Sie sind auf Seite 1von 108

DECEMBER 2014 ` 175

Architecture is the
learned game, correct and
magnificent, of forms
assembled in the light...

DESIGN FOR RECREATION

Le Corbusier

Mikko Laakkonen

PRODUCT DESIGN

VOLUME 31

ISSUE 12

42

13

ABOUT THE ISSUE

16

REFLECTIONS

18

UPDATES
VIEWPOINTS

26

The quest for a holistic city planning process


By Ram Sharma

DESIGN FOR RECREATION


36

42

58

72

84

Lyrical Composition
Bombay Arts Society, Mumbai
Sanjay Puri Architects. Mumbai
Creating Immersive Experience
Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium, Montreal
Cardin Ramirez Julien + Edifica, Canada
Layered Interfaces
Hotel Mana, Ranakpur, Udaipur
Architecture Discipline, New Delhi
Hanseatic Gateway
Steigenberger Hotel Bremen, Bremen
JOI-Design, Germany
Connecting the Rhythms of Nature
City Centre Raipur, Chhattisgarh
Studio for Architecture Landscape Interior & Enterprise Pvt Ltd,
Kolkata

108

36
92

100

108

114

126

Classical in Style
Evershine Key Resort, Mahabaleshwar, Maharashtra
Ahmed & Associates, Mumbai
The greatest challenge in designing
the auditorium was acoustics...
Philharmony in Koszalin, Poland
Autorska Pracownia Architektoniczna - Jacek Bulat,
Poland
the building is a simple yet distinctive
architectural compostition
Stonehenge Visitor Centre, Wiltshire
Denton Corker Marshall, London
PROJECT FEATURE
Play of Forms
Corporate Office for Shivganga Prestressed Pipes,
Maharashtra
ENSO Architects, Bangalore
EXPLORING DESIGN
Profile of Mikko Laakkonen

about the issue


DECEMBER 2014 ` 175

Architecture is the
learned game, correct and
magnificent, of forms
assembled in the light...

DESIGN FOR RECREATION

Le Corbusier

Mikko Laakkonen

PRODUCT DESIGN

VOLUME 31

ISSUE 12

Philharmony, Koszalin, Poland


[Architects: Autorska
Pracownia Architektoniczna Jacek Bulat
(APA JACEK BULAT)]

All drawings and visuals for the


projects and articles, unless
mentioned otherwise, are
courtesy the architects/authors.

Image
of
the

Month

A N

I N D I A N

J O U R N A L

O F

A R C H I T E C T U R E

ut of the many typologies that architecture encapsulates, recreational


architecture is one of the few that provides immense flexibility to the designer
to meaningfully explore and experiment with form and functionality. Whether
it is a hotel, a resort, an auditorium or then a shopping mall, the contemporary
vocabulary for all of them has gradually evolved with the changing lifestyle and
requirements. With the corporatisation of architecture, elements such as landscape
have further come to the forefront and are important ingredients for a visually smart
and sustainable end-product. In fact, they are now very much incorporated at the
concept stage itself. The aid of architectural software further enhances the important
role of structural configurationsand provides that impetus to the architects to
imaginatively and boldly mould design. This Issue focuses on some projects designed
for recreational facilities that give us an insight to emerging contemporary concepts.
These projects are evolutions related to a locale and derive their strength from the
cultural context.
The highlighting feature here is that all these projects carry forward a modern
idiom balanced with traditional and historic overtones. Take the case of the City
Centre at Raipur where the faade embodies traditional elements with cultural
connotations for this mixed-use development. The auditorium in Poland attempts to
become a part of the surroundings with mature trees on the banks of a river. The
planetarium in Montreal is a play of conical forms incorporating cutting-edge
technologies. And not to forget the Ranakpur hoteldescribed by the architects as an
exploration of the local and regional forms of expression as vital resources to create
an architecture that engages with the future and is of a progressive disposition.
Another building with a distinctive architectural composition is the Stonehenge
Centre, Wiltshire. It sets very lightly on the ground with a fundamental design concept
of reversibilitythe ability to return the site to its current state. The building would
last as long as it needs to, but could if necessary be removed leaving little permanent
impact to the landscape. And yes, do view the Bombay Art Society project in
Mumbai which is a bold
statement of a sculptured free
flowing form.
Product designer Mikko
Laakkon recently won the
Finnish Designer Award 2014.
We carry a brief profile that
brings forth his ingenuity in
dealing with materials with
rhythm. His furniture pieces
display modern abstractness
with a purpose.

Street Art: RING II, Mirror Installation at the Art Festival 2014, held at The Echapes belles in Alenon

Architecture is the constant fight between man and nature, the fight to overwhelm nature, to possess it.
The first act of architecture is to put a stone on the ground. That act transforms a condition of nature into
a condition of culture; Its a holy act.

Mario Botta

Life is not just a series of


calculations and a sum total of
statistics, its about experience, it is
about participation, it is something
more complex and more interesting
than what is obvious.
Daniel Libeskind

ARCHITECTURE+ DESIGN
A

Editor-In-Chief SUNEET PAUL

Architectural Assistant ASHNA PURI

Senior Sub Editor POTSHANGBAM JULY

Secretarial Co-Ordinator PRITI SHRIVASTAVA


Creative Director BIPIN KUMAR
Assistant Art Director JOHN ROY

Marketing Designer UPPALLI DAVID


Assistant Manager JOY TALAPATRA (Bengaluru), Tel: 080-22219578, Fax: 080-22243428
Assistant Manager D KARTHIK (Chennai), Tel: 044-2814186, 044-28140159
Sr General Manager SUJIT BOSE (Kolkata), Tel: 033-40042815, 033-22805323
Regional Manager REKHA BILLAVA (Mumbai), Tel: 022-42467777
National Head SONALI ROY (New Delhi), Tel: 0124-4759691, Mobile: +919810640362
Manager GANESH DIXIT (New Delhi), Tel: 0124-4759693, Mobile: +919711419392

SALES

Manager - Activation Sales NEERAJ RAWAT (New Delhi)


Tel: 0124-4759692, Fax: 0124-4759550

MARKETING

Deputy General Manager SUNIL DUBEY


Sr Manager RITESH ROY
Pre-Press Executive BRIJESH KUMAR JUYAL

PRODUCTION

C P SREEDHARAN

MANAGER SCHEDULING
SATHYA NARAYANA T S (South)
SOMNATH PRAMANIK (East)
SUBASH MISHRA (West)

REGIONAL MANAGERS

SONYA CAROLINE SHAH

MANAGER HR

Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd.


Plot No. 323, Udyog Vihar, Phase-4
Gurgaon-122016, Haryana
Ph: 0124-4759500; Fax: 0124-4759550
Editorial E-mail: aplusd@emmindia.com, paul@emmindia.com

EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING OFFICE

Call: Gurgaon: 0124-4759616/17


Mobile: 09899414369, Fax: 0124-4759550
Mumbai: 022-42467777
Bengaluru: 080-22219578, Fax: 080-22243428
Chennai: Telefax: 044-28141816
Kolkata: 033-40042815, Telefax: 033-22805323
Email: subscriptionsupport@emmindia.com
Web: www.mediatransasiaindia.com

FOR SUBSCRIPTION

ARCHITECTURE+ DESIGN
A

Indias Most Authentic


Architectural Magazine.
D

Over 29 Years of Invigorating


Architectural Journalism.
It portrays the modern trends in
planning, building technology,
research and development,
project profiles, conservation and
environmental issues, product
information and much more...

INTERNATIONAL SALES & ADVERTISING

FRANCE/LUXEMBOURG
MARION BADOLLE-FEICK
Tel: +33 1 72 71 25 24,
Marion.Badolle-Feick@burda.com

AUSTRIA & SWITZERLAND


GORAN VUKOTA, Tel: +41 44 81 02 146,
Goran.Vukota@burda.com
ITALY
MARIOLINA SICLARI
Tel: +39 02 91 32 34 66,
Mariolina.Siclari@burda.com

UK + IRELAND
JEANNINE SOELDNER
Tel: +44 20 3440 5832,
Jeannine.Soeldner@burda.com

GERMANY
VANESA NOETZEL
Tel: +49 89 9250 3532,
Vanessa.Noetzel@burda.com

MICHAEL NEUWIRTH
Tel: +49 89 9250 3629,
Michael.Neuwirth@burda.com

USA + CANADA + MEXICO


SALVATORE ZAMMUTO
Tel: +1 212 884 48 24,
Salvatore.Zammuto@burda.com

Chief Executive Officer PIYUSH SHARMA


Chief Financial Officer PUNEET NANDA

Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd.


Director PARINEETA SETHI
Publishing Director RASINA UBEROI BAJAJ
EMM IS A COMPANY OF THE BURDA GROUP
Hubert Burda Media India Pvt. Ltd.
Managing Director MASSIMO MONTI

Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd.


To Subscribe,
CALL : +91- 124-4759-616
E-Mail : circulation@emmindia.com,
subscriptionsupport@emmindia.com
To ADVERTISE,
CALL : +91- 124-4759-691

Hubert Burda Media, Asia


Chief Executive Officer JULIE SHERBORN
Burda Holding International GmbH
Managing Director FABRIZIO DANGELO

Entire contents Copyright 2014 Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd., 323 Udyog Vihar, Phase IV, Gurgaon 122016, Haryana, India. All rights reserved
throughout the world. Reproduction or translation in any language in whole or in part without the consent of Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd. is prohibited.
Requests for permission should be directed to Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd. Published by Xavier Collaco from Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd., 323
Udyog Vihar, Phase IV, Gurgaon 122016, Haryana, India. Printed at Galaxy Offset (India) P.Ltd. B-83, Naraina Industrial Area, Phase-II New Delhi-110028.
Editor: Suneet Paul. Architecture+Design does not take responsibility for returning unsolicited publication material. All disputes are subject to the exclusive
jurisdiction of competent courts and forums in Delhi/New Delhi only. Opinions expressed in the articles are of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those
of the editors or publishers. While the editors do their utmost to verify information published they do not accept responsibility for its absolute accuracy.
Unsolicited material is sent at the owners risk and the publisher accepts no liability for loss or damage. All correspondence regarding advertising or editorial
should be addressed to Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd., 323 Udyog Vihar, Phase IV, Gurgaon 122016, Haryana, India.

Reflections

Part to Whole
Photo credit: Kyungsub Shin

Part to Whole is an installation designed by Korean-based


architectural design studio HG-A|LIVE COMPONENTS at
the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in
Seoul, Korea. It is a space defined by the whole coming
from the flow of repetition. The set of circles moving along
the curves construct a continuous void space. It digs the
specific volume out of the cube, which maximises
available space and minimises materials at the same time.
The whole mass consists of 50% voids and 50% solids.
Depending on the peoples positions and views, it creates
2D patterns by points or lines, which produces 3D space
and form. Its structure is constructed of 9076 pieces of
wood and it shows the qualities of tectonics through
weaving and stacking the wooden modules.

16

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

Updates
Fast Track Architecture

he Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) and ADaRSH


(Association for Development and Research of Sustainable
Habitats) recently organised a Green Tour of the Indira
Paryavaran Bhawan, Indias first net zero energy building, which
has been constructed through the adoption of solar passive
design and energy efficient building material. The building has
got GRIHA 5-Star (provisional) rating for the adoption of green
building strategies.
The building is an earthquake resistant structure, with a total
plinth area of 31,488 sq m. The building covers only 30 per
cent of the total area, while more than 50 per cent area,
outside the building, is a soft area with plantation and grassing.
The building has a robotic parking system in the basement that
can accommodate about 330 cars. Green materials have been
used, such as fly ash bricks, regional building materials, materials
with high recyclable content, high reflectance terrace tiles and
rock wool insulation of outer walls.
Speaking about the energy efficiency of the building, Mili

oronto-based design firm +tongtongs


has come up with their latest project
Her Majestys Pleasure. Situated at the

base of a newly occupied condominium


building on King Street West, Toronto, the
project comprises a caf, a retail boutique,
a beauty salon and a bar, all located under

one roof. Architecturally, the space


seamlessly reflects this multi-purpose
programme, blurring the lines between
each zone. By reiterating
materials, patterns and concepts
across each area, Her Majestys
Pleasure feels cohesive and
connected throughout the space.
Overall, the firm kept the
palette light and fresh, selecting
white, light grey, charcoal, and
varying shades of blue for the
main colour scheme. Hits of
copper, bright yellow, Douglas fir
plywood and slate added warmth and
highlighted the palette. A bold customdesign graphic floor pattern of blue and
grey tiles energise the entry caf/bar. The

esigned by Pritzker-prize-winning architect Zaha Hadid, the


Jockey Club Innovation Tower is home to the Hong Kong
Polytechnic University School of Design and is the new driving
force in the development of Hong Kong as a design hub in Asia.
The design concept was to dissolve the typical typology of
the tower/podium into a more fluid composition. It has
15,000sq m of net floor area and can accommodate about
1,800 staff and students. It houses 10 classrooms, design
studios and workshops as well as exhibition spaces and a
lecture hall of 300 seats and a state-of-the-art auditorium,

18

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

Majumdar, director, Sustainable Habitat Division, TERI, said, The


Indira Paryavaran Bhavan is one of the first buildings in India to
have deployed energy efficiency and renewable energy
technologies at a large scale. It is one of the exemplary projects to
be rated under GRIHA and has set standards that can be emulated
by upcoming buildings in the region.

design creates spaces that are both


comfortable and inviting, while also
addressing the design and fashion-forward
culture of the neighbourhood. On entering
Her Majestys Pleasure, the attention is
drawn to the architectural structure at the
back of the space. Serving double duty as
a pop-up retail boutique and reception to
the salon, the monolith is a product
display system grown out of an
architectural construction.
John Tong, lead designer of +tongtong,
said, The lively juxtaposition of the
natural wood and the whitewash was a
way to really bring a modern architectural,
slightly edgier language to something
more traditional and refined yet playful.
To know more, visit: tongtong.co/

displaying Hadids signature


concentric forms.
These fluid internal and
external courtyards create new
public spaces of an intimate scale
which complement the large open
exhibition forums and outdoor
recreational facilities to promote a
diversity of civic spaces, said
Zaha Hadid.

Updates
Awards

he winners of the World Interiors


News Annual Awards 2014 were
announced at the Saatchi Gallery in
London. The winner of Lighting Projects
category went to Stdel Museum by
Licht Kunst Licht AG. Gamsei by Buero
Wagner was chosen in the Bar Interiors
category. Loft MM by CT Architects was
selected in the Residence Interiors
category. The winner in the Hotel
Interiors went to Al Khan Resort by
Sharjah Investment & Development
Authority (Shurooq).
The World Interiors News Awards
selected highlights from its fifth annual
awards competition which recognises

interior design projects and products. The


judges spent three weeks sorting through
the 610 entries they received from all
over the world and narrowed down to
104. The list included projects, products
and designs in 13 categories, ranging

ohn Portman & Associates-designed


Yinchuan Greenland Center, a 300m tall
mixed-use project, has been cited for
Innovation in Building in the 2014 Be
Inspired Awards. The project, to be built
in phases, is currently under construction
in Yinchuan, China, with the first tower
and the podium to be completed in 2017.
The complex features parallelogramplan geometry with rounded corners,
which serves to distinguish the projects
two elegant 301m tall towers from the
adjacent rectilinear towers seen in the
citys master plan, which was developed
by the local government. In a nod to the
literal meaning of Yinchuan Silver River
the towers are linked by one, a podium building with a
sinuous form.

ermany-based interior
design studio JOI-Design
recently received honours in
two prestigious design
competitions. The creative
team was presented with a
2014 Gold Key Award in the
So Cool category for their
design of the Hotel-Kompetenz-Zentrum,
Oberschleiheim, Germany. The designers
have also won in the Restaurant, Bar and
Lounge and Floor Architecture categories

The tower forms take inspiration from shapes


found in the unique calligraphy of the Chinese
Hui a script that fuses Chinese and Arabic.
Rotating the towers and placing them in
relation to each other creates, from two very
similar towers, a sculptural composition of one
form, ever evolving and changing from various
vantage points.
To the south and the west, the facade is
distinguished with a horizontal blade
sunshade system that allows floor-to-ceiling
glazing to maximise natural light while also
controlling solar gain. To the east and the
north, the fully glazed faade consists of
vision and patterned frit glass to offer similar
daylight control, while also providing contrast
to reinforce the tower shape and give an interesting
modulation of views from the inside.

20

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

from furniture to interior accessories, and


lighting products to workplace interiors.
The next phase of the competition will
involve narrowing down the shortlisted
entries to one winning submission from
each category.

of the newly launched Finest Interior


Award category for their renovation of the
JW Marriott Cannes.
We are thrilled to have been honoured

on a global scale with


awards that recognise high
quality interior design
Made in Germany said
Peter Joehnk, co-managing
director of JOI-Design. He
further said, I want to
emphasise that this success is
shared by the team of JOI-Design with
Wiebke Biss as project manager for the JW
Marriott Cannes and Heinrich Bhm for
the Hotel-Kompetenz-Zentrum.

Updates
Art Musing

ndia Art Fair, one of South Asias leading


art fairs for modern and contemporary art,
has announced its seven edition taking place
from January 29 February 1, 2015, in New
Delhi. The fair remains unchallenged as the
most important stage for facilitating dialogue
and art trade in the region. More than 70
exhibiting galleries in a total of 90 booths
will showcase a breadth of modern and
contemporary art practices, including
painting, sculpture, new media, installation and
performance art.
The 2015 Speakers Forum will engage the entire
range of stakeholders in the visual arts artists, curators, critics,
administrators, academics, gallerists and collectors, as well as
covering a wide spectrum of artistic practices. Speakers will

include Adam Szymczyk, artistic director of


documenta; Venu Vasudevan, director
general of the National Museum, Delhi
Jeremy Deller, leading artist and creator of
the British Pavilion at the 2013 Venice
Biennale Sheikha Hoor alQasimi, director of
the Sharjah Biennale and Julian Stallabrass,
professor at the Courtauld Institute London.
For the 2015 Artistic Projects an
extensive programme spanning the outdoor
and indoor fair space will present a range of work from
high profile Indian and international artists. Highlights of
the programme include renowned French artist Daniel
Burens installation work, supported by the French Embassy in
India and specially designed for the art fair facade.
To know more, visit: www.indiaartfair.in

Trade news

onotech Systems
Ltd, one of the
leading solution providers
in narrow/wide format
printing segment, has recently launched a
new large format print -copy- scan-colour
multi-functional system. This system

is meant for a specific


community of architects,
engineers and construction
professionals.
It is available in three variants,
including 24 (A1), 36 (A0) and 44,
which covers a wide range of customer

applications all in colours. It has a


build -in computer processor
and requires no additional PC with
facility of USB scanning. The scanner is
of Contex A/s from Denmark and plotter
is from Canon and it is preferred for its
small footprint which saves space.

Advertorial

J K Cement Felicitates Excellence in Architecture at the


23rd Architect of The Year Awards in Lucknow

Ar Shiv Datt Sharma receiving the Great Masters


award from Shri Ram Naik (Honble Governor of
Uttar Pradesh)

delighted to host the 23rd edition of


annual Architect of the Year Awards. I
would like to congratulate all the winners
who truly deserve every bit of adulation
coming their way for further raising the
bar in architecture standards.
The Great Masters Award/Chairman
Award for lifetime/outstanding
contribution to architecture, which is
given once in three years, was presented
this year to Ar Shiv Dutt Sharma from
Chandigarh. The Green Architecture
Award was given to Ar Sanjay M Patil,
Nashik.The Indian Architecture Award

About J K Cement Ltd


Born to the 129 year old multi-disciplinary
industrial conglomerate J K Organisation, J
K Cement Ltd is one of the top

was bagged by Ar Sanjay Mohe,

ten producers of cement in the country.

"We are overwhelmed to witness


widespread participation of young and
budding aspirants from across the globe.
We are proud of having created this
platform for recognising the outstanding
work done by the architectural
community and are happy to see it
having grown and flourish over the past
two decades.

fter the phenomenal success of the


22nd Architect of the Year Awards, J
K Cement Ltd hosted its 23rd edition of
Architect of the Year Awards (AYA) in
Lucknow. AYA is one of the most
significant events for the architect
community and sees participation from
across SAARC nations.
Shri Ram Naik, honble governor of
Uttar Pradesh, graced the occasion as the
chief guest. The jury was chaired by
Yadupati Singhania, managing director of J
K Cement Ltd, along with renowned
architects from India.
Speaking on the success of the awards
ceremony, Yadupati Singhania, managing
director of J K Cement Ltd, said, Every
year J K Cement felicitates and honours
outstanding talent in architecture. We are

Ar Sanjay Mohe receiving the Architect of the Year


award from Shri Ram Naik

24

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

Winners of the 23rd AYA along with the jury members

Bangalore. Further commendation awards


in various categories were given to Ar
Vimal Jain, Bangalore; Ar Hiren Patel,
Ahmedabad; Ar Madhav Joshi, Pune and
Ar Nisha Mathew Ghosh, Bangalore. AYA
has always encouraged young talent and
this year IAA Young Architect of the year
was awarded to Ar Manish Gulati, New
Delhi. The Indian State Architecture
Award was presented to Ar Sudhir Reddy
B C, Hyderabad.
AYA has been honouring talents
beyond boundaries with the FCAA Focus
Countries Architect of Year award. This
year, the award was won by Ar Kashef
Mehboob Chowdhury, Bangladesh. The
Commendation Award in this category
was given to Ar Palinda Kannangara,
Sri Lanka.
M P Rawal, administrator(AYA) &
advisor of J K Cement Ltd, remarked,

The company has over three decades of


experience in cement manufacturing with
grey cement plants in Nimbahera, Mangrol
and Gotan, Rajasthan and Muddapur,
Karnataka with a combined capacity of 7.5
MTPA. The company is one of the only 2
producers of white cement in India with a
capacity of 0.6 MTPA making J K White
Cement, the second largest manufacturer
in the country. Other value added products
include brands like J K Wall Putty, J K
Water Proof Compound and J K Super
Grip. The company exports white cement
to a number of countries across the globe.
Having established a strong presence in
India, the company has made its first
international foray with the setting up of a
green-field dual process white cementcum-grey cement plant in the free trade
zone at Fujairah, UAE, to cater to the GCC
and African markets.

Visit us at ACETECH-Delhi Exhibition on 18, 19, 20 & 21st December 2014


Stall No.C-12A, Hall No.18, Upper Floor, Pragati Maidan, New Delhi.

Viewpoints

The quest for a holistic city


planning process
By Ram Sharma

nes concept of a livable city is


where people live in clean well
ventilated, aesthetically
satisfying, agreeable-to-their-lifestyles
houses; within hospitable friendly
neighbourhoods; where work centres are
conveniently located, well equipped and
functionally efficient; where educational
institutions are in plenty, with
qualitatively formatted teaching
curriculums conducted by competent
faculty; where commutation is hasslefree, and secure enough for men and
women to move around without fear of
harm; where shopping complexes and
bazaars are pedestrian-friendly with well
defined areas for parking; where streets
are free of potholes, landscaped with
appropriate trees and shrubs, a pleasure
to commute on; where one has an
uninterrupted supply of water, electricity,
and a satisfactory system of sewerage and
rain water disposable; where the air is
clean and water unpolluted; where there
are an adequate number of parks and
gardens for play, leisure and recreation;
where healthcare receives priority; where
rich and poor live in harmony and there
is no social divide; where social and
cultural conditions are vibrant; where
built-environment comprises well
conceived settings of buildings of high
aesthetic value creating an urban image
of distinction; and most of all, a growing
city which has mechanisms in place for
maintenance and the periodic
upgradation of its built environment.

26

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

Cars encroach walkways in Delhi forcing pedestrians to walk on carriageways much


at the risk of their life

I wonder how many of cities in our


country fulfill these requirements; not
many I guess and certainly not Delhi. This
is because:
Delhi is a sad case of underestimation
of projected population by town planning
experts assigned the task of the
preparation of the1962 Master Plan for
Delhi. The team, upon erring on the
number of people to be catered for,
sporadically altered planning regulations
including density, Floor Area Ratio (FAR)
and land uses and building heights to
overcome the shortcoming. It made
arbitrary changes in the recipe, ending up
with an unsatisfactory product much to
the dismay of citizens.

The intentions of the first Master Plan


for Delhi (MPD62) were noble. They had
considerable merit in controlling the
haphazard growth that took place
following partition and prior to its
promulgation. They established a
disciplined and orderly development
framework for the city. Some of the plans
recommendations included earmarking
urban limits encircled by a wide
agriculture green belt as a buffer against
overstepping by adjacent satellite towns. It
also included an interconnected green belt
within city limits to contain the citys
requirement for recreation, leisure and
clean air. These provisions were of great
merit. A land-use pattern was strategically

dispersed across the city comprising


residential, civic, commercial and retail,
social and institutional uses etc was well
stipulated. A circulation system for
movement of pedestrians, cyclists and
vehicles too was well conceived, in that
the rights-of- way of roads were
determined to tally with the nature and
intensity of anticipated traffic flow. It
further laid down planning and building
norms for development to cover density,
floor area ratio (FAR), ground floor
coverage, setbacks, etc., for varied
built uses.
Where it faulted was in its estimation of
projected future population, and its
implementation strategy for development.
Its computation of projected population
turned out to be highly inadequate as the
growing number of inhabitants far
exceeded the anticipated figure. This
resulted in highly insufficient infrastructure
and built space for residential,
commercial, institutional and other
planned uses. The shortage triggered off
unauthorized building activity, not only in
planned areas but also in urban villages
and undeveloped areas.
Alarmed by the shortages of space for
required uses the Government of India
advised the Delhi Development Authority
(DDA), the implementing authority, to
review building norms and devise more
suitable ones to overcome the deficiency.
This led to a chain of arbitrary decisions
prompted by administrators and
politicians - culminating in chaos.
Revised building norms to overcome
shortage sought further re-densification of
existing residential areas by arbitrarily
enhancing FAR, building heights, and
ground coverage to almost 80 percent. It
further recommended four floor buildings
above stilts on small plots - on narrow
lanes of 30ft width. This led to the growth
of a massive volume of residences (with
little space between them) at the cost of
healthy living. The fact that it was
proposed without augmenting water,
electric supply, surface drainage and
sewerage not only resulted in power and
water supply shortage but also in
waterlogged streets and sewer overflows.
To make matters worse, shops, commercial

Chaotic urban environment of Delhi appals inhabitants

Central Park in New York City povides much needed space for sports and leisure

enterprises, unable to find


accommodation in planned commercial
centres, illegally cropped up in housing
areas, much to the discomfort of residents.
The increase in car population choked the
streets by taking up every conceivable
open space for parking of vehicles - at
times at the cost of parks and the felling of
fully grown trees. Side walks and street
trees in these areas disappeared.
Almost 65 percent of Delhis
population live in ill-ventilated and illlighted houses with little infrastructure.
Over 189 urban villages dotted all over
the metropolitan region have turned into

ill-built walk-up ghettos where people


live on narrow lanes under the most
unhygienic conditions. The ground floors
in these are invariably occupied by
polluting car repair shops or industrial
units. In the absence of any planned
land-use or building bye-laws for these
villages, all hell broke loose as the
landlords went to town by covering every
conceivable open space on the ground
and added a number of shabbily built
floors to their hearts delight. These came
handy especially to lower income groups
on account of the affordable rents. Living
conditions deteriorated as infrastructure

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

27

including roads, water, electric supply


and sanitation turned undersized for the
increased population.
And there are over 1600 unauthorized
colonies, including Sangam Vihar and,
Sanjay colony on the southern ridge,
which have cropped up over the years and
house lakhs of inhabitants in dark dingy
rooms with little sanitation. Open spaces
in the form of narrow lanes are the only
spaces for people to unwind, park vehicles
and for children to play. The areas breed
goons, delinquents and diseases. Facilities,
such as clinics, schools and parks, are
conspicuous by their absence.

8.1 million registered vehicles, the city


has repeatedly beaten Beijing (second
highest polluted city) in air pollution.
Combined with industrial emissions it
generates smog that engulfs Delhi during
the winter months. The drastic reduction
(on account of encroachments) in area of
the Delhi Ridge to 864Ha as against
7,784Ha, which protected Delhi against
dust storms and air pollution has made
the situation worse
Toxic gas emanation by over eight
million vehicles on roads combined with
road dust and industrial pollution has
turned Delhi air exceedingly foul.

Contaminated water of Hauz Khas lake in Delhi repel visitors

Upgradation of infrastructure in most of


the regularised colonies remains to be
undertaken for want of layout plans.
Delhi is well-known for its high
pollution levels - a report featured in
Hindustan Times in January this year
endorses this view, it reads, It is no
surprise that pollution is a perpetual
problem in India. But it is definitely
disheartening to hear that India has
slipped 32 ranks in the global
Environment Performance Index (EPI)
2014 to rank a lowly 155 and its capital
Delhi has earned the dubious tag of being
the worlds most polluted city.
It elaborates that Delhi has the highest
particulate matter of 2.5 levels and with

28

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

According to The Times of Indias report of


8/5/14, Delhi has the most polluted air in
the world. Conditions are worst than
many other congested cities, such as
Beijing and Karachi. World Health
Organisation (WHO) data base of 1600
cities and 91 countries released in month
of May 14 shows that the concentration
of PM2.5 (fine respirable particles)
considered most harmful because they can
get deep into your lungs and some may
even get into your bloodstream is highest
in Delhi at 153 microgram (mg)/per cubic
meter (cm) 15 times higher than the
WHO standard. Concentration of PM10
(coarse particles) at 286 gm/cm is 14
times higher than WHO standards.

Dr S K Sharma, a chest specialist with


All India Institute of Medical Sciences, had
this to add, The capital's air is heavy with
sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide and
nitrogen oxide, mainly from automobile
exhaust. Pollutants from vehicular
emission irritate the delicate air passages
in the lungs, making them react
abnormally and shrivel up .. there are
50 million people suffering from asthma
in India. Of them about 9 lakh reside in
the capital. Another source reveals that
almost 50 percent of Delhiites are at risk
of contracting TB.
According to the National Green
Tribunal, untreated sewerage from 46
percent of Delhi urban area, which has no
sewerage disposal system finds its way to
the Yamuna through storm water drains.
As a result the sacred river, which should
ordinarily be a source of visual and
spiritual stimulation, has turned unclean
and fetid. It is so polluted that its water is
not fit for washing much less drinking.
Other reasons for its being so polluted, as
reported by the TERI University are (a)
high density of human population on the
river bank (b) inflow of domestic and
industrial waste water (c) cattle washing
and dumping of agriculture waste and
dead bodies (d) disposal of untreated
pesticide (e) religious activity and disposal
of idols. Monitoring data showed that
pollution levels measured in terms of BOD
load had increased 2.5 times from 117
tons per day (tpd) in 1980-2005 to 276
tpd. The situation today is worse.
The river has no fresh water flow for
virtually nine months of the year as the
barrage at Wazirabad impounds it.
Sewerage and waste is the only water that
flows in the Yamuna. Almost 1500 crore
rupees have already been spent under the
Yamuna Action Plan I & II to no effect.
The water still remains polluted and
unclean. Almost 70 percent of Delhi
residents drinks river water. No wonder
then that over 60 percent of them suffer
from water borne diseases.
The introduction of the metro in Delhi
as a mass transportation system
undoubtedly has brought some relief to
the commuters but not to a great extent.
This is because of lack of connectivity with

other modes of travel to large a part of


the city comprising commercial, industrial,
civic, educational, entertainment and
residential areas. Commuting in Delhi has
gone from bad to worse over the years.
The increased number of vehicles to over
eight million has congested the roads
some of which carry more than one lakh
vehicles a day. This has led to increase in
travel times and in the number of
accidents. Congestion in over 30 percent
of roads, especially in walled city lowers
the speed of vehicles to 10km/hr.
Potholes, poor lighting and drainage in
roads lead to periodic chaos and mishaps.
Encroachments of roads by vendors and
unauthorised parking create much
annoying hurdles much to the
inconvenience of commuters. Commuting
in the city which at one time was hasslefree has become exasperating and stressful.
Bicyclists and pedestrians are the worst
sufferers. City is not at all bicycle or
pedestrian-friendly. One experiment tried
out by the city administration to have
designated lanes, for buses, cars and high
speed two wheelers, cycles and
pedestrians, proved a great failure. In the
BRT corridor as it is known as, with
designated lanes, the cars spill over to the
bus lanes and cycle track, and motor bikes
and scooters ride over bicycle tracks and
walkways; as a result the poor cyclists and
pedestrians have a harrowing time. Plus
most of the city roads do not have
sidewalks as they have been taken over by
the widening of carriageways. And the few
that exist are encroached by vendors and
illegal parking. The pedestrians are
compelled to walk on the carriageway at a
risk to their life.
Alarmed by the emergence of a chaotic
built-environment, the Government of
India set up The Delhi Urban Art
commission (DUAC) in 1972 by an act of
parliament, with a view to maintain and
develop an appropriate urban
environment. The Commission set about its
functioning by recognising the citys rich
architectural and landscape heritage and
other areas of value. The stipulated
objectives assigned it with the
responsibility for (i) evaluation of
development projects of significance (ii)

Designated passageways for cars, cycles and pedestrians in Montreal facilitate tension
free commutation

Elegant architecture of Amsterdam attributes distinction to the city

Trafalgar Square in London provides a vibrant city space for inhabitants

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

29

Encroached and littered city spaces of Delhi appal visitors

Government staff pollute air in Delhi by burning dry leaves and rubbish in parks

advising the central government and local


authorities on all matters pertaining to the
aesthetic and environmental quality of
proposed projects (iii) intervention when
the urban image is being disfigured.
Despite DUACs good intentions and
efforts, a large number of building
complexes of unsatisfactory visual and
environmental status have come about.
The main reason for this being rejection
of DUACs advice on projects referred to it
by government development agencies
including DDA, MCD, NDMC, etc. DUAC
recommendations to DDA for setting up a
Design Cell to conduct three dimensional
urban design exercises for the design and
of development of projects of significance
too are ignored.

30

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

DDAs failure to appreciate the need of


an appropriate urban form for Delhi is
explained by the fact the master plan
proposals are made by the physical
planners who think two dimensionally
and do not concern themselves with the
architectural merit of a built environment.
They are trained to quantify land use
requirements for housing, commercial,
institutional, social physical infrastructure, civic, industrial, recreation, etc.
and distribute them in some manner over
a piece of land earmarked for
development. Their methodology is
confined essentially to the preparation of
planning and building codes in the form
of a set of bye-laws, including FAR,
setbacks, site coverage, density,

permissible height of buildings, parking,


etc, without ascertaining resultant the
urban form. These are applied throughout
the city without taking into account the
nature of the project, local ground
realities or architectural characteristics.
The law and order status in the city
has deteriorated over the years. To some
extent, this is because of a shortage in
police staff together and the fact that most
of the personnel are occupied with
security of V I Ps. But the real reason lies
in faulty planning for the urban poor.
Though some effort was made in the form
of Janata Housing and resettlement
colonies in the 70s but it proved grossly
inadequate to match with the
requirement. This group comprises over
40 percent of citys population. Not a
small number indeed.
The number, which also includes the
unemployed, live in the most unhygienic
and ramshackle squatters and
unauthorized colonies with no sanitation
or water supply.
The Governments failure to integrate
them with the rest of the society by
providing them with affordable housing
has given rise to bitterness against those
who live in pucca spacious houses in
well developed colonies, with parks and
gardens. Parks to which the children of the
poor are denied access.
It is the deep social divide that has
forced the urban poor to indulge in thefts,
robberies, smuggling, mugging,
molestations, etc. Their inability to carve
out a decent living combined with a
pathetic habitat has made them indulge in
criminal activities. The worsening situation
has forced other citizens to live in gated
colonies, monitored by watchmen.
However, the barricades have not helped
much as cases of car and other thefts
continue to be rampant.
The problems faced by citizens are
mainly due to faulty planning and
improper implementation. But the flaw
also lies in our planners inability to
derive an appropriate concept for the city.
They get so absorbed in allocating
densities, land uses, site coverage and
other development controls that they turn
a blind eye to environmental

power through its layout of broad


avenues and vistas, much in line with
Versailles, which at that stage was
synonymous with grandeur and might.
Lutyens adapted the layout of Versailles
to a great advantage and created a
network of roads, avenues and buildings
within a carefully structured discipline of
landscaping. A strong axial context was
achieved by aligning the Capital Complex
located on Raisina Hills with Purana Qila
to its east and Jama Masjid to its north.
The road pattern of triangular and
hexagonal geometry provided ample
opportunity for highlighting significant
structures positioned at strategic locations.
Rashtrapati Bhavan, Central Secretariat,
India Gate, Connaught Place, Gole
Dakhana form some of the nodes.
The architectural typology was
conceived in a comprehensive manner.

Monuments in Paris attract thousands of national and international tourists each day
to boost city's economy

characteristics of the city. The overall


urban image to be assigned to the capital
city of the country do not feature in their
list of objectives. They failed to recognise
the potential of local water bodies, and
the river Yamuna for recreation, visual
and spiritual stimulation. Appropriate
incorporation and enhancement of
heritage structures, with appropriate
landscape settings which enrich aesthetic
merit of the city do not feature in their
line of thinking. Nor do they find it
necessary to structure the street aesthetic
which enhances physical comfort and
visual experience of the commuters. No
civic spaces of merit, such as Trafalgar
Square (London), Dam Square
(Amsterdam) and Rossio Square in Lisbon,
for social and cultural interaction are
thought about. As a result, barring central

32

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

and old Delhi, visualised by Lutyens and


Shahjahan and which have some
stimulating character, the overall image of
Delhi is prosaic and dull.
The authors of first Master Plan did
appreciate the environmental setting of
Shahjanabad and British New Delhi but
were unable to comprehend their
conceptual merit. They failed to realise
that it requires more than the formulation
of a set of development norms to build a
city. Shahjahanabad is the creation of a
highly cultivated and cultured mind. Its
sensitive setting and delicately conceived
built environment is the outcome of
sophisticated planning by a designer with
high urban aesthetics.
The British too had a strong concept
for the capital of India New Delhi. The
main object was to display imperial

The overall discipline established a high


degree of variety in the rendering of
external expression of buildings within a
unified framework. Traditional Indian
motifs were incorporated judiciously in
designs of important buildings to develop
an identifiable style of unique character.
The implementation of the project too
was comprehensive. Landscape proposals
for the city were developed and executed
along with construction works. It is this
well thought out approach that attributed
a sense of distinction and character to the
capital city.
The urban population in the country is
expected to increase to 350 million by
2030 and 500 million by 2050. This
would necessitate the establishment of
over 300 new cities 100 smart cities our
Prime Minister has announced. The
organised development of these cities
would pose a serious challenge to the
countrys planners, as also provide an
opportunity to them to build cities of
meritorious physical and environmental
quality. It would do the government credit
to go sponsor their developments in a
holistic manner and create cities which are
liveable and environmentally appropriate.
A start can be made by setting up a
team of experts in the discipline of city
planning, headed by an experienced and
reputed visionary of able administrative

caliber. The panel among others would


include physical and transportation
planners, architects, landscape architects,
social scientists and urban designers, along
with environmental specialists (much as it
was done for Chandigarh and Brasilia) to
formulate a concept based on the nature
and magnitude of proposed settings. They
would be well advised to examine cities of
satisfactory physical and environmental
status across the world - prior to
commencement of the planning process.
Much can be learnt from the effective
physical and social infrastructure
prevalent across the world, such as
efficient traffic and transportation, and
parking system of London and New York
City; friendly bicycle and pedestrian paths
of Amsterdam, Montreal and
Copenhagen; people friendly bazaars and
tastefully designed shopping complexes of
Vienna, Copenhagen and Lisbon and old
Delhi, appropriately integrated
residential, retail and commercial centres
of several towns in India; liveable
residential areas for all sections of society
of Chandigarh (although of late slums
have cropped up on the periphery);
generous city greens for sports, recreation,
leisure and clean air, such as Central Vista
of New Delhi, Leisure Valley of
Chandigarh, Central Park of New York and
Hyde Park of London; sensitively
structured civic spaces for art shows,
social and cultural pursuits like Trafalgar
Square of London, St Marco of Venice and
Dam Square of Amsterdam; and distinct
urban image of Paris, Prague, Rome, Bath
and Jaipur.
One can also benefit from a scrutiny of
the designs of new urban developments,
such as Canary Wharf in London and Le
Defense in Paris, river front developments
in Paris and London. A proper analysis
and evaluation of these will go a long way
in developing appropriate concepts for
new cities.
The aim would be to establish a
satisfactory quality of life for the
inhabitants by ascertaining population
control, satisfactory educational status,
economic and employment security and
physical safety. The effort would also be
to optimise land usage by conceiving a

Pathetic state of Khirki Mosque in New Delhi exemplifies our indifference to


national monuments

Pedestrenised streets of Oslo enhance urban environment

Prosaic and unkept architecture of Delhi damages the city's image

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

33

several buildings in cities unoccupied for


months together for want of electrical
and water supply. A more suitable system
would be to lay down a network of
service tunnels with assigned alignments
for running service lines. The installation
can then be done in an orderly manner
to the satisfaction of each construction
agency. The tunnels will facilitate ease in
maintenance without ground ripping.
This tunnel system is prevalent in several
cities across the world. For these and for
other development works, a large
numbers of coordinated documents are

Sukhna Lake in Chandigarh is a source of recreation and leisure

required to be prepared. The process is


labour intensive yet essential for
qualitative and effective implementation.
It would be desirable to adopt the
Public Private Partnership System (PPP) for
preparation of Master Plans, land
acquisitions and development of works.

Well conceived shopping complex in Vienna

city structure which is compact, energy


efficient and sustainable.
The objectives will remain
unaccomplished unless competent
professionals are commissioned for
development and implementation of the
concept. The current set up of agencies
assigned to planning and implementation
in Delhi, with a skeleton planning staff (as
with DDA in Delhi) manages to produce
only a sketchy document which is highly
inadequate, in fact damaging for
structuring a citys built environment. The
planners may like to conduct three
dimensional exercises before fine tuning
architectural and planning norms. The
process would help evolve a satisfactory
urban form. And there are several other
urban design exercises which are required
to be conducted at zonal levels to achieve

34

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

an orderly and articulated street picture


and city form. Plus a mechanism of the
periodical appraisal of implemented
proposals is required to gauge merit of
emerging city forms.
The panel would also be required to
draft a master landscape plan as also a
master services plan stipulating layout
plans for gas, electrical and telephone,
water supply and sewerage, and storm
water drainage. Currently, in the absence
of a defined system, each construction
agency carries on with arbitrary
alignments and time schedules much in
conflict with the others. It is not
uncommon to find a sewer manhole built
exactly where the street light post or a
tree is proposed to be planted. This
results in incongruous streetscape and
delayed completion. Also, one often finds

Associating land owners with land


development would not only make it
economical but also protect the land
against unauthorised encroachments.
Delhi Administrations policy of acquiring
large tracts of land for the first Master
Plan of Delhi in one go, without having a
mechanism in place for full development,
proved faulty as a large portion of the
undeveloped area got encroached on by
unauthorized colonies.
There is no shortage of able and
experienced professionals in the field of
city building in the country. They are well
conversant with shortcomings in our cities
and have a fair idea for setting things right
as also the capacity to conceptualise cities
in a holistic manner. There also exists a
large contingent of talented and
enthusiastic young professionals who are
keen to participate in the venture of city
building. The combined effort by a select
group of physical and environment
planners, architects, urban designers,
landscape architects, and development
agencies is likely to deliver trend setting
cities which are eminently liveable, energy
efficient, architecturally satisfying and
environmentally stimulating.
Photo credit: Ram Sharma

Delhi-based practising architect Ram Sahrma is


currently the chairman of Executive Council of
School of Planning and Architecture, New Delhi.

Tradition meets Emotion.


We meet You.

Years in India
Showrooms

Customized Modular Kitchens


From Germany

GROWING STRONGER...

Exclusive Hacker Showrooms in India :


JAIPUR
DELHI
LUDHIANA
AHMEDABAD MUMBAI HYDERABAD BENGALURU
KOCHI
COIMBATORE CHENNAI
9313134488 9815048222 9414058718 9879538977 9322987229 9700058285
9740999350 9895058285 9500210555 9442081111
E-mail: info@hacker-kitchens.com
Website: www.haecker-india.com / www.haecker-kuechen.com

Design for Recreation

36

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

Lyrical
Composition
Project: Bombay Arts Society, Mumbai
Architects: Sanjay Puri Architects. Mumbai

he client for this project required two distinctly


separate series of spaces. The primary objective was to
create art galleries and allied spaces to promote arts. In
order to minimise the cost of the art spaces to emerging
artists, the client required office spaces with a separate
entrance that would be leased out to generate income. All
of this was required to be created in a small 1300sq m plot.
After leaving the required setbacks from each side, the
resultant plinth area was only 450sq m. Within this limited
plinth, separate circulation cores for the arts spaces and the
offices were provided. The resultant usable space therefore

SECTION

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

37

5
7
7

6
6

1. ART GALLERY
2. RECEPTION
3. LIFT LOBBY
4. RECEPTION FOR COMMERCIAL
5. COMMERCIAL
6. TOILET
7. LIFT

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

4
4

10
5

5
1

4
3

SECOND FLOOR PLAN


1. ENTRANCE FOYER
2. ART GALLERY
3. OFFICE
4. TOILET
5. LIFT

6. STAGE
7. AUDITORIUM
8. LIFT LOBBY
9. ROOM
10. STORE

2
1

FOURTH FLOOR PLAN

1. WORK STATIONS
2. CONFERENCE ROOM
3. MANAGERS CABIN

4. LIFT LOBBY
5. LIFT
6. TOILET

was very limited. This necessitated the distribution of the art


facilities across the 3 lower levels above which the office
spaces were located, also in 3 levels.
To allow the internal spaces to be perceived as larger,
curvilinear walls fluidly define spaces at each level in plan and
across the 3 levels in section within the art gallery spaces. This
language is perceptible externally too with undulating curved
walls across both, the horizontal as well as the vertical planes.
Minimally punctuated sculptural curves enclose the art
spaces below and a small 3 level punctuated volume housing
the offices emerge at the upper levels.

FactFile
Client: Bombay Arts Society Trust
Design team: Sanjay Puri & Nimish Shah
Consultants: Dr Kelkar Designs Pvt Ltd
Contractors: Drushti Group
Built-up area: 2165sq m
Cost of project: Rs 6,99,12,000
Year of completion: 2013

40

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

Design for Recreation

Creating Immersive Experience


Project: Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium, Montral
Architects: Cardin Ramirez Julien + difica, Canada

he chosen site is unique in terms of both its urban


qualities and its historical landmarks like the Olympic
Stadium and the Biodme, which attest to significant
chapters in Qubecs past. Respectfully integrated into this
exceptional setting, the new planetarium offers clear sightlines
to the surrounding architecture while adding a touch of
greenery to a site otherwise dominated by mineral elements.

42

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

The project sets the stage for a special relationship with


nature through views that open up towards the skies as well as
new plantings and landforms. Creating a sense of contact with
nature is crucial, given that many people first become aware of
the night sky outside the city in natural settings like a forest
clearing or the edge of a lake. In such settings, the longer the
eye rests on the heavens, the more the stars are revealed and

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

43

Source: v2com Photo credit: Stephane Brugger

SITE PLAN

Source: v2com Photo credit: Stephane Brugger

BioFresh and NoFrost:


a cool combination
Q

With BioFresh, food retains its healthy vitamins, fresh


appearance and full flavour for much longer than in an
average refrigerator compartment

Professional quality freezing performance thanks to


NoFrost technology in the freezer compartment: Never
defrost again!

Automatic IceMaker

DuoCooling: independently controlled cooling circuits;


prevents odour exchange and dehydration of the food

Customer Helpline: 18001027757


Appliance-india@liebherr.com

biofresh.liebherr.com

78

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

A few glimpses of the interior views...

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

79

acoustics and allow the lighting levels to be modified for


daytime presentations or evening events. Full-height glazing
enables the rooms to be filled with natural light. Meetings of
all sizes may be accommodated in either the two
boardrooms, each with ten seats; the two small conference
rooms which together have a capacity for 40 people; or the
18sq m room that can be divided by partition walls. While

80

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

each space is equipped with the latest technology, the


boardrooms stand out with added touches of style, as seen
for example with the moulded dados.
The expansive, 230sq m spa on the sixth floor includes a
gym, an aromatherapy steam bath, both bio and Finnish
saunas and a relaxation room. Indirect lighting creates a
calming atmosphere, and in the showers, accentuates the

SECTIONAL ELEVATION OF ROOM

sparkle of the glass mosaic walls. Floor-to-ceiling windows


interspersed by wall panels are featured in all areas except
the steam bath so that guests feel a connection with the river.
Intelligent sun shades protect against the UV rays of the direct
sunlight. A warm palette of tranquil water-tones imparts the
sense of pampering and exclusivity which characterise the
Steigenberger spa.
The design concept of the corridors and 137 guestrooms,
including two accessible rooms, two 42sq m junior suites and
two grander, 56sq m and 62sq m suites harmonises with the
other areas of the hotel. The Hanse (Hanseatic) provenance of
the harbour is literally portrayed in each beds headboard
decorated with a delicate embroidered map highlighting
Bremen amongst the European Hanseatic communities. Rich
shades of taupe and burnt orange in the cosy fabrics and carpet

82

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

blend with the sedate tones of the ivory leather chairs and
pickled oak desk/television station surrounded by a patinated
copper frame. Bathrooms with iridescent verdigris copper wall
tiles create a splash of glamour; showers are fitted with both
hand-held sprayers and overhead rain showers to indulge
guests in a luxurious bathing experience.

FactFile
Client: Siedentopf GmbH & Co KG
Design team: JOI-Design
Consultants: BIC Ingenieur-Consulting GmbH
Contractors: Hagenauer Group
Year of completion: 2013

Design for Recreation

Connecting the
Rhythms of Nature
84

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

Project: City Centre Raipur, Chhattisgarh


Architects: Studio for Architecture Landscape Interior & Enterprise Pvt Ltd (SALIENT), Kolkata

he master plan was established keeping the concept


of town centre in heart. As in the historic towns,
ghantaghar (clock tower) used to be the city magnet
and all CBD developed around it. The piazzas around the
ghantaghar were the spaces where the society exhibited
its expression. The survey shows, people in Raipur are

more street shoppers than mall hoppers. Hence,


intervention of water bodies, green terraces and shaded
gathering spaces play an important role of such a public
mixed-use development. Its architecture explores the
design to achieve timelessness in respect to the city.
The architecture is developed as low rise spread out

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

85

2
3

2
1

2
4

1. MULTIPLEX
2. SHOP
3. FOOD COURT
4. FEC

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

1
1. FASHION BAZAR
2. HYPER ZONE
3. SHOP
4. TODDLERS PLAY AREA

SECTION

ELEVATION

86

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

4
3
3

LOWER GROUND FLOOR PLAN

3
3

3
3
3

2
3

1
1

GROUND FLOOR WITH SITE PLAN

1. SHOP
2. MINI-ANCHOR
3. FNB
4. PARKING

blocks which have been split to create courtyards, atriums


and plazas. These courtyards are planted with low
maintenance trees and shrubs which charge them with
oxygen. Numerous water bodies in the plazas and at the
opening points help in passive cooling during the hot and
dry seasons of Raipur. Apart from these, terrace gardens hang
out with every public gathering space like the food courts,
family entertainment centres, restaurants, etc. Thick
plantation on these terraces with indigenous varieties
controls the heat island effect and makes the spaces usable
entire day round.

All the junctions and nodes have an opportunity to


present an ever changing mood of the shopping experience.
Every block in the composition of blocks has been given a
different identity and correlated with vertical streets, high
streets and plazas.
Over 100m set back from the main road allows for
generous surface parking. This has been treated as an
opportunity to plant numerous large trees. A large kund as
the main congregation place also functions as the shallow
water body cooling the ambient air before it enters the
courtyards. Thick planted chat plaza also gives a canopy

cover to the visitors. The cool air travels through the common
areas of the mall and hot air is allowed to escape through
the vents provided in the atrium ceiling.
The entrance is symbolised as a 30m high clock tower. The
mall also has three more entrances along the longer length.
Lower ground, ground floor and first floor have the shops
and above floors are offices. Also, the family and childrens
play streets are designed in the lower ground level. This level
is illuminated with the natural light coming from the
courtyard. Large fountains and liberal plantations at this level
create a wonderland effect for a family outing.
The variety of elements provided in the mall will provoke
the visitor to reconsider their relationship to the physical,
historical and climatic context of the place.

90

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

FactFile
Client: Ambuja Neotia Group
Design team: Vivek Singh Rathore (Principal Designer & Architect), Anuradha
Rathore (Principal Landscape & Environment Designer), Sourabh Banerjee
(Project Manager), Sk Tawsif Hossain, Soma Hore, Gita Das, Sumit Pal, Susanta
Sarkar (Project Team)
Consultants: M N Consultant (Utpal Santra) (Structural), INDCON (Dipankar
Banerjee) (Electrical), Engineering Consultant Services (Manoj Chakravorty)
(HVAC), Unique (Ratan Sarkar) (PHE), Sekhar Dey (Fire)
Contractors: Gannon Dunkerley & Co Ltd, MEHO-HCP Air Systems P Ltd,
Sterling And Wilson Ltd
Built-up area: 6.00 lakh sq ft
Cost of project: Rs 300.00 crore
Year of completion: 2013

Design for Recreation

Classical in Style
Project: Evershine Key Resort, Mahabaleshwar, Maharashtra
Architects: Ahmed & Associates, Mumbai

92

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

he project is an upscale five star resort in


Mahabaleshwar. The architects strike an aesthetic
balance between the clients brief and the visual
potential of the project. The 60-acre space is synonymous
with luxury the classical style. Stonework dominates this
expanse largely, also seen are marble statues that look back
to the era gone by. The architects previous experience of
working in hospitality industry gave him an added advantage
in selecting the right material palate: maintenance-free
materials were opted to cut down the cost of the project. The
mood lighting, detailed designs on the floorings, dark wood
finishes all add an intricate charm in the premises. The
project offers nearly 60 rooms, a restaurant, a bar, two
banquet halls and a health club. One of the suite rooms is
designed as per colonial style; the other suite room is crafted
according to the Thai influences. All the amenities are made
using state-of-the-art products.
This guest room idea rotates around a peaceful holiday
hotel in the lap of lush green mountains. The guest room is
set in natural surroundings combined with the benefits of a
contemporary lifestyle.
At the entrance, the resulting psychological impact is
considerable. The wide span of valley view through the
window welcomes one to a home away in the woods from
the entrance itself. One can enjoy the outer atmosphere
being inside from every corner of the room. The bed is
centrally located within the room facing the window and the
bathroom is integrated into the bedroom separated only by
a glass screen.

12

2
1

11

11

10

5
11
6
7

MASTERPLAN
1. GUARD ROOM
2. ENTRY
3. EXIT
4. PARKING
5. PARTY LAWN
6. POOL

ELEVATIONS

7. WELL
8. TOY TRAIN
9. CHILDRENS PLAY AREA
10. MULTI PURPOSE COURT
11. VILLAS
12. PUTTING GOLF

5
5

10

11

12

13

14
3

GROUND FLOOR PLAN OF HOTEL

1. ROOM
2. STORE
3. LIFT
4. OPEN TO SKY
5. TOILET
6. BACK UP OFFICE
7. TRAVEL DESK/ MANAGERS CABIN

8. RECEPTION
9. SHOP
10. LOBBY
11. TERRACE
12. COFFEE SHOP
13. BAR AREA
14. KITCHEN

6
4

FIRST FLOOR PLAN OF HOTEL

1. ROOM
2. STORE
3. LIFT
4. SUITE ROOM

2
3

5. OPEN TO SKY
6. ATRIUM LOBBY BELOW
7. GARDEN
8. PANTRY

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

95

SECTIONS

Emphasis was placed on modulation of tones and textures


in use of wood, metal, laminate, glass, floor tiles which is the
main finishing material as well as wall paper and carpet. All
the above materials were used keeping in mind the
contemporary minimalist appearance, budget, maintenance
and long life of the furniture.
Harmonised indirect lighting with appropriate artifacts
and paintings are used to enhance the interior for better
visualisation and homely atmosphere. The transparency and
starkness of the setting make the guest room a place for
humans to commune with nature.

96

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

Located in the mountainous region of Mahableshwar,


amidst scenic, strawberry-covered valleys and lush flora, the
resort is designed with the purpose of giving one an out-ofthe-world hospitality experience. The resort also offers
specially designed rooms for the physically challenged.
Executive rooms come with an attached forest view and
are fitted with a queen size bed and all modern day comforts
and amenities. Executive twin room is designed in soothing
pastels and is minimalistic in design and maximises leisure
for corporate. Deluxe room is designed to the taste and
requirements of the discerning leisure traveller. The room is

pool facing and the windows open to spectacular vistas.


Junior suite at 540sq ft is situated on the first floor and
overlooks the forest. Apart from its stunning views, it offers
the ultimate in modern day comfort and luxury. The suite
has a separate living room and a bedroom with private
balconies and antique Thai designed wooden furniture. The
bedroom has an attached bathroom and Jacuzzi. The suite is
a luxurious 700sq ft well-appointed space situated on the
first floor with a picturesque view of the swimming pool and
landscaped grounds. It comes with a spacious living area, two
bedrooms and a private balcony. State-of-the-art conference

98

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

facilities with well organised banqueting facilities have made


the resort a popular venue for a host of business and social
events including weddings.
FactFile
Client: Evershine Group
Design team: Ahmed & Associates
Consultants: PDA Associates
Contractors: Expert Construction
Built-up area: 90,000sq ft
Cost of project: Rs 32 crores
Year of completion: 2011

Design for Recreation

The greatest challenge in designing


Project: Philharmony, Koszalin, Poland
Architects: Autorska Pracownia Architektoniczna - Jacek Bulat (APA JACEK BULAT), Poznan, Poland

100

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

the auditorium was acoustics...

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

101

ts every architectural designers dream to give a building


unique characteristics that stem from the local culture,
traditions, the time when it was built and to make a
mark in the context of the location. In the case of the
Koszalin Philharmonic, the phenomenon that the architects
particularly wanted to honour was the location. The location
was unique in the centre of the old naturalistic park with

102

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

beautiful, mature trees on the banks of the meandering river


next to the historic bridge. The parks context explicitly
made the designers to think about organic architecture
adapted to the requirements of small plots and protection of
the existing trees. Architecture which is integrated into its
surroundings through its form and material was used. At the
same time, the idea to open up the interior to the

PLAN OF FLOOR 01

PLAN OF FLOOR 02

SECTION

104

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

SECTION

surrounding landscape was important. The large glazed foyer


makes the surrounding greenery part of the interior decoration.
The greatest challenge in designing the auditorium was
acoustics. In the case of the design of concert halls, function
and aesthetics must acknowledge the primacy of acoustics.
They have to submit to it. Without achieving the proper
parameters and effects of sound distribution, the whole effort
of the designers and builders will be ineffective, and the
building will get a bad reputation. For designers, especially
architects and acousticians, the first concert is a kind of very
stressful exam or test. The question of how the acoustics of the
hall will be received by musicians and music lovers can only
partially be answered by mathematics, physical examinations,

106

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

quality of work and materials used. The rest of the answer is


emotions. For the architect, the emotions of the first show
always remind him of bridge designers who stand under their
bridge during stress tests.

FactFile
Client: The city of Koszalin, Poland
Design team: Jacek Bulat (Senior Architect), Renata Kicinska, Adam Blaszczyk,
Marcin Siadek, Jakub Urbaniak, Michal Bulat, Michal Masalski
Building area: 1,830sq m
Total floor area: 5,418sq m
Cost of project: 9,000,000 Euros
Year of completion: 2013

Design for Recreation

the building is a simple yet distinctive


Project: Stonehenge Visitor Centre, Wiltshire
Architects: Denton Corker Marshall, London

ocated 1.5 miles to the west of the stone circle at


Airmans Corner, just within the World Heritage Site but
out of sight of the monument, the new visitor centre is
designed with a light touch on the landscape a low key
building sensitive to its environment. Reversibility the
ability to return the site to its current state was a
fundamental design concept. The building will last as long as
it needs to but could, if necessary, be removed leaving little
permanent impact on the landscape. This is achieved by

108

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

constructing it on a concrete raft which in turn sits on an area


of fill with minimal cutting into the soil. The modern
construction, using slender steel columns and lightweight
framed walls, and semi-external spaces allow the depth of
foundations to be minimised.
The new building allows Stonehenge to have dedicated
facilities on site for education and interpretation for the first
time, with museum-quality exhibits that tell the story of the
5,000 year-old monument. The building is a simple yet

architectural composition...

distinctive architectural composition, deferential to the


Stones and the World Heritage Site. A conscious decision was
taken that the building should not directly reference the
Stonehenge monument in its form, material, or alignment.
The design of the scheme is informed, and in many ways
defined, by its sensitivity to a range of archaeological,
landscape, ecological and social considerations. The scheme
sits within one of the most significant archaeological sites in
the world.

Sited within the rolling landforms of Salisbury Plain, the


design consists of a subtle group of simple enclosures resting
on a limestone platform, all sheltered by a fine, perforated,
undulating canopy. Three pods, finished in different
materials, provide the principal accommodation. The largest,
clad in sweet chestnut timber, houses the museum displays
and service facilities. The second largest, clad in glass, houses
the educational base, a stylish caf and retail facilities.
Located between these is the third, by far the smallest and

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

109

1
2

5
7

10

10
9

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


1. EDUCATION CENTRE
2. BOH
3. RETAIL
4. KITCHEN
5. SERVERY

110

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

6. VISITOR TRANSIT SYSTEM


7. TICKETING & AUDIO
8. INTERPRETATION
9. OBJECT CHAMBER
10. TOILET

clad in zinc, which provides ticketing and guide facilities.


Oversailing them all, and resting on 211 irregularly placed
sloping columns, is a steel canopy clad on the underside with
zinc metal panels and shaped with a complex geometry
reflecting the local landforms. Local, recyclable and
renewable materials have been used wherever possible. The
material palette includes locally grown sweet chestnut timber
cladding and Salisbury limestone.
An open loop ground source heating system that pumps
underground water through a unit to extract/inject heat

SECTION

energy enables the building to be heated and provides


cooling without the need for fossil fuels. The building will be
naturally ventilated whenever external conditions allow,
switching to an efficient mechanical ventilation system that
enables the heat energy in the exhaust air to be recovered
and transferred to the supply air, thereby reducing the load
on the heating plant and saving energy. Water supply is

drawn from the aquifer, a local and renewable resource.


A visitor transit low-tech vehicle will take visitors,
including wheelchair users, from Airmans Corner to
Stonehenge, along the existing A344 road to avoid
constructing additional infrastructure. This transit will stop
halfway at the Fargo plantation to encourage visitors to walk
and explore the wider landscape.

ELEVATIONS

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

111

FactFile
Client: English Heritage
Project Associate: Angela Dapper
Project Managers: Gardiner + Theobald
Consultants: Sinclair Knight Merz (Structural), Norman
Disney Young (M&E), Firmingers (Quantity surveyor),
Chris Blandford Associates (Planning supervisor)
Landscape Architects: Chris Blandford Associates
Exhibition Designers: Haley Sharpe Design
Contractor: Vinci Construction UK
Total cost: 27M for overall project

112

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

PROMOTION

Its all about

customer
satisfaction!

Godrej Properties is personalising consumer experiences and reaching out to its customers.
Godrej Properties Ltd (GPL), the real estate
arm of the Godrej Group, is reaching out to its
customers through various innovative on-ground
brand activation activities. Furthermore, the
brand is enhancing the handover experience of
customers by organising carnivals and fares to
welcome them into their new homes with a
grand celebration.

Engaging Customers
GPL is a key player in residential and commercial
segments. The company tries to personalise
experiences of each of these segments with
different approaches. GPL organises the Godrej
Properties Golf Challenge every year with multicity chapters, concluding with an international
finale in Bangkok. Similarly for corporate
customers, GPL associates with relevant business
award functions, conferences, and forums which
set a platform to increase customer engagement
in the commercial space. Meanwhile, the
company also invites its customers to theatre
events and movie premieres with their
familiesa small gesture that goes a long way in
building relations.
There is a high level of engagement with
consumers at these events. There is a classy
kiosk space with a salesperson to interact with

the guests and on-the-spot contests, where the


winners get gift hampers are also planned.

Home Sweet Home


Moving into your dream home is one of the
most memorable moments of your life. Godrej
Properties becomes a part of these celebrations
and make the day even more special for
its customers.
A day-long carnival was planned to welcome
more than 400 residents of Godrej Prakriti at
Kolkata into their new homes. On the occasion, a
welcome kit (with all the details needed for
a seamless transition into their new homes) was
handed over to customers along with house keys.
Games and activities were organised and the
night concluded with a live concert by Mir Afsar
Ali, a renowned Bengali singer and artist.
Another such instance was the handover of
Godrej Garden City (GGC) at Ahmedabad,
where the celebrations lasted for all nine days
of Navratri. Celebrities like RJ Devaki, Devang
Patel, Arvind Vegda and esteemed Chief Minister
Anandi Ben Patel graced the occasion. This
event was also the beginning of the green
initiative, where the residents planted a sapling
in their name within the township as part of the
green pledge.

We have always
believed in
engaging with
customers on a
personal level. This
goes a long way
in cementing the
bond of trust that
Godrej Properties
as a brand has built
over the years with
its customers.
Girish Shah,
EVP, Marketing
and Sales,
Godrej
Properties

For more information, please visit godrejproperties.com

Project Feature

Play of Forms
Project: Corporate Office for Shivganga Prestressed Pipes, Maharashtra
Architects: ENSO Architects, Bangalore

114

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

115

WORMS EYE VIEW

hivganga Prestressed Pipes are in the business of


manufacturing presteressed pipes of various sizes and
have a factory located at Haroli, Sangli district,
Maharashtra. The architects were approached by the company
to design their corporate office in the same premises to house
their operations.

116

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

FRONT VIEW

The part of the site given to the architects was away from the
factory shed yet had a chance to overlook the factory yard
operations. The site was located close to the highway as well, so
it would be widely seen from the highway and always in motion.
The surrounding landscape was open and had a hilly terrain,
which during and after monsoons turned completely green.

BIRD EYE 3D-VIEW

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

117

10

N GROUND FLOOR PLAN

6. ACCOUNTS SECTION
7. TOILET
8. PANTRY
9. RECORDS ROOM
10. DIRECTOR, FINANCE

1. LANDSCAPE GARDEN
2. WAY TO GUEST HOUSE
3. ENTRANCE
4. RECEPTION
5. LOBBY

1
3

FIRST FLOOR PLAN

The approach to design was to give an airy and open


office with view towards the surrounding greenery. The
building is aligned along north-south axis in order to utilise
the diffused light into work spaces. All the public oriented
departments were located on ground floor and the private
cabins of M D, directors, conference room (quiter spaces)
were moved to the upper floor.

118

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

1. TECHNICAL SECTION
2. DIRECTORS ROOM
3. EXECUTIVE ENGINEER
4. LOBBY BELOW
5. CONFERENCE ROOM
6. TOILET
7. ANTE ROOM
8. MANAGING DIRECTORS ROOM
9. LANDSCAPE

The waiting lobby sports a double height ceiling, and


natural light streams down from the two strip skylights
sandwiched between the three office bays. All the cabins and
work spaces open adjoining green areas. MDs cabin has an
attached landscaped terrace which gives a clear view of the
factory yard activities.
The roofs are tapered upwards to guide the occupants

AMASS ARCHITECTURAL KNOWLEDGE

SATYA PAUL TIE WORTH ` 1500

DECE MBER 2014 ` 175

DESIGN FOR RECREATION


the

Architecture is the
t and
learned game, correc
magnificent, of forms
t...
assembled in the ligh
Corbusier

1 YEAR

Le

ARISE ELECTRIC KETTEL WORTH ` 2250

Mik ko La akk on en

PRODUCT DESIGN

2 YEARS

ZIPPO LIGHTER WORTH ` 3599

VOLUME 31

ISSUE 12

Terms

1 Year

2 Years

Name:

ST
BE FER
OF

3 Years

Job Title:

3 YEARS

No. of Issues
12

24

36

Cover Price `
2100

4200

6300

Company Name:

Address:

You Pay `

You Save `

1650

450

3100

1100

4600

1700

Age:

City:

State:

Enclosed DD/Cheque no.

Dated

E-mail:

Mobile:

Drawn on in favour of Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd. (For outstation cheque please add Rs 10)

Free Gift

Satya Paul Tie worth ` 1500

Arise Electric Kettel worth ` 2250


Zippo Lighter worth ` 3599

Sex:
Pin:

Phone:
for Rs

To subscribe, Send this form to Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd, 323 Udyog Vihar, Phase IV, Gurgaon-122016 (Haryana)
Call Delhi: 09899414369, Tel: 0124 4759616, Fax: 0124 4759550, Mumbai: 022 42467777, Fax No: 022 26053710,
Bengaluru: 080 22219578, Fax: 080 2224342, Chennai: 044 28141816 (Telefax), Kolkata: 033 22805323 (Telefax)
E-mail: circulation@emmindia.com / subscriptionsupport@emmindia.com
Subscribe online at www.mediatransasiaindia.com

Terms & Conditions: Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd. reserves the right to cancel, extend or discontinue the offer or any part there of without giving any reason or prior notice. Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd. is not responsible for
any postal delay. All disputes are subjected to competent courts in the jurisdiction of Delhi only. Exposure Media Marketing Pvt. Ltd will take 4-6 weeks to start the subscription and 10-12 weeks to despatch your gift. Gift free with
Subscription in India only Overseas subscription: 1 year-US $120; 2 years- US $270. Products may vary as shown. Conditions Apply.

SECTIONS

view to the sky and the surrounding hilly terrain. All openings
are on north and south except few provided to technical
section and factory in charge director to overlook the factory
activities on the east. The external walls of the structure
extend out to merge with the landscape.

The fact that the structure will always be seen in motion


from the highway leads the architects to a roof form which is
dynamic. They also complement the surrounding hilly terrain
in their form like pointed hills when looked from either side.
External walls are cladded with ACP, silver for outer faces

SECTION

ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

121

and contrasting dark blue for the inner faces to give the
additional depth to the faade and structure. North and
south sides are done up with spider glazing from floor to base
of tapered roof to give a clear and uninterrupted view of the
terrain/landscape outside. Interiors are done up with vitrified
tiles for flooring and granite for stairs. Furniture is done in
sober colours to keep it muted. No dark colours were used as
per the clients request.

122

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

FactFile
Client: M/S Shivganga Prestressed Pipes Pvt Ltd
Design team: Shailendra Arbole, Prathyusha, Kartik Shetty, Mahesh Arbole
Consultants: Vinay Behere (Structural)
Contractors: Clients in house
Built-up area: 12000sq ft
Cost of project: Rs 1.5 crores
Year of completion: 2011

Exploring Design

Contemporary
yet Timeless
Architecture+Design brings across
some unique and insightful works of
Finland-based designer Mikko
Laakkonen who was recently
honoured with The Furniture
Designer of The Year at the Finnish
Designer Awards 14. We carry a few
glimpses of his works

Ka ari
Inspired by Eero Saarinens legendary Gateway Arch,
the coat rack is made of steel and plastic. The hooks
of the coat rack can stand heavy items and can
withstand weight even if it is unevenly distributed.

A ur a Sofa

Made of steel and upholstery, Aura is a harmonious


and cozy two-seater sofa.

Dyyni

Mikko Laakkonen

This suspended light is a new type of atmospheric lamp for offices and
homes. It is made of LED light that is filtered through the acrylic cover,
making it soft without glare, and is given a warm tint by the ash surface.

Latva

was born in Espoo in 1974.


After graduating as a musical
instrument maker, he
studied furniture design at
Kymenlaakso University of
Applied Sciences, and later
received his master degree
from the University of Art
and Design in Helsinki. After
working in design and
architecture firms for several
years, Mikko founded Studio
Mikko Laakkonen in 2004.
Notably, he has been
awarded a number of
international and national
awards, including Muuuz
International Awards 2014,
Red Dot: Best of the Best
Design Award (2013), Red
Dot Design Award (2012),
Chicago Athenaeum's Good
Design Award (2010)
and the Young Designer of
the Year prize (2009).

Created of steel, Latva can be used


as a coat-rack and a space divider.
ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4

127

Kaava
Kaava chair is created of steel and UPM Grada
Plywood, which is a heat mouldable wood
composite panel. The entire seat unit of Kaava
chairs, including the armrests, is cut and moulded
from one mouldable wood composite panel. This
also gives the chair its name Kaava (a pattern).

Ko la Rocking
Kola is aesthetically and weight wise a light
chair making it fit for both public and private
modern interiors, It is made of 100 percent
recyclable polyester felt and has a great
acoustic absorption capacities.

Ko la Lo ung e X
Made of steel and moulded polyesther felt,
the Kola Lounge X is a swiveling lounge
chair. The upholstered cushion gives comfort
and allows the use of playful colours. It also
has great acoustic absorption capacities.

128

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

U-Tur n
Made of Carrara marble,
U-turn is a sculptural
single-material side table.

Lu mm e

Lumme is a container
created in a flower shape
with overlapping petals.

Kol a Stac k
Made of steel and moulded polyesther felt,
Kola Stack is a small chair with or without
armrests. It is available with a perforated back
and optional row connection.

130

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

Ko la L ight Wood
The chair is made of steel, wood and
recyclable moulded polyesther felt. It is
a light chair making it fit for both
public and private modern interiors.

Aura Cha ir
Aura chair is a lounge chair that can also be used as a side chair.
The back of the chair is slightly lower to get a better view of the
surroundings while a person is sitting.

132

D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 4 ARCHITECTURE+DESIGN

Regd. No. R.N.I. 42924/84