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Supernatural elements in

Shakespeares plays
There are many supernatural beings included among the
characters of Shakespeares plays. The three distinct
categories that usually are used to describe these beings
are spirits, ghosts and gods. Between them are not
included the fairies, one of the most noticeable and
entertaining elements in A Midsummer nights dream,
even Shakespeare maybe would include the fairies in the
category of gods, due to the fact that during the play they
are making the humans get confused thanks to their
powers. They do what they want and humans dont realise
that fairies are joking with them.
Shakespeare probably changed the conception of the
natural world that we had, attributed new features to
fairies, and made the formula of romanticism change in a
new comic way.
There is as well always a heaven presiding over the fates of
man in Shakespeares plays. Shakespeare added many of
the supernatural apparitions in his plays due to popular
demand; he wanted his audience to have fun, so he
included ghosts or spirits when the play needed drama and
fairies or other elements when he wanted to create
complicate and make funny situations.

From beginning to end, A Midsummer Nights Dream is


filled with supernatural themes. Titania is the Queen of
fairies, Oberon is the King of fairies and the husband of

Titania, and finally Puck who is the fairy which due to


misunderstood, complicates all the situation in the woods.

Titania, the Queen of the

fairies
William
Shakespeare (1564 1616) was
born at
Stratfordupon-Avon in a
house in
Henley Street.
This is
preserved
intact. His
mother, Mary
Arden, was
one of the
daughters of Robert Arden, a yeoman farmer of Wilmcote: his
father, John Shakespeare, was a glover and wool dealer of good
standing who held the office of Bailiff of the Borough in 1568.
From the age of seven to about 14, he attended Stratford
Grammar School receiving an excellent well rounded education.
At the age of 18 Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway, who was
seven years his senior and three months pregnant. She was of
'yeoman' stock - her family owned a farm one mile west of
Stratford in Shottery. He endured her until he could stand it no
longer and fled to London to become an actor. He then became
actor-manager and part-owner in the Blackfriars and afterwards
the Globe Theatres.

Shakespeare's acting career was spent with the Lord


Chamberlain's Company, where he was a first-rate actor. The
company was renamed the King's Company in 1603 when James
succeeded to the throne. Among the actors in the group was the
famous Richard Burbage. The partnership acquired interests in
two theatres in the Southwark area of London, near the banks of
the Thames - the Globe and the Blackfriars.
Shakespeare returned to Stratford for his latter years where he
died at the age of 52 and now lies at rest in his special grave at
Holy Trinity Church.

The Plays of William Shakespeare


His 37 plays vary in type; historical romances, light, fantastic
comedies, some are tragedies, all including the comical and the
farcical. He was a shrewd business man, amassing quite a fortune
in his time.
Comedies
Histories
Tragedies
All's Well
King John
Romeo and Juliet
That Ends
Richard II
Coriolanus
Well
Henry IV,
Titus Andronicus
As You Like
Part 1
Timon of Athens

It
The
Comedy of
Errors
Love's
Labour's
Lost
Measure for
Measure
The
Merchant
of Venice
The Merry
Wives of
Windsor
A
Midsummer
Night's
Dream
Much Ado
About
Nothing
Pericles,
Prince of
Tyre
The Taming
of the
Shrew
The
Tempest
Twelfth
Night
The Two
Gentlemen
of Verona
The Two
Noble
Kinsmen

Henry IV,
Part 2
Henry V
Henry VI,
Part 1
Henry VI,
Part 2
Henry VI,
Part 3
Richard III
Henry VIII

Julius Caesar
Macbeth
Hamlet
Troilus and Cressida
King Lear
Othello
Antony and Cleopatra

William Shakespeare (National


Portrait Gallery), Chandos portrait,
artist and authenticity unconfirmed.

Most biographical information


about William Shakespeare's
life derives from public instead
of private documents: vital
records, real estate and tax
records, lawsuits, records of
payments, and references to
Shakespeare and his works in
printed and hand-written texts.
The historical record
documents that Shakespeare

The Winter's
TThe

facts
about
Shakespeare
are
interesting
in
themselves,
but they
have little to
do with his
place in
literature.
Shakespeare
wrote his
plays to give
pleasure. It
is possible to
spoil that
pleasure by
giving too
much
attention to
his life, his
times, and
the problem
of figuring

was baptised on 26 April 1564


in Stratford-upon-Avon i
nWarwickshire, England, in
the Holy Trinity Church; at age
18 married Anne
Hathaway with whom he had
three children; and was an
actor, playwright, poet, and
theatre entrepreneur in
London. Though more is
known about Shakespeare's
life than most other
Elizabethan and Jacobean
writers, because of his social
status as a commoner, the low
esteem in which his profession
was held and the general
disinterest of the time in the
personal lives of writers, few
personal biographical facts
about Shakespeare survive.
[1]

Nevertheless, hundreds of

out what he
actually
wrote. He
can be
enjoyed in
book form,
in the
theater, or
on television
without our
knowing any
of these
things.
Some
difficulties
stand in the
way of this
enjoyment.
Shakespeare
wrote more
than 350
years ago.
The
language he
used is
naturally

biographies have been written


and more continue to be, most
of
mbeline

somewhat
different
from the
language of
today.
Besides, he
wrote in
verse. Verse
permits a
free use of
words that
may not be
understood
by some
readers. His
plays are
often
fanciful. This
may not
appeal to
matter-offact people
who are used
to modern
realism. For
all these
reasons,

readers may
find him
difficult. The
worst
handicap to
enjoyment is
the notion
that
Shakespeare
is a
classic, a
writer to be
approached
with awe.
The way to
escape this
last
difficulty is
to remember
that
Shakespeare
wrote his
plays for
everyday
people and
that many in

the audience
were
uneducated.
They looked
upon him as
a funny,
exciting, and
lovable
entertainer,
not as a
great poet.
People today
should read
him as the
people in his
day listened
to him. The
ale
Beautiful books on Stratford and England in Shakespeare's Time:

Stratford upon Avon


'Stratford upon Avon', Nicholas Fogg, Phillimore & Co Ltd., 1986,

ISBN 0 85033 519 1


England in Shakespeare's Time
'The England of William Shakespeare', Michael Justin Davis, Dutton, 1987,

ISBN 0-525-24587-1

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