
2
Varun Grover,
Business process change: Re-Engineering
Idea Group
William J. Kettinger concepts, methods And techniques
Inc
3
Feigenbaum.A.V.
Total Quality Management,
McGraw-Hill
4
Narayana V. and
Quality Management Concepts and Tasks, New Age
Sreenivasan, N.S.
International
5
Greg Bounds
Beyond Total Quality Management.
McGraw Hil
Sr. No.
Examination
Module
1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

- 302 -

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

SEMESTER-VII
CODE: ME 408

CLASS: B.E (Mechanical)


SUBJECT: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS
Lectures
04
Practical
-Period per week
(each of 60 minutes)
Tutorial
02
Credit
05
Hours
Marks
In Semester
01
202
Evaluation System
End Semester*
03
100
Term Work
--50
TOTAL
150
* 60% Weightage for end semester
Course Objectives:
On successful completion of the course, students should be able to
differentiate between modeling and simulation,
know numerical techniques of discrtization and solving linear algebraic and PDE
equations
to write governing equation and boundary condition of a heat and flow problem
do complete CFD analysis of a heat and flow problem using software,
Course Outcome:
On successful completion of the course, students will have the capability to comprehend and
analyze the heat transfer and fluid flow problem and apply the fundamental concept of fluid
mechanics to solve real life problem using CFD software.
Detailed Syllabus:
Module
No

Details

Hrs.

CFD Fundamentals:
Approach of solving engineering problem Analytical and experimental,
Module Modeling and Simulation, Computational Fluid Dynamics - its Scope,
01
Application, advantages and disadvantages. Overall methodology of CFD
analysis -Preprocessing, Solver, Post processing

Mathematical Description of Physical Phenomenon:


Concept of mathematical modeling, Basic conservation equation in
Module differential and Integral form, General thermal and flow boundary condition,
02
Mathematical nature of partial differential equation used in thermo-fluid
analysis.

10

Numerical Solution of Linear Algebraic Equation:


Direct Method Matrix inversion, Gauss Elimination, LU decomposition.
Module Iterative Method- Features of iterative techniques, Jacobi and Gauss Seidel
03
Method, Relaxation method (SUR and SOR). Stability and convergence, Ill
conditioned system of equation and condition number,

12

- 303 -

Numerical Modeling of Heat Conduction:


Module Steady One and two dimensional Conduction, Unsteady One and two
04
dimensional Conduction, Stability restrictions
Numerical Modeling of Convection-Diffusion:
Numerical treatment of convective terms- FOU, SOU, QUICK, Power law
Module scheme. Steady One-dimensional and Two Dimensional Convection05
Diffusion, Unsteady One-dimensional Convection-Diffusion, Unsteady Twodimensional Convection-Diffusion
Incompressible Fluid Flow:
Module Governing Equations, Complexities in solving flow problems, Determination
06
of Pressure for Viscous Flow, SIMPLE, SIMPLER and PISO Algorithm
Turbulence Modeling
Module Introduction to Turbulence Modeling, Basic Theories of Turbulence
07
Reynolds Time-Averaged Equations for Turbulent Flow, Different
turbulence models.

Term Work:
Term work shall consist of minimum 06 (Six) assignments/tutorials
Text Books:
1. Versteeg H.K. and Malalasekera.W: An introduction to computational fluid dynamicsThe finite volume method, Prentice Hall
2. Anderson, D.A., Tannehill, I.I., and Pletcher, R.H., Computational Fluid Mechanics and
Heat Transfer, Hemishphere Publishing Corporation,.
3. Subas, V.Patankar, "Numerical heat transfer fluid flow", Hemisphere Publishing
Corporation
4. Muralidhar, K. and Sundararajan, T., "Computational Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer",
Narosa Publishing House.
References:
1. Ghoshdasdidar, P.S.,"Computer Simulation of flow and heat transfer" Tata McGraw-Hill
Publishing Company Ltd.
2. Niyogi.P. Laha M.K., Chakrabarty S.K.: Introduction to Computational Fluid
Dynamics. Pearson Education, India.
3. Fletcher, C.A.J."Computational Techniques for Fluid Dynamics 1" Fundamental and
General Techniques, Springer-Verlag
4. Schlichting, H. Boundary layer theory, McGraw-Hill

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

- 304 -

SEMESTER-VII
CODE: ME 409
Period per week
(each of 60 minutes)

CLASS: B.E (Mechanical)


SUBJECT: POWER PLANT ENGINEERING
Lectures
04
Practicals
-Tutorials
02
Credit
05
Hours
Marks
In Semester
01
20 x 2

Evaluation System

End Semester

03

100*

Term Work

---

50

TOTAL

150

* 60% Weightage for end semester


Course Objectives:
On successful completion of the course, students should be able to
know about different power generation systems and related technology,
Know economical aspect of power generation and power systems.
Learn the impact or current power generation technology on our environment.
learn few efficient power generation technique from environmental and efficiency view
point,
Course Outcome:
On successful completion of the course, students will have complete exposure to current and
future technology of power generation, their cost estimation and environmental impact.
Module
No.

Details

Hrs.

01

Economics of the power plant: Load curve, load duration curve, various factors,
and effect of fluctuating load on operation and design of the plant, methods of
meeting fluctuating load. Selection of the generating equipments, load sharing, cost
of electrical energy. Tariff methods. Performance and operating characteristics of
Power Plants.

07

07

02

Hydro power plant: Rainfall, runoff and its measurement, hydrograph, flow
duration curve, mass curve, and reservoir storage capacity. Classification of the
plants- Run-off river plant, storage river plant, pumped storage plant.

07

03

Fluidized bed combustion: regimes of combustion, circulating and pressurized


fluidized bed combustion system, Fluidized bed boilers, its important features,
classification. Control of Nitrogen oxides.

07

04

Nuclear power plant: Introduction of nuclear engineering- radioactive decay, half


life, fission, fusion, nuclear materials. Thermal fission reactors and power plant PWR, BWR, Liquid metal fast breeder reactors. Reactor control.
Diesel and Gas turbine power plant: General layout, application of diesel power
plant, advantages and disadvantages, component, performance of gas turbine power
plant, gas turbine material.

07

05

- 305 -

07

06

Combined cycle power generation: Coupled cycle- thermodynamics, combined


cycle plant-thermodynamics of GT-ST plant operation; Advantages. Base Load
plants. Peak load plants. Co-ordination of different types of power plants.

07

07

Environmental impact of power plant: Social and economical issues of the


power plants, Greenhouse effect, Acid precipitation- acid rain and acid snow, dry
deposition and acid fog, Thermal pollution, air pollution, Radiation from nuclear
power plant effluents.
Coal storage, Inplant handling of coal, Ash handling systems. Dust collectors.
Flue gas, desulfurization methods.

Text Books:
1. Power Plant Engineering - P. K. Nag - Tata McGraw Hill
2. Power Plant Technology - M. M. EL - Wakil - McGraw Hill
3. Power Plant Engineering - Morse
4. Power Plant Engineering - Domkundwar
5. Power Plant Engineering - P. C. Sharma
6. Power Plant Engineering - Rajput
References:
1. Power Plant Engineering - Gaffert
2. Power Plant Theory & Design - P.J. Potter - Ronald Press
3. Modern Power Plant Engineering - J. Weisman, R. Eekart
4. Power Station Engineering & Economy'- Skrotzki
5. The Elements of Nuclear Power - Bennet, Thomson
6. Standard handbook of Power Plant Engineering - Elliott
7.
Modern Power Station Practice: Vol. 1 to 8 - British Electricity Intl., London Paragamon Press

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

- 306 -

SEMESTER:- VIII
CODE : ME-451
Periods per week
(each of 60 minutes )

Evaluation System

CLASS: B.E. (MECHANICAL )


SUBJECT: DESIGN OF MECHANICAL SYSTEM
Lectures
04
Practicals
-Tutorials
02
Credit
05
Hours
Marks
In Semester
01
20 x 2
End Semester
04
100*
Practical
---Term Work
-50
TOTAL
150

*60%weightage for end semester


Course Objectives:
On successful completion of the course, students should be able to
Understand the basics of material handling equipments like elevators, conveyors and
EOT cranes.
Design the main components of the belt conveyor system.
Understand the designing aspects of centrifugal pumps, vane pumps and gear pumps.
Understand pressure vessels and its design.
Course Outcomes:
On successful completion of the course, students will have the capability to comprehend and
analyze the material handling equipments. They will be able to understand the design basics
of the mechanical system design.
Detailed Syllabus:
Module
Details
Hrs.
No
Module Introduction to material handling equipments, i.e. hoists, cranes, elevators,
04
conveyors etc.
01
Module Design of EOT crane for: Snatch Block assembly, Rope drum assembly, Over
10
head travelling mechanism assembly.
02
Module Design of belt conveyors-- Power requirement, selection of belt, design of
06
03
tension take up unit ,idler pulley etc.
Module Introduction to centrifugal pump and positive displacement pump such as
04
04
gear pump, vane pump etc.
Design of main components of centrifugal pump Module Motor selection, Suction and delivery pipe, Impeller, Impeller shaft,
10
05
Volute casing. (system design approach)
Design of main component of gear pump Motor selection, Gear design,
Module Shaft design and bearing selection, Casing and bolt design, Suction and
10
06
delivery pipe.
Module Introduction to pressure vessel design.
04
07

- 307 -

Term Work:
The term work shall consist of
1. Design project: The design project shall consist of two imperial size sheets - one involving
assembly drawing with a part list and overall dimensions and the other involving drawings of
individual components, manufacturing tolerances, surface finish symbols and geometric
tolerances.
A design report giving all necessary calculations of the design of components and assembly
should be submitted in a separate file.
2. Assignments based on above topics.
NOTE:
Use of standard design data books like PSG Data Book, Design Data by Mahadevan is
permitted at the examination and shall be supplied by the college.
Text Books:
1) Shigley J.E. and Mischke C.R., Mechanical Engineering Design, McGraw Hill Pub. Co.
Ltd.
2) Bhandari V.B., Design of Machine Elements, Tata McGraw Hill Pub. Co. Ltd.
3) Design Data, P.S.G. College of Technology, Coimbatore.
References
1) Johnson R.C., Mechanical Design Synthesis with Optmisation Applications, VonNostrand-Reynold Pub.
2) Dieter G.E., Engineering Design, McGraw Hill Inc.
3) S.K. Basu and D.K. Pal Design of machine tools, Oxford and IBH
Pub.Co.
4) N.K.Mehta Machine tool design Tata McGraw Hill Pub. Co.
5) S.P. PATIL Mechanical System Design JAICO students Ed., JAICO Publishing House,
Delhi
6) Rudenko Material Handling Equipment M.I.R. publishers, Moscow
7) Pumps Sahu

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

- 308 -

Semester:-VIII

CLASS: BE(Mechanical )
SUBJECT: Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided
Code: ME - 452
Manufacturing /Computer Integrated Manufacturing
Lectures
04
Periods per week
Practicals
02
(each of 60 minutes )
Credit
05
Hours
Marks
In Semester
01
20 x 02
End Semester
03
100*
Evaluation System
Practical
-Term Work
50
TOTAL
150
*60%weightage for end semester
Course Objectives:
The general objectives of the course are to enable the students to
Understand the basic analytical fundamentals that are used to create and manipulate
geometric models in computer programs.
To visualize how the components looks like before its manufacturing or fabrication
To learn 2D & 3D transformations of the basic entities like line, circle, ellipse etc
To understand the different geometric modeling techniques like solid modeling,
surface modeling, feature based modeling etc.
To understand the different types of curves like Bezier curve, B-Spline curve &
Graphics Standards
To understand different Algorithms for optimization of drawing of basic entities
To understand NC,CNC and DNC technology and Concepts of compute integrated
manufacturing (CIM)
Course Outcomes:
At the end of the course the students shall be able to
Describe the mathematical basis in the technique of representation of geometric entities
including points, lines, and parametric curves, surfaces and solid, and the technique
of transformation of geometric entities using transformation matrix
Describe key neutral specifications and standards for product data
Students must be able to design parts in modern parametric CAD systems for
manufacturing on a Rapid Prototyping machine or a CNC machine.
Footprints of emerging breakthrough technologies are created in the areas of
CAD/CAM
Will be conversant with object oriented Programming skills in the areas of
CAD/CAM

- 309 -

Detailed Syllabus:
Sr. No.
Details
48Hrs.
INTRODUCTION
&
ELEMENTS
OF
INTERACTIVE
COMPUTER GRAPHICS
The Design process, the role of modeling & communication, modeling
using CAD, Product life cycle & CAD/ CAM, Concurrent engineering in
Module Product design & development, Collaborative Engineering, computers
08
for design Process, CAD System Architecture.
01
Two dimensional computer graphics, vector generation, the windowing
transformation, three dimensional Computer graphics, viewing
transformation, Visual realism, Hidden line removal & hidden surface
removal algorithm, Shading Algorithm, light & shade ray tracing.

Module
02

Module
03

Module
04

Module
05

TECHNIQUES FOR GEOMETRIC MODELING:


Graphic standards, The parametric representation of geometry, Bezier
curves, Cubic Spline curve, B-Spline curve, parametric representation of
line, circle, ellipse & parabola constructive solid geometry (CSG),
Boundary Representation (B-Rep), Wire Frame Modeling, Solid
Modeling, Surface Modeling, Parametric Modeling, feature based
modeling, Feature recognition, Design by feature.
GROUP TECHNOLOGY, CAPP, and CAQC
Introduction to GT, Part Families, parts Classification & Coding, GT
Machine cells, Benefits of GT.Introduction to Computer Aided Process
Planning (CAPP), Retrieval type Process Planning Systems, Generative
type Process Planning Systems, Benefits of CAPP, Artificial Intelligence
in CAPP,PFA, Similarity coefficient matrix.
Introduction to Computer Aided Quality Control (CAQC), Computers in
QC, Contact Inspection methods, Non Contact Inspection methods,
Computer Aided Testing, Integration of CAQC with CAD/CAM
NC, CNC & DNC TECHNOLOGY:
Introduction to NC,CNC & DNC systems along with its advantages &
disadvantages, Computer Aided Part Programming, Adaptive Control,
CNC programming concepts, Trends & new developments in NC, Part
programmers job, functions of a post processor, NC part programming
languages, Elements of a APT language, Constructional details of CNC
machines, Feedback devices- Velocity & displacement, Flexible
Manufacturing System (FMS), Rapid Prototyping
TRANSFORMATION, MAINPULATION & DATA STORAGE
2D & 3D Transformations, Concatenations, Matrix representation,
Problems & Object Oriented Programming on Transformations. Data
Structures for interactive modeling, Bill of materials from attribute data,
The use of Object Orientation & associatively, Engineering Data
Management System (EDMS), Relational Data Base for Design, Object
Oriented Database, Structured Query Language, Design information
Systems.

- 310 -

06

08

10

06

Module
06

Module
07

COMPUTER INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING


Introduction, Evolution, Objectives, CIM Hardware and Software, CIM
Benefits, Nature and role of the elements of CIM, Identifying CIM
needs, Data base requirements of CIM, Role of CAD/CAM in CIM,
Obstacles to Computer Integrated Manufacturing, Concept of the future
CIM systems, Socio -techno- economic aspects of CIM.

06

EMERGING AREAS in CAD/CAM & ITS INTEGRATION


SCENARIOS WITH OTHER INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES
Virtual Prototyping, Design for Manufacturing, Design for Assembly
and Dis- Assembly, Reverse Engineering and Data Capture techniques,
Artificial Intelligence in Design & Manufacturing, Representation of
Knowledge, and Knowledge base Engineering (KBE).
Green
Manufacturing, Virtual Reality(VR), Product Life Cycle Management
(PLM), Jupiter Technology, CAD-VR Integration, CAD-PLM
Integration

04

NOTE:
Module -1 & Module -2 will be for T1
Module -3 & Module -4 will be for T2

Term Work:
Term work shall consist of class assignments, 3D modeling on any advanced CAD Package,
Programming for transformations, Part Programming, and Part fabrication on CNC trainer.
Text Books:
1. CAD/CAM Computer Aided and Manufacturing by Mikell P. Groover and Emory
W. Zimmers, Jr., Eastern Economy Edition,PHI
2. CAD/ CAM , Theory & Practice by Ibrahim Zeid, R. Sivasubramanian, Tata
McGraw Hill Publications
3. Computer Graphics by Donald Hearn and M. Pauline Baker, Eastern Economy
Edition
4. CAD/CAM Principles, Practice and Manufacturing Management by Chris
McMahon, Jimmie Browne, Pearson Education
5. CAD/CAM/CIM by P. Radhakrishan, S. Subramanyan, V. Raju, New Age
International Publishers
6. CAD/CAM Principles and Applications by P.N. Rao, Tata McGraw Hill
Publications
7. Principle of Computer Graphics by William .M. Neumann and Robert .F. Sproul,
McGraw Hill Book Co. Singapore.
8. David L. Goetsch, Fundamental of CIM technology ,Delmar publication
9. David Bedworth, Computer Integrated Design and Manufacturing, McGraw Hill.
10. CNC Machines by B.S. Pabla and M. Adithan, New Age International Publishers.
- 311 -

11. Numerical Control and Computer Aided Manufacturing , T.K. Kundra, P.N. Rao,
N.K. Tiwari, Tata McGraw Hill
12. CNC Technology and Programming, Krar, S., and Gill, A., McGraw Hill publishers
13. Flexible Manufacturing Systems by H.K. Shivanand, M.M. Benal, V.Koti, New
Age International Publishers
14. "Automation, Production Systems and Computer Integrated Manufacturing ", Groover
M.P., Prentice-Hall of India Pvt. Ltd
15. Mathematical Elements for Computer Graphics, Rogers D F I and Adams J A,
McGraw-Hill.

Books and References:


1. Computer Integrated Manufacturing Hand Book by Eric Teicholz, Joel N. Orr,
McGraw Hill International Editions
2. Computer Integrated Manufacturing- An Introduction with Case Studies by Paul G.
Ranky, Prentice Hall International

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

- 312 -

SEMESTER: VIII

CLASS:B.E.(MECHANICAL)

CODE: ME453

Subject: Industrial Finance and Enterprise Resource Planning

Periods per week


(each of 60
minutes)

Lecture
Tutorial
Credit

Evaluation System

04
02
05
Hours
1
3
-

Marks
20*2
100*
50
150
*60% weightage for end semester

In Semester
End Semester*
Practical
Term Work
Total

Course Objective
5. This course aims to provide the students with the fundamental concepts, principles
and approaches of corporate finance.
6. To understand knowledge areas and tool techniques for Industrial Finance and
Enterprise Resource Planning
7. Understand the role of Finance Manager in an organization.
8. Develop an insight as to how Industrial Finance and Enterprise Resource Planning
tool/techniques are used strategically for the betterment of organization
Course Outcomes
1. The students will be able to apply the tools and techniques of Industrial Finance
and Enterprise Resource Planning in industrial environment.
2. To enable the students to apply relevant principles and approaches in solving
problems of corporate finance and help the students improve their overall
capacities.

Term work

Assignments based on above modules

Seminar based on recent advances in the subject

At least one Case study conducted at industry


Teaching Methods:
The course will use the following pedagogical tools:
A Discussion on concepts and issues on use of Industrial Finance and Enterprise Resource
Planning in an organization.
B Case discussion covering a cross section of gaining strategic advantage by applying
Industrial Finance and Enterprise Resource Planning tools and techniques.
C Projects/ Assignments/ Quizzes/ Class participation etc.
- 313 -

Module

Content

Lectures
TOTAL = 48
04

(A) Industrial Finance


1

Introduction
Basic types of financial management decisions, the role of the
financial manager, forms of business organizations, the goal of
financial management
Financial statements and cash flow
Balance sheet, income statement, cash flow, financial statement
analysis, computing cash flows; computing and interpreting
financial ratios; conducting trend analysis
The Time Value of Money
The time value of money, future value and compounding, present
value and discounting, uneven cash flow and annuity, discounted
cash flow valuation.
Capital budgeting
Concepts and procedures of capital budgeting, investment criteria
(net present value, payback, discounted payback, average
accounting return, internal rate of return, profitability index ),
incremental cash flows, scenario analysis, sensitivity analysis,
break-even analysis, operating leverage
ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING
ERP- Conceptual overview, Critical components, Structure,
Evolution and Architecture of ERP, Best Practices and Business
process reengineering issues in ERP, ERP- Overview of
functional modules like
Manufacturing and Purchase Module: A functional
overview
Finance Module-A functional overview
Sales & Distribution Module-A functional Overview &
similarly for other modules also

04

08

08

Integration scenarios of ERP with other ICT systems:

ERP+CRM Integration
ERP+PLM Integration
ERP+WMS integration
ERP+MES Integration

ERP-Implementation
ERP Systems in India, ERP Audit, Case Study of Success &
Failure of ERP systems in Industries, Future of ERP, Challenges
of ERP implementation, Tangible and Intangible Benefits of ERP.

- 314 -

08

08

S.N.
Title
Author
Text books
1
Fundamentals of Corporate Ross, Westfield & Jordon
Finance, 9th edition,
2
3
4

Financial Management

Publication
The McGraw-Hill
Companies, Inc., 2009

Prasanna Chandra

Reference Books
Principles
of
Corporate Brealey, Myers & Allen,
Finance, 9th edition,

The McGraw-Hill
Companies, Inc., 2007.

Financial
Management: Brigham & Ehrhardt,
Theory and Practice,
Fundamentals of Financial Horne & Wachowicz,
Management

Cengage
2002.
Pearson
Inc., 2005.

Enterprise Resource Planning Leon Alexis

Concept in ERP

The
McGraw-Hill
Companies, Inc., 2008
Thomson, Singapore

1
2
3

Brady, Monk & Wangner

- 315 -

Learning,
Education,

SEMESTER:-VIII
CODE :ME-456
Periods per week
(each of 60 minutes)

CLASS: BE (MECHANICAL)
SUBJECT: ELECTIVE-II INDUSTRIAL ROBOTICS
Lectures
Practicals
Tutorials
Credit

04
-02
05
Hours
01
03
--

In Semester
End Semester
Evaluation System
Practical
Term Work
TOTAL
*60%weightage for end semester

Marks
20 x 2
100*
--50
150

Detailed Syllabus:
Sr. No.
Details
Hrs.
1.1 INTRODUCTION: Automation & robotics, Robotic System &
Anatomy Classification, Future Prospects
1.2 DRIVES: Control Loops, Basic Control System Concepts & Models,
Control System Analysis, Robot Activation & Feedback Components,
Module Position & Velocity Sensors, Actuators, Power Transmission Systems.
8
1.3 ROBOT & ITS PERIPHERALS: End Effecters - types,
01
Mechanical & other grippers, Tool as end effecter
1.4 SENSORS: Sensors in Robotics, Tactile Sensors, Proximity &
Range Sensors, Sensor Based Systems, Uses Vision Systems Equipment
2 MACHINE VISION: Introduction, Low level & High level vision,
Module
Sensing & Digitising, Image processing & analysis, Segmentation, Edge
8
02
detection, Object description & recognition, Interpretation, Applications
3 PROGRAMMING FOR ROBOTS: Methods, Robot programme as a
Module path in space, Motion interpolation, level & task level languages, Robot
8
03
languages; Programming in suitable languages Characteristics of robot.
Module 4 ROBOT KINEMATICS: Forward, Reverse - & Homogeneous
7
Transformations, Manipulator Path Control, Robot Dynamics.
04
5 ROOT INTELLGENCE & TASK PLANNING: Introduction, State
Module
space search, Problem reduction, Use of predictive logic, Means -Ends
9
05
Analysis, Problem solving, Robot learning,- Robot task planning.
6.1 ROBOTIC APPLICATION IN MANUFACTURING: Material
8
Module transfer, Machine loading & unloading, Processing operations, Assembly
& Inspectors, Robotic Cell Design & Control.
06
Module
07

6.2 SOCIAL ISSUES & ECONOMICS OF ROBOTICS

- 316 -

Term Work:
Term work shall consist of minimum 06 assignments at least one on each module,
programming of robots

References:
1. Robotics for Engineers - Yorem Koren
2. Robotics in Practice - J. F. Engelberger
3. Computer Integrated Manufacturing Technology and Systems - Ulrich rembolds, Christial
Blume .
4. Computer Aided Design in Mechanical Engineering - Ramamurthy
5. Robot Dynamics and Control by Mark Spong, Wiley India
6. Robotics - John Craig
7. Robot manipulators: mathematics, Programming and Control - Paul r p
8. Industrial Robotics - Groover and Simmers
9. Measurement systems - Ernest deoblin
10. Mechanical Measurements - Beckwith and Lewisbuck
11. Modern control Engineering - K. Ogata ,PHI
12. Automatic -Control- Systems - Benjamin Kuo, Wiley India
13. Robotic Engineering An Integrated approach - Richard D. KIafter and et. al. PHI
14. Intelligent Robotic Systems - Spyros G. Tzafestas

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

- 317 -

Semester: VIII
Code: ME - 457

Class: BE (Mechanical)
SUBJECT: Elective II Supply Chain Management
Lectures
04
Practicals
02
Periods per week.
(each of 60 minutes)
Tutorials
-Credit
05
Hours
Marks
In Semester
01
20 x 2
Theory Examination
03
100
Practical
--Evaluation System
Term Work
50
TOTAL
150
*60%weightage for end semester
Course Objectives
To learn to apply tools & techniques of Supply Chain Management in real life
industrial environment
To think logically to design the tailor made new techniques which will enhance the
effectiveness of the domain of Supply Chain Management.
To design Tailor made Supply Chain Management for a typical requirement which
will face the new challenges.
Course Outcomes
The students will be able to apply the tools and techniques of Supply Chain
Management in real life industrial environment.
The students will be able to think logically to design the tailor made new philosophy,
principles, theories which will enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of the domain
of Supply Chain Management the industries.
In general the students will be able the design the Tailor made Supply Chain
Management system for a typical requirement which will face the new challenges of
the industrial environment.
Detailed Syllabus:
Sr. No.
Details
Hrs.
1. INTRODUCTION TO SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT:
Current Business Scenario, Value Matrix Analysis, Evolution of SCM
Module
Function, Theme and Pillars of SCM System, How Supply chain works? 04
01
Participants in the Supply Chain, Supply chain drivers, Supply chain
structure
2.SUPPLY CHAIN OPERATIONS:
2.1 Planning and Sourcing
Demand forecasting ,Pricing and Promotional Impacts on demand, CPFR
Concepts, CODP Concepts, Consensus Forecasting, Demand and
Module
PricingOptimization
12
02
2.2 Making and Delivering
Product Design, Production Scheduling, Facility Management, Order
Management, Delivery Scheduling, Distribution network design,
channels of Distribution, Plant and warehouse location.
- 318 -

Module
03

Module
04

Module
05

Module
06

Module
07

3. MATERIALS MANAGEMENT IN SUPPLY CHAIN


Scope, importance, classification of materials, Procurement, Purchasing
policies, vendor development and evaluation, Inventory control systems
of stock replenishment, Cost elements
New Supply Planning Paradigms, VMI, CMI,Green Channel supply, KM
Model of Supplier Partnership, Multi-tier Supplier Partnerships Use of
computers for materials function.
4. LOGISTICS
LogisticsEvolution, 8 wings of Logistics,
Distribution Network Systems, Warehousing and Inventory Cross-Docs,
Multi-Modal Optimization, Inbound and Outbound handling,
Containerization, TPL, FPL, MPL Partnering,Reverse Logistics
5.TRANSPORTATION: Individual Freight and passenger modes,
intermodal transportation and third party transportation services,
economic social, and political roles of transportation, demand, cost and
service characteristics of different transport services, carrier selection and
evaluation methods, contracting for transportation services, freight rate
structure, Private fleet management, Claim management, International
transportation, Ocean carrier management, port administration and
regulation, costing and pricing issues of international transportation,
logistics, cost transport mode choice, Dispatch decisions, routing
decisions, routing Models, packaging to suit mode of Transport
6. SUPPLY CHAIN COORDINATION AND USE OF
TECHNOLOGY
The Bullwhip Effect, Supply Chain Coordination factors, Collaborative
Planning, Forecasting, and Replenishment, supported information
systems, E-Business and Supply Chain Integration, SCM systems
Vendors, Types of Applications, Optimization Modeling, E-Business and
Systems Integrations from ERP to SCM, KM, APS Systems, Further
integration to CRM
7.1 MEASURING PERFORMANCE: SUPPLY CHAIN METRICS
Market Performance Categories, Framework for Performance
Measurement,, Internal Efficiency Metrics, Demand Flexibility Metrics,
Product Development Metrics,
Benchmarking and SCM SCORE modeling
7.2 TOTAL DISTRIBUTION COST ANALYSIS

08

10

07

07

Term Work:
Case Study /Course Project: Report of 10 - 15 pages on any topic from syllabus. Term work
shall consist of minimum 06 assignments

Text Books:
1. Supply Chain Management Theories and Practices(Set) by R.P. Mohanty and S. G.
Deshmukh , Biztantra Publication.
2. Supply Chain Management: Concepts and Cases, by Altekar Rahul V., Prentice Hall
of India, 2005
3. Supply Chain Management by Janat Shah, Pearson Publication.
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Reference Books:
1. Logistics and Supply Chain Management, Martin Christopher, Richard Irwin
2. Principles of Supply ChainManagement, Joel Wisner, G. Keong, Cengage Learning
Modeling the Supply Chain by , Jeremy F. Shapiro, Thomson Learning Publication

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

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Semester: VIII
Code : ME- 458
Periods per week
(each of 60 minutes)

CLASS: BE (Mechanical)
SUBJECT: ELECTIVE -II AUTOMOBILE ENGINEERING
Lectures
04
Practicals
02
Tutorials
-Credit
05
Hours
Marks
In Semester
End Semester
3
100*
Evaluation System
Practical
---Term Work
-50
TOTAL
150
*60%weightage for end semester
Course Objectives:
This syllabus is composed for engineering students from varied backgrounds to
include mechanical, aeronautical, electrical, and astronautical engineering.
Automobile engineer must be familiar with this subject to know commercial
considerations, such as economics, marketing, and sales.
Students must be familiar with different operations of spark ignition engines and
compression ignition engines.
This syllabus is associated with the engine and includes belt drives, air conditioning,
and the starting and charging systems.
Students must be done analysis of both manual and automatic transmissions,
driveshaft design, and four- and all wheel-drive systems.
Course Outcomes:
This subject gives knowledge regarding analytical design of the complete motor
vehicle, and informative knowledge of Vehicle Body Engineering.
Knowledge of this subject is helpful for students in current motor vehicle design.
It is hoped that this syllabus will help to inspire students new to Automotive
Engineering to take up career paths in this field of engineering involved with vehicle
design.
Detailed Syllabus:
Sr. No.
Details
Introduction: Classification of automobiles.
Automobile power plant: constructional features of different types of
engines used in Automobiles, their characteristics, study of various
engine components and their materials.
Vehicle performance: Tractive force, Tractive force Vs Vehicle speed,
Module
resistance to motion of the Vehicle Rolling and gradient resistance,
01
power requirement for acceleration and gradeability, maximum
acceleration for front wheel drive Rear wheel drive four wheel drive
Vehicles, selection of suitable real axle and gear ratios.
Maintenance and troubleshooting aspects of: clutches, gear box,
brakes
Transmission Systems: Study of Propeller shaft and universal joint, live
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Hrs.

08

Module
02

Module
03

Module
04

Module
05

Module
06

Module
07

axle and differential


Steering and front axles: Steering geometry, Steering requirements,
Steering linkages and Steering gears, over Steer and under Steer,
cornering power, reversibility of Steering gears, types of front axles and
their constructions, troubleshooting and remedies.
Suspension systems: objects of Suspension, basic requirements, types of
Suspension, shock absorbers.
Wheels and tyres: requirements of Wheels and tyres, constructional
features, types of tyres, application to ride and stability, troubleshooting
and remedies.
Electrical system: study of different types of batteries, study of
electronic ignition system, study of charging system, study of starting
system.
Lighting system: types of lamps, Energy demands of lighting system,
construction and types of head lamps.
Vehicle Body Design: importance of body design, material for body
constructions styling forms coach and bus body style, layouts of
passenger
cars,
bus
and
Truck
bodies.
Aerodynamic drag aerodynamic lifts, pitching moments, side force,
yawing
moments
and
rolling
moments.
Basic dimensions: geometrical relations to driver seat, dimensions of
foot and pedal control, passenger seats, vehicle dimensions and visibility.
Chassis types and structure types: open semi integral pedal and integral
bus
structures.
Frames: function and types loads on frames, load distribution of
structure.
Vehicle vibration and dynamics: types of vibration, vibration control,
effect of vibration on human body, Drivers comfort and passengers
comfort vehicle vibration with single degree of vibration.
Different accessories used in vehicles: Electric Horn, Wipers, Fuel
pump, power operated windows, etc.
Vehicle maintenance and servicing : Importance of vehicle
maintenance, primitive maintenance, break down maintenance, corrective
maintenance, overhaul major and minor, engine and chassis lubrication,
types
of
lubricants.
Recent trends in automobile: Electronic control module(ECM),
Operating modes of ECM ( Closed loop and Open Loop), inputs required
and output signals from ECM, electronic spark control, air management
system,
ideal
speed
control.
Multipoint fuel injection (MPFI) system and Single point fuel
injection, electronic fuel injectors: principal of operations, construction,
working and application of temperature sensors, inductive sensors,
position sensors, pressure sensors, knock sensors, hot wire and thin film
air flow sensors, vortex flow/ turbine fluid sensors, optical sensors,
oxygen sensors, light sensors, methanol sensors, and rain sensors.
New Developments in sensors technology.

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06

06

06

06

05

05

List of experiments:
assignments and laboratory experiments of ( any 8 )
1. Study of ignition and charging system.
2. Study of starting system, lighting system and battery.
3. Study of suspension system.
4. Study of basic dimension and vehicle layout.
5. Study of computer control engine.
6. Study of wheels and tiers.
7. Study of vehicle maintenance.
8. Study of different drives.
9. Study of steering system.

Term work :
Term work shall consists of minimum Eight experiments, assignments.

Text Books:
1.Automoilbe engineering by Kirpal Singh, Vol l & ll
2. Automobile mechanics by N.K.Giri.
3. The Automobile engineering by T.R.Banga and Nathu Singh.
4. Principle of vehicle dynamics by Steeds .
5. Auto design by R.B.Gupta

References:
1. Automobile by Harbans Singh REyat.
2. Vehicle body engineering by J Powlowski.
3. Computerised Engine control by Dick King.
4. Automotive mechanics by William Crouse.
5. Motor vehicles by Newton and Steeds.

Sr. No.

Examination

Module

1
2
3

T-1
T-2
Final Examination

Module 1 and 2
Module 3 and 4
Module 1 to 7

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PROJECT
ME455

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