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A SYNOPSIS

On

A USES OF WINE IN CONTINENTAL COOKERY

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement of the Degree


of Bachelor of Science
in
Hospitality and Hotel Administration
Under the Guidance of :

Submitted by:-

Ms. Sujata Mathur


Mr. Gaurav Vishal

Dharmesh Kumar
B.Sc.(Hospitality). Sem. VI
Roll. No. : 122983

INSTITUTE OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT


LUCKNOW
Session : 2012-15
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INTRODUCTION
Continental cuisine, or alternatively Continental cuisine, is a generalised term
collectively

referring

countries.[1] Continental

to
cuisine

the cuisines of Europe and


or

Continental

cuisine

other Continental
includes

that

of Europe including (depending on the definition) that ofRussia,[1] as well as nonindigenous cuisines of North America, Australasia, Oceania, andLatin America,
which derive substantial influence from Continental settlers in those regions. The
term is used by East Asians to contrast with Asian styles of cooking.[2] (This is
analogous to Westerners referring collectively to the cuisines of East Asian
countries asAsian cuisine.) When used by Westerners, the term may sometimes
refer more specifically to cuisine in Europe or continental; in this context, a
synonym is Continental cuisine, especially in British English.

INTRODUCTION
The production of wine is indeed a process of complex nature, from
the initial wine grape nurturing at the vineyard to the winery
activities to extract the juices from these grapes. To what extent
do these activities consume energy and produce emissions,
however? In the past this area of beverage production has not
come under much scrutiny as far as environmental loads, due to
the nature of its resources and production. Therefore, the life cycle
of wine will be explored to further detail stages in the process of
concern and to provide areas of improvement in account of
sustainability to health and the environment.

In recent years, new product on the market, ecological wine (or


organic wine) has been emerging with quite rapid success, along
with many other organic foods which now see popular demand.
But, what exactly makes eco-wine more fashionable? Upon the
mere mentioning of the term eco-wine, a reaction from many of
the general public is of conundrum and concern. This follows by
the words, what is it, and what makes it different?
Consequently, a thrill to learn more ensues. Wine is indeed a drink
of luxurious and social status, and the assumption that a particular
wine is of environmental concern only adds to the novelty and
conversational value associated with its consumption.

OVERVIEW OF THE WINE PRODUCTION PROCESS


Wine production is a technique of great regard and complexity to
produce a beverage enjoyed worldwide. The process begins at the
vineyard, where wine grapes using special techniques for cultivating and
maintaining the crop, depending upon the species of grape and type of
wine associated. Thereafter, the grapes are harvested, upon which they
are then either extracted of their juices, called the must, in a process
called crushing either mechanically or by treading, the traditional
method of basically stepping on the grapes in a large container. Red
wines, as described in this report, are fermented with their skins and
pips, from which alcohol that is produced during the fermenting process
will begin to extract colouring and tannins of the skins and seeds, giving
wine its colour. Fermentation commences by adding the juices and skins
together, which contain natural yeasts then producing alcohol and
carbon dioxide. Henceforth, the wine is then introduced into a series of
processes called clarifying where the skins and other debris are filtered,
fined and kept at constant temperature. Hereafter wine undergoes
measures to ensure that the wine will not spoil and produce haze, called
stabilization by addition of chemicals and constant temperature storage.
Wine must then be aged for some time, in a process named aging, and
thereafter bottled and transported to the end user. The whole process can
take considerable time, from several months to years depending upon the
degree of quality to be achieved.
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OBJECTIVE
From the details and data associated with the production cycle in the
wine production industry, a life cycle assessment shall provide
information on relevant impacts to environment, human health and more
of wine production. The contributions of each sub-process is of great
importance in order to classify wine and know the areas which create the
most problems, to be later compared and discussed about with further
context to a new type of wine, ecological wine or organic wine.
Subsequent to the investigation into the life cycle of regular wine
production, the ecological variety will be compared, not with numbers,
but by the areas which it employs as a way to reduce impacts to the
environment. Shortcomings in the process of regular wine will be thus
compared with areas of highlight for ecological wine, and the efficiency
of each stage justified. Therefore, the following report wishes to conduct
an assessment of whether or not an ecological product, such as wine, is
truly more sustainable or comparatively equal to its normal counterpart.
The report also aims to identify whether the labelling of ecological
wine is fair to class, while the regular wine will be compared, in turn, to
assess its impacts and possible similarities with an ecological product.

In retrospect, the specific aims of this report shall include:

consume energy and introduce

emissions in wine production.

Identify the crucial activities/stages in the wine production

which establish the largest impacts.

reduce impacts.

re of ecological wine in respect to regular

wine

LIST OF TERMS USED

Vineyard- The farm where wine grapes are grown for wine

production.

Wine grapes- Special grapes used for wine production .

Viticulture- The science, cultivation and study of grape growing.

Fermentation- The process by which grape sugar turns into

alcohol and carbon dioxide.

Winery- A winery is a facility where fruit, usually grapes, is

processed into wine. Some wineries are located on the same site as the
vineyard whose grapes they process, while others process grapes they
purchase from vineyards many away from their production site.

Clarification- umbrella term for a host of processes designed to

ensure wine is crystal clear, including fining, filtration and


refrigeration.

Treading(Crushing)-

an

important

winemaking

operation

involving literally pressing the juice (white wines) or astringent press


wine out of the skins.

Stabilization- umbrella term for all the winemaking operations

designed to stop wines developing a fault in bottle such as a haze,


cloud or fizz, no matter what the storage conditions. It is practiced
most brutally on everyday wines.

RESEARCH OBJECTIVES

1. To find the Overview of wines in Continental cooking.


2. To find the Cuisine of wines in Continental cooking.
3. To find the Food of wines in Continental cooking.
4. To find the Dishes of wines in Continental cooking.
5. To find the Dining of wines in Continental cooking.
6. To find the Receipes of wines in Continental cooking.
7. To find the Food Style of wines in Continental cooking.
8. To find the Food Equipment of wines in Continental cooking.

METHODOLOGY

1.Desk research, which includes: books, Internet, magazines and journals.


2.Through personal and telephonic interviews.
3.Through correspondence with export managers, owners of vineyards and
eminent people in the industry by means of e-mail and paper mail.
4. By attending shows, seminars, lectures, talks, forums, etc.

LIMITATIONS

1. Non-availability of appropriate books regarding the subject.


2. Contradictory statements regarding Continental food in different books.
3. Lack of opportunities to solve queries regarding Continental Food.
4. Since the subject of Continental food is a very new one, gaining
knowledge from the people concerned was very difficult as few experts
are available in this field.
5. Trying to gain access to these experts to interview them was another
problem.

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DATA ANALYSIS
Q.1 How often do you dine out?

Weekly

Fortnightly

Monthly

Seldom go out

weekly

19%
40%
19%

fortnightly
monthly
seldom go out

22%

As shown in pie-chart 39% consumer consumes Continental food weekly and 23% consumes
fortnightly so that we can say 62% consumers consumes both weekly & fortnightly.

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Q.2 When you dine out which cuisine do you pefer the most?

Continental

Punjabi

Gujrati

Chinese

15%

Awadhi
Punjabi
Gujrati
Chinese

29%

20%
36%

Above pie- chart shows that 36% consumers prefer Continental cuisine ;29% consumers prefer
Continental cuisine; 20% Gujrati cuisine and 15% Chinese.

Q.3 How did you come to know about this cuisine?

Friends

Television

Newspaper

Any other source

0%
7%
friends
television

26%

news paper

67%

any other source

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This is shown in pie-chart that 67% consumers come to know about Continental cuisine through
friends;26% consumers through news paper;7% through television and 0% through any other
source.

Q.5 Which of the Continental cuisine characteristics do you prefer the most?

Spices and Flavour

Richness of cuisine

Cooking Methods

All the above

spices and flavour

30%

40%

richness
cooking methods

15%

all the above

15%

Above pie- chart shows that 40% consumers like all the qualities of
Continental cuisine;30% enjoys spices and flavour .

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Q.6 What shortcomings do you feel that Continental cuisine has?

Too rich

Too oily

Lengthy cooking Methods

All the above

Unavailability of authentic cuisine at your place

15%

too rich

30%
15%

too oily
unavailability
all the above

40%

As shown in pie- chart 40% consumer feel that it is unavailable at their place;30% feel that it is
too oily and too rich & 30% feel all the short comings it has.

Q.7 How do you think that any changes in the Continental cuisine will help in the
betterment of the same?

Yes

No

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25%
yes
no

75%

75% consumer feels that Continental food is already so good So it does not need any changes.

Q.8 How do you rate the aroma of Continental food?

Excellent

Good

Fine

Poor

3%
10%

excellent
good
54%

33%

fine
poor

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As shown in pie chart 54% consumers rate the aroma of Continental food excellent;33% rate
good;10% rate its taste fine & only 3% rate poor.

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Q.9 How often do you cook Continental cuisine?

Daily

Weekly

Fortnightly

Do not cook

19%
40%
19%

weekly
fortnightly
monthly
do not cook

22%

Research shows that 39% consumers cook Continental food weekly at there home & 23%
made fortnightly.

Q.10 How do you rate the taste of Continental food ?

Excellent

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Good
Fine
Poor

5%
8%

excellent
good

52%

35%

fine
poor

As shown in pie chart 52% consumers rate the taste of Continental food excellent; 35% rate
good;8% rate its taste fine & only 5% rate poor.

Q.11. How do you rate the quality of Continental food ?

Excellent
Good
Fine
Bad

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19%
40%

excellent

As shown in pie chart 39% consumer rate quality of Continental food excellent; 23% rate it
good; 19%rate it fine; and 19%rate it bad.

Q.12 How do you rate the Presentation of Continental food ?

Excellent
Good
Fine
Poor

10%

4%
excellent
good

35%

51%

fine

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poor

As shown in pie chart 51% consumers rate the presentation of Continental food excellent;35%
rate good;10% rate its taste fine & only 4% rate poor.

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CONCLUSION

One of the old & richest cuisine of India has now become limited in small
region.

They has been great attempt at bringing back the glory of the past.
There are no famous chefs except chef qureshi who really done the great
work for the Cuisine of Continental .

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BIBLIOGRAPHY
INTERNET
www.google.com
www.ask.com

NEWSPAPER
Hindustan Times
The Times of India

MAGAZINE
First City
FHRAI
Hotelier

HOTEL

Clark Awadh, Lucknow

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CHAPTER SCHEME
Preface
Research objectives
Review of literature
Research methodology
Data analysis & interpretation
Conclusions & recommendations
Appendix
Bibliography

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