You are on page 1of 15

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

1 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

Tech Stuff - RS-232 Cables, Wiring and Pinouts


Brief tutorial and pinouts for RS-232, T1/E1 and V.35. If you want to know more about
RS 232 signals then this page may help - but you may also need to lie down in a
darkened room afterwards.
Contents
DTE (PC) and DCE (Modem)
DB9 and DB25 Male and Female Pin Numbering
RS232 on DB25 Pinout (RS-232C)
RS232 on DB9 Pinout (EIA/TIA - 574)
RS232 on RJ45 (RS-232D EIA/TIA-561)
RS232 DB25 NULL Modem Pinout
RS232 DB9 NULL Modem Pinout
RS232 DB9 and DB25 Loopback Pinout
RS232 DB9 NULL Modem Pinout using Cat5(e)
RS232 DB9 to DB25 Pinout
RS232 DB9 to DB25 NULL Modem Pinout
EIA/TIA RS-530-A (DB25 using RS-422, 423 and 485)
V.35 on a DB25
DBx - Designations for D type sub-miniature connectors
T1/E1 Pinout (RJ-48C)
RS-232 standards(EIA-232) are defined by EIA/TIA (Electronic Industries Alliance
/Telecommunications Industry Association). RS-232 defines both the physical and
electrical characteristics of the interface. RS-232 is practically identical to ITU V.24
(signal description and names) and V.28 (electrical). RS232 is an Active LOW voltage
driven interface and operates at +12V to -12V where:
Signal = 0 (LOW) > +3.0V (SPACE)
Signal = 1 (HIGH) < -3.0V (MARK)
Notes:
1. Signal voltages in the range >-3.0V to +3.0V are regarded as being in the 'dead
area' (indeterminate value) and allow for absorption of noise. For more on the use
of signals and other heavy stuff.
2. The power level on RS232 pins is defined by TIA for short circuit protection to be
100mA. Most RS232 drivers will provide lower short circuit protection (especially
for laptops). A max of 50mA PER PIN may be available but the data sheet for the
specific interface/chip should be consulted before commiting to externally powered
designs.
3. We received an email recently pointing out some issues with NULL modem cables.
The pinouts shown below will generally work. However, there are many
permutations of signal sets that can be used by either end of a connection and
they may not be SYMMETRIC. One end may expect something (a signal) that the
other end cannot generate. This typically happens with CTS/RTS (and perhaps
DCD) and DTR/DSR. If you suspect this is the case then unfortunately you need to
understand the interface and may have to 'spoof' (artifically create) certain
signals. Our signal primer page may help you. Finally, if you are having serious
problems, splash out on what is frequently called a 'light box' or some other device
that will show you which signals are being activated.

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

2 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

4. Serial communications equipment may be either a DTE (Data Terminal Equipment


- a terminal or PC) or a DCE (Data Communications Equipment - for example, a
modem) and have a direction depending on the type. All the diagrams below
define the interface from the DTE perspective.
5. The terms Data Carrier Detect (DCD) and Received Line Signal Detect (RLSD) are
one and the same. We use DCD throughout 'cos we think it's more common.
6. While the term RS232 is almost universally used these days for serial/modem
connections, outside of North America it is quite common to come across the ITU
designations V.24/V.28 when describing serial/modem communications. For all
practical purposes RS232 and V.24/V.28 are identical.
7. Like most folks we use the term DB9 which is widely - but erroneously - coined to
describe a 9-pin serial connector. We got an email pointing out the error of our
ways (hint: it is really a DE-9P). So, if you want to amaze your friends over the
dinner table you can read more and use the technically correct terms in the future.
While we get away with it most of the time (with common or garden PCs),
sometimes it is essential to know EXACTLY what connector type you are talking
about. And, following a recent email request, we discovered that the thread on
RS-232 (DB9 and 25) receptacles is UNC 4-40.
8. RS-232-E is normally defined to be used with a DB25 connector, but does have a
26 pin (a much smaller) alternative . We suggest that if you come across one of
these that you do the decent thing - use an expletive. Alternatively, with your luck
you could consider buying a lottery ticket.
9. We have received a number of emails asking how to wire DB9's using cat5(e)/cat
6 cable. We guess there is a lot of LAN cable lying around these days so folks
naturally want to use it. We have added a null modem only section to cover this
wiring. There is absolutely no standard to cover this form of wiring. This section is
simply offered as one of many possible ways to do it. While we are on the topic of
wiring, RS232 does not define a cable standard but this may help in choosing a
suitable cable.
10. We got an email asking about TTY 20ma current loop interfaces. This was an old
method used to connect teletype devices and uses current (normally 20ma but
sometimes 60ma) to indicate mark and space. A TTY system CANNOT be
connected to RS-232 (which is a voltage driven interface) and has no standard.
You will need to get the manufacturer's specifications and start reading!

DTE (PC) and DCE (Modem)


In serial communications the terminal end (PC) is called the Data Terminal Equipment
(DTE) and the modem end is called the Data Communications Equipment (DCE) as
shown in the diagram below.

Serial Communications with a modem


RS-232 signals have a direction (in or out) depending on whether they are with respect
to a DTE or a DCE. In all the pinout diagrams below the signal direction is with respect
to the DTE (PC) end.

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

3 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

NULL Modem Connections


When PCs are connected back-to-back each end is acting as a DTE (there is no DCE in
this case) and consequently certain signals may have to be looped in the connection to
satisfy any input signal requirement. This is called a NULL (no) modem configuration.
For example, when the DTE raises Request to Send (RTS) it typically expects Clear to
Send (CTS) from the DCE. Since there is no DCE to raise CTS, the outgoing RTS signal is
looped in the NULL modem cable to the incoming CTS to satisfy the DTE's need for this
signal. This is shown in the diagram below.

Serial Communications with a NULL modem configuration

DB9 and DB25 Male and Female Pin Numbering


These diagrams show the male (grey background) and female (black background) pin
numbering for DB9 and DB25 sub-miniature connectors. Generally Pin 1 is marked on
the front of the connector right next to the pin - though you may need a magnifying
glass to read it. Some manufacturers mark each pin number on the plastic housing at
the rear of the connector. The male connector has the pins sticking out!
DB25 Male and Female

DB25: View looking into male connector

DB25: View looking into female connector

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

4 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

DB9 Male and Female

DB9: View looking into male connector

DB9: View looking into female connector

RS232 on DB25 (RS-232C)


The use of each pin including methods for spoofing signals is described in our Signal/pin
primer. The RS-232 DB25 connector is capable of supporting two separate connections each with its own optional clock when used in Synchronous mode or Bit-Synchronous
mode. If you are using the interface purely for Asynchronous communications then you
only need those marked with (ASYNC) below or you can use even fewer (if you
understand what is happening). The column marked Dir shows the signal direction with
respect to the DTE.
Note: This is NOT the same as the DB25 Parallel port on a PC.
Pin No.

Name

Dir

Notes/Description

Protective/shielded ground

TD

OUT

Transmit Data (a.k.a TxD, Tx) (ASYNC)

RD

IN

Receive Data (a.k.a RxD, Rx) (ASYNC)

RTS

OUT

Request To Send (ASYNC)

CTS

IN

Clear To Send (ASYNC)

DSR

IN

Data Set Ready (ASYNC)

SGND

Signal Ground

CD

IN

Carrier Detect (a.k.a DCD).

Reserved for data set testing.

10

Reserved for data set testing.

11

Unassigned

12

SDCD

IN

Secondary Carrier Detect. Only needed if second channel being used.

13

SCTS

IN

Secondary Clear to send. Only needed if second channel being used.

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

5 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

14

STD

OUT

Secondary Transmit Data. Only needed if second channel being used.

15

DB

OUT

Transmit Clock (a.k.a TCLK, TxCLK). Synchronous use only.

16

SRD

IN

Secondary Receive Data. Only needed if second channel being used.

17

DD

IN

Receive Clock (a.k.a. RCLK). Synchronous use only.

18

LL

Local Loopback

19

SRTS

OUT

Secondary Request to Send. Only needed if second channel being used.

20

DTR

OUT

Data Terminal Ready. (ASYNC)

21

RL/SQ

Signal Quality Detector/Remote loopback

22

RI

IN

Ring Indicator. DCE (Modem) raises when incoming call detected used for
auto answer applications.

23

CH/CI

OUT

Signal Rate selector.

24

DA

Auxiliary Clock (a.k.a. ACLK). Secondary Channel only.

25

Unassigned

NOTE: Leave all pins not specified above unconnected.

view - looking into male connector


(male and female connector diagrams)

RS232 on DB9 (EIA/TIA 574)


Signal functions are described in detail in our Signal/pin primer. The column marked Dir
shows the signal direction with respect to the DTE.
Pin No.

Name

Dir

Notes/Description

DCD

IN

Data Carrier Detect. Raised by DCE when modem synchronized.

RD

IN

Receive Data (a.k.a RxD, Rx). Arriving data from DCE.

TD

OUT

Transmit Data (a.k.a TxD, Tx). Sending data from DTE.

DTR

OUT

Data Terminal Ready. Raised by DTE when powered on. In auto-answer


mode raised only when RI arrives from DCE.

SGND

Ground

DSR

IN

Data Set Ready. Raised by DCE to indicate ready.

RTS

OUT

Request To Send. Raised by DTE when it wishes to send. Expects CTS from
DCE.

CTS

IN

Clear To Send. Raised by DCE in response to RTS from DTE.

RI

IN

Ring Indicator. Set when incoming ring detected - used for auto-answer
application. DTE raised DTR to answer.

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

6 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

DB9 (EIA/TIA 574): View - looking into male connector


(male and female connector diagrams)

RS232 on RJ45 (RS-232D)


More properly EIA/TIA - 561. Use when connecting to or from a serial port with a 8
position Modular Jack (RJ45). If you are cross-connecting from a DB9 or a DB25 use the
signal names to cross connect the appropriate pins. To illustrate the process the
equivalent pins used for cross-connecting a DB9 connector signals are shown (see DB9
pin-out above).
Signal/pin primer
RJ45 Pin
No.

Name

DB9 Cross Notes/Description


Connect

DSR/RI

6,9

Data set Ready/ring indicator

DCD

Data Carrier Detect

DTR

Data Terminal Ready

SGND

Signal Ground

RD

Receive Data

TD

Transmit Data

CTS

Clear to Send

RTS

Request to Send

Note: Pin 1 is a multi-function pin sharing DSR (Data Set Ready) and RI (Ring
Indicator). This means it is impossible to differentiate between a incoming ring signal
(RI) and when the modem has finally connected and synched up (DSR). With local (null
modem connections) or if the modem is run in auto-answer mode this is not normally a
problem. If used with a modem and the DTE (the computer end) wants to control the
connection the problem is more real. DSR would normally indicate the 'connected and
synched-up' state following DTR from the DTE whereas RI simply indicates a ring voltage
is present on the line and would normally be the trigger for the DTE to raise DTR if it
wants to accept the call. DCD will indicate that a carrier has been received but does not
indicate synchronization of both ends. In most cases however CTS (Clear To Send) in
response to RTS (Request To Send) will not normally be returned until an end-to-end
connection is available (equivalent to the DSR state).

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

7 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

RJ45 Male Connector Pin Numbering

RS232 DB25 NULL Modem Pinout


Use when connecting two systems (e.g. PCs) via their DB25 interfaces without a modem
(i.e. back-to-back). See the full signal names in the DB25 sections.
If this pinout does not work for you then you could try our Signal/pin primer because
you may need to SPOOF connections.
Note: This DB25 is NOT the same as the DB25 Parallel port on a PC which is defined
here.
DB25

Signal

DB25

Signal

RD

TD

TD

RD

20

DTR

6,8

DSR, DCD

6,8

DSR, DCD

20

DTR

RTS

CTS

CTS

RTS

SGND

SGND

22

RI

22

RI

DB25: View - looking into male connector


(male and female connector diagrams)
NOTE:
1. Leave all pins not specified above unconnected.
2. We have received email suggesting that the above pinout looks like DTR from one
side is driving into DSR/DCD on the other side - not normally a healthy situation.
The emails miss the point that since this is a NULL modem connection both ends
are DTEs. The two peer DTE's treat DSR/DCD signals as RX (INPUT) only. The
INPUT DSR/DCD on one side is created by cross connecting the OUTPUT DTR
signal for the other peer.

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

8 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

RS232 DB9 NULL Modem Pinout


Use when connecting two systems, for example two PCs, via their DB9 interfaces
without a modem. Typically called a back-to-back or NULL modem connection. See the
full signal names in the DB9 section.
If this pinout does not work for you then you could try our Signal/pin primer because
you may need to SPOOF connections.
DB9

Signal

DB9

Signal

RD

TD

TD

RD

DTR

6,1

DSR, DCD

6,1

DSR, DCD

DTR

RTS

CTS

CTS

RTS

SGND

SGND

RI

RI

DB9 TIA/EIA 574: View - looking into male connector


(male and female connector diagrams)
NOTE:
1. We have received email suggesting that the above pinout looks like DTR from one
side is driving into DSR/DCD on the other side - not normally a healthy situation.
The emails miss the point that since this is a NULL modem connection both ends
are DTEs. The two peer DTE's treat DSR/DCD signals as RX (INPUT) only. The
INPUT DSR/DCD on one side is created by cross connecting the OUTPUT DTR
signal for the other peer.

RS232 DB9 and DB25 Loopback Pinout


Loopback is a method of testing the RS232 connector and interface circuitry to ensure it
is functioning correctly, that is, in layman's jargon - it ain't broke! If communication fails
to occur between two machines the question that immediately arises is - which end is
broken? In the worst case both ends could even be broken in which case ritual suicide
may be the best solution. Loopback works by testing each end of the connection
independently. Data is sent and received on the same RS232 connector - which may be
either DB9 or DB25. The test normally consists of using some program to transmit data.
The program then checks to ensure exactly the same data was received. Loopback
testing gives you a binary result - it works, in which case the end under test is good, or

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

9 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

it does not, in which case the end under test is broken. Pinouts are shown for both DB9
and DB25. The loopback is normally constructed in the DB shell or using a diagnostic
light-box.

DB9 Loopback
DB9

Signal

Loopback
to

Signal

RD

TD

TD

RD

DTR

6,1,9

DSR, DCD, RI

RTS

CTS

SGND

SGND

(DB9 male and female connector diagrams)


NOTE:
1. We show 4 (DTR) being looped to 6 (DSR), 1 (DCD) and 9 (RI). RI (9) is included
because we understand that certain test programs use this to ensure a more
complete test of the interface signal set.

DB25 Loopack
DB25

Signal

Loopback
to

Signal

RD

TD

TD

RD

RTS

CTS

CTS

RTS

SGND

SGND

15

DB

17

DD

20

DTR

6,8,22

DSR, DCD, RI

23

CH/CI

23

CH/CI

(male and female connector diagrams)


NOTE:
1. For the sake of simplicity this loopback will only work for the primary channel. Full
DB25 interfaces allow a secondary channel. If a complete interface loopback is
required you will need to add pins 12, 13, 14, 16, 19, 24.
2. By looping the primary channel clocks (15 and 17) both synchronous and
asynchronous capabilities can be tested. If only asynchronous tests are being
performed omit this, and the pin 23 loopback
3. We show 20 (DTR) being looped to 6 (DSR), 8 (DCD) and 22 (RI). RI (22) is
included because we understand that certain test programs use this to ensure a
more complete test of the interface signal set.

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

10 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

RS232 DB9 NULL Modem Pinout on CAT5/CAT5(e)/CAT6


This is in response to a number of recent emails asking how to wire both ends of a DB9
connection using cat5, cat5(e) or cat6 cable. This must not be confused with DB9 to
RJ45 (RS232D). We have shown a null modem (back-to-back PCs) only configuration.
And if you want to use cat5, cat5(e) or cat 6 with a real modem (a DB25 connector)?
Our advice - don't.
Warning:. There is, as far as we know, no standard to cover the use of cat5, cat5(e) or
cat 6 (8 conductor) wiring when used with two DB9 connectors. Any such wiring scheme
is therefore non-standard - that includes the wiring scheme below. Specifically this
means that both ends of the cable must be wired in the same way and that no
assumptions can be made about how the other end is wired. You will have to manually
inspect both ends of the connection. Damage can result from mis-matched wiring.
A DB9 clearly has 9 connections and a cat5, cat5(e) and cat 6 cable has 8 conductors.
RS232D has chosen to use Pin 1 as a multi-function pin (DSR/RI) to provide maximum
flexibility with modems - in particular it allows for DCD which is a meaningful signal from
a modem but not, we suggest, from a peer PC. We have chosen to use a minor variation
on the normal DB9 Null modem pinout above - specifically we have allowed for RI which
could be used from a peer PC to commence a transmission sequence. The colors used
are unimportant but the suggested configuration is one way to provide the shortest use
of the adjacent (twisted) pairs.
If this pinout does not work for you then you could try our Signal/pin primer because
you may need to SPOOF connections.
PC1 Peer
DB9

PC2 Peer

Signal

cat5(e)

DB9

Signal

Color

cat5(e)
Color

RD

Brown

TD

Blue

TD

Blue

RD

Brown

DTR

Green

6,1

DSR, DCD

Brown-white

6,1

DSR, DCD

Brown-white

DTR

Green

RTS

Blue-white

CTS

Green-white

CTS

Green-white

RTS

Blue-white

SGND

Orange

SGND

Orange

RI

Orange-white 9

RI

Orange-white

DB9: View - looking into male connector


(male and female connector diagrams)

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

11 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

NOTE:
1. We have received email suggesting that the above pinout looks like DTR from one
side is driving into DSR/DCD on the other side - not normally a healthy situation.
The emails miss the point that since this is a NULL modem connection both ends
are DTEs. The two peer DTE's treat DSR/DCD signals as RX (INPUT) only. The
INPUT DSR/DCD on one side is created by cross connecting the OUTPUT DTR
signal for the other peer.

RS232 DB9 to DB25 Pinout


Use when connecting a DB9 (e.g. a PC) to a DB25 (e.g. a modem) interface. See the full
signal names in the DB9 and DB25 section.
Signal/pin primer
DB9

Signal

DB25

DCD

RD

TD

DTR

20

SGND

DSR

RTS

CTS

RI

22

View - looking into male connector


(male and female connector diagrams)

View - looking into male connector

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

12 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

(male and female connector diagrams)


NOTE: Leave all pins not specified above unconnected.

RS232 DB9 to DB25 NULL Modem Pinout


Use when connecting two systems (e.g. PCs) when one has a DB9 interface and the
other a DB25 interface without a modem. Typically called a back-to-back or NULL
modem connection. See the full signal names in the DB9 and DB25 sections.
Signal/pin primer
DB9

Signal

DB25

Signal

RD

TD

TD

RD

DTR

6,8

DSR, DCD

6,1

DSR, DCD

20

DTR

RTS

CTS

CTS

RTS

SGND

SGND

RI

22

RI

DB9: View - looking into male connector


(male and female connector diagrams)

View - looking into male connector


(male and female connector diagrams)
Note: Leave all pins not specified above unconnected.

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

13 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

EIA/TIA RS-530-A (DB25)


RS 530-A defines the pinout when using either balanced RS-422 (and RS-485) or
unbalanced RS-423 electrical interfaces using a DB25 connector. By using a DB25
connector RS-530 is now frequently used to replace many older standards which defined
hideously huge connectors such as V.35. (used a whopping 35 pin connector) and
RS-449 (used a pretty serious 37 pin connector).

V.35 on DB25 (RS-530-A)


The original V.35 specification defined use of balanced signals over a huge 35 pin
connector. V.35 has been obsolete for years (replaced with V.10 and V.11) though the
term is still frequently used. Most modern systems that call themselves V.35 use a DB25
connector which has more modest dimensions. The A (+) and B (-) below refer to each
signal pair used in balanced serial interfaces. When used with RS-423 (unbalanced) the
B (-) are tied to a common ground. Signals marked U under Bal/Ubal are not balanced
since they typically change very infrequently (for example once per session) and
therefore do not affect TX/RX performance sensitivity - hence speed. BEWARE: RS-530
(without the A suffix) is an earlier standard and is wired differently. This is the 530-A
pinout spec.
Signal/pin primer
Pin No.

Name

Shield

Cable Shield, connected at DTE only.

BA

Transmit Data (A+) (a.k.a TxD)

BB

Received Data (A+) (a.k.a. RxD)

CA/CJ

RTS (A+) Request To Send

CB

CTS (A+) Clear To Send

CC

AB

Signal Ground

CF

Data Carrier Detect (A+) (a.k.a DCD, CD or RLSD)

DD

Receiver Signal Element Timing (B-) RX Clock

10

CF

Data Carrier Detect (B-) (a.k.a DCD, CD or RLSD)

11

DA

Ext. Transmit Clock (B-)

12

DB

Transmit Signal Element Timing (B-) TX CLOCK

13

CB

CTS (B-) Clear to Send

14

BA

Transmit Data (TD) (B-) (a.k.a TxD)

15

DB

Transmit Signal element Timing (A+) TX CLOCK

16

BB

Received Data (B-) (a.k.a RxD)

17

DD

Receiver Signal Element Timing (A+) RX CLOCK

18

LL

19

CA/CJ

20

CD

DTE Ready (a.k.a DTR)

21

RL

Remote Loopback

22
23

Bal/Ubal Notes/Description

Data Communications Equipment Ready (modem/CSU) (a.k.a DSR)

Local Loopback
RTS (B-) Request to Send

RI Ring Indicator
AC

Signal Ground

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

14 of 15

24

DA

25

TM

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

Ext TX Clock (A+)


U

Test Mode

NOTES:
Leave any pins not specified above unconnected.
In balanced mode signals with the same name are the paired set, for example,
pins 2 and 14 are both named BA and form the Transmit Data pair. Each signal of
the pair is either a high (A+) or low (B-)
When used with RS-485 in half-duplex, multi-dropped environments a simple
three signal arrangements is frequently used - one pin is used as a GND and
RX/TX is alternately switched onto a balanced pair of wires which can be either the
BA (TX) or BB (RX) pair.

View - looking into male connector


(DB25 male and female connector diagrams)

DB - Designations for D-subminiature Connectors


This lists the designations for DB connectors (supplied by Rob Recny - Thanks). Any
errors in this list are ours not Rob's.
A - 15-pin 2-row joystick connector.
B - 25-pin 2-row serial or parallel connector - also 44-pin high-density 3-row.
C - 37-pin connector - sometimes found on multi-port serial or data acquisition
boards.
D - 50-pin connector - a little longer than C, but three rows using the same pins as
the 2-row connectors.
E - 9-pin 2-row serial - also 3-row VGA.
So a DB9 is more properly a DE-9P. Isn't knowledge a wonderful thing!
The thread size on an RS232 receptacle (the jackscrew) is UNC 4-40.

T1/E1 Pinout (RJ-48C)


T1/E1 wiring may use either a RJ45, DB15 or BNC connectors. The pinout shown uses
RJ45 connectors - its formal name is USOC RJ-48C and is defined in ANSI T1-403-1989.
T1 is a North America (primarily) digital service providing 1.544 Mbps. E1 is a
European/Rest of World standard providing digital service at 2.048 Mbps. CATegory 5(e)

04-02-2014 22:38

Tech Stu - RS232 Cables and Wiring

15 of 15

h p://www.zytrax.com/tech/layer_1/cables/tech_rs232.htm

cabling is used to provide balanced pairs. The color coding for Cat 5(e) cabling may be
568A or 568B.
RJ45 Pin

Signal

Notes

RX1 (Ring - negative)

RX2 (TIP - positive)

FGND (RX GND)

TX1 (Ring - negative)

TX2 (TIP - positive)

FGND (TX GND)

Ground/Shield

NC

Unused

NC

Unused

Ground/Shield

NOTES:
1. NC = Not connected.
2. There are a confusing number of pinouts for use with an RJ45/48C connector.
Some specs show use of pins 7,8 for Grounds. Always consult any equipment
specification if available.
3. The telecom world loves its Tip and Ring designations. Tip is assumed to carry a
positive voltage (and would carry the transmission signal), Ring a negative voltage
(and would carry the inverted transmission signal)

Problems, comments, suggestions, corrections (including broken links) or something to


add? Please take the time from a busy life to 'mail us' (at top of screen), the webmaster
(below) or info-support at zytrax. You will have a warm inner glow for the rest of the
day.

Copyright 1994 - 2014 ZyTrax, Inc.


All rights reserved. Legal and Privacy

site by zytrax

web-master at zytrax
Page modified: December 05 2013.

04-02-2014 22:38